From Here to Eternity
The best-selling author of Smoke Gets in Your Eyes expands our sense of what it means to treat the dead with “dignity.”Fascinated by our pervasive terror of dead bodies, mortician Caitlin Doughty set out to discover how other cultures care for their dead. In rural Indonesia, she observes a man clean and dress his grandfather’s mummified body. Grandpa’s mummy has lived in the family home for two years, where the family has maintained a warm and respectful relationship. She meets Bolivian natitas (cigarette- smoking, wish- granting human skulls), and introduces us to a Japanese kotsuage, in which relatives use chopsticks to pluck their loved- ones’ bones from cremation ashes. With curiosity and morbid humor, Doughty encounters vividly decomposed bodies and participates in compelling, powerful death practices almost entirely unknown in America. Featuring Gorey-esque illustrations by artist Landis Blair, From Here to Eternity introduces death-care innovators researching green burial and body composting, explores new spaces for mourning— including a glowing- Buddha columbarium in Japan and America’s only open-air pyre— and reveals unexpected new possibilities for our own death rituals.

From Here to Eternity Details

TitleFrom Here to Eternity
Author
ReleaseOct 3rd, 2017
PublisherW. W. Norton Company
ISBN-139780393249897
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Death, Travel, Adult, Science, Sociology, History, Reference, Research, Anthropology, Autobiography, Memoir

From Here to Eternity Review

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    I was sent this book by the publisher after responding to an email sent to a librarian email list; they had extras leftover from ALA, and I was #ALAleftbehind, so I asked for a few from their list.I knew of Caitlin Doughty but never read her earlier book, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory, which talks about her experience running a crematory and funeral home. In this book, she visits several different places that deal with death differently, either from cultural diffe I was sent this book by the publisher after responding to an email sent to a librarian email list; they had extras leftover from ALA, and I was #ALAleftbehind, so I asked for a few from their list.I knew of Caitlin Doughty but never read her earlier book, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory, which talks about her experience running a crematory and funeral home. In this book, she visits several different places that deal with death differently, either from cultural differences or people thinking outside the mold. From going through my father's death this past year, I certainly was well acquainted with the incredible costs of a burial, and my Dad was fortunate enough to have a gravesite and gravestone provided by the government because of his status as a veteran. But I witnessed price gouging and how funeral homes take advantage of grieving families who feel trapped. It isn't pretty.I hadn't stopped to think of how it might be different other places, how the racket might be unique to our country or that other countries at the very least would have different rackets. Doughty explores some of the standard expectations of other places and I felt like I learned a lot, from the Japanese crematorium experience (where the family watches), to the corpses living with families on an island in Indonesia, to the idea that a burial plot is only as good as long as the body is decomposing in Spain (and not a permanent space as it is in the USA.) Doughty also tells the story of how the way a Mexican town honors their dead is healing to her friend who lost a baby.Such a minor part, but I found myself fascinated by the pages about whales... how their poop feeds an ecosystem, how their decomposing bodies sustain life for half a year! These are the things I brought up during dinner conversation. I was surprised too, but the way she has written some of the details proves hard to forget.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Caitlin Doughty has done it again: dragged us death-phobic Westerners into the light of what grieving and death could (and maybe should) look like. In From Here to Eternity, Caitlin travels the globe and shares her first-hand experiences of getting up close and personal with death rituals from around the world. I found each section absolutely captivating, and although the Tana Toraja bit did give me a nightmare last night (seriously), I'm going to blame that on the arms-length (or maybe football Caitlin Doughty has done it again: dragged us death-phobic Westerners into the light of what grieving and death could (and maybe should) look like. In From Here to Eternity, Caitlin travels the globe and shares her first-hand experiences of getting up close and personal with death rituals from around the world. I found each section absolutely captivating, and although the Tana Toraja bit did give me a nightmare last night (seriously), I'm going to blame that on the arms-length (or maybe football field) distance we Americans prefer to keep from death. I still don't know what I'd like to happen to my remains after I die, but thanks to Caitlin Doughty, I have hope that we as a culture can move towards a more open-minded, natural approach to death that allows different preferences and options to be acceptable and attainable for everyone.
