A Newfoundlander in Canada
Following the fantastic success of his bestselling memoir, Where I Belong, Great Big Sea front man Alan Doyle returns with a hilarious, heartwarming account of leaving Newfoundland and discovering Canada for the first time.Armed with the same personable, candid style found in his first book, Alan Doyle turns his perspective outward from Petty Harbour toward mainland Canada, reflecting on what it was like to venture away from the comforts of home and the familiarity of the island. Often in a van, sometimes in a bus, occasionally in a car with broken wipers "using Bob's belt and a rope found by Paddy's Pond" to pull them back and forth, Alan and his bandmates charted new territory, and he constantly measured what he saw of the vast country against what his forefathers once called the Daemon Canada. In a period punctuated by triumphant leaps forward for the band, deflating steps backward and everything in between--opening for Barney the Dinosaur at an outdoor music festival, being propositioned at a gas station mail-order bride service in Alberta, drinking moonshine with an elderly church-goer on a Sunday morning in PEI--Alan's few established notions about Canada were often debunked and his own identity as a Newfoundlander was constantly challenged. Touring the country, he also discovered how others view Newfoundlanders and how skewed these images can sometimes be. Asked to play in front of the Queen at a massive Canada Day festival on Parliament Hill, the concert organizers assured Alan and his bandmates that the best way to showcase Newfoundland culture was for them to be towed onto stage in a dory and introduced not as Newfoundlanders but as "Newfies." The boys were not amused. Heartfelt, funny and always insightful, these stories tap into the complexities of community and Canadianness, forming the portrait of a young man from a tiny fishing village trying to define and hold on to his sense of home while navigating a vast and diverse and wonder-filled country.

A Newfoundlander in Canada Details

TitleA Newfoundlander in Canada
Author
ReleaseOct 17th, 2017
PublisherDoubleday Canada
ISBN-139780385686198
Rating
GenreBiography, Autobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Cultural, Canada, Music

A Newfoundlander in Canada Review

  • Richard
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book on a Goodreads giveaway. Alan Doyle delivers a truly delightful read as he takes you across Canada as he and the boys in Great Big Sea discover the country in their early tours as band. The book is structured with a chapter for each province that is followed by a story back in Newfoundland. This allows the reader to discover the country with the author while at the same time understanding the importance of "home". While Great Big Sea are often the characters in the book and are t I won this book on a Goodreads giveaway. Alan Doyle delivers a truly delightful read as he takes you across Canada as he and the boys in Great Big Sea discover the country in their early tours as band. The book is structured with a chapter for each province that is followed by a story back in Newfoundland. This allows the reader to discover the country with the author while at the same time understanding the importance of "home". While Great Big Sea are often the characters in the book and are the reason for the cross country tour, this is not a book about the band and can be enjoyed by readers unfamiliar with their music (all you need to know is they play really amazing traditional Newfoundland and original tunes).The story telling flows freely resulting in the read feeling they are sitting across the table hearing these tales straight from the authors mouth. The stories selected often had me laughing out loud while at the same time providing insight into the psyche of one particular Newfoundlander (the author) and the psyche of the country as a whole. Canada is a country that struggles with what it means to be Canadian and each region has its own views and prejudices about whatever they consider to be the rest of Canada. This book does a great job of highlighting the view of a Newfoundlander heading out to the mainland and discovering that this country is able to embrace and celebrate culture from coast to coast. This is definitely an enjoyable read that will give you an insight into this country that few of us will ever experience on our own.
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  • Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺
    January 1, 1970
    Another great memoir by Alan Doyle. In the book he describes his travels across Canada with Great Big Sea and it really is a delight. It's great how he intersperses his tales from across the country with tidbits from around the island. I strongly suggest the audiobooks for both his memoirs as he narrates them and does it really well. Both his books are written in a conversational tone, which is why they seem to work so well in audio.
