Salvation (Salvation Sequence #1)
Humanity's complex relationship with technology spirals out of control in this first book of an all-new trilogy from "the owner of the most powerful imagination in science fiction" (Ken Follett).In 2204, humanity is expanding into the wider galaxy in leaps and bounds. A new technology of linked jump gates has rendered most forms of transporation--including starships--virtually obsolete. Every place on earth, every distant planet mankind has settled, is now merely a step away from any other. And all seems wonderful...until a crashed alien spaceship is found on a newly-located world 89 light years from Earth, harboring seventeen human victims. And of the high-powered team dispatched to investigate the mystery, one is an alien spy...Bursting with tension and big ideas, this standalone series highlights the inventiveness of an author at the top of his game, as the interweaving story lines tell us not only how humanity arrived at this moment, but also the far-future consequences that spin off from it.

Salvation (Salvation Sequence #1) Details

TitleSalvation (Salvation Sequence #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 4th, 2018
PublisherDel Rey Books
ISBN-139780399178849
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Space, Space Opera, Science Fiction Fantasy

Salvation (Salvation Sequence #1) Review

  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Under normal circumstances, I would normally rate a book like this lower because the setup leaves us hanging, but this is PETER F HAMILTON we're talking about. That means, if you're picking up the first book in one of his trilogies, no matter how long each individual book might be, you're invested for the long haul. You might be slightly miffed you need to wait that much longer before SOMETHING major gets resolved, but that's the nature of this beast.That being said, Salvation has a ton of great Under normal circumstances, I would normally rate a book like this lower because the setup leaves us hanging, but this is PETER F HAMILTON we're talking about. That means, if you're picking up the first book in one of his trilogies, no matter how long each individual book might be, you're invested for the long haul. You might be slightly miffed you need to wait that much longer before SOMETHING major gets resolved, but that's the nature of this beast.That being said, Salvation has a ton of great multiple storylines going on here, full of technothriller action, early AIs, assassins and investigators, and a mysterious alien spaceship that seems to be quite benign, hopping into our system and piling us with some pretty cool medical toys turning us all into *better* immortal-ish younglings. There are still people around from our age and tons of understood references from our day, so that means this trilogy is much earlier than most of Hamilton's other books.Oh, and the aliens are encouraging us to join their religious crusade to the end of time. As in, come with us, we'll transform the hell out of you and we'll be on our merry way. But they're not dumb about it. They trade with us, live among us, and are generally good neighbors.Supposedly.Another huge plotline takes us to one of our colonies designed to be a true utopia. Post-scarcity. And they're also trying to go about protecting the hell out of humanity. Fun, interesting characters, and of course there's tons of conflict there because the rest of our species loves to distrust the hell out of them.Is the novel a winner?Only in the sense that it's fun to get a fully established storyline, character base, and feel for the galaxy-at-this-time. We're also rightly suspicious of everyone. The intrigue is high.End analysis?High-quality setup, interested in reading on, and I think Hamilton is mightily imaginative. The devil is truly in the details.
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    This is my most anticipated release of 2018, and I was extremely fortunate to get an early advance copy. I won’t say much to avoid spoilers, but Salvation was very good – typical Hamilton. It has a similar feel to Pandora’s Star or Fallen Dragon, if anything, but it’s also a very different story. It’s also clearly the first part of a trilogy, which is good, but with the first book issues that come with the territory. Great world building, great characters, intriguing plot – Salvation ticks almos This is my most anticipated release of 2018, and I was extremely fortunate to get an early advance copy. I won’t say much to avoid spoilers, but Salvation was very good – typical Hamilton. It has a similar feel to Pandora’s Star or Fallen Dragon, if anything, but it’s also a very different story. It’s also clearly the first part of a trilogy, which is good, but with the first book issues that come with the territory. Great world building, great characters, intriguing plot – Salvation ticks almost all the boxes. Full review now below:Salvation is Peter F Hamilton’s latest novel, the first book in his Salvation Sequence, and a series set in a brand-new universe. After some considerable time (and eight novels) spent writing in his Commonwealth universe, with a slight detour for 2012’s Great North Road, Salvation is a chance to see Hamilton build a setting from scratch with a longer story in mind. As one of the best SF writers out there at doing this, I was eager to see just how it would compare to his previous stories, and what this fresh canvas would produce.With Connexion Corp’s quantum entangled portals, everywhere in human space is but a step away. When a crashed alien starship is discovered at the edge of explored space, with cargo it shouldn’t contain, Connexion’s deputy director of security, Feriton Kayne, hand-picks a team from across human society to travel and investigate. With security and defence of humanity a high concern, strict protocols are put in place to separate the discovery from the portal network, and it’s a long drive to the crash site.It is during this journey we learn more about the selected team members: Yuri Alster, Feriton Kayne’s boss and security chief for Connexion Corp; Callum Hepburn, former emergency detoxification team leader at Connexion and now living as part of the Utopial society; Alik Monday, FBI senior specialist detective; Kandara Martinez, dark ops and mercenary specialist. We also have some aides with the main group: Loi, executive assistant to Yuri and great-grandson of Connexion founder Ainlsey Zangari; Edlund, aide to Callum and a true Utopial – genetically modified to be both male and female through a thousand-day cycle; Jessika Mye, Callum’s assistant who has been part of both the Universal and Utopial societies. We follow this group through various flashback events, seeing each of these characters doing what they do best, and discovering some interesting information along the way. Some of these sections are quite long (one particularly so), others short and sweet, but each contribute to the overall story in their own way.Interspersed between these chapters is the story of Dellian and his classmates. Set many millennia in the future, humanity are running from an enemy, one that stops at nothing to track them down and wipe them out. Bred specifically as soldiers to take the fight to the enemy, we follow them from childhood to adulthood, watching as they learn and perfect their training…Hamilton starts Salvation off with a couple of revelations that set the scene for the novel. The first of these is the mission of the Neána, an alien civilisation that have sent an expedition after detecting electromagnetic signals from Earth. A species in hiding, they have sent their envoys with no knowledge of where they have come from, only what they must do when they get to Earth. The second bit of information is the discovery of the crashed starship and its human cargo that simply could not be that far from human space when it crashed. It’s with these in mind that we step into the meat of the story – or more accurately, a history of what has come before.Essentially, Salvation is the backstory of the characters on this trek to the alien shipwreck, and serves to give us a lot of information, but without moving the actual plot forward much. However, Hamilton manages to give us this backstory in a way that is interesting and relevant, slowly building the setting he has created and allowing his imagination to run wild with the implications of the technology here. While he has a slightly different take on FTL travel with his portals compared to previous novels, it’s the Utopial society he’s crafted that is of most interest with its focus on working together as a whole rather than the capitalism of the rest of humanity. It’s also a society that requires those who join to have their genome modified so all children born are omnia – both male and female – slowly switching between the two in a thousand-day cycle. With a different core philosophy and equality the standard in their society, it’s fascinating to read and see the more intricate workings as we discover more about it.We have also made contact with the Olyix, an alien species travelling across the universe on their voyage