Oathbringer (The Stormlight Archive, #3)
In Oathbringer, the third volume of the New York Times bestselling Stormlight Archive, humanity faces a new Desolation with the return of the Voidbringers, a foe with numbers as great as their thirst for vengeance.Dalinar Kholin's Alethi armies won a fleeting victory at a terrible cost: The enemy Parshendi summoned the violent Everstorm, which now sweeps the world with destruction, and in its passing awakens the once peaceful and subservient parshmen to the horror of their millennia-long enslavement by humans. While on a desperate flight to warn his family of the threat, Kaladin Stormblessed must come to grips with the fact that the newly kindled anger of the parshmen may be wholly justified.Nestled in the mountains high above the storms, in the tower city of Urithiru, Shallan Davar investigates the wonders of the ancient stronghold of the Knights Radiant and unearths dark secrets lurking in its depths. And Dalinar realizes that his holy mission to unite his homeland of Alethkar was too narrow in scope. Unless all the nations of Roshar can put aside Dalinar's blood-soaked past and stand together--and unless Dalinar himself can confront that past--even the restoration of the Knights Radiant will not prevent the end of civilization.

Oathbringer (The Stormlight Archive, #3) Details

TitleOathbringer (The Stormlight Archive, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 14th, 2017
PublisherTor Books
ISBN-139780765326379
Rating
GenreFantasy, Fiction, Epic Fantasy

Oathbringer (The Stormlight Archive, #3) Review

  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
    January 1, 1970
    CHECK OUT MY FREAKING PICTURES AFTER THE GIFS Y'ALL! OMG! ♥Let simply start with the book itself before I show the freaking freaking freaking awesome inside pictures and map on the dust jacket! I'm am freaking happy! I got the pre-order from Audible BUT I was waiting to read this beautiful book and listen at the same time. ♥PART ONE ~ UNITED ~ DALINAR * SHALLAN * KALADIN * ADOLINI'm going to do a series of excerpts from each person. I'm not going to say what is going on or from what year. I want CHECK OUT MY FREAKING PICTURES AFTER THE GIFS Y'ALL! OMG! ♥Let simply start with the book itself before I show the freaking freaking freaking awesome inside pictures and map on the dust jacket! I'm am freaking happy! I got the pre-order from Audible BUT I was waiting to read this beautiful book and listen at the same time. ♥PART ONE ~ UNITED ~ DALINAR * SHALLAN * KALADIN * ADOLINI'm going to do a series of excerpts from each person. I'm not going to say what is going on or from what year. I want to keep it a little mysterious. Although, there will be some funny parts. There will probably be *****SPOILERS***** in some of the excerpts so if you haven't read the book just skip this or if you don't plan on reading the book and want to read the randomness, then be my guest. I decided to only do this for the first part of the book and the rest will be my regular review. So, lets crack on with it! DALINAR Dalinar Kholin appeared in the vision standing beside the memory of a dead god.***Only six days had passed since their discovery of Urithiru. Six days since the awakening of the Parshendi, who had gained strange powers and glowing red eyes. Six days since the arrival of the new storm--the Everstorm, a tempest of the dark thunderheads and red lightening. ***"And the Voidbringers?" Dalinar asked. "They came to annihilate," Kalami said. "Their goal to wipe humankind from Roshar. They were specters, formless--some say they are spirits of the dead, others spren from Damnation."***A single awespren burst around around Dalinar, like a ring of blue smoke. "Stormfather! Thakka, before today, I'd have bet you half the princedom that such a shot wasn't possible." He turned to the archer. "What's your name, assasin?"The man raised his chin, but didn't reply. "Well, in any case, welcome to my elites," Dalinar said. "Someone get the fellow a horse.""What?" the archer said. "I tried to kill you!""Yes, from a distance. Which shows remarkably good judgement. I can make use of someone with your skills."***"They can write?" Navani pressed. "The Voidbringers themselves are sending you contracts?"***Dalinar's shoulder protested as he stretched. He had found middle age to be like an assassin--quiet, creeping along behind him. Much of the time he would go about his life as he always had, until an unexpected ache or pain gave warning. He was not the youth he had once been. ***Dalinar remembered. Her name was Evi. She'd been tall and willowy, with pale yellow hair--not true golden, like the hair of the Iriali, but striking in its own right. ***"Anyone?" Dalinar said. "You can show them to anyone?"During a storm, I can approach anyone I choose, the Stormfather said. But you do not have to be in a storm, so you can join a vision in which I have placed someone else, even if you are distant. Storms! Dalinar bellowed a laugh. What have I done? the Stormfather asked. "You've just solved my problems!" The problem from The Way of Kings?"No, the greater one. I've been wishing for a way to meet with the other monarchs in person." Dalinar grinned. "I think that in a coming highstorm, Queen Fen of Thaylenah is going to have a quite remarkable experience."SHALLAN (Brightness Radiant)She rested her freehand against the map. Stormlight poured off her, illuminating the map in a swirling tempest of Light. She didn't exactly understand what she was doing, but she rarely did. Art wasn't about understanding, but about knowing. ***The one knocking would be Palona, who had once again noticed that Shallan had skipped dinner. Shallan sucked in a breath, destroying the image of Veil, recovering some of the Stormlight from her Lightweaving. "Come, she said. Honestly, id didn't seem to matter to Palona that Shallan was a storming Knight Radiant now, she'd still mother her all the--Adolin stepped in, carrying a large plate of food in one hand, some books under the other arm. He saw her and stumbled, nearly dropping it all. Shallan froze, then yelped and tucked her bare safehand behind her back. Adolin didn't even have the decency to blush at finding her practically naked. He balanced the food in his hand, recovering from his stumble, then grinned. "Out!" Shallan said, waving the freehand at him. "Out, out, out!"skip some..."Oh for Damnation's sake, Shallan. Can I come in now? And just so we're clear, I'm a man and your betrothed, my name is Adolin Kholin, I was born under the sign of the nine, I have a birthmark on the back of my left thigh, and I had crab curry for breakfast. Anything else you need to know?""Sure. Fine. Anyway, we aren't alone. Pattern, come here please." She held out her hand, palm up. He reluctantly moved down from the wall where he'd been watching. As always, he made a ripple in whatever he crossed, be it cloth or stone--like there was something under the surface. His complex, fluctuating pattern of lines was always changing, melding, vaguely circular but with surprising tangents. skip some...."Anyway," Shallan said. "Pattern, you're to be our chaperone tonight." "What," Pattern said with a hum, "is a chaperone?""That is someone who watches two young people when they are together, to make certain they don't do anything inappropriate." "Inappropriate?" Pattern said. "Such as . . . dividing by zero?" skip some..."Very well, you two," Pattern said. "No mating. NO MATING." He hummed to himself, as if pleased, then sank down onto a plate. ***Pattern approached and tried to slide up her illusory dress, but then stopped, backing away and humming in pleasure at the lie. "I found him!" he proclaimed. "I found Adolin!" "I see that, " Shallan said. "He came at me," Adolin said, "in the training rooms, screaming that you'd found the killer. Said that if I didn't come, you'd probably--and I quote--'go do something stupid without letting me watch.'"