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  • Gina Morphy
    January 1, 1970
    With tales of woe like the 1997 Parliament Hill debacle, or funny moments like the Fantasy Elevator party in Saskatoon, Alan Doyle delivers another bout of fantastic story-telling. This time around, his stories encapsulate the band’s travels across Canada and his pride in representing his home province of Newfoundland. Now I’ll have to wait patiently for the next audio book....
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  • Trisha
    January 1, 1970
    I won a copy of this book through a First Reads giveaway.I was excited to get this as a Canadian stuck in the middle, this book allowed me to have an insight into the unique world of a Newfoundlander. This was easy to read and quite enjoyable! I have always loved hearing Alan sing but this was just so much better.Thank you Alan and please write more!
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  • Chuck Slack
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very enjoyable book. Mr. Doyle is a fantastic storyteller. The chapter entitled “Worst Seat Ever” is one of the funniest passages I have read in a long time. Highly recommend this light, entertaining, hilarious read.
  • Heather(Gibby)
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge Great Big Sea so I really enjoyed this read. I have been to all provinces in Canada except Newfoundland, which I hope to do in the next couple of years. I was hoping there would be a little bit more about the band itself, but maybe that is a topic for another book. The chapter dealing with his seat on the airplane beside the baby had me rolling on the floor laughing.
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  • Carla
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable read. Not as good as his first book however. This time, it was focused more on the band, and their travels off the Island to various parts of Canada. Each province they visited had it's own chapter. I've always loved Great Big Sea, and this book about their beginnings didn't disappoint. I've never seen them live, which I would have loved to. I was particularly touched by his chapter on Saskatchewan, where I'm from and the bunny hug incident. Alan writes "That was my first indication An enjoyable read. Not as good as his first book however. This time, it was focused more on the band, and their travels off the Island to various parts of Canada. Each province they visited had it's own chapter. I've always loved Great Big Sea, and this book about their beginnings didn't disappoint. I've never seen them live, which I would have loved to. I was particularly touched by his chapter on Saskatchewan, where I'm from and the bunny hug incident. Alan writes "That was my first indication that Saskatchewan, like Newfoundland, had a vocabulary of its own. They abbreviate their town names like we do...It would turn out that Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador had much in common. I recognized their work-hard, play-hard attitude and survivalist mentality. I got the immediate sense that people here were used to difficult times and solving problems for themselves. There was no waiting on the army to clear the road after a snowstorm. These folks jumped in their tractors, grabbed shovels, and did it themselves...Saskatchewan is the fraternal twin to Newfoundland. Separated at birth." I could go on, but I think you know what I mean. I love reading about Canada, my home and native land.
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  • Ron S
    January 1, 1970
    A memoir from Great Big Sea front man Alan Doyle about the band's early days on the road, as they make their way from Newfoundland to B.C.,. I'll confess to not being a fan of GBS, and there is something smug about Doyle that basically makes me want to punch him. So given the significant obstacles to my enjoyment of this book, I was pleasantly surprised at how entertained I was by his remembrances. The Rock might not be very good for spuds, but Newfoundland does grow a lot of great storytellers, A memoir from Great Big Sea front man Alan Doyle about the band's early days on the road, as they make their way from Newfoundland to B.C.,. I'll confess to not being a fan of GBS, and there is something smug about Doyle that basically makes me want to punch him. So given the significant obstacles to my enjoyment of this book, I was pleasantly surprised at how entertained I was by his remembrances. The Rock might not be very good for spuds, but Newfoundland does grow a lot of great storytellers, and Doyle is one of them. While I'm not about to go out and buy a Great Big Sea album now, there's a strong chance I'll pick up his first book, Where I Belong.
