The House on Foster Hill
Kaine Prescott is no stranger to death. When her husband died two years ago, her pleas for further investigation into his suspicious death fell on deaf ears. In desperate need of a fresh start, Kaine purchases an old house sight unseen in her grandfather's Wisconsin hometown. But one look at the eerie, abandoned house immediately leaves her questioning her rash decision. And when the house's dark history comes back with a vengeance, Kaine is forced to face the terrifying realization she has nowhere left to hide. A century earlier, the house on Foster Hill holds nothing but painful memories for Ivy Thorpe. When an unidentified woman is found dead on the property, Ivy is compelled to discover her identity. Ivy's search leads her into dangerous waters and, even as she works together with a man from her past, can she unravel the mystery before any other lives--including her own--are lost?

The House on Foster Hill Details

TitleThe House on Foster Hill
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 21st, 2017
PublisherBethany House Publishers
ISBN-139780764230288
Rating
GenreMystery, Christian Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Contemporary, Christian

The House on Foster Hill Review

  • Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*
    January 1, 1970
    EXCERPT: It was long rumored that the Foster Hill oak tree was not only the largest but also the oldest tree in Oakwood. While its top rose to a marvelous height, it was still dead and its branches never blossomed. The trunk was very wide at the base and split open to reveal a hollow inside. Many a child had hidden there during a rambunctious game of hide-and-seek. They wouldn't hide there any more. Not after today. The petite body was curled into the position of a babe, inside the tree's womb. EXCERPT: It was long rumored that the Foster Hill oak tree was not only the largest but also the oldest tree in Oakwood. While its top rose to a marvelous height, it was still dead and its branches never blossomed. The trunk was very wide at the base and split open to reveal a hollow inside. Many a child had hidden there during a rambunctious game of hide-and-seek. They wouldn't hide there any more. Not after today. The petite body was curled into the position of a babe, inside the tree's womb. Blonde hair hung free over her cold, bare shoulders and floated out on the wind. Her torso was covered in a paper-thin dress of grey calico. It was nowhere enough to keep her warm, but it was more than the cold that tinted the young woman’s skin blue. It was death. THE BLURB: Kaine Prescott is no stranger to death. When her husband died two years ago, her pleas for further investigation into his suspicious death fell on deaf ears. In desperate need of a fresh start, Kaine purchases an old house sight unseen in her grandfather's Wisconsin hometown. But one look at the eerie, abandoned house immediately leaves her questioning her rash decision. And when the house's dark history comes back with a vengeance, Kaine is forced to face the terrifying realization she has nowhere left to hide. A century earlier, the house on Foster Hill holds nothing but painful memories for Ivy Thorpe. When an unidentified woman is found dead on the property, Ivy is compelled to discover her identity. Ivy's search leads her into dangerous waters and, even as she works together with a man from her past, can she unravel the mystery before any other lives--including her own--are lost? MY THOUGHTS: 3 stars for The House on Foster Hill from me. I was excited by the first few chapters of this book. Their tone was insidiously creepy and hinted at great things to come, but for me, they never quite materialised. I loved the character of Ivy, author of the book of deaths, where she recorded her thoughts and memories of the people of her town who passed away so that they would not be forgotten. She is a strong willed, unconventional young woman who has not recovered from the tragedy that robbed her of her beloved brother Andrew. I found it harder to relate to Kaine, whose story is interspersed with Ivy's, but occurring a century later. I could not warm to her and found her decisions and actions hard to understand. Ultimately, I think that the author of The House on Foster Hill tried to make this book too many things, all being given equal billing, and as a result it all becomes slightly muddied. We have in Ivy's story, a historical, Christian, romantic-suspense, people trafficking, murder mystery. With Kaine, we have a contemporary, Christian, romantic-suspense, stalker, murder-mystery. And then there is the family connection between the two women, voila! A genealogical mystery to boot!I applaud Jaime Jo Wright's intentions in her debut novel. If I have one piece of advice for her, it is this. Make one aspect of the novel the main thread, the star if you like, and the other aspects become side stories feeding into and supporting the main story, acting as the supporting cast, instead of all battling with one another to reign supreme. Thank you to Bethany House Publishers via Netgalley for providing a digital copy of The House on Foster Hill by Jaime Jo Wright for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the 'about' page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my blog sandysbookaday.wordpress.com https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, a new author to follow! :) I wasn't sure what I was getting into, with the spooky tones, but I really, really loved the mystery that is strewn through the story, parallel in the two time frames as each character (Ivy and Kaine) probes into the mysterious secrets surrounding the deserted Foster Hill house. A murdered girl was found in a hollow tree a hundred years ago. Ivy, in the early 1900s, is the doctor's daughter and the keeper of the book of deaths, her way of writing obituaries for tow Oh, a new author to follow! :) I wasn't sure what I was getting into, with the spooky tones, but I really, really loved the mystery that is strewn through the story, parallel in the two time frames as each character (Ivy and Kaine) probes into the mysterious secrets surrounding the deserted Foster Hill house. A murdered girl was found in a hollow tree a hundred years ago. Ivy, in the early 1900s, is the doctor's daughter and the keeper of the book of deaths, her way of writing obituaries for townspeople.Ivy is considered odd after her brother's early death leaves her pensive and quiet. Her quick intuition leads to town rumors of a "second sight" and leaves her even more alone. At the young woman's mysterious death and unknown identity, Joel re-enters her life: her brother's best friend who disappeared years before and left her to face her grief alone. He's just returned as the new sheriff's deputy and is soon in the midst of the attempt to solve the crime.Kaine, the modern-day heroine, is also doubted by her community after no real evidence shows up for a stalker she knows she has. The person who caused her husband's fatal car accident, she's sure, must still be after her. Problem is, the death was ruled accidental. Only her sister believes she's telling the truth, and isn't simply overly forgetful or suffering from some form of PTSD. Unable to stand the sinister tricks any longer, she quits her job, buys a historic home in her ancestors' hometown, and heads off to an adventure. Trouble is, the realtor's pictures were overly kind, and she finds herself in a world of hurt trying to make her new home livable. And things begin to happen there...things like what her stalker did, only more aggressive than before.There are quite a number of creepy passages, melodies from an abandoned house, "ghosts" in the halls...but it's not sensationalized. The focus remains on the house's mysterious past rather than the creepy phenomenons. I liked having an engaging mystery with a touch of the shiver-y to keep it compelling, and I actually enjoyed both timelines equally.Thanks to the publisher for a free ebook for review. A positive review was not required.