to meet their God at the end of time. They’ve contributed towards human medical advancement, trading knowledge for the antimatter they require to fuel their colossal arkship on its onward journey. But with their advancements come sceptics and conspiracy theorists, and some aspects ever so relevant to the stories we hear.This brings us to the far future narrative, and one that shows humanity on the run from an enemy that is constantly searching for them. Humanity is an omnia society that has now decided to take the fight to the enemy, but is doing so by genetically creating soldiers of distinct gender – Dellian, Yirella, and their cohort. Led and guided by their year group leader Alexandre, they face a variety of situations while growing up that is to prepare them for the inevitable fight. It’s entirely fascinating, yet just not quite enough focus here outside of the necessary, and it’s clearly a thread that is going to be playing a larger role in future novels.This all brings me to my general thoughts on Salvation: it’s a great novel but reads much like a set up for the rest of the trilogy. It’s a frustrating thing to say given how much I enjoyed the book (on both first and second reads), yet it’s true. The split narrative also means that the future sections are written not to give things away, and while it works overall, it raises plenty of questions as the story progresses. However, despite the heavy focus on back-story rather than plot progression, I was thoroughly entertained throughout, and relished getting to know this new setting and all its inhabitants.Salvation is, without a doubt, the type of novel you would expect from Peter F Hamilton. It’s got thoroughly in-depth world-building, a large cast of characters, plenty of advanced technology, and enigmatic aliens. Add all of these together and you get the kind of Space Opera that Hamilton is known for, in a shiny new universe that has plenty promise for a great continuation, and given the ending here the sequel can’t come soon enough. Recommended.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Salvation is the first book of a trilogy. For a first book, I had a hard time while reading it. It reminded me too much of another book as far as the way it was written and some of the concepts in the book. Once I got that other book in my head it was hard to not make comparisons. Most of the book revolved around five people that were chosen to investigate an alien ship that had been discovered. During the transport to the alien ship, each person tells a story from their past. The stories each t Salvation is the first book of a trilogy. For a first book, I had a hard time while reading it. It reminded me too much of another book as far as the way it was written and some of the concepts in the book. Once I got that other book in my head it was hard to not make comparisons. Most of the book revolved around five people that were chosen to investigate an alien ship that had been discovered. During the transport to the alien ship, each person tells a story from their past. The stories each tells were all action-packed thriller type stories. Which were a bit of a slog to read. Interspersed between their stories, is another storyline far into the future. I thought the more interesting parts of the books was what was going on far into the future. I was getting worried near the end when the last story was being told. I thought I was going to be left hanging as to what was going on at the alien ship. There was some resolution (albeit very quickly done) and thus the setup for the next book. I can’t say I was enamored with his book. The series as a whole has potential but I am not sure if I am interested enough to keep going or not. I received an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Quite possibly my most anticipated novel of 2018 and it did not disappoint. Superb storytelling, just as we'd expect from this extraordinary writer, matched by the novel's vision and ambition. And, blimey, where it takes us! This is going to be a wonderful trilogy. Its beginning couldn't be any better in my eyes. Review to follow closer to publication on For Winter Nights.
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  • Liviu
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the book which will be a top 10 of the year for me and I am really eager for the sequel. For more detail I highly recommend Mark's Goodreads review (link below) as it is spot-on:https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...A few shoutouts I would mention that add to the fun - the Morgan, Asher and McAuley starships, the painting by Jim Burns present in the embassy etc
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Callum Hepburn has just married Savi Chaudhri after a whirlwind relationship. They both work for Connexion, he as a team leader for the emergency detoxification squad and she is in the security division. After their all too brief honeymoon they both head back to work, Callum, to dig a government from the mire with an urgent material extraction and Savi heads back undercover. A week later and he hasn't heard a thing from her, so pings her and does not get a response. Worrying about her he heads o Callum Hepburn has just married Savi Chaudhri after a whirlwind relationship. They both work for Connexion, he as a team leader for the emergency detoxification squad and she is in the security division. After their all too brief honeymoon they both head back to work, Callum, to dig a government from the mire with an urgent material extraction and Savi heads back undercover. A week later and he hasn't heard a thing from her, so pings her and does not get a response. Worrying about her he heads off to see her boss, Yuri Alster to see if he knows anything. The thing is, no one does; she has vanished off the face of the planet. It looks like it might be down to him to find her and in his search, he will discover more than he really wants to know about the company he works for.Connexion Corp, the organisation that they both work for, can really be considered a government in their own right. Their quantum entangled portals is a technology that allows people to live in one part of the world and work in another and literally be there in no time at all. This technology along with most other things on Earth are powered by solarwells, that have been dropped into the sun and have allowed humanity to have unlimited power.In 2204 and an alien ship has been discovered 90 light years from Earth. That there are aliens is not the surprise, another race, the Olyix have been known to humanity for a while now. What is shocking is the cargo that they are carrying; human beings held in suspended animation. No one knows how they got there. No one knows who took them there. Feriton Kayne, Connexion’s deputy director of security is asked to pick a team to investigate. Two of the people that he picks for this team are Yuri Alster and Callum Hepburn, who have a healthy disregard for each other after their earlier clash over Savi. What they are walking into will change everything.Entwined in this narrative is the story of Dellian and his friends set thousands of years in the future. They have been born as soldiers and are being trained to combat an enemy who is prepared to stop at absolutely nothing to wipe humanity from the universe…To say this is fast-paced would be a little bit of an understatement, certain scenes rocket by, in particular, the ones with the Connexion security team. The technology that Hamilton uses in the books, all sounds plausible, the web that they all use is pervasive and all-seeing, however, most people feel free and liberated in the modern society. I loved the portals and the way that they worked with people passing all over the world in the blink of an eye. The scenes with Dellian and his team, set way in the future felt like they were inspired by Enders Game. There are a plethora of characters in here, and it occasionally I had to think who was who, thankfully there is a guide and a timeline included. The only bit that I didn't like was the way it jumped backwards and forwards between the different times and there were several ambiguities that weren't cleared up by the ending. That is fine as there are more books to follow and threads opened here leads onto other things, but this was a brilliant start to a new series. Now have a long while to wait for the next! 4.5 stars
