Where We Belong
The Adventure of a Lifetime for Two Indomitable Socialite Sisters In the city of Chicago in 1892, the rules for Victorian women are strict, their roles limited. But sisters Rebecca and Flora Hawes are not typical Victorian ladies. Their love of adventure and their desire to use their God-given talents has brought them to the Sinai Desert--and into a sandstorm.Accompanied by Soren Petersen, their somber young butler, and Kate Rafferty, a street urchin who is learning to be their ladies' maid, the two women are on a quest to find an important biblical manuscript. As the journey becomes more dangerous and uncertain, the four travelers sift through memories of their past, recalling the events that shaped them and the circumstances that brought them to this time and place.

Where We Belong Details

TitleWhere We Belong
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 3rd, 2017
PublisherBethany House Publishers
ISBN-139780764217623
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Christian, Fiction, Christian Fiction, Christian Historical Fiction

Where We Belong Review

  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    An inspiring historical tale based in part on the lives of two remarkable real-life sisters whose courage and faith led them to follow their dreams against societal norms, and make an amazing discovery that rocked the world. The story begins in 1890 while the pair are on a difficult trek to an ancient monastery in the Sinai Desert. Told in retrospect, a clear picture emerges of each character and how they all ended up on this dangerous journey together.This well-written novel kept me interested An inspiring historical tale based in part on the lives of two remarkable real-life sisters whose courage and faith led them to follow their dreams against societal norms, and make an amazing discovery that rocked the world. The story begins in 1890 while the pair are on a difficult trek to an ancient monastery in the Sinai Desert. Told in retrospect, a clear picture emerges of each character and how they all ended up on this dangerous journey together.This well-written novel kept me interested all the way to the end, and had me thinking about it constantly. I really enjoyed getting to know these wonderful, intelligent, caring, nonconformist sisters as they bravely traveled the world and faced challenges together. I especially liked no-nonsense Rebecca, with her strong sense of God’s leading in her life, and her faith that gave her the courage to follow her dreams despite any opposition. Their father’s saying is often quoted as they encourage each other through trials: “The Lord knows the number of our days. We don’t have to be afraid.” They are fiercely loyal to each other, encouraging and supportive, loving sacrificially at times. Rebecca and Flora grow in faith and are great examples, reaching out to help others with compassion. They show real faith in action, wanting others to see that God is loving and personal, full of grace and truth, and that He has created us all uniquely for a purpose. Flora's tender heart for the poor children of Chicago, starting Sunday Schools and an orphan's home, reminded me of my own dear grandma, who helped her father start a neighborhood Sunday School. There are some great examples of redemption in this story, shown well through characters who doubt their worth because of their past, or who need a large dose of faith to overcome their skepticism. Highly recommend this book to readers who enjoy historical Christian fiction with inspiration and some adventure. It is one that will stay with you and make you think even when the last page is turned. A very satisfying read!(A book was provided by the author and publisher for review purposes. All opinions are my own.)
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  • Sarah Monzon
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this book for one reason--Lynn Austin! I'm a big fan of her books. Wonderland Creek is my jam. A Woman's Place, epic. I could go on and on.Where We Belong starts in the late 1880's (90's? One of those...) and that is the "present day". Here we are introduced to Rebekah, Flora, Peterson, and Kate. Each character takes turns recounting their lives and how they got to where they are.The goal, motivation, and conflict...three elements essential to fiction, are relegated to only the "pres I picked up this book for one reason--Lynn Austin! I'm a big fan of her books. Wonderland Creek is my jam. A Woman's Place, epic. I could go on and on.Where We Belong starts in the late 1880's (90's? One of those...) and that is the "present day". Here we are introduced to Rebekah, Flora, Peterson, and Kate. Each character takes turns recounting their lives and how they got to where they are.The goal, motivation, and conflict...three elements essential to fiction, are relegated to only the "present" day scenes, which are the minority of scenes, by the way. Because of this, I found the book read more as a fictional memoir than anything else.I loved the uniqueness of the setting, part of the book taking place in the Middle East, and the indomitable spirits of the two sisters.Lynn Austin is a talented writer and I could never find fault in her craft, but the style of the book was not exactly my favorite.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    I was introduced to Lynn Austin's books this past summer when Lynn was a featured speaker at a local Public Library event. Lynn was invited to talk about her latest book (at that time), Waves of Mercy. Waves of Mercy is set in my hometown, Holland Michigan, where Lynn also lives (I have since discovered she is right around the corner from me!). I have been searching for and buying more of Lynn's books in the months since then and was eagerly looking forward to her newest release, Where We Belong I was introduced to Lynn Austin's books this past summer when Lynn was a featured speaker at a local Public Library event. Lynn was invited to talk about her latest book (at that time), Waves of Mercy. Waves of Mercy is set in my hometown, Holland Michigan, where Lynn also lives (I have since discovered she is right around the corner from me!). I have been searching for and buying more of Lynn's books in the months since then and was eagerly looking forward to her newest release, Where We Belong. When the opportunity came along to apply to be a part of the Lynn Austin Where We Belong Launch Team, of course I applied and kept my fingers crossed! When I received word that I was going to be a member of the team, I was thrilled beyond words! So...A huge Thank you to Lynn Austin, the Lynn Austin Where We Belong Launch Team, and Bethany house Books for providing me with a free copy of Where We Belong in exchange for my honest review. (and for all the new "friends" I feel we have all made as members of this team!)Where We Belong review: Sisters Flora and Rebecca, left motherless as small girls, are being raised as independent (in thoughts and actions) and well educated young ladies by their intelligent, wealthy, loving father in Chicago in the late 1800's. The sisters are much devoted to each other and to their father and both girls share a love of adventure although Rebecca is the "instigator." Flora has a big heart and is a people pleaser and Rebecca is a bit of a Victorian Era rebel not wishing to conform to societies expectations of what young ladies of the time should be and instead being true to herself. Both girls firmly believe that "To whom much has been given, much will be required." The book is told in "parts" focusing on the main characters of Flora, Rebecca, Peterson, and Kate, and goes back and forth from present to past as Lynn effortlessly (although I'm sure is was anything but effortless for Lynn to write it this way but, it flows effortlessly for the reader) weaves a story that keeps readers moving forward and always anxiously anticipating more! The story begins in the Sinai Desert where the girls are traveling with their young butler and lady's maid in search of an ancient biblical manuscript. The story ends with the culmination of the adventure in the desert and what happens shortly after they return home to Chicago. A book of Faith and history with a dash of romance and oodles of adventure mixed with a bit of spunk without feeling sappy or "preachy." Each adventure along their journey brings the girls to discover just "Where they belong" at that particular time and shows how their Faith plays such a primary role in this. Certain historical events in this book, such as the Chicago Fire, were particularly compelling for me to read; I could almost imagine being there (and I then dreamed about the fire that night) as Lynn painted such an amazing word picture/story with her writing! I really identified with Rebecca and was not so silently cheering her on on more than one occasion in the book!Where We Belong really spoke to me on a personal level; having been married most of my adult life and then widowed several years ago, I feel as though I have been on a journey to "where I (now)belong." I have always looked for the signs, the messages, and my daily Prayer is "Open my eyes to the possibilities you put before me, show me where you want me to go, and give me the courage to follow." This books emphasized that message for me!In conclusion, the only "negative" thing I can say about this book is that I (personally) felt as though the ending was a bit rushed (in comparison to the rest of the book) but the book and story was so good, so masterfully told, that it more than made up for this and I still gave it 5 stars! I can't wait to continue my quest to read more of Lynn's books (4 await me on the TRB stack)!!!Happy reading!