***"Your imitation is pathetic," Shallan whispered. "Here. Let me show you how it's done."Shallan drew in her Stormlight, going alight like a beacon. Things screamed, pulling away from her. As she stepped around the formation of worried bridgemen--wading into the blackness at their left flank--figures extended from her, shapes growing from light. The people from her recently rebuilt collection. KALADIN"Hello, Father," Kaladin said. The guardsman finally caught up, shouldering past gawking townspeople and waving his mace toward Kaladin like a baton. Kaladin sidestepped absently, then pushed the man so he stumbled farther down the hallway. "It is you," Lirin said. Then he scrambled over and caught Kaladin in an embrace. "Oh, Kal. My boy. My little boy. Hesina! HESINA!" Kaladin's mother appeared in the doorway a moment later. ***"I gave you people an order," Kaladin said. "I'm not fond of repeating myself." "And what," Roshone said, "makes you think you can order anyone around, boy?"Kaladin turned back and swept his arm before him, summoning Syl. A bright, dew-covered Shardblade formed from the mist into his hand. He spun the Blade and rammed her down into the floor in one smooth motion. He held the grip, feeling this eyes bleed blue. Everything grew still. Townspeople froze, gaping. Roshone's eyes bulged. Curiously, Kaladin's father just lowered his head and closed his eyes. "Any other questions?" Kaladin asked. ***Kaladin crept through the rains, sidling in a wet uniform across the rocks until he was able to peek through the trees at the Voidbringers. Monstrous terrors from the mythological past, enemies of all that was right and good. Destroyers who had laid waste to civilization countless times. They were playing cards. ***No spoilers ahead.. I can't believe I just finished the 3rd book and there are, what is it now... 7 more to be written?! I feel like I feel like I feel drained. I feel like I have come through so much. This book is by far better than the first two books, in my opinion. Oathbringer was filled with so freaking much. And yes, the first two books at 1000 + were filled too but it was just different. I felt like this book had more. I mean I would never not love the first two books and have them on my favorites list but this one just sealed the deal even more. I can't even imagine what else Brandon Sanderson can write in this world. I'm almost scared to know. Although, I don't think I will live long enough to finish the series since there are so many and what 2-3 years in between. I loved every single character in this book, even more than I did before. Well, not so much the evil people but they were great too. The back and forth stories, the past, the interludes, they were all perfect. I'm not saying that some didn't go over my head because all high/epic fantasy does that to me. I don't care. I will sort it all out some day with re-reads like I always do. =) Lord though, the freaking battles! I had to fight off a panic attack! My peeps fought a crazy, bloody battle! Brandon Sanderson, thank you for this wonderful book. Thank you for the art inside and out. Thank you for putting so much effort into this book. I don't see how you or any other author I love that writes these freaking murder weapon tomes can think up these worlds. and that's all I have to say. Okay, a couple more things. I know that all Stormlight fans will love this book. If you don't then you fell off the cliff. I don't know. Now, I'm going to shut-up because this is my longest review to date and Goodreads isn't going to let me write much more =) Happy Reading My Wonderful Stormlight friends. Mel ♥MY BLOG: Melissa Martin's Reading List
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  • Petrik
    January 1, 1970
    My review probably won’t be able to do this book justice. Well, justice is dead but I’ll see what I can do.It’s not an exaggeration to say that my expectations regarding Oathbringer were extremely hard to contain. I had heard a lot of fantastic things about this series the first time I went through The Way of Kings and Words of Radiance last year, but I read through them many years after their original release dates. Oathbringer is a different experience in terms of environment and surrounding h My review probably won’t be able to do this book justice. Well, justice is dead but I’ll see what I can do.It’s not an exaggeration to say that my expectations regarding Oathbringer were extremely hard to contain. I had heard a lot of fantastic things about this series the first time I went through The Way of Kings and Words of Radiance last year, but I read through them many years after their original release dates. Oathbringer is a different experience in terms of environment and surrounding hype; this time I’m actually in the midst of all the hype, praises, and excitement everywhere. Because of this my expectations were Skybreaking high; especially after reading one of my favorite books of all time: Words of Radiance. Despite my irrational expectations, I’m gratified to say that Sanderson managed to meet my expectations because Oathbringer ended up being another masterwork installment in The Stormlight Archive series. “This book, the third in the Stormlight Archive, is the most intimate, most tightly woven, and most eclectic book I’ve ever written—all wrapped up into one… I like this book. I really, really like this book.” –Brandon Sanderson There’s always something in Sanderson’s story that resonates with me. Whether it’s a topic involving religion, oppression, camaraderie, or love, any book he writes will always feature one theme that is expressed articulately, and that is hope. In my opinion, out of every book that Sanderson has written so far, Oathbringer is the darkest in terms of tone. Yet, despite how dark the story gets, Sanderson reminds us that hope will always be there, and it is a theme that I will always appreciate. It’s refreshing, satisfying, and makes me happy to read his books. There’s always something philosophical and positive to learn and apply in our real-life situations from Sanderson’s books, and that remained true here, maybe even stronger than ever. “The trick to happiness wasn’t in freezing every momentary pleasure and clinging to each one, but in ensuring one’s life would produce many future moments to anticipate.” The story was unpredictable, full of twists and turns and filled with tons of revelations. Oathbringer managed to build upon every foundation that was prepared since the beginning of The Way of Kings, and in phenomenal ways. In this gigantic book, there are no words wasted. In fact, there is so much plot progression in Oathbringer that it makes both The Way of Kings and Words of Radiance–as epic and majestic as they are already—feel like a preparation for this book alone. With new antagonists who completely raise the stakes for Roshar, along with tons of powerful and memorable moments, Oathbringer is a meticulously structured book that felt like a trilogy or duology on its own.The amount of action sequences in this book far surpasses both of its predecessors. Sanderson is seriously at the top of his game when it comes to his action scenes here. If you have read any of Sanderson’s books, you should know by now that Sanderson always prepares a fantastic climax sequence to end his book in a memorable way; this applies for all of his books. The fanbase called it the "Sanderson Avalanche" (no idea who named this in the first place) and this time, we didn’t get just one, but two avalanches. This, in my opinion, is a very smart move. Not only it made the book felt like a duology/trilogy, it also made the pacing exceptional. Unlike Words of Radiance, which featured Sanderson’s best close-quarter combat sequences to date, Oathbringer’s final conclusion is more of an epic war on a grand scale. Giant monsters, magical blades, magic clashing and unleashed, dark and cataclysmic situations, heart-pounding, intense, fist pumping and poignant moments, all told in magnificent shifting multi-POV narration; it was action-packed, pivotal, and simply epic in the true sense of the word. It’s been half a year since I’ve read and reviewed any of Sanderson’s full novels. You know what made me miss his work the most? His characterizations. Sanderson always has a way of developing his characters with his narration to the point where we truly get inside their heads, even when it’s written in third person perspective. I’ve read a lot of fantasy books and there are really only a few authors who can do this wonderfully. The number of characters featured is not small by any means; this series features hundreds of characters. At the same time, it features Sanderson’s biggest cast of POV; yet these characters all remain distinct and unique in their personalities. Tons of characters—both main and side characters—receive proper and significant character developments, but the spotlight of this book undisputedly goes to Dalinar. We have seen Kaladin’s past in The Way of Kings, Shallan’s in Words of Radiance, and finally, it’s time for Dalinar’s. If you have started the first book, most likely you’ll know already what Dalinar past will involves. I need to remind you of this: unlike the previous two books—even though Words of Radiance was meant to be Shallan’s book—Kaladin is not the main character here. Oathbringer is without a doubt, Dalinar’s book.Picture: Dalinar Kholin by vargasniIt's truly an incredible experience to have witnessed Dalinar’s growth throughout the passage of time. Three chapters into his past and I can say that it was already better than all Shallan’s flashback chapters in Words of Radiance. I was completely captivated by Dalinar’s character development and history here; Sanderson truly did a superlative job in integrating Dalinar’s past into the main storyline. It was emotionally rewarding to read the culmination of all his experience in this book; making him one of my favorite characters of all time. “Dalinar Kholin was a connoisseur of death. Even since his youth, the sight of dead men had been a familiar thing to him. You stay on the battlefield long enough, and you become familiar with its master.” If I have to choose only ONE thing that Oathbringer did better than its predecessors, it’s definitely the lore and world-building. The world-building is already masterfully done in the previous two books, but somehow, Sanderson successfully made it even better. The Way of Kings and Words of Radiance storylines were heavily centered on The Shattered Plain, whereas Oathbringer finally diverts its attention from that place and visits many other major cities in Roshar. It’s epic in scope and, combined with intricate maps and astounding revelations in the lore, this