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  • Thea
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Just when I thought I couldn't love Alan Doyle any more than I already do, he up and suprised me. This follow-up book to Where I Belong did not disappoint!As funny and heartwarming as his first memoir, A Newfoundlander in Canada provides the reader with more glimpses into the artist's life and into the lives of the Canadians he meets while touring the country with Great Big Sea.Alan Doyle comes across as a kind, friendly, intelligent man whose love for Newfoundland, Canada, and his fellow C Wow! Just when I thought I couldn't love Alan Doyle any more than I already do, he up and suprised me. This follow-up book to Where I Belong did not disappoint!As funny and heartwarming as his first memoir, A Newfoundlander in Canada provides the reader with more glimpses into the artist's life and into the lives of the Canadians he meets while touring the country with Great Big Sea.Alan Doyle comes across as a kind, friendly, intelligent man whose love for Newfoundland, Canada, and his fellow Canadians is palpable. Part memoir, part travel guide, this book imparts a vision of Canada you'd have a hard time finding anywhere else. Well written and highly entertaining, this book made me smile more than I have in a long while. I highly recommend the audio book if you can get your hands on it; listening to Alan Doyle's voice tell his tales only adds to the experience. I could listen to him speak forever.(I'd give this book 6 stars if I could!)
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    While Alan Doyle's first book, Where I Belong, was set primarily in Petty Harbour and St. John's, Newfoundland, his newest release spans from one Canadian coast to the other.Beginning in Newfoundland, the chapters of A Newfoundlander in Canada are divided into different Canadian provinces. The reader travels with Doyle as he shares stories and anecdotes from his first experiences off the island on the road with Great Big Sea.Many of the stories are laugh out loud funny and woven among them all i While Alan Doyle's first book, Where I Belong, was set primarily in Petty Harbour and St. John's, Newfoundland, his newest release spans from one Canadian coast to the other.Beginning in Newfoundland, the chapters of A Newfoundlander in Canada are divided into different Canadian provinces. The reader travels with Doyle as he shares stories and anecdotes from his first experiences off the island on the road with Great Big Sea.Many of the stories are laugh out loud funny and woven among them all is the theme of home and identity. Doyle presents a kind of birds eye view of how the vastly different parts of Canada are still very clearly still part of the same family.One thing I have loved about both of Alan Doyle's books is that he easily develops a connection with his readers. You get the sense that he is right beside you with a pint of beer telling you about his amazing adventures on the "mainland". On the back of Doyle's first book, actor Russell Crowe is quoted saying, "I feel like I've lived another's life." This holds true for A Newfoundlander in Canada as well.A Newfoundlander in Canada is certainly a must read for any Great Big Sea fan, though you do not need to be familiar with their work to enjoy this book, most especially if you are Canadian.xoJennDisclaimer - I received a complementary copy of A Newfoundlander In Canada from Penguin Random House Canada. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.
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  • PEI Public Library Service
    January 1, 1970
    A Newfoundlander in Canada: Always Going Somewhere, Always Coming Home by Alan Doyle recounts the early days of Great Big Sea, and their first tour across Canada (excluding the Territories). It also gives insight into Doyle's experiences and feelings as a "first-generation Canadian", one whose parents never had to move but who was born after Newfoundland joined Canada in 1949. Doyle remains true to the subtitle, alternating chapters between traveling with the band and sharing anecdotes from home A Newfoundlander in Canada: Always Going Somewhere, Always Coming Home by Alan Doyle recounts the early days of Great Big Sea, and their first tour across Canada (excluding the Territories). It also gives insight into Doyle's experiences and feelings as a "first-generation Canadian", one whose parents never had to move but who was born after Newfoundland joined Canada in 1949. Doyle remains true to the subtitle, alternating chapters between traveling with the band and sharing anecdotes from home in Newfoundland.Alan Doyle is a wonderful storyteller; I feel like I'm in the livingroom, or the back of the van, listening to him. He is articulate, funny, and caring and balances the humour, horrors and politics with grace and compassion. This tour across Canada is described with the delight and fear of Doyle's first trip "off Island", as GBS grows and grows in popularity. Doyle has no compunction about sharing his naivete, while never mocking his younger self. He celebrates his home province, Canada and the band with obvious love and pride, yet acknowledges room for improvements. My biggest "take away" from this book is the sheer joy Doyle has, as a member of Great Big Sea (and now a successful solo artist), as a Newfoundlander and a Canadian, and his pleasure in sharing that with us.Borrow a copy: https://bit.ly/2stadtZ