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  • Reading.Between.Wines
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐ / 5This might actually be more of a ⭐⭐⭐⭐💫, but I decided to go with a solid 4.My reviews and other random thoughts can also be seen at ----------------------> https://readingbetweenwinessite.wordp...The House on Foster Hill was a SUPER fast read and I was so engrossed in it that I stayed up until 2 AM of the same day to finish reading it. I literally couldn't go to sleep without knowing how it was going to end. I really enjoyed that this book is told from dual perspectives and dual time ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ / 5This might actually be more of a ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫, but I decided to go with a solid 4.My reviews and other random thoughts can also be seen at ----------------------> https://readingbetweenwinessite.wordp...The House on Foster Hill was a SUPER fast read and I was so engrossed in it that I stayed up until 2 AM of the same day to finish reading it. I literally couldn't go to sleep without knowing how it was going to end. I really enjoyed that this book is told from dual perspectives and dual time periods. You get Ivy and Kaine, plus the 1900s and present time, respectively.Kaine's story had me hooked a lot more than Ivy's did at first even though Ivy's story begins with the dead girl found on the property. For some reason Kaine's viewpoint was more mysterious for me at the beginning, but of course that quickly changed. I don't know if action-packed is exactly the right way to describe this book, but there is plenty going on, and TONS of mystery. I didn't really connect to any of the characters, but that was OKAY. I still think you found out plenty about everyone and everything tied together nicely. I was also completely shocked by the ending, I definitely did not see THAT coming. I think this will be great for those who love a good twisty mystery, and enjoy a fast read. Plus, the cover is 😍Final Thought: This is a great book and I highly recommend it. One thing that I would like to note is that I was really surprised that this book had an underlying Christian theme. I don't think you often find very many creepy mystery/thrillers that blend God in so seamlessly. *The paperback version of this book is set to be published on 11/21/2017**Special thanks to NetGalley and Bethany House Publishers for providing a "Read Now" electronic ARC of this book. My review is completely honest and unbiased
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  • Irene
    January 1, 1970
    This was an intriguing dual mystery, though I had hoped for a bit more suspense. It's told from two points of view. In the present day we have Kaine, still grieving the loss of her husband and looking for a new start away from old memories and a stalker. Her husband's death had been ruled an accident but in her heart she knows it was a murder. The police ignored her suspicions, and her stalker even though she could have made several enemies while helping to get other women out of abusive situati This was an intriguing dual mystery, though I had hoped for a bit more suspense. It's told from two points of view. In the present day we have Kaine, still grieving the loss of her husband and looking for a new start away from old memories and a stalker. Her husband's death had been ruled an accident but in her heart she knows it was a murder. The police ignored her suspicions, and her stalker even though she could have made several enemies while helping to get other women out of abusive situations.On the other hand we have Ivy. A century ago Ivy had assisted in the autopsy of a murdered woman whose body was found near what would later become Kaine's home. When it became apparent that the murdered woman had recently given birth, Ivy was willing to risk her own life to find the baby, and the murderer. As the mystery of the past unravels we slowly learn how it pertains to Kaine. I did enjoy the way the stories intertwined these two strong female characters.I received an advance copy for review.
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  • Jocelyn Green
    January 1, 1970
    Riveting! With its dual storyline connected by a single house and the women it touched, Jaime Jo Wright delivers double the suspense, double the romance, and double the reasons to keep turning the pages far into the night. The House on Foster Hill has it all: robust characters, twists I didn’t predict, sky-high stakes, and a strong thread of hope hemming it all together. An outstanding novel from an author to watch.
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  • Christen E.
    January 1, 1970
    Guys, this book is so amazing (I was so honored to be able to read snippets of it in its baby stage—can't wait to get my fingers on a real, deal hard copy). Romance TONS of suspense and a mystery that will have you up all night until you're finished! This is one that you need to put on your TBR and pre-order lists!!