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  • Sydney O (Сидней О)
    January 1, 1970
    This was quite interesting as it covers the more common features of how different cultures approach death. The Thai culture was probably the more interesting, as they follow the same ancient traditions as their ancestors.I would recommend this if you had a college class on philosophy or religion as a way to explore different peoples; or, if you have an interest in different cultures views on life and death.
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  • Ashley Brooks
    January 1, 1970
    4.5In her second book, Caitlin takes us around the world to take a look at how other cultures view and treat death. If you're already aware of how bizarre, detached and corporate-ified the US is about death, this will be a lovely trip through some truly beautiful rituals and cultures. If you aren't aware, well, this might be a bit jarring for you. Caitlin approaches the topic with respect and just the right amount of humor. I can't recommend her writing enough, and would definitely recommend her 4.5In her second book, Caitlin takes us around the world to take a look at how other cultures view and treat death. If you're already aware of how bizarre, detached and corporate-ified the US is about death, this will be a lovely trip through some truly beautiful rituals and cultures. If you aren't aware, well, this might be a bit jarring for you. Caitlin approaches the topic with respect and just the right amount of humor. I can't recommend her writing enough, and would definitely recommend her first book Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory if you'd like to learn a bit more about the way our current death care system works. Also, moving to Colorado immediately because I WANT THE PYRE TREATMENT.Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss for providing me a copy for review.
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  • Mainlinebooker
    January 1, 1970
    Calling all fans of cultural anthropology for this dive into how different cultures approach death and funereal rights is eye opening and fascinating. I never know how other people will react to this subject but I found her former book, Smoke gets in your Eyes, which talked about the cremation process utterly engrossing. This book is no exception. She takes us on a world tour of different practices through her easy conversational style,humor ,and her dedicated belief in accepting different cultu Calling all fans of cultural anthropology for this dive into how different cultures approach death and funereal rights is eye opening and fascinating. I never know how other people will react to this subject but I found her former book, Smoke gets in your Eyes, which talked about the cremation process utterly engrossing. This book is no exception. She takes us on a world tour of different practices through her easy conversational style,humor ,and her dedicated belief in accepting different cultural norms. Having observed first hand funerals in Bali and Sulawesi, her comments were right on. I also work with hospice and found many of her comments so applicable to dealing with the death and dying. I really invite anyone to be open to the wondrous messages she shares about our final stage of life.
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    This author is so awesome. I want to go to her funeral facility when I pass. More to come.
  • Monika
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't think that it was possible, but I loved this even more than Smoke Gets in Your Eyes. I like to pretend that I'm not, but I am an extremely squeamish person. Despite that, Doughty had me hooked on page one. From Here to Eternity is entertaining, surprisingly heart warming, and very eye-opening.Special thanks to NetGalley for the ARC. This book will be out October 3, and I highly recommend grabbing a copy.
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous cover design, great drawings throughout, and a very cool exploration of how death is treated in some different parts of the world. I especially loved the chapters on death in America (Colorado, North Carolina, California), where people are stepping away from the current tradition of super expensive funerals with embalmed bodies in fancy caskets to look for a more natural method. When I was growing up my mom used to say, "just bury me in a pine box in the back yard, don't waste a bunch o Gorgeous cover design, great drawings throughout, and a very cool exploration of how death is treated in some different parts of the world. I especially loved the chapters on death in America (Colorado, North Carolina, California), where people are stepping away from the current tradition of super expensive funerals with embalmed bodies in fancy caskets to look for a more natural method. When I was growing up my mom used to say, "just bury me in a pine box in the back yard, don't waste a bunch of money on a funeral," then contradict that by saying she couldn't bear to not have a nice funeral if I were to die before her. This book evoked those contradictory feelings about how people deal with death and how some see the way others deal with death as wrong or barbaric. Hopefully people will read this and come away with a new respect for how other cultures deal with their dead or at least more of an understanding of it. And an appreciation of what is hopefully a trend towards more natural "burials," in whatever form they may take, for the future.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Once again, another stellar read from Caitlin Doughty. This book was a fast read but also intelligent, thoughtful, and witty. It also led me to text my family super late at night about how cool open-air community pyres are and asking what I'm supposed to do with them when they die and suggesting maybe we can avoid the rip-off that is the commercial funeral industry? Thought-provoking and bright with pleasantly surprising illustrations.