Loose Ends
No one seemed to notice Sonny Gibson as he stepped back into "The Hideaway," a dusty little honky-tonk nestled off the Carolina highway. But before the night was over, Sonny would be on the run--from the law, from the criminals, even from himself. LOOSE ENDS is a gritty, slow-cooked, Southern crime romance that follows a winding trail down Tobacco Road, through the war-torn streets of Baghdad, and into the bright lights and bloody gutters of South Florida. From JASON LATOUR, co-creator of Eisner-winning SOUTHERN BASTARDS and the writer of Spider-Gwen, CHRIS BRUNNER (SOUTHERN BASTARDS, Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight), and RICO RENZI (Spider-Gwen, Squirrel Girl). Collects LOOSE ENDS #1-4.

Loose Ends Details

TitleLoose Ends
Author
FormatPaperback
ReleaseJul 11th, 2017
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN1534302158
ISBN-139781534302150
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Fiction, Graphic Novels, Anthologies, Collections

Loose Ends Review

  • Sam Quixote
    April 28, 2017
    The first issue of the four-part miniseries Loose Ends was published in 2007 and the fourth issue was finally published this week, ten years later! Was it worth the wait? Sorta… Billed as a “Southern crime romance”, Loose Ends is about a drug runner and a waitress who hit the road ahead of gangsters the drug runner ripped off who want them dead.Because the story came together over such long intervals in between issues, you can see Jason Latour change as a writer. Weirdly though, he starts off go The first issue of the four-part miniseries Loose Ends was published in 2007 and the fourth issue was finally published this week, ten years later! Was it worth the wait? Sorta… Billed as a “Southern crime romance”, Loose Ends is about a drug runner and a waitress who hit the road ahead of gangsters the drug runner ripped off who want them dead.Because the story came together over such long intervals in between issues, you can see Jason Latour change as a writer. Weirdly though, he starts off good and gets worse as the story progresses instead of the other way around! The first issue is great. You get a strong sense of life in a dead-end small Southern town, the dive bar and its clientele - it’s like Latour foreshadowing his later, better work with Jason Aaron on their similarly-themed series, Southern Bastards. The issue sets up a potentially exciting storyline well, throwing in a couple of shockingly violent scenes too. Then the second issue, published some time later, is ok but a bit meandering and feels like it doesn’t know where to go after such a solid, explosive opener. The third issue, published some more time later, is better, building on the drug-running storyline more, and then the fourth and final chapter, published years later, is a crapshoot - rushed, messy, barely coherent. It’s like it was written by a completely different writer from the first issue, which, in a way, it was, considering Jason Latour’s success with Marvel and Image in the intervening years. The problem is that the storyline is too vague. Something about drug-smuggling which hearkens back to the Second Gulf War, our main character’s ripped off some gangsters, his army buddy is being forced to bring him in, and some nutter is just being a crazy nutter. The girl, despite being on all the covers, is incidental - it’s not really clear why she threw her lot in with the guy. Why not, I guess? It’s not the most compelling plot and not at all a convincing romance. The characters are equally underwritten. Sonny is a dirtbag but he’s apparently the hero we’re meant to care about for some reason while the girl - whose name I had to look up, she was so unmemorable! - Cheri, is never more than a cipher, and the others are just there. I liked Chris Brunner’s art especially the flashback scenes to the US Military in the Middle-East and Rico Renzi’s colours were beautiful and vibrant - Loose Ends has a pretty cool trippy look to it as a result. After such a strong first issue, I was disappointed with how the book played out as a whole. The rest of the book has some good scenes sporadically as well as interesting visuals but Loose Ends shows why stories should be realised within a much tighter timeframe than a decade(!) - wait too long and you wind up with a tonally inconsistent, somewhat confused end product. Still, it’ll serve as a decent stopgap until the next volume of Southern Bastards.
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  • Mad Tom
    July 15, 2017