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    This was the first time I've read anything by Peter Hamilton. I found the sci-fi future tech fascinating and enjoyed the future he created. Salvation's storyline is told using the past, present, and future. 5 people are investigating a crashed alien ship and on their way, each tells a story that gives their backstory. Interspersed are chapters of humans in the future being trained to fight the aliens who are trying to wipe out the human species.To be honest, I had a hard time staying with this o This was the first time I've read anything by Peter Hamilton. I found the sci-fi future tech fascinating and enjoyed the future he created. Salvation's storyline is told using the past, present, and future. 5 people are investigating a crashed alien ship and on their way, each tells a story that gives their backstory. Interspersed are chapters of humans in the future being trained to fight the aliens who are trying to wipe out the human species.To be honest, I had a hard time staying with this one. The writing was extremely dense and just slogged along. There were so many different storylines, and too many names so I had a hard time keeping track of everyone. Especially at the beginning. And when I finally did get to the end, very little was revealed. The story is a "to be continued" which was disappointing. I was hoping for a bit more to be revealed. At this time, I'm not sure I'll continue with this series. I guess it will depend on my mood at the time.*Thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing for the advance copy.*
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  • Judy Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to read this book because I have been so impressed with other books written by Peter Hamilton. I am so glad I didn't have much of any idea what the story would be about so I could discover everything for myself. I think the book blurb gives away too much of the story the author is trying to tell and leaves the reader with fewer surprises.Salvation is told from a past, present and future perspective. The backstory segments are quite long, novella length long, and under other circumstance I wanted to read this book because I have been so impressed with other books written by Peter Hamilton. I am so glad I didn't have much of any idea what the story would be about so I could discover everything for myself. I think the book blurb gives away too much of the story the author is trying to tell and leaves the reader with fewer surprises.Salvation is told from a past, present and future perspective. The backstory segments are quite long, novella length long, and under other circumstances I would have become impatient with being kept away from what the "real" story - the present - was about. That didn't happen in this book because the backstories were all critical to placing the characters in the present, plus they were mini-stories within the book and were as superbly written as the present and future segments. This novel had me questioning the motives of every character, whether they were human or alien. The science was especially intriguing for me with an incredibly large corporation discovering the means of traveling around earth or planet hopping with their transport system. I had read books containing similar transport methods but this one explained it better for me and sold me on the concept. The methods used for extending life also gave me much food for thought as did the religious beliefs at the core of the justifications for actions taken. This was a thought provoking novel for me.This was one of the best books I've read in a long time and I eagerly await Salvation Lost, second in the Salvation Sequence series. Definitely five glowing stars.Thank you to NetGalley and Random House Del Rey for a digital galley of this novel.
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  • Helen
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this took me a really long time to read! It starts out with a very interesting story about a crashed alien spaceship. Unfortunately, this story barely gets any page time until right at the end because most of the book is bogged down in not very interesting background stories for all of the characters. It introduces us to a cast of potentially interesting people but then doesn't give enough time to get to know them to care really what their past stories are. The back stories were very bog s Well, this took me a really long time to read! It starts out with a very interesting story about a crashed alien spaceship. Unfortunately, this story barely gets any page time until right at the end because most of the book is bogged down in not very interesting background stories for all of the characters. It introduces us to a cast of potentially interesting people but then doesn't give enough time to get to know them to care really what their past stories are. The back stories were very bog standard action thriller style, lots of heroic, smarter than everyone else manly men running around with guns fighting bad guys. It felt a lot like I imagine a Clive Cussler novel is like but with a sci-fi background to make it more souped up. It also made me very sad to see the fight for gender equality hasn't moved on from where we are now in all those years. The best female character in the book, an intelligent and resourceful spy, was there only to get into trouble and be saved by her hero husband. When the story about the crashed alien ship did get going I actually enjoyed it and then the ending set the next book up to be potentially quite exciting. There's a lot that I liked and there are some very interesting ideas but it's overwhelmed by the 'black ops' superhero backstories. It's potential to be a good series is saved by the ending and I am interested in how the story continues, I'm just not sure if I'm interested enough to actively seek out the next book. I received a free copy in return for an honest review.
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  • Les
    January 1, 1970
    As a definite space opera and PFH fan, I was bound to sink my teeth into this one and most likely enjoy it. But, there's no undue bias here when I say that this book is simply superb. There's no other way to describe it and this new standalone series from PFH certainly looks like it's going to be another epic. The style in which it's written is very good, and typically PFH, and he didn't seem to get as bogged down in minutiae this time [as I feel much of his earlier work is affected]. All of the As a definite space opera and PFH fan, I was bound to sink my teeth into this one and most likely enjoy it. But, there's no undue bias here when I say that this book is simply superb. There's no other way to describe it and this new standalone series from PFH certainly looks like it's going to be another epic. The style in which it's written is very good, and typically PFH, and he didn't seem to get as bogged down in minutiae this time [as I feel much of his earlier work is affected]. All of the action and sub-stories are firmly part of the greater storyline, which is only just beginning to take shape in this book. The format is excellent, with numerous flashbacks and flashforwards from a central narrative, all of which link together and give you a hazy yet tantalizingly intriguing picture of where the story appears to be headed. It finished well and I am very excited to see where the series goes, this book being a good introduction to the universe and players before the story slips into a higher gear. Now tell me that doesn’t sound exciting.To read, it felt a lot like a short story collection where the individual stories link together to form the framework of a larger tale, and this is pretty much what it is, each “chapter” giving a portion of the background, mostly about the key characters but also about the places and things within this new universe. As per usual, PFH’s world-building is second to none [ie. awesomely cool] and I found myself re-reading more than once some of his descriptions of locations and technology so that I could better grasp the wonder of it. Another hallmark of Hamilton’s fiction which is again present are lots of high-tech future cops and robbers and there’s no shortage of these in Salvation, with most of the central characters being some sort of police officer, security specialist, mercenary or criminal. The future flashforward sections are excellent, slightly reminiscent of other child or youth sci-fi soldier stories that you may have read, the characters struggling to come to grips with the knowledge that the future existence of mankind rests upon their shoulders. Overall, you can quite clearly how the different timelines relate to each other and how things might transpire.It’s space opera as it should be, a story painted on a canvas of galactic scale with an abundance of massive awesome stuff contained therein. There are interesting alien life-forms, interesting alien agendas and interesting alien technology, which is totally what you’d expect from PFH. Anybody who enjoys good sci-fi [and galaxy-spanning space opera in particular] will just devour this and love every moment of doing so. It’s a must for any PFH fan and also a perfectly suitable starting point for any readers new to his work. Hamilton has been shortening his novels a little in recent years and his work is much the better for it in my humble opinion, meaning that his work is probably that much more accessible for a mainstream audience. The earlier Night’s Dawn Trilogy, Commonwealth Saga and Void Trilogy books, while truly excellent books, were seen as a bit daunting by some readers. Such were my observations anyway. There are no such worries with this one, however, and it should be a thoroughly engaging and enjoyable read for a lot of people. Get into it.