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  • Joanne
    January 1, 1970
    Man, I've been on a bit of a roll with Canadian non-fiction this year. Add this one to the list. It was 244 pages of the sweetest, funniest, most heart-felt prose I've seen in ages. I loved Doyle's first book, Where I Belong, and this one is an impressive second work. There were times I was laughing so hard that it caught the attention of others in the house (asking for directions, PEI vs. Newfoundland). There were also moments of deep poignancy (flying home from Fort Mac). Most of all, what I t Man, I've been on a bit of a roll with Canadian non-fiction this year. Add this one to the list. It was 244 pages of the sweetest, funniest, most heart-felt prose I've seen in ages. I loved Doyle's first book, Where I Belong, and this one is an impressive second work. There were times I was laughing so hard that it caught the attention of others in the house (asking for directions, PEI vs. Newfoundland). There were also moments of deep poignancy (flying home from Fort Mac). Most of all, what I took away from this book was the depth of Doyle's love for not only Newfoundland but Canada overall, and how much fun he has in life. It's not all easy; he and the other members of Great Big Sea have paid their dues. Doyle is a natural writer and raconteur. I hope he has more to come.
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  • Elisabeth Manley
    January 1, 1970
    Alan Doyle is first and foremost an entertainer. Whether he's singing on stage or writing a book, you can't help but smile along singing or reading. I was laughing out loud reading his stories about the evil baby TJ on a plane, or his never-ending supply of Cadbury Creme Eggs. His second book however was not only a collection of funny anecdotes but also a guide across Canada, as seen through the eyes of a new Newfie band on the road for the first time. The way Alan relates every province as a di Alan Doyle is first and foremost an entertainer. Whether he's singing on stage or writing a book, you can't help but smile along singing or reading. I was laughing out loud reading his stories about the evil baby TJ on a plane, or his never-ending supply of Cadbury Creme Eggs. His second book however was not only a collection of funny anecdotes but also a guide across Canada, as seen through the eyes of a new Newfie band on the road for the first time. The way Alan relates every province as a different family member to Newfoundland just makes you proud to be a part of the Canadian family. Can only hope he'll keep up this writing career! I'd read any old story he chooses to share.
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  • Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    While reading this book, I spent my drives home from work listening to A Week at the Warehouse, Alan's latest solo album. I highly recommend this combination, I think it's what pushed my rating from a 4 to a 5 - it felt like an experience rather than just reading a book. Alan's humour is fantastic and he has a real knack for story-telling. The Canada he describes is my Canada, even though it may not always shine through in all of our citizens. Alan's account of his time spent touring Canada is s While reading this book, I spent my drives home from work listening to A Week at the Warehouse, Alan's latest solo album. I highly recommend this combination, I think it's what pushed my rating from a 4 to a 5 - it felt like an experience rather than just reading a book. Alan's humour is fantastic and he has a real knack for story-telling. The Canada he describes is my Canada, even though it may not always shine through in all of our citizens. Alan's account of his time spent touring Canada is so entertaining, I would highly recommend A Newfoundlander in Canada.
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  • Darren
    January 1, 1970
    I borrowed this a e book for my tablet from the NB electronic library website. I enjoyed reading it. It is the second book I read by Alan Doyle. It is about how the band he is in (Great Big Sea) is famous and their adventures across Canada. I am a fan of this band and a fan of both books that Alan wrote so far.
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  • Anita
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book partly because I’m a fan of great big sea and also because I’ve travelled across Canada and could appreciate his views of all these provinces.I thoroughly enjoyed all these delightful stories, Especially the fantasy elevator story. I laughed out loud on many an occasion.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Quick! Somebody nominate this treasure for next year's Canada Reads!
  • Marianne
    January 1, 1970
    A genius storyteller, especially good b/c I've been feeling homesick for Canada lately.