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    Where We BelongI really enjoyed this story about two plucky sisters, Rebecca and Flora, living in 1800's Chicago. These ladies followed their passion for travel and adventure in spite of the fact that very little was expected of them other than getting married and hosting social gatherings. I was presently surprised to discover this story is based loosely on a true story.Rebecca is very stubborn and sometimes frustrating, but it's this stubborn streak that drives her to follow her heart and trav Where We BelongI really enjoyed this story about two plucky sisters, Rebecca and Flora, living in 1800's Chicago. These ladies followed their passion for travel and adventure in spite of the fact that very little was expected of them other than getting married and hosting social gatherings. I was presently surprised to discover this story is based loosely on a true story.Rebecca is very stubborn and sometimes frustrating, but it's this stubborn streak that drives her to follow her heart and travel the world looking for ancient Bible manuscripts. She is brave and very loyal to her sister.Flora is my favorite character. She is very caring and compassionate. She is an activist for the poor in the city of Chicago, but she's always up for an adventure with her sister. She and Rebecca make a good team.Themes of forgiveness, the importance of prayer, grace, and the truth of scripture are frequent throughout the book. There were a lot of details about Christianity in America and other parts of the world at the time. Much of this story is set in 1890's Egypt which I really enjoyed. It felt exotic and unique...and hot. If you enjoy historical fiction with strong faith elements and not a lot of romance, I would highly recommend this book. I received this book for free for the purpose of review.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    "Where We Belong" is historical fiction set in 1860 to 1890 in Chicago and all over the world. The framing narrative occurred in 1890 as the four main characters try to reach the monastery at Mt. Sinai, but the weather and uncooperative guides are making that difficult. We get flashbacks to when Rebecca and Flora were young (in 1860) on up to the current situation to show how events brought them to undertake this quest. Near the end, we also get flashbacks for their two servants, Kate and Soren, "Where We Belong" is historical fiction set in 1860 to 1890 in Chicago and all over the world. The framing narrative occurred in 1890 as the four main characters try to reach the monastery at Mt. Sinai, but the weather and uncooperative guides are making that difficult. We get flashbacks to when Rebecca and Flora were young (in 1860) on up to the current situation to show how events brought them to undertake this quest. Near the end, we also get flashbacks for their two servants, Kate and Soren, so we see how meeting the sisters changed their lives. The overall theme was living a life filled with meaning by finding God's purposes for your life. Rebecca loves ancient manuscripts and travel while her sister loves helping the poor and orphans. Throughout their narrative, the sisters do a lot of traveling to France, England, Egypt, etc. The characters were interesting and acted realistically. While independent for their day, the sisters still came across as women of their time (rather than modern feminists transported back in time). Historical details were woven into the story and prompted some exciting adventures. The sisters trusted God with their safety and future, and Rebecca looked for ancient biblical manuscripts to help defend the accuracy of the Bible. There was no sex or bad language. Overall, I'd recommend this enjoyable novel.I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Erin Laramore
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved every single Lynn Austin book I've read, and this one was no different. As a matter of fact, this one ranks near the top as one of my favorites of hers!This book starts in the Sinai Desert in 1890 where we find 2 middle aged sisters with 2 of their servants on their way to the Monastery of St. Catherine (located on Mt. Sinai) in search of ancient manuscripts. During this journey, they encounter several "life or death" scenarios which causes each of them to reminisce on the events th I have loved every single Lynn Austin book I've read, and this one was no different. As a matter of fact, this one ranks near the top as one of my favorites of hers!This book starts in the Sinai Desert in 1890 where we find 2 middle aged sisters with 2 of their servants on their way to the Monastery of St. Catherine (located on Mt. Sinai) in search of ancient manuscripts. During this journey, they encounter several "life or death" scenarios which causes each of them to reminisce on the events that lead them to this point. The book starts from the perspective (I use that term loosely as the book is in 3rd person throughout, which makes it much less confusing) of Rebecca, the older of the 2 sisters. During an intense sandstorm that has them battening down the hatches in the desert, she begins by thinking back to the first adventure she took with her sister, Flora, back in their teenage years. To be honest, I didn't much care for Rebecca when reading her own perspective.... she was overly opinionated, selfish and a bit too verbal..... and she reminded me a lot of myself. However, as the story progresses, we continue in the story line of the "present"(1890) and the memories flow into one full back-story as each person recognizes what events have brought them to this point. The first third of the book is devoted to Rebecca's perspective. The second third of the book flows into Flora's perspective. When reading as Rebecca, I adored Flora; however, when reading as Flora, I came to truly appreciate Rebecca and saw how their qualities complemented each other. I gained a new appreciation for those character "flaws" that had annoyed me as I saw myself in Rebecca and saw how those same traits were perceived by those she encountered. Flora's tale picks up where Rebecca's left off. The last third of the book is from the perspective of the 2 servants that have come into the sisters' care when they had nowhere else to go. I have always enjoyed books that take on different perspectives of individuals and meld it into one story and Ms. Austin has done a beautiful job of that here!One thing that I truly loved about this book is that it is based on a true story. There were indeed 2 sisters in the late 1800's who discovered some ancient texts at the Monastery of Saint Catherine on Mt. Sinai. In this time in history, women were not considered able to fend for themselves. They were not supposed to be overly educated and they certainly weren't supposed to be able to travel by themselves. These sisters overcame all of these odds and did all of those things. Lynn Austin took this story, and moving the sisters from Scotland to Chicago, wove an exceptional back-story that lead them to this place. It was fascinating to see how different they were from those around them, to read from their perspective of the great Chicago Fire, the War Between the States, and other nuances of the times. The great overwhelming theme of the book was seeking out God's purpose for your life - finding that one specific thing you were placed on this earth to do. Each of the characters was able, through this trip and their own personal history, able to find that. This was a great tale of faith, love, redemption and adventure. The characters were all well written and easy to love (yes, even Rebecca). And I loved how the way they lived their lives influenced those around them. If I could give this one more than 5 stars, I would. I was given a free copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review."This is where belong, isn't it?On the path that leads to serving God? Isn't that the essence of faith - walking forward, trusting what you can't see?"