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  • Natalie Walters
    January 1, 1970
    In her debut novel, Jaime Jo Wright invites readers on a chilling journey buried in secrets, murder, and a mystery shrouded in a century old house.I could not wait to get my hands on this story. Not since Agatha Christie have I read a haunting mystery that's left me rattled enough to keep turning pages in spite of the fear of what was coming next. I had to know. If only so I could sleep at night (fitfully and with a nightlight).Ms. Wright mirrors two stories of two women entwined in a shared his In her debut novel, Jaime Jo Wright invites readers on a chilling journey buried in secrets, murder, and a mystery shrouded in a century old house.I could not wait to get my hands on this story. Not since Agatha Christie have I read a haunting mystery that's left me rattled enough to keep turning pages in spite of the fear of what was coming next. I had to know. If only so I could sleep at night (fitfully and with a nightlight).Ms. Wright mirrors two stories of two women entwined in a shared history that spans a century and promises death. Split time novels often fall short of their goal to encourage readers to fully embrace their characters because just as soon as you develop a relationship with one character the reader is pulled out of their history to join another and in my opinion, the reader is left wanting. Not so for The House on Foster Hill. Ms Wright delivers a compelling puzzle that pieces together seamlessly with each character's point-of-view.The story is rich in detail and I found myself easily drawn into the enigmatic town of Oakwood, Wisconsin. Whether I was traveling back to the 1900's with Ivy Thorpe, or suspended in the present day fear stalking Kaine Prescott, Ms. Wright took hold of my imagination and refused to surrender it until the very last page.It's not often that I find myself unable to figure out the WHO in a mystery but again, Ms. Wright masterfully concealed her secrets in a plot full of suspenseful twists until... checkmate. Well, played, Ms. Wright, well played.Not to be forgotten are the characters of THOFH. I loved Ivy Thorpe. She's unique, smart, and unashamedly driven with a spirit that will not step aside just because she's a girl. Her doggedness to discover the answers to Gabriella's murder lead her into some witty-yet-tension-filled scenes with Joel Cunningham. Ms. Wright nails this relationship creating a palpable yearning between Ivy and Joel that had me chewing my lip in anticipation for that moment when their love would prove to strong for them to deny any longer. Each character demonstrates a myriad of personality that come to life on the page and prove Ms. Wright's impressive skills at bringing depth and dimension not just to the main characters but to secondary characters as well.In its authenticity THOFH appears dark in theme but the redemptive light throughout the mystery shines on the truth that grief can give way to life and new beginnings can emerge from the depravity of humanity. I cannot wait for Ms. Wright's next book!!**I received an Advanced Reader Copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    What a mysterious debut!This time slip novel told the story of current day Kaine Prescott and early 1900's Ivy Thorpe. The story was set in Oakwood, Wisconsin and primarily at the eerie House on Foster Hill.The author does a nice job of connecting the two women's stories and I was equally engaged in the present day and yesteryear stories. Once the mysteries were solved, I found the outcomes to be plausible as well as the ending for both Kaine and Ivy.I look forward to what the author will offer What a mysterious debut!This time slip novel told the story of current day Kaine Prescott and early 1900's Ivy Thorpe. The story was set in Oakwood, Wisconsin and primarily at the eerie House on Foster Hill.The author does a nice job of connecting the two women's stories and I was equally engaged in the present day and yesteryear stories. Once the mysteries were solved, I found the outcomes to be plausible as well as the ending for both Kaine and Ivy.I look forward to what the author will offer next.My gratitude to the publisher for a complimentary copy of the novel. I was not required to post a review and the opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Dana Blazsek
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and Bethany House Publishers for this ARC. In a debut novel, Jamie Jo Wright, tells a story told in two different time periods. Ivy tells the story in 1906. Outside the house on Foster Hill, a body has been found-- stuffed into a hollow tree. The girl is unknown and nameless. Still raw from the loss of her brother over a decade ago, Ivy insists on inserting herself into the investigation, even if it means putting herself in danger. On the other side, we have Kaine. Kaine i Thank you to Netgalley and Bethany House Publishers for this ARC. In a debut novel, Jamie Jo Wright, tells a story told in two different time periods. Ivy tells the story in 1906. Outside the house on Foster Hill, a body has been found-- stuffed into a hollow tree. The girl is unknown and nameless. Still raw from the loss of her brother over a decade ago, Ivy insists on inserting herself into the investigation, even if it means putting herself in danger. On the other side, we have Kaine. Kaine is the great-great-granddaughter of Ivy. Moving to Foster Hill was a way of getting out of San Diego-- away from a stalker and the recent murder of her husband. Kaine finds herself owning a run down house when odd things start to happen. Worried her stalker followed her, Kaine also works to uncover the mystery surrounding the house she has purchased. I found the book to be well written. There was no scramble between the time periods and it wasn't difficult to keep up with. I found myself disappointed when I had to put the book down to go to dinner or work. Impressive debut novel from Wright! I look forward to future books!