is once again Sanderson at the top of this game. If you’re not a fan of intricate world-building, I seriously think you’re going to have a hard time enjoying this series because that is definitely one of the main strengths of this series.I’ve talked about Sanderson’s prose several times now, and I don’t think I need to state how well written his books are. His prose is simple, immersive, vivid, (Oops, I did it again) but the most important thing to me is that it always feels like coming “home”. Sanderson shows us that fancy words and purple prose aren’t necessary to create a masterpiece of an epic fantasy. His writing never felt forced, it’s like all these words came to his head naturally. A sign of an amazing book is when you’re reading and never felt bored with any page. Oathbringer is in fact the biggest single installment I’ve ever read in my life, and I was completely enthralled with every moment of it. Some much smaller book could make me feel like homework but for Oathbringer, despite its staggering size, I still craved more. This is all due to the extremely well written and well-polished prose style that Sanderson employs.Let’s talk about the book’s value. When people told me they don’t want to start this series because it’s too monstrous, I honestly can’t agree with that. The Way of Kings and Words of Radiance were too short for me; with each book’s conclusion I always ended up craving more, and that’s still true here. Oathbringer is a staggering 450k words or 1243 pages and somehow, it’s still not enough. Plus, each book in the series feels like a special limited edition. Starting from the beautiful endpapers by Dan Dos Santos and Howard Lyon, then the gorgeous chapter icons and twenty-two interior artworks by amazing artists such as Miranda Meeks, Kelly Harris, Ben McSweeney, Isaac Steward and once again, Dan Dos Santos, we are given so much in order to enrich our imagination and experience. Oathbringer is truly a MUST HAVE book. At the time of writing this review, I have around one hundred physical books and only three of them—Words of Radiance, Oathbringer, and Arcanum Unbounded—are hardcovers. I won’t go into full detail on why I dislike hardcover, but to explain it as simply as possible, they’re heavy, uncomfortable to read, and super expensive. However, I have to make a special exception for this series because of its gorgeous artworks and satisfying value. I spent $45 to buy the HC of Oathbringer, (it is that expensive where I live) but it was truly money well spent and I’ll do it again for future installments of the series.Picture: Thaylen Female Fashion by Dan Dos Santos.I have talked a LOT about this book. Let’s get to the most important questions:-Is Oathbringer a worthy sequel? Absolutely-Is it better than the previous books? Sadly, I have to say no.It’s definitely better than The Way of Kings but not Words of Radiance. In my opinion, it’s inferior to Words of Radiance in terms of quality. There are some things that Words of Radiance did better, especially when it comes to intimate and evocative scenes, and there are also some ways in which Oathbringer surpasses it, such as plot and world building. However, this will be the first time I actually have some cons—though they are minor—with any installment in this series. To me, the main character of the series is Kaladin. This is almost completely a Dalinar and somehow, Shallan’s book. I know, I know, it was meant to be written that way, and I have no complaint about how it’s written. However, Kaladin’s storyline didn’t truly begin until halfway through the book, which took 600 pages; before that, his POV was scarce and close to nonexistent despite him making an appearance in other character’s POV. Picture: Grumpy Kaladin by botanicaxuIt’s just a matter of preference; Dalinar’s, Shallan’s, and everyone’s storyline are incredibly compelling in their own way, but Kaladin and Bridge Four will always be special and remained one of the most illuminating parts of the series for me. Secondly, I mentioned in my Words of Radiance review that I fell in love with Shallan’s character there, but Oathbringer changed my mind on this. Shallan’s growth—though fascinating and making the plot more interesting—occurred in ways that made me dislike her character. Shallan is, in fact, the first female character written by Sanderson that I dislike at this point, and I sometimes even found her infuriating. Lastly, there are two scenes that I wish didn’t happen off-screen. “Accept the pain, but don't accept that you deserved it.” Do know that these are minor cons and that the three books in The Stormlight Archive totally stand above almost all books I’ve ever read in the genre. Oathbringer is not a perfect book by any means, but just like true love, I absolutely love this book with all my heart despite some flaws it had. Diving into this series is like diving into a long-term relationship, and one I’m glad to partake in. Call me selfish but right now, I’m at the point where I’ll be completely happy if Sanderson decides to drop all his outside of Cosmere universe works. I just can’t bring myself to care about his other books outside of Cosmere when in fact, I already know that the Cosmere and this series comprise his magnum opus. This will probably be my last epic fantasy novel review of the year. I binge reread and read the series so far within three weeks and now I’m in a major “Stormlight Archive’s hangover”, I will need at least a month before starting another epic fantasy series unless I’m willing to risk rating them unfairly. That said, I’m going to end my review here, this has become the longest review I ever wrote so far and trust me, there are a myriad amount of things I left out for the sake of making this review as spoiler-free as possible for your maximum reading experience. Oathbringer is not just a book, it’s a grimoire that’s filled with magical power capable of transporting me to the best kind of escapism experience. It strengthens the reason why I read, why I love epic fantasy, and why The Stormlight Archive is my number 1 favorite series of all time. (I haven’t read Malazan Book of the Fallen yet so this might change in the future.)The Stormlight Archive has always been one of the series which I urge anyone to start as soon as possible, and this is still true. Waiting for the completion of this series before diving into it is ridiculous; not only are you going to have to wait at least twenty years before its completion, but we don’t even know what the future holds for this series, and for each one of us. Do. Not. Wait. Start this masterpiece series now and let us speak the ancient oaths together! “Life before death. Strength before weakness. Journey before destination.” Picture: My Cosmere collectionSide note: I need to remind you once again to please read Warbreaker before diving into this series; same as Words of Radiance, one more character from that book appears here.You can find this and the rest of my Adult Epic/High Fantasy & Sci-Fi reviews at BookNest
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. Finishing Oathbringer was both a satisfaction and a disappointment. Satisfying because this book was absolutely astonishing in every way that I expected it to be. Disappointing because I wanted it to be longer (even though it's almost 1300 pgs and it took me over two weeks to finish it). What can I really say about Oathbringer? Questions that I have waited years for answers were finally answered, all of my favorite characters were amazing as usual and Sanderson still keeps on developi 4.5 stars. Finishing Oathbringer was both a satisfaction and a disappointment. Satisfying because this book was absolutely astonishing in every way that I expected it to be. Disappointing because I wanted it to be longer (even though it's almost 1300 pgs and it took me over two weeks to finish it). What can I really say about Oathbringer? Questions that I have waited years for answers were finally answered, all of my favorite characters were amazing as usual and Sanderson still keeps on developing a 10/10 solid epic fantasy world with intriguing and full-fledged characters in a world filled with great magic and despair. I just......Don't know how to really write a proper review for this without leaving out important bits and things here. All I can say is that this series is looooooooooooong and can be rough to get through at times, but it is so satisfying to read and if you have read some of Sanderson's other books in the Cosmere universe, then Oathbringer will blow your mind with how complex it is within the Cosmere and how it all relates. My only really critique for this book is that the overall redemption/forgiveness theme in the story could be a tad too much at times, but I see why it was necessary to bring it so much in focus for the overall arc. There are also some expectations that were not fulfilled within the plot, but those might be fulfilled within the next book(s). Anyhow, Oathbringer is astonishing in a mind-blowing way. Absolutely worth the wait and one of the most memorable books I have read this year. Thank you, Brandon Sanderson.BEFORE READING OATHBRINGER Edit: 9/12/2017: ONLY TWO MONTHS LEFT UNTIL I HAVE THIS BOOK IN MY HANDS, WHAT A JOY!!!I NEED THIS BOOK RIGHT NOW WHO DO I HAVE TO SACRIFICE TO GET IT IN MY HANDS?!!?!?!