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  • Fiction Aficionado
    January 1, 1970
    What an inspiring read! This book excited my wanderlust, my love of history, and my love of apologetics, and it reminded me that even when you feel like a misfit for the society you were born into—in fact, even when you’re TOLD you’re a misfit for the society you were born into—God has a purpose for your life, if you only have the faith and courage to pursue it.Sisters Rebecca and Flora most certainly had the faith and the courage! They firmly believe that ‘To whom much has been given, much will What an inspiring read! This book excited my wanderlust, my love of history, and my love of apologetics, and it reminded me that even when you feel like a misfit for the society you were born into—in fact, even when you’re TOLD you’re a misfit for the society you were born into—God has a purpose for your life, if you only have the faith and courage to pursue it.Sisters Rebecca and Flora most certainly had the faith and the courage! They firmly believe that ‘To whom much has been given, much will be required’ and they have spent their lives living out this belief. Flora has devoted herself to caring for society’s less fortunate, particularly establishing and teaching in local Sunday Schools so that children who are forced to work from a young age get the benefit of an education AND hearing the gospel. Rebecca firmly believes God’s purpose for her is searching for lost biblical documents and writing books that counter the faulty teaching of so-called scientists like Charles Darwin. It’s a purpose well served by her incurable thirst for adventure!At the opening of this novel, all of these aspects of Rebecca’s life have converged into a very personal quest to convince the man she loves that God is real. Hence she and Flora are making their way across the Sinai Desert in order to locate Biblical documents that will prove the reliability of the Bible to Rebecca’s beloved skeptic. How’s that for commitment?! But as important as this journey is, it actually constitutes the smaller part of this book.The larger part looks back over the sisters’ lives, starting in their teens and filling in the thirty years that have led them to this point, initially from Rebecca’s point of view (the first third of the novel) and then from Flora’s (the second third of the novel). The final third of the novel fills in the background story for their two companions on the journey: Soren Petersen (an orphaned teen they have taken in as a butler) and Kate Rafferty (a street urchin they took in to train as a lady’s maid after she tried to steal from them). While this may sound like a disjointed way to present their story, there was a very logical flow to the narrative, and it wasn’t long before I was completely hooked into the story and following Rebecca and Flora’s experiences, both past and present, with avid interest.At least part of my interest was because I could so easily relate to Rebecca in particular. I’m a total bluestocking, and I often felt out of place for it when I was growing up (and sometimes still do). But it was also inspiring to watch these sisters apply their faith at each stage of their lives, both in the little things and in the life-altering ones.If you're already a fan of Lynn Austin's writing, you likely need no encouragement to pick up this book, but if you haven't yet discovered her gift for weaving a compelling, faith-filled story, then this is a great place to start.I received a copy of this novel from the publisher. This had not influenced the content of my review, which is my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • Tanya
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first book by Lynn Austin and I am interested to read more of her work. I did enjoy the adventure part of it, girls' travels and discoveries. However, the way the message is served is a little out of place. It did not seem believable that these two Victorian girls were able to make such decisions and trips at the time. It did not feel anything like Victorian or even historical, other than the dates themselves and mention of the events, such as the American Civil War. My impression is This is my first book by Lynn Austin and I am interested to read more of her work. I did enjoy the adventure part of it, girls' travels and discoveries. However, the way the message is served is a little out of place. It did not seem believable that these two Victorian girls were able to make such decisions and trips at the time. It did not feel anything like Victorian or even historical, other than the dates themselves and mention of the events, such as the American Civil War. My impression is that the modern ideas are packed into semi historic wrapper. These girls could be just as successfully traveling today or two hundred years from now. I was hoping for a deeper attachment to the historic period.
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  • Caitlin Allen
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Bethany House Publishers and NetGalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions in this blog are my own.Rebecca and Flora are unlike other women of their time. They take adventures and want more for their life than what is expected for a late nineteenth-century woman. As they find themselves in a sandstorm, they reflect on what God has done in their lives to lead them to this moment.This book, though it’s fiction, has so much wond Thank you to Bethany House Publishers and NetGalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions in this blog are my own.Rebecca and Flora are unlike other women of their time. They take adventures and want more for their life than what is expected for a late nineteenth-century woman. As they find themselves in a sandstorm, they reflect on what God has done in their lives to lead them to this moment.This book, though it’s fiction, has so much wonderful Biblical truth and wisdom embedded in the pages. As the journey of the sisters, past and present, moves through this story, the reader is able to see God at work. Austin doesn’t shy away from the gospel, and makes sure it’s woven into the story, without being so strong that it could make some non-believers shy away from its pages.I really enjoyed how Austin portrayed the characters as having strong faith and the love of God in their lives. She has created a wonderful book that shows the Gospel alive and active. She makes the characters live the life of a true believer. In almost every chapter, we hear of God’s love, grace, and forgiveness.This book is refreshing for the soul. The wisdom in it is wonderful, and there is much to learn from how these characters live their lives. I would HIGHLY recommend this book to anyone who is a believer, or is contemplating the Christian faith. Austin makes the characters lovable and the plot adventurous. This book comes out on October 3, 2017, and I highly suggest anyone who loves historical fiction or reading about God’s goodness to go and pre-order this book now. It’s by far one of my favorite books I have read all year!