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  • Heather Gilbert
    January 1, 1970
    This book kept me riveted! I love mysterious stories that are tied in with old houses, and this one had some amazing plot twists. Also, as an aside, I really loved the character of Grant Jesse. Wright has a really fresh way of writing that enabled me to "see" the setting and characters and I was really rooting for both protagonists (since it's a dual-timeline story). And speaking of dual-timeline, this one was impeccably done and I love how events in one era would kind of segue into the other. E This book kept me riveted! I love mysterious stories that are tied in with old houses, and this one had some amazing plot twists. Also, as an aside, I really loved the character of Grant Jesse. Wright has a really fresh way of writing that enabled me to "see" the setting and characters and I was really rooting for both protagonists (since it's a dual-timeline story). And speaking of dual-timeline, this one was impeccably done and I love how events in one era would kind of segue into the other. Excellent and UNUSUAL novel from a Christian publisher--I liked that it dealt with some heavier issues, but not in a graphic way. I really hope we see more books like this from Wright!
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  • Cathy Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    Uhhhh I read this book in one night. Mainly because it was too intense to put it down without resolution. It's dark. Pretty dark for Christian fiction but there's hope and a good faith thread woven in. But did I mention it's intense and dark? Lol. Enjoy!
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Gripping! This book held me spellbound. The only thing that kept me from reading this in one sitting was the obligations of work and family. Debut author, Jaime Jo Wright, demonstrates skill one usually finds in a more experienced author. Her ability to tell a story with dual timelines is remarkable. The suspense skillfully builds in both story-lines, keeping this reader invested in both Kaine and Ivy's stories. The common link between both stories was not forced, unfolding naturally. Two strong Gripping! This book held me spellbound. The only thing that kept me from reading this in one sitting was the obligations of work and family. Debut author, Jaime Jo Wright, demonstrates skill one usually finds in a more experienced author. Her ability to tell a story with dual timelines is remarkable. The suspense skillfully builds in both story-lines, keeping this reader invested in both Kaine and Ivy's stories. The common link between both stories was not forced, unfolding naturally. Two strong women find their lives in danger as they seek to solve the mysteries hidden in Foster House in their respective time periods. Not only does this book provide a great mystery, it is also a story of hope, a hope that heals, a hope that God's promises will be fulfilled in spite of our circumstances.Be prepared for a few spine-tingling moments as you immerse yourself in this mystery. I will definitely be watching for more releases by this author. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from the author/publisher. I was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Caidyn (BW Book Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews.1/5 - DNF at 41%Thanks to Netgalley for providing me with an advance copy of this book! It, in no way, influenced my opinions. I basically requested this book because of the title, description, and cover. They interested me, really.The story in this is dual told from different periods. Ivy is Kaine's great-great grandmother (give or take a great). It's a mystery of sorts where they're trying to figure out an eerily similar problem from their This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews.1/5 - DNF at 41%Thanks to Netgalley for providing me with an advance copy of this book! It, in no way, influenced my opinions. I basically requested this book because of the title, description, and cover. They interested me, really.The story in this is dual told from different periods. Ivy is Kaine's great-great grandmother (give or take a great). It's a mystery of sorts where they're trying to figure out an eerily similar problem from their respective time periods. Ivy is dealing with a murdered girl who recently had a baby, the baby nowhere to be found. Kaine's husband was possibly murdered and she has a stalker, a stalker that followed her to her new home.I told you it sounded interesting. However, it was just dull.There was absolutely no tension to be seen, even if it was described as a mystery. The focus just wasn't on the mystery. It was a catalyst for the women to find new love, with the mystery hovering in the background with some decisions to be made. However, it just really felt like romance and things were just being figured out. I was 40% into it and there were no suspects in either story. It left me wondering what point the mystery held besides to get them close to men who could heal the women's dark pasts.Definitely not one for me.
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  • Toni Shiloh
    January 1, 1970
    So I’ve been trying to figure out what to say in my review of The House on Foster Hill. It’s my first Jaime Jo Wright read and I couldn’t wait to open it. But as soon as I did, I closed it because the mood Jaime Jo Wright creates in THOFH was enough to make me afraid of things that go bump in the night. It’s not that it was scary like Stephen King’s IT. There was just a mood and unease in it all. After all this is a mystery and suspense novel. The hairs on my neck raised at the appropriate times So I’ve been trying to figure out what to say in my review of The House on Foster Hill. It’s my first Jaime Jo Wright read and I couldn’t wait to open it. But as soon as I did, I closed it because the mood Jaime Jo Wright creates in THOFH was enough to make me afraid of things that go bump in the night. It’s not that it was scary like Stephen King’s IT. There was just a mood and unease in it all. After all this is a mystery and suspense novel. The hairs on my neck raised at the appropriate times as I slipped back and forth between Ivy and Kaine’s story.I can’t imagine what Kaine has gone through and my heart ached for her and the despair that cloaked her. And the God moments that shined light into her weary heart inspired a meme or two from me.All in all, I enjoyed this novel. I enjoyed seeing the courage Ivy possessed in overcoming grief. Now that she forgot about it, but that she could embrace life and live one of her own.*I received a free copy through NetGalley. This review is my own, honest opinion.**Full review at: https://tonishiloh.wordpress.com/2017...