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  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    Hamilton starts a new series by interweaving several stories. First we have a mysterious landing of aliens infiltrating our world that form the prologue and obviously are very significant. But the story moves elsewhere making us wonder how this short act will play out. Then we have the investigation of another alien craft and the team assigned to do so. Most of the tale isn't about the investigation however, but learning who this team is as they introduce themselves and we learn their individual Hamilton starts a new series by interweaving several stories. First we have a mysterious landing of aliens infiltrating our world that form the prologue and obviously are very significant. But the story moves elsewhere making us wonder how this short act will play out. Then we have the investigation of another alien craft and the team assigned to do so. Most of the tale isn't about the investigation however, but learning who this team is as they introduce themselves and we learn their individual backstories. This team is the focus of something significant, as they are legendary figures known far far in the future too. The final thread is the story of a group of budding warriors in the far future training to fight the enemies besetting humanity on all sides. Slowly these threads mesh to tell the tale of what appears to be an alien threat against all of humanity. Strongly looking forward to the next installment.
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  • Nadja Miller
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced copy for an honest review. I enjoy Peter Hamilton's books but this one took me a long time to get through. It almost feels like short stories. There is a main story of youths preparing for war against a big evil. We get to know them and how they progress on their training and the challenges they encounter. The other story is a group of business/ security and government personnel ( which we will know later in the book how they relate to the first group) going out to see wha I received an advanced copy for an honest review. I enjoy Peter Hamilton's books but this one took me a long time to get through. It almost feels like short stories. There is a main story of youths preparing for war against a big evil. We get to know them and how they progress on their training and the challenges they encounter. The other story is a group of business/ security and government personnel ( which we will know later in the book how they relate to the first group) going out to see what they think might be an alien crash site that includes (dead?) abducted humans. We get stories of things that happened in the past that connect them. This is the part that felt a little bit like short stories. They were well written, they were interesting but they were hard to connect with and I am not sure why. I understand that he slowly builds up his stories but his one felt like it went on forever but I am a fan so it will take a lot more than a slow story for me to stop reading his books. Still the ending was awesome
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  • Patrick St-Denis
    January 1, 1970
    As you know, although I own every single title Peter F. Hamilton has released over the years, other than the stand-alone novels I'm really far behind when it comes to his series. I've finally begun the Night's Dawn trilogy earlier this year and was planning on reading The Neutronium Alchemist when Salvation unexpectedly showed up in my mailbox. I was glad, for now I'd be able to read and review installments of a new Hamilton sequence as they are published.Having only read The Reality Dysfunction As you know, although I own every single title Peter F. Hamilton has released over the years, other than the stand-alone novels I'm really far behind when it comes to his series. I've finally begun the Night's Dawn trilogy earlier this year and was planning on reading The Neutronium Alchemist when Salvation unexpectedly showed up in my mailbox. I was glad, for now I'd be able to read and review installments of a new Hamilton sequence as they are published.Having only read The Reality Dysfunction, I can't really compare the opening chapter in the Salvation Sequence with the Night's Dawn, the Commenwealth, and the Void series. Yet as was the case with the Peter F. Hamilton books I've read thus far, it's obvious that Salvation is another space opera yarn of epic scope.Here's the blurb:Humanity's complex relationship with technology spirals out of control in this first book of an all-new trilogy from "the owner of the most powerful imagination in science fiction" (Ken Follett).In 2204, humanity is expanding into the wider galaxy in leaps and bounds. A new technology of linked jump gates has rendered most forms of transporation--including starships--virtually obsolete. Every place on earth, every distant planet mankind has settled, is now merely a step away from any other. And all seems wonderful...until a crashed alien spaceship is found on a newly-located world 89 light years from Earth, harboring seventeen human victims. And of the high-powered team dispatched to investigate the mystery, one is an alien spy...Bursting with tension and big ideas, this standalone series highlights the inventiveness of an author at the top of his game, as the interweaving story lines tell us not only how humanity arrived at this moment, but also the far-future consequences that spin off from it.Hamilton is renowned for his worldbuilding, which is always vast in scope and vision. And Salvation is certainly no exception! By the beginning of the 23rd century, mankind has taken to the stars. Demonstration of quantum spatial entanglement engendered the creation of portals that now connect every place on Earth and every settled planet and asteroid out there. Solar powerwell portals dropped directly into the sun provide the vast amount of energy required to keep everything running. In 2144, as a number of planets are being terraformed, an alien starship approaching our solar system is detected. The extraterrestrial civilization is known as the Olyix and they travel in the arkship Salvation of Life to the End of the Universe to meet their god. The arkship requires enormous amounts of electricity to generate antimatter, so the Olyix begin to trade their superior biotechnology with humans in exchange for the energy they need to continue their endless pilgrimage across the galaxies. When a portal ship arrives in the Beta Eridani system in 2204, it detects a beacon signal coming from a crashed alien spaceship light years away from Earth. And as impossible as it sounds, that ship contains the remains of human victims. An assessment team comprised of powerful and important men and women is sent to investigate, and they'll soon realize that they have more in common than they ever thought possible. And eighty-nine years from their home world, they'll come to realize that Earth might be facing a threat and that no one is aware of the imminent danger.The structure of this novel is a little unusual and takes some time getting used to. There are three different timelines, and one of them feels somewhat discordant until you realize that it takes place far into the future. The first timeline follows the assessment team as they make their way to the alien ship's crash site. The second timeline explores the backstories of a number of members of the assessment team, and these chapters allow readers to connect the dots and find out how some of these people are related to one another and why they were selected for this mission. The third timeline occurs on Juloss, a terraformed planet nearly six centuries after the arrival of human settlers. That final timeline is decidedly different and it takes a while for things to start making sense. Protected by skyforts and with traveler generation ships having portaled out of orbit, the only people left on Juloss are those training to face the enemy which has decimated countless of mankind's home worlds. It's only when they refer to some of the assessment team members as Saints that it dawns upon you that the Juloss plotline takes place centuries, or even millennia, in the future and that Earth may already have been destroyed. This atypical narrative structure can sometimes make for an uneven reading experience. Salvation is never boring, mind you. But until everything comes together at the very end, one often wonders why such a big chunk of the pagecount is dedicated to some characters' backstories. The plot doesn't progress a whole lot for the better part of the novel, and Salvation often feels like the introduction to an introduction.Peter F. Hamilton always had a knack for creating interesting and genuine characters and the same can be said of the Salvation cast. The perspective through which we follow the assessment team is that of Feriton Kayne, an exosolar security division officer from