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    From Here to Eternity: Travelling the World to Find the Good Death by Caitlin Doughty It seemed only fitting that I chose to read Caitlin Doughty's “From Here to Eternity" on a rainy Saturday afternoon on the third anniversary of my mother’s death and contemplate a subject that makes most of us a little squeamish. Doughty's book is a frank and good humored look at death rituals around the world. "All will die...We avoid the death that surrounds us at our own peril, missing its beauty and its les From Here to Eternity: Travelling the World to Find the Good Death by Caitlin Doughty It seemed only fitting that I chose to read Caitlin Doughty's “From Here to Eternity" on a rainy Saturday afternoon on the third anniversary of my mother’s death and contemplate a subject that makes most of us a little squeamish. Doughty's book is a frank and good humored look at death rituals around the world. "All will die...We avoid the death that surrounds us at our own peril, missing its beauty and its lessons. Death avoidance is not an individual failing; it's a cultural one." There is much within these pages to think on and learn. Highly recommended. (mv)
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  • Erin Duerr
    January 1, 1970
    If Jessica Mitford's "Behind the Formaldehyde Curtain" frightened us into facing the reality of dying in America, Caitlin Doughty's writing is like being hugged and told everything is going to be okay. Once again Doughty guides us along an entertaining, informative and empathetic journey through death culture and this time we get to travel the world as we do it. Just like her first book, this is a title I want to hand to people and say, "Read it and then let's talk."
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  • Cynthia Nicola
    January 1, 1970
    So much yes! I really enjoyed Doughty's first book and this one was even better. I loved the Crestone, CO portion the best! A natural cemetery open to public and a funeral pyre open to those living in the community. I may be rethinking my cremation plan. Highly recommended!
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    Honestly, I didn't enjoy this *as* much as Smoke, but it was still absolutely wonderful. I especially liked the chapters on alternative death practices and rituals here in the US...even though we're still heavily mired in the commercialization of the funeral industry and puritanical view of death, these few examples give me hope and definitely pique my curiosity into what else is out there (and will hopefully become available eventually...). Blair's sketches were quite a nice addition to the tex Honestly, I didn't enjoy this *as* much as Smoke, but it was still absolutely wonderful. I especially liked the chapters on alternative death practices and rituals here in the US...even though we're still heavily mired in the commercialization of the funeral industry and puritanical view of death, these few examples give me hope and definitely pique my curiosity into what else is out there (and will hopefully become available eventually...). Blair's sketches were quite a nice addition to the text. (Pro-tip: you can also follow Doughty on IG and see her own footage!)These books (and now a whole new reading list thanks to Doughty's The Order of the Good Death website) have made a profound impact on me, and I'm looking forward to how my ongoing exploration will help me become more comfortable with death. I'm already contemplating how I can get more involved. Yeah yeah, I am a total Doughty fangirl now.Many thanks to Goodreads and the publisher for providing me with this ARC.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Extremely readable and very convincing. Our society needs to bring death back to the conversation table and I say this as a person who experiences extreme existential dread when I think about the fact that someday I won't exist anymore. Perhaps that feeling would go away if death wasn't so far removed from our every day lives. Fascinating look at the death rituals around the world and certainly made me think about what I'd like to happen with my remains.Thanks to the publisher for an advance rea Extremely readable and very convincing. Our society needs to bring death back to the conversation table and I say this as a person who experiences extreme existential dread when I think about the fact that someday I won't exist anymore. Perhaps that feeling would go away if death wasn't so far removed from our every day lives. Fascinating look at the death rituals around the world and certainly made me think about what I'd like to happen with my remains.Thanks to the publisher for an advance reader's copy.
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  • Deborah
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book through the goodreads first reads program. I received an ARC, but it has the same image on the cover as the hardback. It's very interesting, but too short. I plan to read her first book Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory now. It's not exactly about death, it's more about funeral customs and the ways bodies are treated and handled. So, it's more about the families and their grief than about the person who died. There's another book called The Good Death: I won this book through the goodreads first reads program. I received an ARC, but it has the same image on the cover as the hardback. It's very interesting, but too short. I plan to read her first book Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory now. It's not exactly about death, it's more about funeral customs and the ways bodies are treated and handled. So, it's more about the families and their grief than about the person who died. There's another book called The Good Death: An Exploration of Dying in America that does seem to be about dying, but I haven't read it yet.