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  • Aleksiel
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this was disappointing. Easily the worst so far. I postponed writing a review hoping some time and a re-read would somehow improve my opinion of the book. It didn’t.Part 1 was passable. Part 2 was watered by too many unnecessary PoVs. Part 3 was watered by too many sub-plots and not enough interaction between characters. Part 4 didn’t manage to pick up the pace. Part 5 tried to squish so many events it became chaotic. The plot takes over characters and they are like leafs in the storm. The Well, this was disappointing. Easily the worst so far. I postponed writing a review hoping some time and a re-read would somehow improve my opinion of the book. It didn’t.Part 1 was passable. Part 2 was watered by too many unnecessary PoVs. Part 3 was watered by too many sub-plots and not enough interaction between characters. Part 4 didn’t manage to pick up the pace. Part 5 tried to squish so many events it became chaotic. The plot takes over characters and they are like leafs in the storm. They just accept whatever for the purpose of moving the story forward because there was no time to be bothered or surprised. So much so that the author felt the need to at least include a sentence on how overwhelming everything is and people have no choice, but to carry on without wasting time to be relatable or fleshed out. Yeah, that should fix it… not.Adolin murdered Sadeas at the end of WoR, yet the consequences lead to a larger narrative arc with little personal development. None of the main cast cared. Adolin was missing in the second part, served as solely comic relief in the third. Kaladin also didn’t get a PoV in the second part; instead we have various Bridge Four narrators. Expansion of PoV characters is one of the things I dislike in this book. The world is large enough. We already have interludes. The constant inclusion of new viewpoints breaks the WoK promise of focus. Those new Kaladin flashbacks were unnecessary, we already have chapters upon chapters on Dalinar’s flashbacks, can Brandon not make a third of the book about the past, please? Especially when simultaneously trying to have thousand things happen in the present, too.Shallan continues her personality split, which initially didn’t bother me much, but I hoped we’d be done with that by the end of the book. Instead not even the Hoid dues ex machine could stop this painfully boring arch. Her fascination with Kaladin doesn’t get explored, but neither is it fully denied. However, he does acknowledge he never loved her, which should have been obvious; you don’t fall in love with someone just because you fell in a chasm with them. Plus she constantly insults him and shows no appreciation of his character. Why do people ship them again? Anyway, I’m glad there wasn’t a love triangle. Dalinar’s flashbacks were probably the most interesting set we got so far. Dalinar’s oath was once again unclear. What exactly happened? Why didn’t Dalinar ask that question? He didn’t know what Ascention is. He ignored this remark like he ignored all mentions of Adonalsium while simultaneously claiming to be looking for the real God and anything larger than Honor. Syl is this special Ancient Daughter and blah-blah. Like Ivory is basically a prince, Stormfather is sliver of Honor, Glys is half corrupted… Don’t tell me, is Wyndle Cultivation’s personal gardener? Lift was able to enter Dalinar’s visions and sneak up on Odium? Where’s the foreshadowing for that? Last book and in Edgedancer she had very little understanding of her powers. How about a little explanation? Or can she suddenly do this because it’s convenient for the plot? Like how Amaram conveniently became a superpowerful mutant Kaladin couldn’t win against? And the drastic change in the scope of Shallan's abilities - last book she could barely make her illusions move and they disappeared if she wasn't looking unless attached to Pattern. Now she can make them perform a play, create a whole army of them - no need to look or attach them to anything. She can also have a conversation with her illusions! How believable... At least she had the decency to be surprised.A dozen new PoVs and characters, yet not a sentence about Redin, the bastard son of the late king of Jah Keved, who rode with a considerable force somewhere? Yet another dropped sub-plot and unfulfilled expectation from last book. R.I.P all characters with the letter E, the author hates you all. Elhokar’s non-existent redemption arch with unsatisfying end was one of the worst. Now a woman and a heretic is king and I bet we won’t see the social outcry and pushback such a drastic change should have upon a nation, because the plot probably can’t spare time to deal with this like it couldn’t with a bunch of other arcs that were left midway. List of ‘overpromised and under delivered’:•Everstorm•Voidbringers•Unmade•People’s hatred for Radiants•Recreanse secretBut the crown of ‘most ridiculous’ goes to the Skybreakers – the only Knight Radiant Order to have kept their oaths for millennia only to join the enemy they have been fighting since times immemorial. Wow. As if the secret that caused Recreanse should be a secret to them. They learned this over a thousand years ago for fucks sake. They should have told Nale centuries ago and I’m already extremely skeptical to the notion this is news to a Herald… This is either bad writing or an insult to the readers’ intelligence as there should be something else. If there isn’t, this a plot hole larger the hole that sank Titanic.
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  • TS Chan
    January 1, 1970
    The Storming genius has outdone himself. Again! Words of Radiance was easily the best book I've ever read, which naturally resulted in some pretty high expectations going into Oathbringer. As much as I've tried to smother it after waiting for over 3.5 years, I just had to accept that it was futile. Who am I kidding? Sanderson has completely smashed all expectations by offering yet another best book I've ever read. Is Oathbringer a literary masterpiece? A classic that will stand the test of time The Storming genius has outdone himself. Again! Words of Radiance was easily the best book I've ever read, which naturally resulted in some pretty high expectations going into Oathbringer. As much as I've tried to smother it after waiting for over 3.5 years, I just had to accept that it was futile. Who am I kidding? Sanderson has completely smashed all expectations by offering yet another best book I've ever read. Is Oathbringer a literary masterpiece? A classic that will stand the test of time and be remembered in the same vein as Lord of the Rings? That might stretch it a bit too far, but only time will tell. I wouldn't also call it flawless, as it is not. As far as I am concerned, however, it is a singularly brilliant creation which is both epic in its scope and intimate in its soul. Art is about emotion, examination, and going places people have never gone before to discover and investigate new things. The only way to create something that nobody hates is to ensure that it can't be loved either. Remove enough spice from soup, and you'll just end up with water. The worldbuilding in this book, to put it mildly, outshines its predecessors. We finally leave the confines of The Shattered Plains to traverse the other parts of this vivid and alien world. The events from the end of Words of Radiance precipitated the need to extend the reach of the political narrative to other monarchies in Roshar. Urithiru, Kholinar and Thaylen City are all impressive and fascinating in very distinct and unique ways. I appreciate having the large full-coloured map of Roshar behind the dust jacket that came in handy when trying to understand the relative location of one country to another. The interior art is, as usual, stunning in illustrating the worldbuilding elements. An endpaper depicting in-world Heraldic art. By Howard Lyon Oathbringer is a dense book. Much to my delight, the lore and histories of Roshar, which so intrigued readers in The Way of Kings and Words of Radiance, are deeply explored. With each deftly handled exposition or revelation, one cannot help but wonder at the mind that did not merely create but also balance and manage such complexity (not only of Roshar but the Cosmere); the skill to weave that complexity into strands that teased and yet seemed almost apparent on hindsight. It is like seeing tiny unconnected parts of a massive painting, each giving you a small clue, its implications only dawning upon you once the larger picture has been revealed. Even then, I am sure that I am only seeing a fragment of a whole - one which is, more or less, complete at this stage. Or so I've been led to believe.After three books in, one thing that I kept marvelling at is Sanderson's naming convention in this series. Using the term Radiants to denote knights who adhere to specific Ideals and who glow with Stormlight is so fittingly epic. The names of the Ten Orders of the Knights Radiant, those of the Heralds and the Unmade, and the pivotal historical events such as the Desolations, Aharietiam and the Recreance - it all just sounds so appropriate in its own context. I don't usually pay much attention to this aspect while reading (unless it's really bad). In this series, it is too good not to do so. As for pacing and plot progression, it is close to perfection. Oathbringer felt even more like a trilogy in a single book than the previous two instalments. The narrative ebbed and flowed with a slower start followed by mini-climaxes and little lulls as the events gradually escalated to a mind-blowing, heart-stopping and breathtaking climactic ending. When the final chapters start to switch into multiple POVs, you will know that you have arrived at what has come to be known as the "Sanderson avalanche". In this book, it is an avalanche to end all that had come before – to think that this is only the third instalment. For all the worldbuilding, lore and action present, this novel is sublime in balancing between a grand sweeping tale and personal character growth. And this is where the book transcended from great to spectacular.I've watched a recording of the BYU launch party of Oathbringer, where Sanderson said that the first magic system he developed for Stormlight was that of soulcasting; an allusion to transformation, which is the theme of The Stormlight Archive. It is about the change and progression of people through their conflicts, both internal and external, and experiences. As such, the series is ultimately character-driven, despite all the fantastical elements wrapped around it. The past is the future, and as each man has lived, so must you.The question is not whether you will love, hurt, dream and die. It is what you will love, why you will hurt, when you will dream, and how you will die. This is your choice. You cannot pick the destination, only the path. Most of you would know this if you follow the series and its updates closely. Oathbringer is Dalinar Kholin's book, as the previous two were Kaladin's and Shallan's respectively - from a backstory perspective. And it very much feels like Dalinar's book. With a longer history given his age relative to the two younger main characters, there are a lot more flashback chapters of Dalinar - an enlightening, powerful and highly relevant backstory to the events unfolding in the present timeline. The manner in which the story of his past is woven to lead into the climax is absolutely masterful. Accept the pain, but don't accept that you deserved it. The development of the characters - both main and supporting ones - continues to be most compelling and excellent, taking the story in a direction that is not entirely expected, but still wholly satisfying. It is an understatement to say that Sanderson does not make it easy for his characters. The path towards being a full Knight Radiant demands an embodiment of the Ideals, each being more difficult than the previous. In this, we see our beloved characters going through significant internal struggles and learning acceptance, which makes any transformation more realistic and gratifying when it happens. More importantly is how Sanderson enabled readers to feel as if they are part of the inner turmoil and eventual evolution of these characters, instead