    Neon noir. While the story isn't new, it's a fresh approach to the old crime genre. Especially with this crazy artwork. Girl gets in trouble, down-and-out man aids her, and they lam it. That's Loose Ends in a nutshell. But there's far more to it than that. Like Southern Bastards several years later, the characters, at least in the beginning, are small town. Sonny and Cheri (actually I'm just realizing what that sounds like) met at a high school party and connected over being outcasts. Years late Neon noir. While the story isn't new, it's a fresh approach to the old crime genre. Especially with this crazy artwork. Girl gets in trouble, down-and-out man aids her, and they lam it. That's Loose Ends in a nutshell. But there's far more to it than that. Like Southern Bastards several years later, the characters, at least in the beginning, are small town. Sonny and Cheri (actually I'm just realizing what that sounds like) met at a high school party and connected over being outcasts. Years later, Cheri waitresses and Sonny is still up to no good. Through an almost unsurprising turn of events, they are reunited on a journey of chaos and ultra-violence. While they aren't the deepest characters ever, they're captivating for four issues, and we at least get flashbacks on several characters for added development. Awesome things that stood out to me: a thick black woman as a co-protagonist, social commentary, arcade games, and the Looney Tunes character moods via cartoon symbols spinning around characters' heads. Those aren't really typical things you'd see in a crime comic, which was refreshing. But seriously, the artwork. Jesus Christ this stuff is psychedelic amazing. Chris Brunner on illustrations, Rico Renzi on colors. Who are these guys?? Best comparison would be Cliff Chiang/Matt Hollingsworth (Paper Girls) or Wes Craig/Lee Loughridge (Deadly Class). Worth reading for the artwork alone, but in a crime comic? Brilliant. A fast and violent read full of deplorable characters in a neon noir, drug-crazed Southern America. What's not to love?
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  • Lis Carey
    June 9, 2017
    Sonny Gibson already has a tough past when he turns up at his old favorite honky-tonk, "The Hideaway." He spent time in Iraq during the war, and he's had some shady connections both over there and since he's been back.But he's been out of sight for a while.Now he's turned up again, and some old connections have some old business they want to discuss. A gunfight and a death start a crime spree that runs from the Carolinas down to Florida.The art is good. I believe in these people physically, how Sonny Gibson already has a tough past when he turns up at his old favorite honky-tonk, "The Hideaway." He spent time in Iraq during the war, and he's had some shady connections both over there and since he's been back.But he's been out of sight for a while.Now he's turned up again, and some old connections have some old business they want to discuss. A gunfight and a death start a crime spree that runs from the Carolinas down to Florida.The art is good. I believe in these people physically, how they look and how they move. I also believe in them as people; there are certainly people like them, making up a good part of the crime-committing population. They're violent, impulsive, not overly smart, not much inclined to think things through even after the fact.Some of them are veterans, too. The military doesn't make everyone stronger and more disciplined; some people are wrecked by it, and not just physically.So, yes, these people exist.With a stronger story, I could potentially have enjoyed this. These aren't attractive characters I wont to spend lots of time with, but there are certainly strong stories to be told about them. With good art and good characterization, a strong story would give it a good shot at "not what I like, but I like it anyway.Sadly, I found the story disjointed and incoherent.This definitely did not work for me, and I can't recommend it. but bear in mind that doesn't mean it won't work for you, if your tastes run differently than mine.Not recommended.I received a free electronic galley of this book, and am reviewing it voluntarily.
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  • Amy
    May 28, 2017
    The plot was difficult to follow. There were flashbacks and lots of characters. It could've been longer than 4 issues.
  • Paul Allard
    July 7, 2017
    Reminiscent of a lot of current comic collections around at present, this four-issue collection deals with crime in the Southern states, including murder, corruption, attempted rape, drug dealing etc..It's quite good stuff but not particularly original. the characters are reasonably well-defined as is the action but it's far too colourful and there are no endearing characters.Recommended to anyone who enjoys violent crime comics but don't expect too much.
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  • Reyel2107
    July 9, 2017
    an amazing art for a normal crime story !!!!
  • Erica McGillivray
    July 10, 2017
    First issue involves violent sexual assault that's almost rape. I will stop here.
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