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  • Robin Willson
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully different! . . . the book and the characters within. Anchored in historical fact, this is the story of two sisters in the mid to late 1800s who are strong, intelligent and independent. Their mother died so they are raised by their father who is intelligent, no-frill and has built a fortune through good investments. The two girls are easily bored in school and set out on adventures that include travel to Europe – itineraries their father lets them plan themselves. Throughout they are Beautifully different! . . . the book and the characters within. Anchored in historical fact, this is the story of two sisters in the mid to late 1800s who are strong, intelligent and independent. Their mother died so they are raised by their father who is intelligent, no-frill and has built a fortune through good investments. The two girls are easily bored in school and set out on adventures that include travel to Europe – itineraries their father lets them plan themselves. Throughout they are completely grounded in Christianity and the desire to follow God’s plan for their lives. Their adventures start at home in Chicago and become widespread including Egypt and the holy land. It’s a pleasure to learn more about the sisters and what they will do next, unselfishly sharing their wealth and caring for others as well as unearthing archeological treasures. The sisters made a significant contribution to the world with these discoveries. They get into some dangerous situations, but their strong faith sees them through each one. Nothing boring here!Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the Bethany House Publishers - Netgalley book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/wa....
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  • Martha
    January 1, 1970
    I love Lynn Austin's books. This one is not a race to the story kind of novel, but a slow build up to the fever pitch that dies down and then revs up again. The story is written in a different style than some of her books, giving it to you in pieces, leaving you wanting in some areas as you travel through the pages and travel the globe with the two sisters. It is not a romance, even though there is mention of romantic attachments in the novel, but it is more the story of discovery. Two sisters d I love Lynn Austin's books. This one is not a race to the story kind of novel, but a slow build up to the fever pitch that dies down and then revs up again. The story is written in a different style than some of her books, giving it to you in pieces, leaving you wanting in some areas as you travel through the pages and travel the globe with the two sisters. It is not a romance, even though there is mention of romantic attachments in the novel, but it is more the story of discovery. Two sisters discovering themselves and discovering the world. It was one that while I totally enjoyed it, did take me awhile to warm up and be invested in the story.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    I thought the ending was a bit rushed and I almost gave this one a 3, but I really enjoyed all that lead up to the end. The characters, the way the story was told and encouragement from the story made up for the rushed ending.
  • Maggie Boyd
    January 1, 1970
    It’s hard to part ways with a beloved author. However, considering the experience I had reading Ms. Austin’s previous book (Waves of Mercy) and after finishing Where We Belong I’ve realized I will not be reading her future works. While her backlist has afforded me much joy, these latest novels have convinced me that we are no longer compatible.Rebecca Hawes is a wealthy, privileged young lady who chafes against the restrictions placed upon her by society. She finds clothes, boys and the things o It’s hard to part ways with a beloved author. However, considering the experience I had reading Ms. Austin’s previous book (Waves of Mercy) and after finishing Where We Belong I’ve realized I will not be reading her future works. While her backlist has afforded me much joy, these latest novels have convinced me that we are no longer compatible.Rebecca Hawes is a wealthy, privileged young lady who chafes against the restrictions placed upon her by society. She finds clothes, boys and the things other young girls are interested in beneath her. She has no patience for others who don’t share her intellectual pursuits and she has little tolerance for those who aren’t interested in travel. As our story begins, Rebecca gives vent to her adventurous spirit by talking her sister Flora into skipping school and exploring the city of Chicago. During their day off, they find out the cost of traveling about Europe and present it in a report to their widowed father. My kids would have found their thirst for such clandestine activity rewarded with manual labor and a firm grounding but their father is more open minded about such things and rewards the girls with a French tutor and a summer abroad.On the journey home aboard an elegant ocean liner they meet a destitute widow whom they fear has designs on dear old dad. The lady lives in Chicago and insists on pursuing the relationship once they return to dry land. Rebecca soothes her worries by once more insisting on exploring rather than attending school. This time she drags Flora to the tenements of the Irish immigrants where they buy apples for the street children and Rebecca begins a campaign against the local factory which employs some of those urchins. This time, the report they present to their father is about the evils of child labor, the plight of the immigrants and other such wrongs in the world. And this time their father reacts a bit more normally. He asks the widow, Mrs. Worthington, to step in and help his staff supervise the young ladies more closely and also to take an active hand in guiding the girls’ conduct in order to help them comport themselves in a more appropriate manner. There are lessons in dress, manners and etiquette but of course Rebecca holds this all in deep contempt. Her interests, presented as clearly superior, include disdaining Charles Darwin and ungodly evolutionists and researching and proving biblical history. A marriage between their father and Mrs. Worthington now seems inevitable but fortunately tragedy strikes. (See the rest of my review at https://allaboutromance.com/book-revi...