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  • Sarahbeth Yamiolkowski
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it!
  • Diana Iozzia
    January 1, 1970
    “From Here to Eternity” is a sad, interesting, slightly nauseating, and educational look at the culture of the world and how their people celebrate death. In this book, we hear the funeral preparations and ceremonies from ( ) countries in the world. There are many interesting aspects of these different cultures. I personally enjoyed reading about the true Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico, the mausoleums and cremations in Japan, the (slightly disgusting) body decompositions in California, a “From Here to Eternity” is a sad, interesting, slightly nauseating, and educational look at the culture of the world and how their people celebrate death. In this book, we hear the funeral preparations and ceremonies from ( ) countries in the world. There are many interesting aspects of these different cultures. I personally enjoyed reading about the true Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico, the mausoleums and cremations in Japan, the (slightly disgusting) body decompositions in California, and the Natita skulls in Bolivia. To many of these countries in the book, funerals are a way to celebrate life and death in a kind, sweet, and memorable fashion. There are so many interesting stories and fascinating facts about mortuary services. Naturally, this could be a bit uncomfortable for those with weak stomachs, or if you’ve just experienced a recent death. The content is very interesting, and the book is written relatively well. Some of the dialogue is strange and probably a little made up, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. I can give it a three out of five stars, because it’s mostly a book of facts, anecdotes, and dead body details. This doesn’t discredit it in any way, there just isn’t much substance other than details and weird stories about buffalo sacrifices.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    3.75. I loved Doughty's first book and it's examination of death combined with tales throughout her career as a mortician, and I was super excited for this next work considering it involves travel and learning about death cultures around the world, but there was a little bit of something missing from this for me. The whole book felt a little jumpy and disjointed, and the humor maybe a little overt. All in all, I learned quite a bit and there were some fascinating information, but I didn't love i 3.75. I loved Doughty's first book and it's examination of death combined with tales throughout her career as a mortician, and I was super excited for this next work considering it involves travel and learning about death cultures around the world, but there was a little bit of something missing from this for me. The whole book felt a little jumpy and disjointed, and the humor maybe a little overt. All in all, I learned quite a bit and there were some fascinating information, but I didn't love it as much as I was anticipating that I would. I'd still definitely recommend this and her previous book because they are short and you can absolutely learn a lot from them. It also forces you to really think about death and your beliefs.*I received an ARC from the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jason Diamond
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating look at how people care for the dead all across the globe.
  • Joy
    January 1, 1970
    SO GOOD.In her previous book, Caitlin Doughty told her story of working in a US crematorium and her vision of the good death. In this one, she travels around the world to explore myriad ways of sending off and remembering the dead.The book covers a huge range of funeral practices, some of which I had heard of and some I hadn't. The book is illustrated with pen and ink drawings - these are attractive and I can understand why they took this approach, though I would have liked to see photos of the SO GOOD.In her previous book, Caitlin Doughty told her story of working in a US crematorium and her vision of the good death. In this one, she travels around the world to explore myriad ways of sending off and remembering the dead.The book covers a huge range of funeral practices, some of which I had heard of and some I hadn't. The book is illustrated with pen and ink drawings - these are attractive and I can understand why they took this approach, though I would have liked to see photos of the USA's only open-air pyre or Japan's techno-columbaria.The chapters run the gamut from old, traditional techniques to cutting-edge projects that give hope for the future of the death industry. As always, Caitlin's voice shines through, as well as her passion for the subject.
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  • Megan De Laloë
    January 1, 1970
    Death is an incredibly difficult subject, yet Caitlin approaches death and loss and manages to turn it into a humorous, comforting story of her adventures, all while asking us what society has lost by being afraid to look at death as an old, inevitable friend.If you are facing the loss of a loved one, read this book. If you're struggling with your own mortality, read it. If you want to laugh uncontrollably while your heart breaks and your face hurts from crying - read it, and find out how import Death is an incredibly difficult subject, yet Caitlin approaches death and loss and manages to turn it into a humorous, comforting story of her adventures, all while asking us what society has lost by being afraid to look at death as an old, inevitable friend.If you are facing the loss of a loved one, read this book. If you're struggling with your own mortality, read it. If you want to laugh uncontrollably while your heart breaks and your face hurts from crying - read it, and find out how important it is for western civilization to take back our after-life.