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyable! We’re planning an East Coast trip soon and I’ve taken note of his Canadian stops and observations. We will have to visit the Lower Deck and I wonder if the Inglis House is still standing? This book made me laugh out loud a few times-very funny road trips. We learn so much about people and the vastness and beauty of Canada! Thanks for the music too!
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  • CJ
    January 1, 1970
    I wouldn't want to run Alan through a fact checker hahaha but I absolutely adored this book anyway. Alan Doyle is a brilliant storyteller with an incredible voice and perfectly-timed humour. I loved the east-west trajectory of self-discovery in this book and how vividly Canadian it is. Newfoundlanders can find themselves in these pages 1000 times over but it's a book that all Canadians can enjoy.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Alan Doyle's second book is as enjoyable as his firsts (Where I Belong). This book, in a way, is a continuation of "Where I belong". If you have not read Alan Doyle's first book, you will find this book an enjoyable stand alone read. He writes, no rather talks to the reader, about the experiences of the early touring days of Great Big Sea. That sentence makes the book sound simplistic, but it is far from that. If you are looking for an entertaining read, you need to read this book.
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  • Jocelyn
    January 1, 1970
    GARBAGE READ. lol jkThis satisfied my itch for more stories from the Great Big Sea years, storied that were framed again by Doyle's humility and optimism. ie. There's no sense of when the made it, or anxiety about whether they'd make it - just stories about the fun they had along the way.
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  • Geoffrey Kelley
    January 1, 1970
    A light-hearted account of the Great Big Sea as they set out to conquer Canada from east to west. Tales from the road, glimpses into celebrated music venues including Halifax's Lower Deck and Toronto's Horseshoe Tavern as the b'ys take Newfoundland to the mainland. A perfect read for a rainy November's day.
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  • Aly
    January 1, 1970
    I don't think you need to be a fan of Great Big Sea to read this book. You don't even need to know who Alan Doyle is to enjoy it. Do you need to have read his first book ? Not either. There might be an expression or two I wouldn't have understand if I haven't read Where I Belong but that's it.While Mr. Doyle's previous book focus on his childhood and his hometown in Petty Harbour, Newfoundland, this one is about his debut with the band and the concert tour they did in every province of Canada in I don't think you need to be a fan of Great Big Sea to read this book. You don't even need to know who Alan Doyle is to enjoy it. Do you need to have read his first book ? Not either. There might be an expression or two I wouldn't have understand if I haven't read Where I Belong but that's it.While Mr. Doyle's previous book focus on his childhood and his hometown in Petty Harbour, Newfoundland, this one is about his debut with the band and the concert tour they did in every province of Canada in the early 1900's. While this autobiography might not tell you all the secrets nor recount the complete career (I wonder if maybe he's keeping it for a next book?), Alan Doyle is such a good storyteller that I was never bored. He have a way to tell a story and give you informations at the same time that I find quite entertaining. My favorite part is when he compare each province to a family member in relation to Newfoundland. "New Brunswick, I supposed, is Newfoundland's quiet cousin. She gets very little air-time at the supper table, but is way more complex and fascinating than you might have thought."I wondered if my interest may relate to the fact I'm Canadian. Maybe it is, but I still think it would be a great book for people who wants to know more about the geography and history of Canada. Add to that a lot of funny anecdotes.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    A love letter to Canada, and to Newfoundland. Laugh out loud funny, warm, thought-provoking at times, an exploration of what it means to be a Newfoundlander and a Canadian and both at once. If you're looking for nasty gossip or behind the scenes shockers, this is not the book for you, Alan is not that kind of writer, or person. But I've been looking forward to reading this one since I finished his last one, and it did not disappoint.
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  • Jacqueline
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it! Read it because it's one of four books in the first ever NLReads by NLPublicLibraries. This one may just have one my vote. Got it from the library through ILL but I think I'm going to have to purchase a copy.