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  • Cara Putman
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book, the mystery surrounding the home, and the intertwining timelines. With dual plotlines that collide in the spooky house on Foster Hill Jaime Jo Wright has created a story that will delight historical and contemporary mystery readers. There are hints of romance, suspense, and intrigue that kept me engaged with a story that had characters I quickly cared about. I needed to know how Ivy's and Kaine's stories connected and how they would be resolved. A really engaging read.
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  • Brandy
    January 1, 1970
    I don't normally rate books I haven't read, but Goodreads does allow us to rate how we think a book will be. I think this one will be amazing.
  • Sarah Monzon
    January 1, 1970
    This is not your grandma’s Christian Fiction. A bit on the dark side, a bit brave as it broadens the scope of the genre, and I always love something new and fresh in what I read. There was a lot going on (some I loved and some not so much, though only a personal preference) but the two story complimented each other.
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  • Denise Hershberger (100 Pages per Hour)
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! This book has countless mysteries, tons of suspense, some romance, history and much more!I couldn't believe how much was packed into this book - especially a debut novel! I have to admit I was a little unsure about it since I had heard it was a little darker than I usually read (and it was...) but it was so good. I couldn't stop reading and flew through it because I just had to know the answers to the million questions that came up. And it wasn't like they were easy answers either. I was re Wow! This book has countless mysteries, tons of suspense, some romance, history and much more!I couldn't believe how much was packed into this book - especially a debut novel! I have to admit I was a little unsure about it since I had heard it was a little darker than I usually read (and it was...) but it was so good. I couldn't stop reading and flew through it because I just had to know the answers to the million questions that came up. And it wasn't like they were easy answers either. I was really impressed with the depth of the historical value in this book. It was clear Wright put in many hours of research to write this well thought out book.I'd love to tell you who I loved more. Ivy or Kaine but I think that would be impossible. I loved both of their lives in this dual time story. I loved the parallels in their lives as much as I loved their uniqueness. I also loved how in both of their stories I wasn't able to figure everything out. In fact, by the end I think I only figured out one small detail out of the many others.I have to admit I do like romance in my books or at least some love so I was glad that this book included a little love. I really liked Joel and Grant. I was amazed at the trials that Joel went through but admired him for his perseverance. And i loved Grant's willingness to be there for someone he barely knew. Both had excellent qualities.In the end what I think I loved most about this book was how it brought to light current day problems that actually started long ago in history but most of us haven't read about. I love how a fiction book can expose terrible atrocities that occurred long ago in the United States that to this day most people don't want to believe ever happened let alone that happen now. It was also a good book for the ramifications of what social workers and counselors deal with everyday. I appreciated that the trials they witness were depicted honestly. I also liked how orphanages were depicted in a less than perfect light. So often in novels they are romanticized and shouldn't be.I really don't even know how to classify this book! It has elements of historical, contemporary, mystery, suspense, and even a little romance. I truly think it is a novel for everyone! I loved reading a book with so many deep emotional and difficult moments from Bethany House. I love seeing Christian Fiction branch out into deeper and difficult themes. I'm pretty sure that if I read this book again right now I'd discover even more things I loved about it because it had so many layers.I received an advanced copy of this book from Bethany House. This review is my honest opinion.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Wright's fiction debut is a look at the ways the past influences the present. The two storylines are equally developed in some aspects, but in other ways, they are equally undeveloped. The modern-day plot featuring Kaine is convoluted in its delivery, as part of the story happens before the scope of the tale, so there's no investment in its outcome. The historical thread is stronger, and the character of Ivy is headstrong and spunky. Readers will root for her dogged pursuit of the villain as wel Wright's fiction debut is a look at the ways the past influences the present. The two storylines are equally developed in some aspects, but in other ways, they are equally undeveloped. The modern-day plot featuring Kaine is convoluted in its delivery, as part of the story happens before the scope of the tale, so there's no investment in its outcome. The historical thread is stronger, and the character of Ivy is headstrong and spunky. Readers will root for her dogged pursuit of the villain as well as her developing romance with Joel. Overall, the story is difficult to follow at times, and both the faith aspects and the romance between Kaine and Grant feel more tacked on than truly organic parts of a real-life story. Readers will be invested enough to want to find out what happens in the end.Kaine Prescott lost her husband in an accident two years before, and her insistence that it was not an accident falls on deaf ears. She feels as if she is being stalked, which is again ignored by the police, so she purchases a historic home once owned by a relative in Wisconsin, far from her home in California. The house is a bit creepier and not as renovated as she is originally led to believe. Kaine discovers that a distant relative named Ivy lived there in 1906 and begins to learn about a suspicious murder of a young girl that happened during that time. How do the two timelines intersect and have effects on each other? https://www.rtbookreviews.com/book-re...