of being a mere bystander to the events. And by staying steadfast to an existing core cast, this only further fuelled my empathy and emotional investment for them, favourites or otherwise. Ten spears go to battle, and nine shatter. Did that war forge the one that remained? No. All the war did was identify the spear that would not break. Allegorically, the story deals with both big and abstract world-spanning issues and small and personal real-life matters. I respect the effort he took to understand and then write about mental health issues, as well as his openness in dealing with discrimination and prejudice, whether it's challenging individual perception, societal norms or even religious doctrine. Now, I need to touch upon the prose and dialogue. Personally, I have always enjoyed Sanderson's dialogue and writing, and find him quite talented in delivering simple, direct and succinct phrases that truly make an impact, without having to go into long and rambling philosophical discourses. The in-world texts in The Stormlight Archive demonstrate that he is capable of writing in a more ‘elegant and poetic' manner, but perhaps that is just not how he wanted to tell his stories. Just as I can admire long beautiful passages of introspection and philosophy, I can also equally appreciate the simplicity of unembellished prose which distils the verbiage. Given how dense these Stormlight books are, I prefer this style of writing as it allows me a more thoroughly immersive experience. Notably, his writing skills are noticeably improving with every book he releases.All that said, the primary reason why this is the best book I've ever read is that it gave me the most emotionally charged reading experience I've had. I cried and laughed. I squealed and screamed. I felt my heart turning to mush. It brought out joy, tears, sorrow, pain, fear, anger, excitement, anticipation, shock, wonder and awe, so strongly that I'm sure emotionsprens surrounded me. This is also, in my opinion, the darkest book that Sanderson has ever written. There are moments, which made me think that the series is treading into the grimdark territory. Admittedly, I did wish for my favourite character of the series (and possibly of all-time) to have more presence in this instalment, but I accept that this might not always be the case given that the story is not going to centre around one main character (as much as it might seem to be in the past two books). There are also a few storylines which appear to be given too much of a light touch in the narrative, possibly in compromise for the momentum of the overarching story, or even perhaps to fit into future books. These are a few of the issues which, I am all too aware of, may not be entirely well-received by some existing fans. Oathbringer can be treated as Book 3 of 5, out of a larger 2-part series of 10 books, with the second part of The Stormlight Archive heading in a new direction. As with each volume so far, this novel is a self-contained story that concludes most satisfactorily, while teasing the reader with more questions and leaving some loose and new threads for future instalments. Even after reading over 1200 pages, I wanted more and almost flipped back to the first page to start over again. There can be no other testament to the magnificence of Sanderson's magnum opus, where every book so far had succeeded in perpetuating such an obsession from me. Fantasy fans, allow me to reiterate - if you haven't started reading this fantastic series, seriously, what are you waiting for? A fair warning though – be prepared to suffer from a hangover once you have finished reading these masterpieces.NB: For maximum reading enjoyment, one should read Warbreaker before Words of Radiance and absolutely must do so before Oathbringer. This review can also be found at Booknest
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Tor in exchange for an honest review.1.) The Way of Kings ★★★★★2.) Words of Radiance ★★★★★2.5) Edgedancer ★★★★ “You cannot have my pain” I am so sorry this review is a month late! With the holidays and the start of this new year, my life has just been a little hectic to write a review that does this amazing book and series justice! But hopefully this will sing even an ounce of the praise that this epic fantasy series deserves, because this third installment was nothing short of ARC provided by Tor in exchange for an honest review.1.) The Way of Kings ★★★★★2.) Words of Radiance ★★★★★2.5) Edgedancer ★★★★ “You cannot have my pain” I am so sorry this review is a month late! With the holidays and the start of this new year, my life has just been a little hectic to write a review that does this amazing book and series justice! But hopefully this will sing even an ounce of the praise that this epic fantasy series deserves, because this third installment was nothing short of a masterpiece. Also, I’m going to try to write this review spoiler free, but I am very sorry if I accidentally say a little something that could perhaps be considered a spoiler. I mean, these three books are massive, and this story is so heavy, I apologize in advance if I slip up. I know I won’t say anything major, but please use caution, or maybe pass on my review, if you would like to start The Way of Kings completely blind. And I also think it is important to note that it is very important to read the novella, Edgedancer, before reading Oathbringer, too! This is a huge scale, epic fantasy, that is massive not only in size, but in content. Roshar is divided into ten mini/major kingdoms, that are self-governed. Alethkar is the largest kingdom on Roshar, and where most our main characters come from.There is a battle going on for all of Roshar. The Parshendi, who live in the middle of the Shattered Plains, are being led by some ancient beings to gain more land and to free their enslaved relatives. They also have war waged on them for assassinating a king. The Stormlight Archive world is unlike anything else in literature. First off, unforgiving Highstorms are constantly happening around the world of Roshar. Highstorms provide Stormlight, which is an energy that the people keep in different gemstones, which have a super vast array of different uses. And because this story surrounds wars on many different fronts, it makes sense that these Highstorms also help power some pretty powerful and unique weapons, armor, and even some magical companions.We mostly follow three main characters, even though these books have extremely large casts! Each of the characters you’ll be introduced to, you’ll easily love, or easily love to hate. These are some of the best and most fleshed out characters I’ve ever read. ➽Dalinar - This whole series truly starts when Dalinar’s brother, the King himself, is murdered in cold blood. Dalinar is also a Highprince of Alethkar. Dalinar has struggled throughout all of these books, trying to remember a past that is too dark for him to remember. In my very humble opinion, Oathbringer is Dalinar’s book. Him and his family are truly the focal point, and Dalinars character arch, both past and present, made me feel more emotions than I have words for. ➽Kaladin - Once an apprentice surgeon, once a solider, once a slave, once a head guard, always a natural born leader, but now… so much more. Kaladin’s story has been such a beautiful story to watch unfold, and I know it’s nowhere close to being done. Kaladin has very much struggled with his self-worth, but I think he is truly starting to realize how much he belongs, and how sometimes it is worth it to take a chance, even if you’ve regretted it in the past. Also, if I don’t see a flute being played anytime soon… I’m going to explode with anticipation. ➽Shallan - My feminist icon cinnamon roll. I will never understand people who say that Brandon Sanderson cannot write female characters. Shallan, and her journey, is one of the most inspiring things in this entire series. She is daughter of a recently deceased Brightlord. Then, studied under Jasnah Kholin, Dalinar’s niece. She will forever and always be an artist. And she is constantly growing more and more with her powers and as a person. On top of all this, I love the representation she shows/gives as an abuse survivor. And even though I personally feel like these are the main three, there are so many amazing characters in this world. Jasnah is forever and always my queen. Adolin has completely stolen my heart in every way imaginable. Syl is everything I’ve ever wanted in literature, but I probably don’t deserve her. Pattern made me cry from laughing probably about 20 times with “NO MATING!” Hoid is probably going to end up my favorite character in all of literature, or at least the Cosmere. And I’ll forever be begging for more Szeth chapters, because no amount will ever be enough. “To love the journey is to accept no such end. I have found, through painful experience, that the most important step a person can take is always the next one.” The heart of this story is oppression, but Oathbringer really focuses on what happens when you realize you’ve been the one oppressing on lands that you thought were your own. Some pretty heavy parallels to our world, if I do say so myself. The bones of this story are religion, and what people from all walks of life are willing to do in the name of their God(s). I’ve said this in many reviews, but religion is equally the best and worst thing in this world. Religion can bring love, and acceptance, and peace, but never has a war been fought that hasn’t somehow been about religion. Brandon Sanderson is a very religious man, but the way he writes about people who choose not to believe is so wonderfully done. “The question,’ she replied, ‘is not whether you will love, hurt, dream, and die. It is what you will love, why you will hurt, when you will dream, and how you will die. This is your choice. You cannot pick the destination, only the path.” The theme of this story is and always will ultimately be love. The love of lovers, the love of family, the love of friends, the love of ourselves, the love of clans, the love of our soldiers, the love of our God(s). Oathbringer truly feels like a love letter to found families and how true, unconditional love can change the world, always. Like, I know that sounds somewhat corny for this epic fantasy series, but it’s the damn truth. Love will always be the biggest driving force, and this is proven time and time again in this series, but truly highlighted in Oathbringer. I know Brandon Sanderson gets a lot of hate for a ten-year-old, ignorant statement he made. And I’ll never defend or make excuses for what he said; it was wrong, but I do believe he has changed his views and no longer feels/thinks like that. As for the representation in this book, Oathbringer has a m/m relationship that warms my heart so very much! We also get a POV from a disabled woman who is in a wheelchair, who also happens to have the best bird companion ever. And this book heavily deals with grief and trauma. Dalinar, in my opinion, very much is living with PTSD and we find out a lot about his past in this book. You know, the past he desperately wanted to never remember. My heart broke for him over and over in this book, but I think the portrayal of his grief was expertly done and it meant a lot to me. Brandon Sanderson has also stated that Renarin is on the autism spectrum, which is awesome representation we rarely see in high fantasy. Content warnings for severe depression, suicide, war themes, physical abuse, mental abuse, emotional abuse, violence, murder, and gore. This is a very heavy book, that doesn’t shy away from brutal things, and that constantly talks about wars, and duels, and battles. Please, use caution if these things are not for you. I finished this book on Christmas day, and I couldn’t have asked for a better gift. This series just brings me so much love and joy. I honestly feel like it is Brandon Sanderson’s best work to date, and I’m not sure how I’m going to be able to wait until the next installment. I truly believe this is a once in a lifetime series, and I feel so blessed to be able to experience it. Perfection. “Life breaks us, Teft. Then we fill the cracks with something stronger.” Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch
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  • Eon ♒Windrunner♒
    January 1, 1970
    ALL. THE. STARS. RTC.