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  • Brendan Cooney
    January 1, 1970
    This is a spoiler-free reviewRead on In The SheetsThis is a book I have been waiting an eternity for (I'm not even sorry for that pun). I've been a supporter of Caitlin's since she had just a few hundred subscribers (now 200,000+ and growing) on her YouTube channel, Ask a Mortician, and am so lucky to have been able to read this a bit early.Upon the release of her debut novel, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes and Other Stories from the Crematory, I immediately purchased it and read it in a single sittin This is a spoiler-free reviewRead on In The SheetsThis is a book I have been waiting an eternity for (I'm not even sorry for that pun). I've been a supporter of Caitlin's since she had just a few hundred subscribers (now 200,000+ and growing) on her YouTube channel, Ask a Mortician, and am so lucky to have been able to read this a bit early.Upon the release of her debut novel, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes and Other Stories from the Crematory, I immediately purchased it and read it in a single sitting, this book was no different. Caitlin is the only person I've ever been a patron of on Patreon and this is the first book I had ever pre-ordered (though W.W. Norton was nice enough to send me an advanced copy for review, I still wanted to support the book).Given all of those things and my history with Caitlin's work, I had a lot of expectations for this new book. I was overjoyed when it was announced on her channel and have patiently awaiting it ever since. That being said, it was approximately 1.5 Billion times better than I had expected it to be (the illustrations alone are jaw-dropping).From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death is exactly what it sounds like. It chronicles Caitlin traveling the world and exploring the death rituals of various cultures across it. She does an amazing job through her writing of balancing a heavy topic like death with her brilliant sense of humor. The humor is never distasteful in anyway, it works quite well. The serious moments are serious, and the rest is just fun and educational. This book is, inside and out, indisputable proof that death can be beautiful. Caitlin observes and describes many death rituals in the most respective way possible, contrasts them with the death industry in North America, and showcases the ways people here are trying to improve death culture, our relationship with death, and the way we interact with our own dead.While reading this book, I had many conversations with friends and loved ones about death and, while some found a few of the stories in this book to be "creepy" (they're not, they're beautiful), they all seemed to agree that the way we handle death, by not handling it at all, leaves something to be desired. I think reading books like Smoke Gets in Your Eyes and From Here to Eternity should be mandatory. Caitlin is on a very difficult journey of changing the way a lot of stubborn people view death, and these books are a massive step in the right direction. For that, I thank her.
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  • Kevin Shepherd
    January 1, 1970
    To say Caitlin Doughty's sense of humor is a bit dark and macabre might be accurate, but it's very misleading. She's dead serious (pun intended) about her subject matter but approaches it with an intertwining of zeal and humor that is at once enlightening and entertaining. From Colorado, to Indonesia, to Mexico, to Japan, back to the states and North Carolina, off again to Spain, south to Bolivia, and finally California, Doughty takes us on a whirlwind tour of some of the world's most interestin To say Caitlin Doughty's sense of humor is a bit dark and macabre might be accurate, but it's very misleading. She's dead serious (pun intended) about her subject matter but approaches it with an intertwining of zeal and humor that is at once enlightening and entertaining. From Colorado, to Indonesia, to Mexico, to Japan, back to the states and North Carolina, off again to Spain, south to Bolivia, and finally California, Doughty takes us on a whirlwind tour of some of the world's most interesting death rituals. Her openminded inquisitiveness is infectious, challenging her readers to question their own conceptions about embalming, interment and cremation. I absolutely loved this book and believe it should be required reading for anyone making arrangements for the inevitable, for loved ones or yourself.