the Connexion company. He is convinced that someone on the team could be an alien spy and he's trying to uncover who it might be before they reach the crash site. The second timeline features the points of view of disparate protagonists as their respective backstories are unveiled. It was interesting to discover what led to Callum and Yuri's profound hatred and how they were both involved with Jessika. And I loved how the mysterious dark ops agent only known as Cancer showed up in both Alik's multiple-murder case and Kandara's secret mission. The Juloss timeline is comprised of two POVS, that of Dellian and Yirella, following the evolution and training of a boy and a girl at the beginning, all the way to adulhood when they ultimately board a battleship and leave their world in search of the nameless enemy for a final showdown.Sadly, Salvation does suffer from occasional pacing issues. As is habitually his wont, Hamilton's latest novel weighs in at 565 pages and is another big work of fiction. Problem is, the bulk of the book focuses on the aforementioned backstories, not on what the blurb promised. And although those backstories can be fascinating and action-packed, there are times when you wonder why such a huge portion of the novel is devoted to what at first appears to be extraneous material. Only a handful of pages actually deal with the assessment team's arrival at the crash site, which was a bit of a disappointment. Having said that, Peter F. Hamilton closes the show with panache, with all the storylines culminating into the sort of ending that makes it impossible for me not to want to read the second volume, Salvation Lost, as soon as it comes out.In the end, Salvation is another epic space opera that sets the stage for what should be another gripping series featuring rich worldbuilding and complex characters. On its own, the book is not as self-contained as it could have been and that can be detrimental to both the plotlines and the rhythm of the novel. Still, it's a satisfying read that will likely get better and better when the forthcoming sequels are published.For more reviews, check out www.fantasyhotlist.blogspot.com
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    When I’m looking for science fiction with epic scale and a plot that is guaranteed to be engrossing I find there a few more reliable than Peter F Hamilton. His latest, Salvation, is another classic that is bound to please new and old fans alike. If aliens, global conspiracies, cool technology and a suitably vast collection of characters sounds like you’re thing then look no further, your next read has arrivedThe chapters involving Feriton Kayne and his colleagues reminded me of portmanteau films When I’m looking for science fiction with epic scale and a plot that is guaranteed to be engrossing I find there a few more reliable than Peter F Hamilton. His latest, Salvation, is another classic that is bound to please new and old fans alike. If aliens, global conspiracies, cool technology and a suitably vast collection of characters sounds like you’re thing then look no further, your next read has arrivedThe chapters involving Feriton Kayne and his colleagues reminded me of portmanteau films I’ve seen in the past. It feels like Salvation can almost be viewed as an interconnected collection of short stories. Each of the characters has their own story to tell and each of those stories help to move forward the main narrative. Each character takes a turn revealing to the others how and why they are part of the mission to the shipwreck. As they all sit around waiting to arrive at their destination, everyone is getting more and more suspicious of everyone else. Who can be trusted? And what secrets have yet to be revealed? We are in a whodunnit where we don’t know the details of the crime, never mind who perpetrated it. Don’t panic, you ultimately find out. This approach is a very effective plot device. It adds a nice extra layer of tension to proceedingsInterspersed throughout this is a second thread of the narrative that is set many years in the future. It follows a young man called Dellian and a group of his classmates as they grow into adults and prepare to take part in a war. Since the day they were born, they have been training for one purpose – destroy the enemy and save what is left of humanity. Their development and inter-relationships allow the reader to explore how the human race has changed. This works as a good counterpoint to futuristic political thriller being played out in the other chapters. At first glance these two strands appear entirely disparate. How can Dellian’s story connect with Feriton’s? Hamilton drops a few tantalizing hints but this is only the first book in a series, so there is plenty left unsaid. This approach is likely to drive some readers a little bit bonkers, but I was left wanting more. Peter F Hamilton has always shown great skill when it comes to stories that are huge in scope, and I don’t think this book is any exception. You’ll soon realise that Salvation is just the beginning of something far larger.When it comes to genres, Science Fiction and I have a sometimes-fractious relationship. I remember the first time I tried to read The Reality Dysfunction, also by Hamilton, I could not get past the first chapter. It’s the weirdest thing, but I tried it again a couple of years later and it just clicked. I think it is the science part of science fiction I can find a little intimidating. If a novel is science heavy, for want of a better term, my brain goes into a bit of a blind panic. Salvation does feature some quantum entanglement related jiggery pokery, and some faster than light bit and bobs, but never so much that I found it jarring or distracting from the plot. If I can deal with that level of future stuff, then I’m sure anyone else can. In fact, some of the technological marvels are very easy to understand and appreciate. Hamilton’s take on future travel is particularly well executed. I loved the idea that there is a whole Stargate-esque gate system that allows people to quickly travel anywhere in the world, and beyond. Live in Edinburgh, but commute daily to Tokyo for work. The development of these gates immediately changes the face of the entire planet. That level of detail is consistently impressive. You can tell a great deal of thought has gone into considering all the aspects of how technology shapes humanity.When it comes to futurism, I think Peter F Hamilton is a bit of a master. He explores all manner of topics in his writing. Social injustice, gender equality, capitalism and religion all feature in Salvation in some form or another. As with his other novels there is much to digest. If you’re a Hamilton fan that it is almost a foregone conclusion that you’ll pick up this book. You won’t be disappointed. If you haven’t read his work before then Salvation may well be the place to start. It’s the ideal gateway drug. This is a news series, unconnected to any of his previous work. If you enjoy it, then the good news is that he has an extensive back catalogue which are all excellent. Nearly twenty years since its original publication* I’m still a huge fan of The Night’s Dawn trilogy.*Yes, I am terribly old. Thanks for noticing.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I would consider myself a fan of Peter F. Hamilton. I’ve previously read both the Void trilogy and The Abyss Beyond Dreams, which are set in his Commonwealth universe. I honestly adored both and was fully expecting to have the same feelings about Salvation. Maybe I wasn’t in a sci-fi mood, or maybe I just wasn’t in a Salvation mood, but as much as I wanted to like this book, it really fell flat for me. I didn’t hate it, I just didn’t really feel much of anything for it.As usual for Hamilton’s bo I would consider myself a fan of Peter F. Hamilton. I’ve previously read both the Void trilogy and The Abyss Beyond Dreams, which are set in his Commonwealth universe. I honestly adored both and was fully expecting to have the same feelings about Salvation. Maybe I wasn’t in a sci-fi mood, or maybe I just wasn’t in a Salvation mood, but as much as I wanted to like this book, it really fell flat for me. I didn’t hate it, I just didn’t really feel much of anything for it.As usual for Hamilton’s books, we’re all over the place. The book takes place over many years, over many continents and planets, and involves a whole lot of people. And also, as usual, everything is connected. The problem is that I never really felt any connection to any of the characters. I also felt that the book was unnecessarily long and ended up skimming a lot of the chapters.I know that this review sounds pretty negative for a book that I gave three stars, so I feel like I should say again that I didn’t actually dislike this book. I think that people who read a lot of sci-fi would probably enjoy it. It’s a slow start to a new universe, but given what I know about Hamilton’s writing, I’m sure that it’ll all be worth it in the end.