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  • Iola
    January 1, 1970
    Where We Belong starts in 1890, in the Sinai Desert, with forty-five year-old Rebecca Hawes traveling to St Catherine’s Monastery to search for ancient copies of the Bible. It’s a start that hooked me immediately, both because of the historical setting, and because of the age of the heroine—it’s refreshing to read a novel where the heroine is out of her twenties.I was also intrigued because I could relate to Rebecca’s thoughts about the desolate nature of the Sinai between Cairo and St Catherine Where We Belong starts in 1890, in the Sinai Desert, with forty-five year-old Rebecca Hawes traveling to St Catherine’s Monastery to search for ancient copies of the Bible. It’s a start that hooked me immediately, both because of the historical setting, and because of the age of the heroine—it’s refreshing to read a novel where the heroine is out of her twenties.I was also intrigued because I could relate to Rebecca’s thoughts about the desolate nature of the Sinai between Cairo and St Catherines. Her journey took seven days by camel. In comparison, mine took seven hours by minibus, but that was quite long enough to feel for the stubborn Israelites, condemned to spend forty years in the heat and dust.It's one thing to learn a language and another thing to understand the people who speak it.But then Where We Belong left the Sinai in 1890, and travelled back to 1860 Chicago—and I wasn’t impressed. It was still Rebecca’s story, but now Rebecca was a pampered teenager in the days before the Civil War (which I knew was coming, even though she didn’t). Fortunately, it soon became apparent that Rebecca was no ordinary Victorian-era teenager, and nor was her sister, Flora.The novel followed Rebecca and Flora from their teenage years in Chicago through to showing why they are travelling to the Sinai in 1890 with only a couple of young servants for protection. The most fascinating thing is that Rebecca and Flora are based on real-life adventurers, Agnes and Margaret Smith, born in Scotland in 1843.This explains one of the strengths of the novel—the feeling of historical authenticity that can only be gained by extensive research (and then leaving out most of the detail of that research). The other strength was related, and that was the Christian element. Rebecca and Flora (like the real-life Agnes and Margaret) were women of deep faith. They were intelligent women who had the strength of character to choose to follow God, not society, and who had endless compassion for the poor.I’m a history fan, and I loved it from the first line to the last. (I don’t think I stopped in between). Lynn Austin has yet to write a novel I haven’t enjoyed, but I do think this is her best yet. Recommended for Christian historical fiction fans, especially those who enjoy authors such as Elizabeth Camden and Jody Hedlund.Thanks to Bethany House and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Picture it: 1890 in the Sahara Desert looking for a monastery that is supposed to have ancient documents and codices that will prove the verity of the Bible. Two sisters, two of their servants, and several Bedouin guides as well as a sheik are riding camels across the desert toward the monastery. Each of the sisters and both of the servants get a voice in telling the story of this book.Lynn Austin has woven together a cohesive narrative from four viewpoints that entertains her readers as well as Picture it: 1890 in the Sahara Desert looking for a monastery that is supposed to have ancient documents and codices that will prove the verity of the Bible. Two sisters, two of their servants, and several Bedouin guides as well as a sheik are riding camels across the desert toward the monastery. Each of the sisters and both of the servants get a voice in telling the story of this book.Lynn Austin has woven together a cohesive narrative from four viewpoints that entertains her readers as well as challenges them. I love it when a book I read for enjoyment has nuggets of truth that will push me to see what there is beyond my own little world. Rebecca and Flora are sisters who live for adventure. At the young ages of 14 and 12 respectively, they begin their first adventure by skipping school and planning a trip to Europe. They want all the information in hand to present to their father before asking for the trip. Rebecca is thoroughly engulfed in finding what her purpose is in God's Kingdom, she wants to know where she belongs. She is fearless in seeking her place and in her adventures because only God knows the end of her days. Flora finds her purpose rather early on--to reach the children who have no one to speak for them or to protect them. She goes along with Rebecca's adventures because she doesn't want Rebecca to be alone. A "Good Samaritan" situation allows Flora to find the love of her life who will stand beside her and help her with her purpose--funding and founding an orphanage that will provide a place for children who have lost their parents, or been abandoned by them, or for whatever reason are living on the streets.The two servants along on the last adventure are street children that Rebecca and Flora have taken in to show them what love is all about. Soren and Kate are incredulous that there are people in their small worlds who will put themselves out for them. All of these characters are finding "Where We Belong" throughout the book. Sometimes the hunt for place is longer and more involved than at other times, but the getting there is entertaining and intriguing. I've read many of Lynn Austin's books and she NEVER disappoints. Five Stars, Two Thumbs Up, and a camel ride across the desert.My thanks to Bethany House for allowing me to read and review this book.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    With her remarkable turn of phrase and vivid descriptions, Lynn Austin’s books are very hard to put down. Few authors have the ability to bring history to life as she does. Her characters become friends with whom readers can relate and empathise. As these characters navigate their way through the twists and turns of the story, the reader is challenged and encouraged by the way in which they live out or wrestle with their Christian faith. I was given a digital version of ‘Where We Belong’ to read With her remarkable turn of phrase and vivid descriptions, Lynn Austin’s books are very hard to put down. Few authors have the ability to bring history to life as she does. Her characters become friends with whom readers can relate and empathise. As these characters navigate their way through the twists and turns of the story, the reader is challenged and encouraged by the way in which they live out or wrestle with their Christian faith. I was given a digital version of ‘Where We Belong’ to read and review. I must confess, it is the first time I’ve read a complete book on Kindle, and I won’t hurry to do so again. I found it difficult to get lost in the tablet as I do the pages of a book! Inspired by a true story, ‘Where We Belong’ takes readers on a journey through time as two sisters, Rebecca and Flora, take adventures across the globe. It is a story of struggle; resisting pressure from others to conform to expectation and the rules of propriety, and striving to discover God’s purpose in, and will for their lives. The story is set in ‘present day’ 1890, and narrates through recollections of the lives of these and other characters. The changing timeframes and vast scope of life experience therein limited the extent to which I felt I knew the characters compared to a dozen other Lynn Austin books I’ve read, and there were some events about which I’d have like to read a lot more. However, I really enjoyed the book. I empathised with the characters, ‘lived’ the ups and downs of their experiences and lost myself in the scenes of their adventures! Having had the opportunity to travel to some of the places the sisters visit, I was transported to another time and place – I could smell the markets of Cairo, and I could taste the desert sand, waking up in a flimsy tent in the middle of nowhere! Lynn Austin is an outstanding author. With her powerful descriptions and personable characters, she takes her readers on a journey. However, my favourite aspect of her writing is the way she weaves scripture and discipleship into the story. ‘Where We Belong’ contains a plethora of food for thought, but the strongest messages are about faith. Flora poses the question, “This is where we belong, isn't it? On the path that leads to serving God? Isn't that the essence of faith - walking forward, trusting what you can't see?" As the book unfolds, the two sisters ‘live out’ their faith as they seek to serve God. The real-life sisters who inspired the novel had a motto which Lynn Austin borrowed, “God knows when the end of our days will be. We have nothing to fear.” In today’s uncertain world, we need to be reminded of and encouraged by that!