  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2017/11/14/...A full five stars to Oathbringer and nothing less. If you’ve read the two previous volumes in the Stormlight Archive, you’d probably already understand; this series is a masterful, meticulous continuation into the journey to explore the mysterious world of Roshar, and once again this third installment is revealing so much more about our characters and their roles in this epic tableau. I find myself speechless, as I often a 5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2017/11/14/...A full five stars to Oathbringer and nothing less. If you’ve read the two previous volumes in the Stormlight Archive, you’d probably already understand; this series is a masterful, meticulous continuation into the journey to explore the mysterious world of Roshar, and once again this third installment is revealing so much more about our characters and their roles in this epic tableau. I find myself speechless, as I often am after reading a Brandon Sanderson novel, because there’s so much to talk about and yet also so much I can’t spoil. I’m also not too articulate when my mind is blown, so trying to put into words my roiling feelings upon finishing Oathbringer will be difficult, but I’ll try my best to convey my thoughts on this work of art. That said, you should still only read this review after you’ve read the first two books (and if you haven’t yet, what are you waiting for, anyway!?) just in case.For readers who have made it to this point though, you’ll already know that the world is on the verge of another Desolation, a cataclysmic event that has occurred on a cyclical basis throughout the history of Roshar. The heralds of these wars, known as Voidbringers, have returned along with the other forces of Odium, a powerful being who is the manifestation of hatred itself. The focus once more returns to the main characters of this series: Dalinar Kholin, a Highprince of Alethkar who is the brother of the late King Gavilar; Kaladin, also known as the Stormblessed, who was a bridge crew slave before eventually becoming captain of the royal guard; Shallan Davar, a young Lighteyes woman and scholar-in-training, who studied under the tutelage of Princes Jasnah Kholin; and Adolin Kholin, eldest son of Dalinar and a full Shardbearer like his father, who is now betrothed to Shallan. Together, these characters must work together to hold off the end of the world, but to do that they’ll also need some outside help.Desperate for allies, Dalinar has set up his new base of operations at the legendary city of Urithiru after losing his own home to the invaders, attempting to reach out to the other Highprinces and rulers of other nations in the hopes of forming a united front against the forces of Odium. The enemy has now subsumed a great number of Parshendi fighters for their side through awakening of the previously docile parshmen with their summoning of the Everstorm, and the only chance the humans have now may be the mysterious fabrials known as Oathgates which, when activated, are said to be capable of transporting anyone to Urithiru.Problem is though, Dalinar not only has the shadow of his past working against him, most people also think he’s gotten soft in his resolve as well as in his head, especially after he expressed beliefs that could be considered heresy. So far, much of what we’ve seen of Dalinar paints him as an honorable, principled, and valiant figure, which is one of the reasons why he’s always been a favorite of mine ever since meeting him in The Way of Kings. But the story has always teased a darkness in his past, hinting at an angry, violent, and ruthless young man before the assassination of Gavilar dramatically altered his way of thinking. There was also that mysterious business with Dalinar’s wife, whom he can’t remember at all—not even her name, which comes across as white noise in his mind if someone utters it in his hearing.As a result, many questions have been raised about Dalinar’s history, and the good news is that Oathbringer lives up to every expectation by offering up a ton of answers. Is it any wonder that this may be my favorite volume of the Stormlight Archives yet? In between telling the events of the present, the narrative also occasionally takes us back to the past, delving into Dalinar’s younger years. Admittedly, these sections weren’t always easy to read, and not just because we got to see some of the atrocities he’s committed in his youth. It was also hard to reconcile this young man, who constantly fed off his sense of “The Thrill” by seeking violence and death, with the older and wiser Dalinar I’ve come to know. Though I hated to admit it, I even came to sympathize with some of the other leaders and their reluctance in helping Dalinar, fearing him to be a tyrant who will use the Oathgates to usurp them. Still, I suppose there was some beauty in these flashback chapters, especially when Adolin was born and we got to see Dalinar react to becoming a father, but ultimately there is a lot more pain than happiness in these past sequences, and some of the terrible and heartbreaking events covered the final few flashbacks damn near broke me.Of course, Oathbringer being “Dalinar’s book” notwithstanding, Sanderson also pays plenty of attention to the other characters, developing the roles of Kaladin, Shallan, Adolin, and even those of a number of important supporting figures besides, including a few I can’t name for fear of revealing too much. Shallan in particular gets a lot of love, because following the revelation that she is a Knight Radiant, she has become something of a magical powerhouse. That said, getting a hang of her Lightweaving abilities involve a lot of growing pains, and in inventing multiple identities for herself, Shallan also risks losing the essence of who she is. Much of Shallan’s storyline sees her testing the limits of her powers and learning to become comfortable in her own skin, which also ties into her growing relationship with Adolin, who is trying to come to terms with all that is expected of him as Dalinar’s son. Their romance subplot continues to fill my girlish heart with glee though, because I still can’t get over just how damn cute the two of them are together. To be honest, Kaladin was perhaps my one source of mild disappointment, and only because his character and personality has not evolved as much compared to the others. The storming bridgeboy is still as brave, loyal, and caring as ever, but his penchant to want to save everybody all the time also means that the all-consuming guilt still gets to him when he realizes he can’t. But then again, that’s why we all love Kaladin, isn't it?Thus far, I know I’ve only mostly talked about the characters, but mainly because I think they are the heart and soul and these books. But I would be remiss if I didn’t at least mention the incredible world-building, even if I probably sound like a broken record by now, since it’s no secret that Brandon Sanderson is a genius when it comes to this area. I am in awe of the number of new ideas that are still coming out of this series though, and the astounding amount of new knowledge I gained about the world of Roshar from reading Oathbringer. The characters go to some amazing places and see some amazing things, and we learn along with them as they discover new and important information about the Desolations, the Heralds, the Oathpact, Honorblades, spren, and so much more.And finally, all I have to say about the plot is that it was epic. Virtually no other word would do to describe this magnificent feat of storytelling. While I won’t pretend that every moment of this 1200+ page tome was a riveting experience, I can honestly say I was never bored. Oathbringer was long and slow to build, but in a good way, unfolding at the kind of pace that increases anticipation rather than induces tedium, and there were also plenty of surprises and shocking developments, including both triumphs and losses. The last two hundred pages or so were something else as well. Much of the book builds towards this final showdown, when all the character POVs come together in an exhilarating, climactic battle that’s sure to knock you off your feet. You’ll remember the ending to this one for sure.All told, Oathbringer is another stunning addition to the already impressive Stormlight Archive, and I’m in love with this series more than ever. Events are starting to come together to form a clearer picture, but of course there’s still much to come in this journey, which I’m excited to continue. If you’ve been enjoying this ride as much as I have so far, trust me when I say there is no way you will want to miss this book. Read it, I say, read it!