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    A creepy house with a dark past (check), unsolved murders (check), woman on the run from a stalker (check), yes, this book will cause a few sleepless nights and raise your blood pressure a few notches! It sure did for me, but well worth the wait to find out how the intertwined mysteries of past and present are solved, and if there would be justice in the end. Questions of faith are discussed briefly as they flowed naturally from situations, like how come God allows the innocent to suffer, and h A creepy house with a dark past (check), unsolved murders (check), woman on the run from a stalker (check), yes, this book will cause a few sleepless nights and raise your blood pressure a few notches! It sure did for me, but well worth the wait to find out how the intertwined mysteries of past and present are solved, and if there would be justice in the end. Questions of faith are discussed briefly as they flowed naturally from situations, like how come God allows the innocent to suffer, and how can someone regain hope. A hint of romance sweetens the tale that has some dark sides to it, carefully addressing issues like abuse. An impressive debut novel well worth the read for those who enjoy suspense and mystery, with a touch of a Gothic feel, plus a bit of faith and clean romance.(An e-book was provided by NetGalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.)
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    (Thank you NetGalley and the Publisher for allowing me to read and review this book)The House on Foster Hill by Jaime Jo Wright is a very well written story of suspense which weaves together different generations of women through terror in one large old house. The house itself is not haunted by otherworldly spirits, but by the secret evil of men who have lived there, which can be more dangerous and deadly than haunted spirits! The story opens in Oakwood, Wisconsin 1906 with Ivy Thorpe accompanyi (Thank you NetGalley and the Publisher for allowing me to read and review this book)The House on Foster Hill by Jaime Jo Wright is a very well written story of suspense which weaves together different generations of women through terror in one large old house. The house itself is not haunted by otherworldly spirits, but by the secret evil of men who have lived there, which can be more dangerous and deadly than haunted spirits! The story opens in Oakwood, Wisconsin 1906 with Ivy Thorpe accompanying her father, the town physician and medical examiner, to an ancient oak tree which now held the lifeless body of a young woman inside the hollow of its huge trunk. In the background loomed the abandoned Foster Hill House. The Foster family had suddenly left the huge house at the end of the Civil war. As Ivy and her father examine the body it is obvious the unknown woman had been restrained in the past and her death is due to strangulation. She has bruising all over her body and the most shocking discovery … she had given birth within a couple of weeks of her death. Where did she come from? But the body of the young woman is not the only shock Ivy receives on that cold and icy morning.As the story progresses we meet Kaine Prescott in present day driving to Oakwood, Wisconsin looking to start a new life in a historic old home and after a few renovations maybe open a B&B. Her sister Leah had encouraged her to leave San Diego and the grief she could not shake since Danny’s death two years ago. But grief was not the only trouble Kaine was running from, she had a stalker who was making her life miserable with fear. She has lost her faith and feels misplaced. Kaine had been a social worker for abused and battered women, she had taught the frightened women to find the courage to leave violent situations, start a new life, and fight for their right to live without fear. When she sees the horrible condition of the house she had purchased through a realtor, having only seen pictures of the place, she is upset and in despair. There is not even a door on the front! Why would a reputable realtor plainly misrepresent the condition of the whole house, only showing her the very best angles and encourage a widow buy such a place? And why does Kaine want to live in Oakwood of all places you may wonder? Her great-great-grandmother Ivy had lived in this town! A wonderful and suspenseful read !
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  • lacy
    January 1, 1970
    A special thank you goes out to Netgalley and Bethany House publishers for allowing me to read this early. All thoughts and opinions are my own. 4.5 stars!I didn't know that this was a Christian fiction book when I requested this from Netgalley. I thought it was a mystery/thriller and I was sucked in by that beautiful cover. But I was wrong. Surprisingly, up until the end, the Christian aspect of it didn't both me so much. It did get to me in the end though, which I will explain further. The st A special thank you goes out to Netgalley and Bethany House publishers for allowing me to read this early. All thoughts and opinions are my own. 4.5 stars!I didn't know that this was a Christian fiction book when I requested this from Netgalley. I thought it was a mystery/thriller and I was sucked in by that beautiful cover. But I was wrong. Surprisingly, up until the end, the Christian aspect of it didn't both me so much. It did get to me in the end though, which I will explain further. The strength of this novel was the dual POV's from Kaine (loved the name for a girl, by the way!) and Ivy. Kaine's POV took place in the present while Ivy's took place in the 1900s. The entire book centers around a house on Foster Hill and the terrible secrets it holds. The dual POVs told the story of this house, with each POV filling in where the other could not. This was a slow burn mystery, which I found that I liked. And by slow, I mean slooooooooow. It took it's time, building the stories of Ivy and Kaine and how they are connected to each other and the house on Foster Hill. The slow pace might bother some but I felt it was needed for this particular story. It hooked me into the story and I couldn't read fast enough to find out what was going to happen next or what those two would find out. Kaine and Ivy were both really good characters and I liked reading both of their POVs. Each had so much grief in their heart, which was a prominent theme in this book. Each had to deal with their grief in their own and watching them work through it was hard but I felt really proud of them for trying, nonetheless. As for the Christian fiction thing, it was fine until the end. Then it started to get a little preachy and almost like it was trying to convert the reader or something. I didn't much care for that but I understood, at the same time, that faith was important to these characters. And that leaning on their faith was helping them to deal with their grief. So I could accept it, even it was slightly annoying.Overall, this was a real solid book. I really enjoyed the slow burn of the mystery of the Foster Hill house. I liked the two characters, Ivy and Kaine, and the growth that they experienced during the course of the book. If you are into slow burn mysteries with Christian based faith, then this is the book for you.
