The Ghosts of Captain Grant's Inn
This is the story of the saints and spirits that helped Carol Matsumoto buy and renovate a stately home that had fallen into disrepair, turning it into a successful bed and breakfast. As Carol began the laborious process of renovating a historic Connecticut home, originally built by Captain William Grant in 1754, it became clear to her that the miracles and messages she received were coming from helpers beyond this world. Once the bed and breakfast opened, the evidence for paranormal activity became overwhelming. When a guest of the inn used dowsing rods to communicate with the spirits, a whole new chapter began, with Carol learning the backstory and desires of the twelve spirits who call the inn home.

The Ghosts of Captain Grant's Inn Details

TitleThe Ghosts of Captain Grant's Inn
Author
ReleaseOct 8th, 2017
PublisherLlewellyn Publications
ISBN-139780738753027
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Historical, Mystery, Biography

The Ghosts of Captain Grant's Inn Review

  • Sarah Joint
    January 1, 1970
    This book wasn't exactly what I expected. I was counting on experiences with ghosts, and I did get that. I expected a little more history about the inn than I got, and I wasn't totally expecting how religious the book got at times. At times the writing flowed naturally, and at times it was a little disjointed and I found myself quite distracted by it. I did get some enjoyment out of the book, but can't go higher than a 2.5-3. It seemed like additional thoughts were often added when chapters were This book wasn't exactly what I expected. I was counting on experiences with ghosts, and I did get that. I expected a little more history about the inn than I got, and I wasn't totally expecting how religious the book got at times. At times the writing flowed naturally, and at times it was a little disjointed and I found myself quite distracted by it. I did get some enjoyment out of the book, but can't go higher than a 2.5-3. It seemed like additional thoughts were often added when chapters were already finished. Carol Matsumoto took a huge risk by purchasing the home that would later become Captain Grant's Inn. It took just about all the money she had to her name, and it didn't come without problems... pretty much the whole building needed renovated. Somehow, she managed. There always seemed to be a favor given, a coincidence, someone willing to help her out. She credits God and the saints with it. Eventually, she turned a dilapidated home into a lovely inn.Carol has always been sensitive, and she knew almost immediately that she was never the only presence in Captain Grant's Inn. As guests begin to filter in and out, it becomes even clearer that there are some souls who never leave. One guest introduces Carol to dowsing rods (I've known them as divining rods, they go by several names) and that becomes something that draws even more people to the inn. Come for the ghostly experiences, stay for the great breakfast.Most of the book is about the ghostly experiences both Carol and her many guests have had. With the dowsing rods, she gains the ability to actually speak with the ghosts and find out more about them. After awhile, the book changes track and Carol communicates with the spirits about the afterlife, religion, heaven and hell, and reincarnation. The very last part of the book is transcripts of some conversations with the spirits, bits and pieces we'd already read in previous chapters. The photos of the house and grounds interspersed throughout the book were lovely. I received a copy of this book from Net Galley and Llewellyn Publications, thank you! My review is honest and unbiased.
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  • Susan Angela Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    The ghost of Captain Grants Inn by carol Matsumoto.This is the story of the saints and spirits that helped Carol Matsumoto buy and renovate a stately home that had fallen into disrepair, turning it into a successful bed and breakfast. As Carol began the laborious process of renovating a historic Connecticut home, originally built by Captain William Grant in 1754, it became clear to her that the miracles and messages she received were coming from helpers beyond this world. Once the bed and breakf The ghost of Captain Grants Inn by carol Matsumoto.This is the story of the saints and spirits that helped Carol Matsumoto buy and renovate a stately home that had fallen into disrepair, turning it into a successful bed and breakfast. As Carol began the laborious process of renovating a historic Connecticut home, originally built by Captain William Grant in 1754, it became clear to her that the miracles and messages she received were coming from helpers beyond this world. Once the bed and breakfast opened, the evidence for paranormal activity became overwhelming. When a guest of the inn used dowsing rods to communicate with the spirits, a whole new chapter began, with Carol learning the backstory and desires of the twelve spirits who call the inn home.Good read with good characters. Little slow in places but I managed to read it. I did like the pictures in the book. 3*. Netgalley and Llewelyn worldwide Ltd.
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  • Carrie {The Butterfly Reader}
    January 1, 1970