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  • Holly Ann
    January 1, 1970
    From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death was extremely interesting. Before picking up this book, I thought that death was pretty straightforward. I didn't think too much on how other cultures approached the subject, or what they did with their dead. Day of the Dead was about as far as my knowledge went.Caitlin's book is informative and eye-opening. She selects several locales and really focuses on not only how they process their grief and what they do with their dead, bu From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death was extremely interesting. Before picking up this book, I thought that death was pretty straightforward. I didn't think too much on how other cultures approached the subject, or what they did with their dead. Day of the Dead was about as far as my knowledge went.Caitlin's book is informative and eye-opening. She selects several locales and really focuses on not only how they process their grief and what they do with their dead, but the reasons behind their rituals. This knowledge is gained first-hand, working with the death professionals and religious leaders who care for their communities. The respect Caitlin feels for these cultures is evident in the way she treats their rituals. There are a few humorous moments that arise because of her culture clashing with that of a foreign land, but she works to understand and push past. If you're curious about death in other cultures or loved Caitlin's other book, pick this up and read it. I'm sure you'll love it!
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  • BriKie
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. I won this as an ARC through a GR giveaway (which I was thrilled about!) From Here to Eternity is Caitlin Doughty’s second book and I liked it even more than her first book, Smoke Gets In Your Eyes. This is a short 250 page book, and it takes a wider, international focus, examining how a variety of cultures around the world deal with death and grief. It’s readable, informative, and entertaining, in equal portions. I highly recommend it.
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  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    Took me long enough to get to this ARC I happily stumbled upon at ALA Midwinter 2017! I loved "Up in Smoke" and I really enjoyed "From Here to Eternity"!
  • Alaina
    January 1, 1970
    I've read more books than I care to admit about dead bodies, so I was ecstatic to see Caitlin Doughty had written something new to add to my shelves. This book did not disappointed. It was wonderful to see the variety of customs and beliefs around the world. I'm very vocal about my plans to donate my body to a body farm, so seeing one represented in a chapter made me especially happy. This book is a phenomenal introduction for anyone who does not typically read about topics like death and funera I've read more books than I care to admit about dead bodies, so I was ecstatic to see Caitlin Doughty had written something new to add to my shelves. This book did not disappointed. It was wonderful to see the variety of customs and beliefs around the world. I'm very vocal about my plans to donate my body to a body farm, so seeing one represented in a chapter made me especially happy. This book is a phenomenal introduction for anyone who does not typically read about topics like death and funerary customs. I do wish the author had been able to visit even more places as only 8 locations were discussed, and three of those were in the United States. Or perhaps this just leaves the door open for further books.Overall, I greatly enjoyed this book and I loved the the author's sense of humor.Special thanks to the publisher and Goodreads for sending me an ARC of this book!
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  • Shannon A
    January 1, 1970
    An eye-opening look at something we spend our lives attempting to avoid. Traveling the world with Caitlin, we discover that the James Bond film Spectre inspired The Dias de los Muertos (The day of the dead) parade in Mexico, that the fear surrounding death and the dead doesn't hold true throughout the world, and that we in the west have so sterilized the natural process of death that we have replaced both intimacy and rituals with distance and shame. This book is an heartfelt offering that sheds An eye-opening look at something we spend our lives attempting to avoid. Traveling the world with Caitlin, we discover that the James Bond film Spectre inspired The Dias de los Muertos (The day of the dead) parade in Mexico, that the fear surrounding death and the dead doesn't hold true throughout the world, and that we in the west have so sterilized the natural process of death that we have replaced both intimacy and rituals with distance and shame. This book is an heartfelt offering that sheds light on a dark topic with ease, humor and hope.
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  • Mindy Rose
    January 1, 1970
    caitlin travels the world to experience the death practices of other cultures. i loved her first book and when i saw that we'd gotten the ARC of this in at work i yelped and immediately demanded it, and it did not disappoint. i read it this afternoon in one sitting, i could not put it down. i loved it. it was fascinating. it brought me to tears a few times. @thegooddeath is an incredible weird awesome woman and makes me want to get involved in the death industry. i hope she writes a dozen more b caitlin travels the world to experience the death practices of other cultures. i loved her first book and when i saw that we'd gotten the ARC of this in at work i yelped and immediately demanded it, and it did not disappoint. i read it this afternoon in one sitting, i could not put it down. i loved it. it was fascinating. it brought me to tears a few times. @thegooddeath is an incredible weird awesome woman and makes me want to get involved in the death industry. i hope she writes a dozen more books. 5/5.
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  • Bokayokay
    January 1, 1970
    Very interesting mixture of travel narratives which provide perspective on death practices from around the world. Having the context of other traditions makes the examination of the US death industry more interesting. An excellent autumn read!
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