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  • Kim Bayne
    January 1, 1970
    Kaine Prescott has made an impulse purchase on a grand scale and for all the wrong reasons. Running from strange occurrences in San Diego following the death of her husband Danny two years prior, Kaine purchases the historical Foster Hill House sight unseen. She hopes to throw herself into fixing up the old house and escape the feeling that Danny’s death was no accident. A familial link exists between the property, Kaine and her sister Leah; their great-great-grandmother Ivy lived in the area at Kaine Prescott has made an impulse purchase on a grand scale and for all the wrong reasons. Running from strange occurrences in San Diego following the death of her husband Danny two years prior, Kaine purchases the historical Foster Hill House sight unseen. She hopes to throw herself into fixing up the old house and escape the feeling that Danny’s death was no accident. A familial link exists between the property, Kaine and her sister Leah; their great-great-grandmother Ivy lived in the area at the turn of the century. Ivy Thorpe is an astute young woman haunted by a tragic event from her childhood. A young woman’s corpse, retrieved from the hollow of a tree trunk near Foster Hill House, winds up on her father’s mortuary table where Ivy assists in the examination. Ivy’s need to find the perpetrator of the crime becomes obsessive, placing her in harm’s way as she recklessly pursues leads, much to the frustration of Joel, Detective and Ivy’s childhood friend recently returned to Oakwood.Told from both Kaine and Ivy’s POV, the stories intertwine in an unexpected way and both women, generations apart are unprepared for the shocking truth about Foster Hill House.Jaime Jo Wright’s debut novel tells an intriguing story of grief, strength and hope.The story alternates between Ivy in 1906 and Kaine in the present time. I found Ivy a refreshingly robust character for that period. The male characters had respect for her and her opinions and I liked her tenacity, even though at times it bordered on reckless disregard for her own safety! There was a personal growth to her character which was neatly woven in. I really liked that her father wasn’t overbearing or dismissive, illustrating another facet of the respect that the male counterparts paid Ivy. Kaine is in personal disarray as she wrestles with the guilt of the complacency she had towards her marriage that ended abruptly and too soon. In contrast to Ivy, Kaine’s opinions about Danny’s death being suspicious and the subsequent happenings in her home are dismissed by present day authority and even to a degree her sister. I found the personal struggles in Kaine realistic. At first, I was sceptical of her behaviour, purchasing the house from the other side of the country seemed a stretch even for fiction. When the full picture of Kaine’s motivations develop it is easy to empathise with her and believe that in times of extreme stress our actions are likely to be out of the ordinary and impulsive. I loathe to give critique because I don’t feel I have any right, as the reader, to criticise a creative work. Art is subjective after all. In the spirit of an honest review I will make a few points, which are purely from my experience of the book and just my personal opinions. For me, the story seemed to gain strength toward the end, when more is revealed in both Ivy’s time and Kaine’s. Whilst this might be an obvious progression I found it noteworthy because that is when the story really tightened up and the pace became more enjoyable. The prose, at times, I found a little clunky, lacking some finesse. The meaning was clear, I just felt sometime the phrases used were laborious or overly convoluted. These moments were more noticeable at the beginning of the book. Another aspect that I found slightly frustrating was that quite a lot of the nuances of the story were funnelled through Ivy and Kaine, which made it difficult to really visualise the other characters independently and gain insight into them. Illustration of the various characters independent of Ivy and Kaine’s voice would have added some depth the book. Overall I think the story was well told and I was pleasantly surprised with the strong ending
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  • Linsey Adair
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. She wrote two timelines, several mysteries, two romances, and some gut-wrenching drama. And they all came together flawlessly. And I couldn’t figure it out until the end. Talk about edge-of-your-seat-page-turner!Each character was blessed with his or her own amazing details. There were no filler characters, they were all vibrant and needed. Backstory was recounted as it was needed. No info dumps in sight. I was never left wanting for details, nor was I overwhelmed with information. I could Wow. She wrote two timelines, several mysteries, two romances, and some gut-wrenching drama. And they all came together flawlessly. And I couldn’t figure it out until the end. Talk about edge-of-your-seat-page-turner!Each character was blessed with his or her own amazing details. There were no filler characters, they were all vibrant and needed. Backstory was recounted as it was needed. No info dumps in sight. I was never left wanting for details, nor was I overwhelmed with information. I could see, hear, smell, and taste each scene. I could almost feel all of it happening. The museum was musty from its artifacts. The wooded trail was earthy and wet, and the branches were even coming at my face while I was reading. Each emotion was relatable and painted clearly so I was IN the story with those characters. Jaime brings reality to the table for the subject matter as well. No spoiler alerts here. Suffice it to say that the stories are relevant and her perspective is refreshing. 5/5 Do Recommend. Bring a blanket and your favorite hot beverage. You’ll be up all night.