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  • Hannah West
    January 1, 1970
    Lynn Austin has been a favorite author of mine for quite some time. Although I am not usually one to read a book immediately upon its release I found myself anticipating this one for a very long time! The book, which was inspired by the true story of Agnes and Margaret Smith, follows the lives of two women who grew up during a time much different than ours. They came of age during a time when women were expected to fit a very specific mold. Well, the sisters in this book broke the mold!Rebecca, Lynn Austin has been a favorite author of mine for quite some time. Although I am not usually one to read a book immediately upon its release I found myself anticipating this one for a very long time! The book, which was inspired by the true story of Agnes and Margaret Smith, follows the lives of two women who grew up during a time much different than ours. They came of age during a time when women were expected to fit a very specific mold. Well, the sisters in this book broke the mold!Rebecca, the older of the two, has a deep desire for adventure. She longs to see and experience the world! She has a deep thirst for knowledge and is fascinated by history. Flora, on the other hand, seems to be along for the ride at times. That's not to say she doesn't find pleasure in their adventures, in fact, the adventures are important to finding her purpose in life.Their latest adventure takes them to the Sinai Desert on a quest for something life-changing. While much of the book focuses on this adventure you also have the opportunity to learn about their past. You can see how each adventure, taken at an important time of their lives, contributes to who they are and helps them navigate the path that God set forth for them.I found myself relating to the sisters. As someone who loves adventure and history this was a great read for me! However, I found that I related to them on a whole other level! Often in life we hear the expectations others have for us, yet we fail to speak up and defend ourselves. Too often we go with the flow, allowing the desires of others to influence our future. Rebecca and Flora are constantly asking themselves how they can use the gifts and resources God gave them. What is their purpose? What is their calling?The main themes of the book were discovery and adventure, but an underlying theme of family seemed to jump out to me. The sisters were close to their father and close to each other. As time passed they pulled others in to the fold, taking them under their wing, even if there was no blood relation. Their care and compassion for others played an integral part in the story line and I am thankful for it.I received a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Kim Brown
    January 1, 1970
    I have been a fan of Lynn Austin's books for several years. I had the opportunity to join a launch team to receive a copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. So, here goes my very honest review. Lynn has managed, yet again, to bring historical fiction to life in a fun (and educational) way!This time her book follows sisters Rebecca and Flora Hawes on, not one, but many adventures. The book begins in the Sinai Desert in 1890, as the sisters are on a quest to find anci I have been a fan of Lynn Austin's books for several years. I had the opportunity to join a launch team to receive a copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. So, here goes my very honest review. Lynn has managed, yet again, to bring historical fiction to life in a fun (and educational) way!This time her book follows sisters Rebecca and Flora Hawes on, not one, but many adventures. The book begins in the Sinai Desert in 1890, as the sisters are on a quest to find ancient and original documents verifying the Gospels of the Bible. They are joined on their quest by their butler and lady's maid. Each of the individuals has the opportunity to reflect back on moments from their lives, which takes us back to Chicago in the 1860's.We get to experience many historical moments in time including the Civil War and the Great Chicago Fire in 1871. Now, I was a bit leery of the description of the book because, while I love the Bible, I can lose interest very quickly when reading about ancient copies and where they were found. But, Lynn has a God-given talent to make even those historical moments that I can't quite grasp, engaging and interesting.The characters in this book are feisty, fun, and I quickly came to love them! Lynn has a knack of intertwining Jesus and the Bible into her books without being pushy or preachy, and I think a lot of people appreciate that in an author.There were a couple of tear-jerker moments, at least for me, so I believe this book has everything a good Christian novel should.Oh, and I should mention that this book is inspired by the true story of Agnes and Margaret Smith, twin sisters born in Scotland in 1843. I found that to be a bonus to this book.I highly recommend that you add this to your reading list, and be sure to check out Lynn Austin's other novels, as well.Happy Reading!
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    On a scale of cotton candy to Brussels sprouts, Where We Belong by Lynn Austin is sourdough bread. Sourdough bread requires many days of preparation as the starter must be given time to grow. This preparation creates a delicious bread with a crusty outside and a slightly sour yet delicious flavor..[free copy received. opinions my own.].Rebecca and Flora grow up without the care of a mother during the 1800s. Their father values smart and resourcefulness so the girls become not-so-conventional Vic On a scale of cotton candy to Brussels sprouts, Where We Belong by Lynn Austin is sourdough bread. Sourdough bread requires many days of preparation as the starter must be given time to grow. This preparation creates a delicious bread with a crusty outside and a slightly sour yet delicious flavor..[free copy received. opinions my own.].Rebecca and Flora grow up without the care of a mother during the 1800s. Their father values smart and resourcefulness so the girls become not-so-conventional Victorian ladies. Set on adventure, Rebecca and Flora want to figure out how to best use their lives. Rebecca is set on finding ancient documents that will prove the Bible's truth while Flora longs to care for Chicago orphans. Will Rebecca and Flora figure out how to save two orphans and themselves when stranded in the middle of the Sinai desert?.Okay, okay. So it's really hard to sum up a book written by Lynn Austin. She does such an excellent job of exploring the breadth of life for her characters. Told from four different perspectives, Where We Belong explores life destiny and purpose. While I loved the deep development of the story, I got distracted by occasional preachy monologues and I thought that a few things ended too simply. But of course, this is only my opinion, and overall, I loved this book. And now, I'm itching to travel more than I did before!
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  • Anne Shank
    January 1, 1970
    Do you know where you belong? I hadn’t thought to ask myself this question before reading this book because I was not prepared to be spiritually questioning myself while reading a fiction book. I should have known though as every Lynn Austin book I’ve read I’ve come away a little wiser and closer to my Savior. This book is about two sisters and essentially their life journey together. They primary focus is on the pivotal points in life that changed them and led them to new adventures. I received Do you know where you belong? I hadn’t thought to ask myself this question before reading this book because I was not prepared to be spiritually questioning myself while reading a fiction book. I should have known though as every Lynn Austin book I’ve read I’ve come away a little wiser and closer to my Savior. This book is about two sisters and essentially their life journey together. They primary focus is on the pivotal points in life that changed them and led them to new adventures. I received this book from Bethany House publishers to read and review it. I will honestly say that it is a great honor to be able to do this, however, I was a bit distracted by life when the book arrived. I was not initially into reading this book. I’ve read Lynn Austin’s books before and have greatly enjoyed them but again I was not in the reading mood as I was a bit overwhelmed by my own life. I was quickly pulled into the book. I was taken away from my life problems not to be temporarily distracted, but to be thoughtful about myself. I came away from reading this book inspired and changed. Again, I will ask, do you know where you belong? If you are looking for a book that you can enjoy and learn from this is a book to consider reading (as well as any of Lynn Austin’s books). Lynn has a way with words as well as a heart for God.