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  • Trisha Perry
    January 1, 1970
    Salvation is a story told in the past present and future and while that is fine in itself this story jumps back and forth inside the same chapter which can be a bit confusing at first. It was something that took some getting used to as well as the abnormally long chapters that made for a few long nights until I gave up on stopping points. But the writing was smooth and characters blended well in their appropriate times, the action was tremendous as well as the twists and suspense. All in all thi Salvation is a story told in the past present and future and while that is fine in itself this story jumps back and forth inside the same chapter which can be a bit confusing at first. It was something that took some getting used to as well as the abnormally long chapters that made for a few long nights until I gave up on stopping points. But the writing was smooth and characters blended well in their appropriate times, the action was tremendous as well as the twists and suspense. All in all this turn out to be a decent book once I got into the books rhythm and we meshed. I loved the story it would grab you and not let go, thus some of those late nights searching for a decent stopping point that never came. I think if you like sci-fi you should give it a whirl, I wish I could really try the audio I think that would be so much better for this dyslexic.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    Well that was fun. One of the Saint-stories is written as a hard boiled detective novel. Very frustrated that I have to wait until next year for the next book.
  • Lisa B.
    January 1, 1970
    While I do not actively seek out books in the sci-fi genre, I do look forward to reading Peter Hamilton's stories. So when I had the opportunity to read Salvation, I jumped on it.As book #1 of a trilogy, there was lots of character building and scene development. This is a complex story with chapters that alternate between past, present and future. I don't want to give away any spoilers and the overview does a great job of explaining the gist of this story.. Suffice it to say that I am eagerly a While I do not actively seek out books in the sci-fi genre, I do look forward to reading Peter Hamilton's stories. So when I had the opportunity to read Salvation, I jumped on it.As book #1 of a trilogy, there was lots of character building and scene development. This is a complex story with chapters that alternate between past, present and future. I don't want to give away any spoilers and the overview does a great job of explaining the gist of this story.. Suffice it to say that I am eagerly awaiting book #2.I received this book from Random House Publishing - Ballantine, via Netgalley.
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  • Jeannine
    January 1, 1970
    First I must mention that this is the first book by Peter Hamilton I have read, so I cannot compare it to his previous novels. The situation is complex (as is the science and speculation) - part takes place in the 22nd century when a group of powerful individuals meets for a very hushed trip to an alien crash site, part is flashback to the backstories of five of those individuals, and the rest takes place in the distant future, where humans are trying to stay ahead of species obliteration and wo First I must mention that this is the first book by Peter Hamilton I have read, so I cannot compare it to his previous novels. The situation is complex (as is the science and speculation) - part takes place in the 22nd century when a group of powerful individuals meets for a very hushed trip to an alien crash site, part is flashback to the backstories of five of those individuals, and the rest takes place in the distant future, where humans are trying to stay ahead of species obliteration and work toward a final battle with killer aliens. Which barely touches the surface of the story.The story and writing are dense. The characters are well-realized and diverse, the action segments are fast-moving and exciting, but the exposition of the science and culture is vast and can slow the story down to a crawl. Well thought out and perfectly plausible, but so MUCH to learn, and far more "telling" than "showing." So for me at least, it was a bit of a slog, and I doubt I will continue the series.My copy was an ARC from NetGalley.