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  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Holy c**p.This was amazing.I thought it was going to be hard to top the first two doorstoppers, but this one not only outdid the others in page-count but also in the quality of the storytelling. Every aspect of it was brilliant.I'm not usually one to gush on and on about epic fantasies. Most are pretty okay and I can slog through and eventually enjoy certain ones like GoT all right, but a few really manage to jump right out there and grab you with character, world-building, and overall story wit Holy c**p.This was amazing.I thought it was going to be hard to top the first two doorstoppers, but this one not only outdid the others in page-count but also in the quality of the storytelling. Every aspect of it was brilliant.I'm not usually one to gush on and on about epic fantasies. Most are pretty okay and I can slog through and eventually enjoy certain ones like GoT all right, but a few really manage to jump right out there and grab you with character, world-building, and overall story with heart, rage, heartache, and amazeballs reveals that are about as far away from the usual as you can get but still slam you with the reality and inevitability. I'm talking about Dalinar. I mean, sure, we get a lot of great stuff from Kaladin as he grows into his new heroic role and learns a lot of disturbing things about the Parchendi, including the fact that humanity is the invaders to this land, that we are the villains. And Shallan continues to grow as an illusionist and her love story is quite satisfying if generally on the backburner to the main action. Doesn't matter. I think I'll always love her and all her split personalities.But even though we think we've learned a lot of things about the ultra-honorable Dalinar and we're satisfied with the fact that he's bonded with the Stormfather himself, the reveals regarding his missing memory is kinda shocking, to say the least. I mean, it's kinda flooring. And now all the unspoken and referred-to actions of his younger self now make a lot more sense. He's an animal. All about the passion and the Thrill. The blood-rage, the thing that consumes all. How did he get here from there? Ah, that's the trick, no? Well, I can tell you all that it is all brilliant. :)But don't just think this is all character development. Indeed, most of it is occurring during really fantastic scenes of action or during inopportune times. The momentum is maintained. And then there's a whole squad of flying, storm-riding heroes. Matter-altering women, master illusionists, blade dancers, immortal assassins, gods, and my personal favorite... the cognitive realm itself.Oh, yes, we are treated to the homeworld of the Spren. A lot of it. And a very cool place it is. :) Nature spirits or creatures of pure thought, who cares? It's damn cool. :) And the reveals about humanity? NICE. :)I think this one might be my favorite. It obviously builds on the previous novels, but it has the wonderful distinction of not just gliding. It pushes and strives for a lot more and I couldn't be happier. :) Bravo, Sanderson! You've got a life-long fanboy here!
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  • James Lafayette Tivendale
    January 1, 1970
    This will just be a quick informal review as I know better reviewers have already written essay long assessments on what they think about Oathbringer. This is a difficult one for me to rate actually. The Stormlight Archive is probably my second favourite fantasy world following Malazan. I adore the characters so much. Kaladin is brilliant and I really liked Shallan's development, especially with reference to Veil. (We didn't get to see too much of Radiant but I'm sure she'll be important going f This will just be a quick informal review as I know better reviewers have already written essay long assessments on what they think about Oathbringer. This is a difficult one for me to rate actually. The Stormlight Archive is probably my second favourite fantasy world following Malazan. I adore the characters so much. Kaladin is brilliant and I really liked Shallan's development, especially with reference to Veil. (We didn't get to see too much of Radiant but I'm sure she'll be important going forward.) Dalinar is as confused and conflicted as ever and this time we get to see more dream sequences and also his backstory. Certain segments of the flashbacks were pretty intriguing, especially his time suffering from alcoholism, details about his ShShShShSh wife and about his meeting with the Nightwatcher. I can't help thinking that some of Dalinar's sections bored me though. I know they are super important to the story but I can't deny that I was occasionally disappointed when I saw that a 25-minute Dalinar flashback was in the middle of the more immediate action. In addition to this, I mainly found that the interludes took me away from the drama and I was often found to be rushing these sections. For all these tiny problems I had with the book, there are many amazing moments and aspects here too. Talking to Wit is always charming, crazy and interesting, Shallan's progression was really well described and intriguing, Bridge Four essentially turning into flying superheroes, and I liked a couple of the fable-like past stories that were presented to add depth to this already deep and monstrously detailed world. These tales in isolation would probably win most short story contents. Most notable to me was a short story that Shallan depicted using her drawings to bring it to life for Pattern. Speaking of Pattern - I adore the spren. I really wish I had a pet one whether they could turn into a sword or a 'sylblade' or not. Syl is my favourite and we find out a bit more about her and her past here which was really interesting. The magic's still brilliant as is normally the way in Sanderson books and as the Radiants and others get used to there powers it seems like the possibilities could be endless if the mysterious capabilities are in the right hands. I enjoyed seeing Lift in this after reading her novella - Edgedancer. It's great to find out more about the ultimate enemy Odium and talk about his nine shadows created superb imagery in my mind. Some of Szeth's chapters were slightly boring but the ending makes his 'transformation' seem worthwhile... and what's going on with his sword? The last 20-percent of the narrative was brilliant but before that I found sections dragging, therefore, it didn't quite have the unputdownability that a 5-star rating of mine needs to have. All this being said, it's still a brilliant book by arguably the best, most consistent and most reliable author writing fantasy today. I'll still pick up the 4th book in this series the day it comes out but unfortunately, this one didn't quite tick all the boxes. It's still recommended if you've read the previous two of course. This is no way a 'dud' though - the characters, magic and the world are magnificent.
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  • Simone
    January 1, 1970
    I am so in love with this world. And by that I mean Roshar - the spren! the storms! the spren! the Listener's rhythms and forms! THE SPREN! - but definitely also the entire Cosmere. Brandon Sanderson has created something incredible here and I'm enjoying every part of it.As for this book specifically, it was a terrific ride. We learned more about the history of Roshar and the desolations and we got some big developments in the current situation. There were also some great characters arcs. Shalla I am so in love with this world. And by that I mean Roshar - the spren! the storms! the spren! the Listener's rhythms and forms! THE SPREN! - but definitely also the entire Cosmere. Brandon Sanderson has created something incredible here and I'm enjoying every part of it.As for this book specifically, it was a terrific ride. We learned more about the history of Roshar and the desolations and we got some big developments in the current situation. There were also some great characters arcs. Shallan and Kaladin both had a lot to deal with, and of course dealt with it in veeeery different ways. (view spoiler)[Shallan's personal storyline actually really freaked me out. She was/is really mentally unstable and clearly needed help. I loved her conversations with Wit/Hoid. Those were some of my favourite scenes in the whole book. (hide spoiler)] Dalinar's past caught up with him and we got to see who he was, but also who he is very much becoming. (view spoiler)[The things he's done, though! He was a disgusting human being. The flashback with Evi's death was so disturbing and haunting. (hide spoiler)] Navani had to hold everything together when Dalinar couldn't. Adolin had to find a way to deal with this new world and his place in it. (view spoiler)[I love him a Shallan so much together! That scene where she basically confessed her love to him was GORGEOUS. Before this book, I was rooting for her and Kaladin (or for Kaladin and Adolin, but that was a wild dream), but now I'm fully on board with Shallan and Adolin. Good thing, too, as they're now married. :) (hide spoiler)] Jasnah... was fucking awesome. Renarin was explored a little more, though I still want to know SO MUCH MORE about him. I want his flashbacks. A bunch of the bridgemen got some extra focus in this book, and I loved that.Unless I'm forgetting someone, this book even gave us our first officially gay Sanderson character! I know it wasn't a big deal in the book, but it brought a huge grin to my face. EDIT: I was corrected by Daniel in the comments, because of course there's Ranette from the Wax & Wayne Mistborn books! :)Oh, and Cosmere developments! I am such a geek when it comes to worldhoppers and other magics crossing over. I probably missed some of it, but everything I noticed got me so excited! (view spoiler)[Nightblood, obviously, but also Vasher and Vivenna! I need to see more of them. Why are they not together now? I want to see them meet up again! In related news, I need to reread Warbreaker :DBut also more Hoid. A LOT more Hoid. And he's becoming a Radiant now, bonding the spren that Elhokar (RIP) almost bonded, if I'm not mistaken. The spren was like a cryptic like Pattern, so I'm assuming he's becoming a Lightweaver. Definitely fits him; actually, he can already do some very similar things. So does he just want the powers, or is he actually going to join the other Radiants? Because that would be ridiculously awesome. Either way, I'd love to hear his truths! (hide spoiler)] I'm gonna go explore the forums soon, see what I missed!On the whole, I just adore all of these characters. At this point, after about 3500 pages with them, I've grown entirely attached to them. And the spren! Syl and Pattern are definitelly some of my favourite characters. Along with Shallan, of course, and Rock and Lopen (view spoiler)[and now Rua! (hide spoiler)], and Lift! God, I adore Lift. (view spoiler)[Her scenes with Szeth were glorious. Now there's a brilliant pair. Especially with Nightblood in the mix too! (hide spoiler)] And Wit, but I don't think that needs saying.I didn't reread the first two books before jumping into this one, because that would have taken months, and I was reading other things. I was mostly fine; I never felt lost, but I do think it would have been even even better if I had. I think before the next one comes out - which will probably be three years from now - I'll take about a year to slowly make my way through the first three (and Edgedancer!) again. Similarly, I want to reread Mistborn 4-6 before The Lost Metal comes out and a bunch more of his books before they get sequels. Basically, there's a lot of Sanderson to (re)read, even if I am caught up now, so I don't have to feel too sad that I've finished this.--------------WE HAVE A COVER!!! That's just stunning, can't wait to get my hands on it!---------------I'm extremely excited about this book and my sister knows that, so she did a thing. A brilliant thing. She made me the book:ISN'T IT GORGEOUS? IT IS. IT TOTALLY IS. If the actual book looks like this, I'll be thrilled. AMAZING SISTER. AND I CAN'T WAIT FOR THIS BOOK.