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  • Anne Rightler
    January 1, 1970
    Where We Belong by Lynn Austin is historical fiction at its finest. Based on the true story of Agnes and Margaret Smith, Austin takes readers on an adventuresome journey with Rebecca and Flora Hawes. It is a journey that goes from Chicago to Cairo to Cambridge and back again and one that was fraught with dangers from raging storms at sea, sand storms in the desert and calamitous fires in city streets. The characters are wonderful...strong, passionate, full of life and charm. I loved the sisters' Where We Belong by Lynn Austin is historical fiction at its finest. Based on the true story of Agnes and Margaret Smith, Austin takes readers on an adventuresome journey with Rebecca and Flora Hawes. It is a journey that goes from Chicago to Cairo to Cambridge and back again and one that was fraught with dangers from raging storms at sea, sand storms in the desert and calamitous fires in city streets. The characters are wonderful...strong, passionate, full of life and charm. I loved the sisters' strength of purpose and how the Becky and Flora were best of friends. Austin has permeated the story with suspense, drama, emotional and romantic tension and she gives clear, logical arguments for faith in a God who numbers our days and who answers prayers. Adventure and the anticipation of discovery beckoned them and as they took on the challenges they find another piece of the puzzle of their lives, of what God has planned for them, where He wanted them to be. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and highly recommend it. I received a complimentary copy of the book and was not required to write a review. The opinions are my own.
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  • Leona Herxegh
    January 1, 1970
    Lynn Austin has always been my favorite author; I’ve read and enjoyed each and every of her more than twenty books and own a copy of most of them. This latest book, WHERE WE BELONG, did not disappoint. Lynn’s writing style is easy and pleasant to read. She combines truths of faith in God with historical facts, romance and adventure. Her main characters, Rebecca and Flora, were inspired by two Scottish sisters in the 1800s, who were adventurous and traveled on their own to seek old Bible manuscri Lynn Austin has always been my favorite author; I’ve read and enjoyed each and every of her more than twenty books and own a copy of most of them. This latest book, WHERE WE BELONG, did not disappoint. Lynn’s writing style is easy and pleasant to read. She combines truths of faith in God with historical facts, romance and adventure. Her main characters, Rebecca and Flora, were inspired by two Scottish sisters in the 1800s, who were adventurous and traveled on their own to seek old Bible manuscripts. Lynn’s Flora and Rebecca were from Chicago and were raised by their widowed father, who taught them the love of reading, studying the world, thinking and speaking their minds, and adventure. They couldn’t tolerate the social mandates put upon women at that time in history. With their mental and physical strength and their strong faith in God, they traveled the world and trekked across the desert in Egypt on camels with their young butler and ladies maid, guided by a nomad sheikh to find old Biblical manuscripts at an old monastery. Rebecca and Flora weren’t perfect in their faith, but they learned that if they trusted God and followed His leading they received their heart’s desire even if it wasn’t exactly what they had originally envisioned, but it was exactly what brought the greatest happiness. This is a wonderful story, and I highly recommend reading it.
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  • Rochelle Rigterink
    January 1, 1970
    Haven’t we all felt a lack of belonging at some point in our lives? In Lynn Austin’s newest book, Where We Belong, we adventure with Rebecca and Flora, wealthy sisters, as they confront everyday living in Chicago and travel on camel back in the Sinai desert in search of ancient biblical manuscripts. The central characters in the book reveal throughout their lives that sometimes we need an adventure to see the course that God has prepared for us all along. Lynn has a way of revealing how the puzz Haven’t we all felt a lack of belonging at some point in our lives? In Lynn Austin’s newest book, Where We Belong, we adventure with Rebecca and Flora, wealthy sisters, as they confront everyday living in Chicago and travel on camel back in the Sinai desert in search of ancient biblical manuscripts. The central characters in the book reveal throughout their lives that sometimes we need an adventure to see the course that God has prepared for us all along. Lynn has a way of revealing how the puzzle pieces of the lives of these ladies fit together, giving them a renewed sense of purpose. In addition, there is plenty of excitement, whether the Chicago Fire of 1871 or a Bedouin marriage proposal in the the desert.Lynn Austin is one of my very favorite authors and this book did not disappoint. I enjoyed the relationships, romance, adventure and godly wisdom. One of the outcomes from reading the book was how sometimes God gives us adventures to reveal his guiding hand in our life to a place where we belong.I purchased my own book and received a book from the publisher. The honest thoughts here are my own.