    This books follows the story of how Captain Grant's came to be and the spirits that live there. It's cool to see this woman's journey as she went through this long process. It was also nice to see how she connected with the spirits and how it changed her views on things. I loved hearing about the things the spirits would do to the guests that stayed at her Bed and Breakfast. I'd never heard about the Gathering before and the war with that the spirits that is going to come soon. It was also nice This books follows the story of how Captain Grant's came to be and the spirits that live there. It's cool to see this woman's journey as she went through this long process. It was also nice to see how she connected with the spirits and how it changed her views on things. I loved hearing about the things the spirits would do to the guests that stayed at her Bed and Breakfast. I'd never heard about the Gathering before and the war with that the spirits that is going to come soon. It was also nice to see a different version of hell. Not hot and burning but a cold, alone place with no God there at all. No other humans, no contact. That sounds worse to me than burning forever. Being trapped in darkness with no love around you. It would drive one insane I think. I love how simple the author writes and how easy it is to follow her though all this. She starts way back to the experience she had as a child. So you really get to glimpse her life and how she has been in tune with things even before she knew it herself. Wonderful read. I enjoyed it very much. If you like ghosts, then you'll love this!*Thanks to NetGalley for giving me this copy in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    This was really a great book until towards the end when the book to me went off track a bit. While reading about the Inn, how it was purchased, renovated and the guests staying at the Inn I was unable to put the book down. The last few chapters to me did not really belong in the book. Learning about the Inn was awesome I would love to go stay there., when it switched to religion and Carols ideas of reincarnation and all I was a bit put off. Not that I don't believe in reincarnation because I do This was really a great book until towards the end when the book to me went off track a bit. While reading about the Inn, how it was purchased, renovated and the guests staying at the Inn I was unable to put the book down. The last few chapters to me did not really belong in the book. Learning about the Inn was awesome I would love to go stay there., when it switched to religion and Carols ideas of reincarnation and all I was a bit put off. Not that I don't believe in reincarnation because I do wholeheartedly. Maybe it was just my beliefs and her vary so far out that I couldn't go with it. Also the Spirit Gathering was a bit much. I also have a few sets of dowsing rods and have used them for years. I have never ever been able to have as in depth conversations with the spirits to give me a look on reincarnation or about the coming of the end of days. Maybe I am being a bit critical and I am open minded, but also experienced. I just felt that these chapters did not go with the book.
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  • Susan Johnston
    January 1, 1970
    Princess Fuzzypants here:We love good ghost stories especially true ones so we devoured this book. The Inn has such a fascinating story as do so many old haunted places. It is a treat that they were able to commune with the spirits and share the experience with so many guests.I think the stories could have been tighter and might have flowed better but I cannot complain about the backstories. I did have some issues when the text veered in preachy commentary. But then I have difficulty with anythi Princess Fuzzypants here:We love good ghost stories especially true ones so we devoured this book. The Inn has such a fascinating story as do so many old haunted places. It is a treat that they were able to commune with the spirits and share the experience with so many guests.I think the stories could have been tighter and might have flowed better but I cannot complain about the backstories. I did have some issues when the text veered in preachy commentary. But then I have difficulty with anything that tends to demand the reader adhere to a certain belief system as it limits the appeal to others who may not hold similar beliefs.Still and all, it was an enjoyable and quick read that I could recommend to ghost fans. It is worth the visit.I give it three purrs and one paw up.
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  • Melinda Anders
    January 1, 1970
    It was a good ghost story but dove into reincarnation too much. The ghost hauntings and the history of why it happens was good. The guests viewpoints helped too. However I was not interested in the religious reason of the hauntings.
  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    If you like ghost stories this book is for you. It follows Carol's journey of buying the Inn and the renovations. Interesting.
  • Katlyn
    January 1, 1970
    A far more philosophical perspective of life after death than I expected. You don’t necessarily have to believe everything written in this book, but it’s definitely worth pondering.
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