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it!When I first read that Hamilton was not returning to the Commonwealth universe in this, his new novel, I was really disappointed. I adore the Commonwealth and the stories he has written within it.But this new novel is just brilliant. It truly showcases what a creative genius, Hamilton is. From his ability to pull trends and social movements from our world today and to extrapolate them into what they could become, to his ability to twist plots and give his readers a story that is basical Loved it!When I first read that Hamilton was not returning to the Commonwealth universe in this, his new novel, I was really disappointed. I adore the Commonwealth and the stories he has written within it.But this new novel is just brilliant. It truly showcases what a creative genius, Hamilton is. From his ability to pull trends and social movements from our world today and to extrapolate them into what they could become, to his ability to twist plots and give his readers a story that is basically akin to a messed up Rubik's cube - which we then have the sheer joy of watching a master put back together before our eyes, to his understanding of science and its principles and just what could be on our horizon (I think R&D departments of Virgin Space, Tesla, Google, Apple and Samsung etc, need to be going through his work with a fine tooth comb for ideas because his novels are bursting with them).This book has action, murder, mystery, space, science, far-future tech, human interest and detective work all rolled into one. It is fast paced, insightful and thrilling. An absolute joy to read. I cannot wait for book two. Or for the audiobook to be released because I will be reading/listening to it again then!*This book was sent by the publisher in exchange for my honest review.*
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  • James Bingham
    January 1, 1970
    For me, a new Peter F. Hamilton book is an event, so I was very happy that Random House sent me an advance copy to review.After reading the Amazon blurb, there was a lot about this book I wasn't expecting. In some ways, it seemed completely different. That's not to say that what you're reading is wrong, only that there's more to it than what's been let on. It's a little tough to judge this book on its own, with two sequels due out in 2019 and 2020. Hamilton is known for his world-building, and t For me, a new Peter F. Hamilton book is an event, so I was very happy that Random House sent me an advance copy to review.After reading the Amazon blurb, there was a lot about this book I wasn't expecting. In some ways, it seemed completely different. That's not to say that what you're reading is wrong, only that there's more to it than what's been let on. It's a little tough to judge this book on its own, with two sequels due out in 2019 and 2020. Hamilton is known for his world-building, and there were things I saw in Salvation that I also saw in Pandora's Star and Great North Road. You're introduced to a group of characters and spend a good chunk of the book exploring their backgrounds. At first, it seemed like this "intro" portion of the story was dragging out a little longer than usual (which wasn't bad, just different from his other books). But the more I read the more I realized what I was learning would become more important later in the book. By the end, everything came together and really left me wishing I could fast-forward to September of next year. I think if you're a fan of Hamilton's other work, you're going to be a fan of this. The biggest difference for me, as opposed to other books, was that this was very much set up for parts two and three, and I may have enjoyed it a little more if I was immediately able to jump into the next one. In any case, enjoy. Just be ready to feel the wait for Salvation Lost.
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  • Richard Pearson
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate enough to receive an advance copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I’ve been a huge fan of Peter F Hamilton for years however I was a little disappointed by his last series - The Chronicle of the Fallers. The whole Commonwealth universe was getting a little dry.I’m pleased to report that the first in his new series The Salvation Sequence is bloody marvellous. It’s a fresh new universe, and it’s been a pleasure to read about.My only criticism is that I’m I was fortunate enough to receive an advance copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I’ve been a huge fan of Peter F Hamilton for years however I was a little disappointed by his last series - The Chronicle of the Fallers. The whole Commonwealth universe was getting a little dry.I’m pleased to report that the first in his new series The Salvation Sequence is bloody marvellous. It’s a fresh new universe, and it’s been a pleasure to read about.My only criticism is that I’m going to have to wait for the next book, for the moment I almost dropped the rating to 4 stars because of that. This first book in the sequence feels very much like the setup for the two future books. The book itself is a familiar format to any Hamilton fan - there’s stories within stories and they all come together towards the end.I pride myself in figuring out the plots way before they come together but not this time; just read the book you’ll see what I mean - I don’t want to give any spoilers away!I don’t really want to talk about the storylines themselves as that gives things away however I loved the technology stack and the timeline of events and the general feel that; yeah, this could possibly come true in the future. It’s not too far fetched.Easily my favourite novel of 2018 so far. Just buy it, you won’t be disappointed.
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  • Leya
    January 1, 1970
    Overall I really enjoyed this book. I've read most of Hamilton's series books (although not some of his single novels). In this book, he is taking storylines from some of his other series and making a new story. He has the good old-fashioned murder mystery of Great North Road. He has the overarching space opera of Pandora's Star/Dreaming Void, and a lot of the technology comes out of those two series/novels.Since I was listening to the audiobook, I was really confused with the pronouns. I'd like Overall I really enjoyed this book. I've read most of Hamilton's series books (although not some of his single novels). In this book, he is taking storylines from some of his other series and making a new story. He has the good old-fashioned murder mystery of Great North Road. He has the overarching space opera of Pandora's Star/Dreaming Void, and a lot of the technology comes out of those two series/novels.Since I was listening to the audiobook, I was really confused with the pronouns. I'd like to see how they are portrayed in writing. I understand it has to do with being Omnia (both genders/one body), but I kept stumbling over the C'He/S'he thing. I thought it was a name at first. And if he was going to mess with the pronoun there, why did characters still use the Her and Him pronouns?Like Jacqueline Carey's new book Starless, I feel the focus on non-binary gender to be a politically correct fad to address the current political environment. Luckily Peter Hamilton managed it in a very thoughtful and elegant way. I wasn't put off by it, and it did make a lot of sense in how he portrayed it. I wasn't a fan of the whole "Omnia people are the enlightened version of humans" and "binary humans are inferior" concept. This strikes me as an insult. The emphasis on their form of truly universal socialism/equality as being the enlightened version of humanity also seemed politically driven. I much preferred the Higher culture of the Commonwealth saga. I truly didn't understand the focus on the kids on Juloss. What was the point of all the stuff about Yirella? These parts felt a lot like Enders Game. I get that they are the main story of the next book, but their section seemed like filler and fluff. I wasn't overly impressed with the ending of this book. The twist at the end was cool and unexpected. But the explanation of "The Enemy" is straight out of the Dreaming Void series. He wasn't overly original. I look forward to the next books since I love how long and complicated his books are, but I'm sad he wasn't more original with "The Enemy".I believe that Nights Dawn and Dreaming Void are his best works. Nights Dawn is him during his beginning as a writer, and only suffers from an overabundance of story/plot (parts really do drag), but it is truly an epic space opera. Dreaming Void I believe is the pinnacle of his career so far. The two books about the Fallers were just a reiteration of Dreaming Void (although interesting, they were redundant). Great North Road was a great single novel epic, but overly long (I had enough of the gory scenes about halfway through). This new series will be great, but it won't match Dreaming Void since it seems the stories are too similar.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I am always excited to read a new to me author, especially in one of my favorite genres, however that excitement dwindled a little because I had a hard time becoming invested in the story. I loved the plot. However, there were a few things about the book I did not enjoy. I’ll get into that later.The story open with aliens, disguised as humans, landing on Earth. Skip forward to the beginning of the 23rd century and the Olyix, another alien species, has made contact. They are on a religious missio I am always excited to read a new to me author, especially in one of my favorite genres, however that excitement dwindled a little because I had a hard time becoming invested in the story. I loved the plot. However, there were a few things about the book I did not enjoy. I’ll get into that later.The story open with aliens, disguised as humans, landing on Earth. Skip forward to the beginning of the 23rd century and the Olyix, another alien species, has made contact. They are on a religious mission and are making a stop over to refuel before continuing on their journey to the end of time to meet their God. They have given humans technology to greatly extend life expectancy in exchange for the fuel they need. In addition, humans have now begun to colonize the galaxy. A new technology of jump gates, literally, makes far flung plants just one step away. A crashed alien ship is found on a newly discovered planet and this has a highly skilled team assembled to review the findings. As the team travels to the crash site, we learn more about each team member and how their lives, and what they do from this point forward, will affect the future of mankind. Interspersed with the team member’s stories is a look at life in the future at least 1000 years later. The humans of this time are being genetically modified to do battle against a group of hostile aliens. The reader learns that the crash site investigation team members are now called “Saints”. Therefore, you know something is not at it seems and the reader does not yet know why they are called “Saints”. I loved the story. My beef is with the execution. First problem, there is no main character. Therefore, I never had someone to identify with and root for. In addition, I did not enjoy all the various stories and the jumping around between time lines. It made the pace of the plot rough. Basically, it felt like a bunch of short stories strung together. I liked the inventiveness of the story and a couple of characters I liked a lot. I just wished the author had focused on one or two of the characters to advance the plot. I did like the story enough that it over came some of the problems and I liked it enough to read the next book in the series. Two addition items to note. First, this book ends on a cliff hanger so if you enjoy the book it will be a wait for the next installment. Lastly, my rating is 3.5 but I have rounded up to 4. I recommend this book to all those who love Science Fiction. If you are a true Sci-Fi fan, I think the flaws in the book are not fatal and you will still enjoy this one. I received an ARC from the publisher, via NetGalley, in exchange for my honest opinion.For more of my reviews, and author interviews, see my blog at www.thespineview.com.