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  • Dwina Willis
    January 1, 1970
    This book is loosely based on the life of Agnes & Margaret Smith who discovered a copy of the Gospels in a palimpsest (old paper that had other writing on top of the original writing) dating from AD500 at a monastery at Mt. Sinai. It is from Lynn's other books. The main characters, Rebecca and Flora, are unconventional women living in the mid-1800s. They escape the Chicago fire, and the reader can feel the panic of the people impacted by the fire. The sisters love to learn, travel and have a This book is loosely based on the life of Agnes & Margaret Smith who discovered a copy of the Gospels in a palimpsest (old paper that had other writing on top of the original writing) dating from AD500 at a monastery at Mt. Sinai. It is from Lynn's other books. The main characters, Rebecca and Flora, are unconventional women living in the mid-1800s. They escape the Chicago fire, and the reader can feel the panic of the people impacted by the fire. The sisters love to learn, travel and have adventures. The descriptions of their explorations make the reader feels they are riding the camels with the sisters. While unbelievably wealthy, Rebecca & Fora are down to earth. They are determined to find the path God has for them to follow. They not only talk about their faith, they live their faith. They find ways to use their money and their time to help the poor. During their trips, the sisters uncover very old papyri, and codexes to help scholars confirm the validity of the Bible. I can't remember reading a novel that is so faith building and that makes me want to be better at living my faith. I received a copy of the book and was asked to write an honest review.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    "Where We Belong" is the story of two sisters in the 1800s. The story opens in the Sinai Desert with Rebecca and Flora in a great adventure. During the book, the story takes us back into the lives of Rebecca and Flora, and explains how they ended up where they are now. Lynn Austin's storytelling and character development drew me into the story, and I found myself cheering on the characters during their successes. The theme of the book is about finding God's purpose in your life. Both Rebecca and "Where We Belong" is the story of two sisters in the 1800s. The story opens in the Sinai Desert with Rebecca and Flora in a great adventure. During the book, the story takes us back into the lives of Rebecca and Flora, and explains how they ended up where they are now. Lynn Austin's storytelling and character development drew me into the story, and I found myself cheering on the characters during their successes. The theme of the book is about finding God's purpose in your life. Both Rebecca and Flora have ups and downs in finding their purpose, but they learn that their adventures give them another piece of the puzzle in finding their purpose. While I was reading the book, it got me thinking about what God's purpose is for me in life, and how I can serve God where he has me right now. Lynn Austin's newest book paints a picture of what life was like for women in the 1800s, and how Rebecca and Flora broke that mold. I was given a copy of the book by the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't sure what to expect from the synopsis of the book. There wasn't a major historical event or usual plot line to follow. Until I started reading the book and realized the scope of the story. Lynn Austin covers the Civil War, Chicago Fire, orphanages, European tours, archaeological discoveries, the Holy Land, and much more. And it is a seamless story of two sisters following God and trusting Him throughout their lives. One of the sisters has wanderlust while the other goes along for the ri I wasn't sure what to expect from the synopsis of the book. There wasn't a major historical event or usual plot line to follow. Until I started reading the book and realized the scope of the story. Lynn Austin covers the Civil War, Chicago Fire, orphanages, European tours, archaeological discoveries, the Holy Land, and much more. And it is a seamless story of two sisters following God and trusting Him throughout their lives. One of the sisters has wanderlust while the other goes along for the ride. But on their adventures they discover new ways to serve and follow Christ. We also get the stories of some orphans. And how the sisters' generosity and willingness to offer grace impacted their lives. Lynn Austin weaves together their tales along with the overarcing story of the two sisters. I love every single one of her books and this is no exception. I also recommend reading the author's note at the end of the book. It adds another layer to the story. Thanks to Bethany House and Lynn Austin for a copy of the book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    I was so excited to be chosen as part of a launch team for this novel and receive a copy of this book to review. I never tire of Lynn Austin's style of writing. Lynn Austin breaks the mold of traditional Christian fiction. Each book is written in a different place or time and doesn't follow the predictable story line that revolves around romantic love. That doesn't mean that love isn't a key part of "Where We Belong". Her characters experience the love of Christ, love of family, love of sharing I was so excited to be chosen as part of a launch team for this novel and receive a copy of this book to review. I never tire of Lynn Austin's style of writing. Lynn Austin breaks the mold of traditional Christian fiction. Each book is written in a different place or time and doesn't follow the predictable story line that revolves around romantic love. That doesn't mean that love isn't a key part of "Where We Belong". Her characters experience the love of Christ, love of family, love of sharing the good news with others, and the love that comes through forgiveness and faith. Lynn Austin weaves the truth of the Gospel into this book beautifully while telling a story of two sisters and their desire for adventure and the need to know God's will. "Where We Belong" is another epic tale by author Lynn Austin. I definitely recommend this book to anyone needing a break from the ordinary and a trip through time.
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  • Michelle Kidwell
    January 1, 1970
    Where We Belongby Lynn AustinBethany HouseBethany House PublishersChristianPub Date 03 Oct 2017I am reviewing of Where We Belong through Bethany House Publishers and Netgalley:Chicago 1892, the rules for Victorian Women are free. Rebecca and Flora Hayes are definitely not typical Victorian ladies though. They have a love for adventure and a passion for God that has lead them into a sandstorm in the Sinai Desert.Rebecca and Flora have travelled the world. The sisters are accompanied by their youn Where We Belongby Lynn AustinBethany HouseBethany House PublishersChristianPub Date 03 Oct 2017I am reviewing of Where We Belong through Bethany House Publishers and Netgalley:Chicago 1892, the rules for Victorian Women are free. Rebecca and Flora Hayes are definitely not typical Victorian ladies though. They have a love for adventure and a passion for God that has lead them into a sandstorm in the Sinai Desert.Rebecca and Flora have travelled the world. The sisters are accompanied by their young butler Soren Petersen, and Kate Rafferty a former street urchin who is learning to be the sisters lady maid while the sisters go on the hunt for an ancient Biblical Manuscript.Will these adventurous sisters, ahead of their time, find what they are searching for? Find out in Where We Belong!Five out of five stars! Happy Reading!
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  • Candice Valdez
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story of the life of two sisters. It is told from each of their point of views and then, later, from the point of view of two other characters. I enjoyed reading the story from one persons point of view and then getting the other side of the story. It was a slow read at the beginning and took me some time to get invested in it. I felt like Rebecca came across bratty at times and needed to get her way, but aren't we all like that at some points in our lives? She began to grow on me as s This is a story of the life of two sisters. It is told from each of their point of views and then, later, from the point of view of two other characters. I enjoyed reading the story from one persons point of view and then getting the other side of the story. It was a slow read at the beginning and took me some time to get invested in it. I felt like Rebecca came across bratty at times and needed to get her way, but aren't we all like that at some points in our lives? She began to grow on me as she got older and I love how the faith in each girl matured and they were always dedicated to finding out the purpose and reason that God put them on this earth. A delightful read that I would recommend to anyone. I was given a copy of this book for an honest review.
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  • Oak
    January 1, 1970
    Lynn Austin's novel Where We Belong focuses on Rebecca and Flora Hawes, two sisters from Chicago circa 1892. I enjoyed the novel for its depth and its heartfeltness. The 470-page book takes you on a journey, both emotionally and geographically, as the sisters search for a Biblical manuscript, along with their butler, Soren Petersen, and ladies' maid in training, Kate Rafferty. I loved getting to know the key characters of the novel, who are all crafted with unique personalities and ambitions. It Lynn Austin's novel Where We Belong focuses on Rebecca and Flora Hawes, two sisters from Chicago circa 1892. I enjoyed the novel for its depth and its heartfeltness. The 470-page book takes you on a journey, both emotionally and geographically, as the sisters search for a Biblical manuscript, along with their butler, Soren Petersen, and ladies' maid in training, Kate Rafferty. I loved getting to know the key characters of the novel, who are all crafted with unique personalities and ambitions. It is exciting for the reader to tag along on the group's adventure.*I received this book for review*
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