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  • Carolyn Vandine west
    January 1, 1970
    This book will pull you everywhich way so much buried history. I was glad it was fiction and not real life. A big change from most of Bethany house books, but not a bad genre to head toward. I was on heavy meds while recovering from a knee replacement so I won't try to fill in too much of the storyline. The publishers summary will give you a better background than I can now. But well worth the time and dollars to read it. Don't miss this one!I was provided a promotional ecopy of this book throug This book will pull you everywhich way so much buried history. I was glad it was fiction and not real life. A big change from most of Bethany house books, but not a bad genre to head toward. I was on heavy meds while recovering from a knee replacement so I won't try to fill in too much of the storyline. The publishers summary will give you a better background than I can now. But well worth the time and dollars to read it. Don't miss this one!I was provided a promotional ecopy of this book through NetGalley and Bethany House. I was not required to write a review and this did not affect my opinions which are my own.
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  • Gail Hollingsworth
    January 1, 1970
    I found the writing in The House on Foster Hill to be sophisticated and well versed. Very remarkable for a full length debut novelist. Jaime Jo Wright brings this time slip story to life that spans four generations and centers around an old falling apart historical mansion. The characters were real, well developed and I held my breath each time one would find themselves in a precarious position, which was often. Kaine in present day flees her life and a stalker in California only to find herself I found the writing in The House on Foster Hill to be sophisticated and well versed. Very remarkable for a full length debut novelist. Jaime Jo Wright brings this time slip story to life that spans four generations and centers around an old falling apart historical mansion. The characters were real, well developed and I held my breath each time one would find themselves in a precarious position, which was often. Kaine in present day flees her life and a stalker in California only to find herself staring at an old house she bought sight unseen. It's falling apart, just like her, and has some strange happenings going on within as the original matriarch looks down from a worn out painting. Has her stalker followed her to "finish the job" so to speak?Ivy, Kaine's great, great grandmother, is told about from the past. She is trying to find out who murdered a young, beautiful, unknown woman whose body was found stuffed in a tree trunk right below Foster Hill. As she gets closer and closer to the truth, she finds danger following her. Who is trying to hide the evil that seems to surround the house on Foster Hill and why?I really enjoyed this suspenseful story that kept me up late at night turning page after page. I had to find out the truth and how the past tied into the present. I'll be looking for more coming from this new author. Bring it on!I was given a complimentary ARC but was not required to write a review. These opinions are strictly my own.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    I need this book to become a movie. Because #GrantJesse for starters. But also because of the incredibly deep romantic suspense plot that would NOT let me stop reading. The creepy house, the geneology, the stalking, the plot twists, the multiple tenacious heroines. The healing of dispair with the light of God's hope. I will be recommending this book. Fans of historical romance, contemporary romance, and romantic suspense will unite fandoms after reading this story. I have some friends who are go I need this book to become a movie. Because #GrantJesse for starters. But also because of the incredibly deep romantic suspense plot that would NOT let me stop reading. The creepy house, the geneology, the stalking, the plot twists, the multiple tenacious heroines. The healing of dispair with the light of God's hope. I will be recommending this book. Fans of historical romance, contemporary romance, and romantic suspense will unite fandoms after reading this story. I have some friends who are going to love this. Can't wait to tell them about it! Bravo, Jaime!
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
  • Lynda Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    Jamie Jo Wright’s debut book is a time-slip novel containing both historical and contemporary components. Combined, they form a complete story, complex and well-written. Those who enjoy deep plots will find plenty to mine here, but the characters and the greater storyline maintain prominence over the details, making for an incredible tale of loss, determination, and faith.Ivy is a unique heroine, one hard to pin down into a category. She is a flawed character, realistic, devoted to doing what sh Jamie Jo Wright’s debut book is a time-slip novel containing both historical and contemporary components. Combined, they form a complete story, complex and well-written. Those who enjoy deep plots will find plenty to mine here, but the characters and the greater storyline maintain prominence over the details, making for an incredible tale of loss, determination, and faith.Ivy is a unique heroine, one hard to pin down into a category. She is a flawed character, realistic, devoted to doing what she can to bring justice and honor to those who cannot do it for themselves in a time where women were often limited by their gender. She is not obsessed with death but longs for no one to be forgotten when they have passed from this life.Kaine has also suffered her share of loss and guilt, but her personality is distinct from Ivy’s. The voice is different, owing to more than her updated circumstances, a feat I would imagine is difficult in a book with two leading ladies. She possesses a kind of wry humor, bringing a smile to my face in several spots despite the tension in the storyline. I really enjoyed this novel. While I primarily read historical fiction, I found that I liked the modern timeline and its characters just as much, even though we don’t see how the two stories really intertwine until the final chapters. This book kept me guessing all the way through, but the characters are what made the story for me—their tenacity and heart speak to the need we all have for connection. Those who enjoy suspense or mystery will find much to enjoy here, and a touch of romance will please still more readers. I highly recommend it for fans of those genres, whatever time period they may prefer. I easily forgot that this is a debut novel as I read—and the outstanding storytelling ensures that I eagerly await the next book, and the one after that, too. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the author and publisher but was under no obligation to post a positive review. The thoughts expressed are both honest and my own.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    As a person living in North Central Wisconsin, I thought the setting of this book would be fun. And it was, but there was so much more to this book! Mystery, suspense, a little love (nothing too over the top!) and a fascinating weaving of 2 different time periods. The main topic of this book brings awareness to a little known dark side of our area of the country. More awareness is always needed and putting that awareness in an intriguing work of fiction is a great platform!
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