  • Teena in Toronto
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a fan of Great Big Sea and had seen them many times in concert over the years. I discovered them in the mid 1990s when they were just starting out. Alan Doyle was one of the members in Great Big Sea. I read his first book, Where I Belong, a couple years ago and enjoyed it.This book is Alan's memoir and a collection of his memories, starting just after the band was formed in 1992. He starts by giving a bit of history of how Newfoundland had joined Canada (or Canada joined Newfoundland, depend I'm a fan of Great Big Sea and had seen them many times in concert over the years. I discovered them in the mid 1990s when they were just starting out. Alan Doyle was one of the members in Great Big Sea. I read his first book, Where I Belong, a couple years ago and enjoyed it.This book is Alan's memoir and a collection of his memories, starting just after the band was formed in 1992. He starts by giving a bit of history of how Newfoundland had joined Canada (or Canada joined Newfoundland, depending on your point of view) in 1949. He then tells of his adventures in various cities and provinces across the country as Great Big Sea made their way from Newfoundland to British Columbia as their popularity and awareness grew. He had lots of funny stories to tell such as finding accommodations and renting vehicles, partying with locals and the concert line-ups they were in (they have opened for Barney and Junkhouse!).I liked the writing style ... I thought it was honest and humorous. I bet Doyle would be a fun guy to sit and have a beer with. The dialogue is great because it's written phonetically and I could hear Newfoundland accents when I read it (he devotes some time to acknowledging that Newfoundland has it's own dialect). There is some swearing swearing. This was a fun and interesting book about a proud young Newfoundland band who played their version of traditional songs that started with not a lot but had dreams of making it big (which they have). It would have been nice to have included some pictures. I'd recommend this book.Blog review book: http://www.teenaintoronto.com/2017/12...
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  • Hope
    January 1, 1970
    I won this novel in a Goodreads giveaway.If you like a good yarn, then this is the book for you. A Newfoundlander in Canada is packed with good old fashioned storytelling of the band, Great Big Sea, traveling across Canada. Frontman, Alan Doyle, describes each province as a family member.Loved this book.
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  • Bob
    January 1, 1970
    It's a little depressing that Alan Doyle is good at so many things: music, acting, and now writing. This is his second memoir, and a bit of a mirror image of his first, "Where I belong". Where his first book looked at his childhood and the role of his home community of Petty Harbour in his life, this one looks at the rest of Canada. It's actually a bit deceptive. The book is so easy to read, the author's voice so comfortable telling stories, that you may miss some of the insights that he offers It's a little depressing that Alan Doyle is good at so many things: music, acting, and now writing. This is his second memoir, and a bit of a mirror image of his first, "Where I belong". Where his first book looked at his childhood and the role of his home community of Petty Harbour in his life, this one looks at the rest of Canada. It's actually a bit deceptive. The book is so easy to read, the author's voice so comfortable telling stories, that you may miss some of the insights that he offers up about Canada from the context of the island on its furthest easternward edge.
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't laughed this hard reading a book in a long time. Some of the stories are so far fetched, you know they can't be made up."Worst Seat Ever", coming off the plane and approaching future (now current) wife Joanne and explaining that he is covered in pee, poo, beer, rum, coke, baby formula, and breast milk. Or maybe the all night elevator party in Saskatoon. How about being asked if he and the band would take a Chinese bride for $10,000? Jaysus!After reading Where I Belong and now A Newfoun I haven't laughed this hard reading a book in a long time. Some of the stories are so far fetched, you know they can't be made up."Worst Seat Ever", coming off the plane and approaching future (now current) wife Joanne and explaining that he is covered in pee, poo, beer, rum, coke, baby formula, and breast milk. Or maybe the all night elevator party in Saskatoon. How about being asked if he and the band would take a Chinese bride for $10,000? Jaysus!After reading Where I Belong and now A Newfoundlander in Canada my respect for Alan Doyle has increased exponentially, which is incredible since I already had tremendous respect for the man. A Canadian from Newfoundland and a Newfoundlander in Canada.I received this book for free through Goodreads First-Reads.
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