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  • Luiz Marques
    January 1, 1970
    I am a big fan of the author. When I read that the book was not in the CommonWealth universe, I was a bit sad, but for no reason as I really like this universe so far, too.It is a bit heavy on the parallels to the Commonwealth - portals are everywhere, too (even more), and an alien race has infiltrated the human race in a near human form.(not a spoiler as it happens very early in this book)Some people complained about the slow background stories, but I felt they worked quite well as a set up.The I am a big fan of the author. When I read that the book was not in the CommonWealth universe, I was a bit sad, but for no reason as I really like this universe so far, too.It is a bit heavy on the parallels to the Commonwealth - portals are everywhere, too (even more), and an alien race has infiltrated the human race in a near human form.(not a spoiler as it happens very early in this book)Some people complained about the slow background stories, but I felt they worked quite well as a set up.The story is a little hard to describe well. A few important envoys take a journey to a distant star where an alien ship has crashed. On the way in a ground car (used to protect humankind of attack by portals), they all tell stories that are vital to the conclusion (in a little too convenient way).Meanwhile, further into the future a group of teens are being raised to fight unnamed aliens, because humankind is being hunted by them, and is on the run. Those envoys are referred to as the Saints, in reverence.The end is pretty great, and makes me sad that I have to wait for the next volume in the series.
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  • Autumn Is Azathoth The Haunted Reading Room
    January 1, 1970
    Review: SALVATION by Peter F. HamiltonEach time I open a novel by Peter F. Hamilton, I am in awe, throughout the reading and after. In a colloquial sense, Mr. Hamilton is like the Stephen Hawking of Science Fiction, such an utter genius that our minds and imaginations are tasked and stretched trying to comprehend. I think his oeuvre ought to be a required university course.In this massively dual-timeline story, we are introduced to multiple species of aliens, with diverging purposes, and a human Review: SALVATION by Peter F. HamiltonEach time I open a novel by Peter F. Hamilton, I am in awe, throughout the reading and after. In a colloquial sense, Mr. Hamilton is like the Stephen Hawking of Science Fiction, such an utter genius that our minds and imaginations are tasked and stretched trying to comprehend. I think his oeuvre ought to be a required university course.In this massively dual-timeline story, we are introduced to multiple species of aliens, with diverging purposes, and a humanity with advanced technology under control but still displaying the vices of greed, covetousness, vanity, and violence.SALVATION is Book One in the SALVATION SEQUENCE Series.
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  • Derek
    January 1, 1970
    This book is set up with three different strands, far future, and current with 5 people traveling to a star ship and telling stories from their past. far future and traveling to the spaceship were interesting but the stories individual characters told were just an absolute slog to get through. So slow, and I just didn't care about the characters. I had the same problem with the great North Road. The end to the novel was fast and the setup for the next novel looks good. But I will not be reading This book is set up with three different strands, far future, and current with 5 people traveling to a star ship and telling stories from their past. far future and traveling to the spaceship were interesting but the stories individual characters told were just an absolute slog to get through. So slow, and I just didn't care about the characters. I had the same problem with the great North Road. The end to the novel was fast and the setup for the next novel looks good. But I will not be reading anymore of it until the series is complete.
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  • Gerry Vogel
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this future echoes Hamilton's Confederation and Commonwealth sagas about the ways technology changes how we live at varying paces. So, by 2204, there are quantum entangled" portals" everywhere and the whole world (and a few others too) is ONE STEP AWAY. Immense wealth, depravity, puzzling crime scenes and supercriminals, enigmatic aliens (do they "serve man?" And how?) in a cast of many many many come together in a narrative covering seemingly unrelated situations that are vitally connecte Well, this future echoes Hamilton's Confederation and Commonwealth sagas about the ways technology changes how we live at varying paces. So, by 2204, there are quantum entangled" portals" everywhere and the whole world (and a few others too) is ONE STEP AWAY. Immense wealth, depravity, puzzling crime scenes and supercriminals, enigmatic aliens (do they "serve man?" And how?) in a cast of many many many come together in a narrative covering seemingly unrelated situations that are vitally connected and NOW WE MUST WAIT ANOTHER YEAR!!!!!!
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  • Chester Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to really get into this book, but it was hard to really get going. It's a slow drag through numerous storylines, and it's a very very slow building story. I understand this is the first book of the series, but I wasn't ever really engaged with the story at all. I can see how and where this over all story is going for the next book, but not sure if I'm invested or interested enough in the story to pick up the next book. I'd give this a 2.75 star review if Good reads would let me.
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  • Joe McGowan
    January 1, 1970
    Middle of the roadSalvation uses many of the elements found previous Hamilton books, so nothing new and radical. Unfortunately, I hold his Reality Disfunction series to be my standard, followed by the Mendal Series. I’m uncertainty I’ll continue on the Sequence, I would have gone 4 stars but I was so annoyed but the addition of “ez” to simple words to make them futuristic, it is a senseless ploy.
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