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  • ❄️Nani❄️
    January 1, 1970
    You NAILED IT. You... genius human.First of all, this is NOT a review. There are plenty of well-spoken, coherent people in here who can give this book the justice it deserves far better than I can. This is me incoherently recounting my emotional state while I was reading it.WOW. So freaking much happened that I don't even know where to begin. It all started out well and mellow. There were lighthearted funny moments and all around ‘’calm’’-ish (well, as calm as can be expected) atmosphere as the You NAILED IT. You... genius human.First of all, this is NOT a review. There are plenty of well-spoken, coherent people in here who can give this book the justice it deserves far better than I can. This is me incoherently recounting my emotional state while I was reading it.WOW. So freaking much happened that I don't even know where to begin. It all started out well and mellow. There were lighthearted funny moments and all around ‘’calm’’-ish (well, as calm as can be expected) atmosphere as the journey of our heroes picked up right from where WoR left off - racing against time, trying to stop the annihilation of mankind (You know how it goes). WELL! In no time, like a true BS fashion, the shitstorm of epic proportions left me sleepless; unable to think of anything else, pacing around my room muttering ‘what the shit just got revealed!’, and with one hell of a migraine! I kid you not, my head is still pounding from the lack of sleep.🤕As the fates of our leads were hanging on by a thread (a very thin one, mind you), the shocking revelations that came to light and the things I DID NOT see coming which kept hitting me from every direction sent me on a wave of emotions I didn’t even know I had. One minute I'm at the edge of my seat, eyes wide open over what I’d just read, terrified of what’d come next (after Mistborn, I learned never to trust Sanderson with my beloveds. I’m still haunted by some memories), the next I’m yelling - damn Sanderson, yes! you just dropped the mic! And then of course, back to, what the actual fuck just happened. I'm also pretty certain that I missed some crucial parts as I was racing to the finish line, which shall be rectified in my next re-read. How is it that Sanderson always manages to turn me into an emotional mess!?Dalinar's flashbacks were epic! As his past is integral to his arc in the present, finding out about the ‘beast’ before the tamed warrior, why the rest of the continent is so reluctant to trust him, and his constant internal conflicts was a page-turner. I mean, wow. Talk about a tortured soul. And of course, the one and only beloved, Kaladin Stormblessed. Though he’s not completely let go of the darkness within him, he's matured in more ways than one and can now better deal with the new conflicts that he's faced with that bare a heavy weight on his shoulders. It was also amazing to see the other members of Bridge Four get time in the spotlight that coincide with Kaldin’s arc in the climax.The characters that Sanderson creates are so insanely complex and riveting. No one’s ever completely innocent or saintly. They all have their flaws, shortcomings and... good people end up doing some completely messed up shit. Which makes them human and utterly relatable. I LOVE THEM ALL! Including the 'villains'. You find yourself sympathising even with them as their for-the-greater-good intentions come to light (Wait, no. Some Just belong in the gutter).And the world & magic system?... well, to say it is amazing would be an insult. Simple as that.Whenever I read any BS books (which I end up completely loving), I find myself asking, do I love this because of its content or am I being biased because I love the author? Well, trust me, this series is worthy of praise all on its own merits. As well as his other books. I’m just giving credit where credit is due. However, that’s not to say that I didn’t miss certain things from the past two books. The biggest of which being, the dialogues between Kaladin and Dalinar. Every conversation between them carried such depth and weigh that I wish I saw some of that here as well. The other thing being, Shallan. Though I loved her in the previous books and her powers seem to have improved, I found myself getting so very annoyed with her here. There were moments she did more harm than good. In a nutshell, she was batshit crazy. One last note, that's right - he did it again!Furthermore, apologies because this was messy as shit! But I did warn you. Incoherent, questionable emotional state. Now I'm off to pick up some fun comic book or binge-watch Friends cause I’m in some serious need of laughter.
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  • Helen 2.0
    January 1, 1970
    "Having power is a terrible burden, the worst thing imaginable, except for every other alternative." Power and its burden seems to be a major theme in Oathbringer, which features a number of exciting and frustrating developments in its 1200 pages. (The most frustrating revelation of all is the fact that we will be waiting until 2020 at least for the fourth installment.)Every Stormlight Archive volume is a character study of a different Knight Radiant; first Kaladin, then Shallan, and now Dalina "Having power is a terrible burden, the worst thing imaginable, except for every other alternative." Power and its burden seems to be a major theme in Oathbringer, which features a number of exciting and frustrating developments in its 1200 pages. (The most frustrating revelation of all is the fact that we will be waiting until 2020 at least for the fourth installment.)Every Stormlight Archive volume is a character study of a different Knight Radiant; first Kaladin, then Shallan, and now Dalinar. Oathbringer focuses heavily on Dalinar’s past as the Blackthorn and the violent history he’s tried to put behind him through discipline and honor. "You stand where you do because of a brutal determination to do what had to be done. It is because of that trail of corpses that you have the luxury to uphold some lofty, nebulous code. Well, it might make you feel better about your past, but morality is not a thing you can simply doff to put on the helm of battle, then put back on when you’re done with the slaughter.” Branderson definitely did not hold back on Dalinar’s characterization, turning him into a tortured man with a frightening past. What’s more, constant flashbacks to the mind of the Blackthorn did not detract at all from Dalinar’s plotline in the present, as I sometimes felt was the case with Shallan in Words of Radiance.Kaladin faces bigger challenges than ever before in this book; his Windrunner ideals are rocked badly when he once again faces that, in a war, you cannot protect everyone, even if both sides are right in some way. Although I thought he was pushed to the sidelines a little to broaden our perspective of Roshar; chapters that may have followed Kal were instead dedicated to Teft, Venli, Moash, Renarin, and other emerging players on the field. Still, Kaladin gets some great lines, like: "Ten spears go to battle, and nine shatter. Did that war forge the one that remained? No. All the war did was identify the spear that would not break.” Mild spoilers in this paragraph only – speaking of Kal, Oathbringer saw the unfortunate crash and burn of my favorite ship, Kallan. I was obviously disappointed, not so much that things didn’t pan out the way I would have liked, but rather that Branderson spent SO MUCH TIME building up their relationship in Words of Radiance that I ended book 3 feeling vaguely cheated. Why set up a mutual attraction, both physical and emotional, between two characters then dismiss it offhand in a single chapter? From the hilarious scene where Kal and Shallan first met, through the entire chasmfiend fiasco, then all the little moments in Oathbringer when even Syl was shipping it – all casually pushed aside in a single scene. That felt kind of unfair. If the author was going to make Shallan endgame with someone else, there at least should have been more drama surrounding her final choice after all the buildup.Overall, I liked that Oathbringer widened its focus a little more beyond the human scope and gave insight into the parshmen and spren worlds. In over 3000 pages of the series so far, things would have gotten old if we stuck with the same old characters. In book 4 I hope to read more from Lift, Venli, Jasnah, and Renarin.Let me leave off with this fun little note Branderson may or may not have left to all his critics: "That a thing is hated is not proof that it’s great art, but the lack of hatred is certainly proof that it is not.”
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  • Celeste
    January 1, 1970
    Full review now posted!Rating: 6/5 starsThis book deserves all the stars in the Cosmere. And then some.When I read The Way of Kings, it became one of my favorite books of all time. When I read Words of Radiance, it supplanted its predecessor, which I find to be incredibly rare for a second book in a series. I was understandably impressed, but while I was excited for Oathbringer, I honestly believed there was no way it could be better than the books that came before it. I’ve never in my life been Full review now posted!Rating: 6/5 starsThis book deserves all the stars in the Cosmere. And then some.When I read The Way of Kings, it became one of my favorite books of all time. When I read Words of Radiance, it supplanted its predecessor, which I find to be incredibly rare for a second book in a series. I was understandably impressed, but while I was excited for Oathbringer, I honestly believed there was no way it could be better than the books that came before it. I’ve never in my life been happier to have been proven wrong. Sanderson absolutely blew me away with Oathbringer. I don’t how he did it, but I’m ecstatic that he did.In The Way of Kings, we got Kaladin’s back story, which I loved. In Words of Radiance, we learned about the past that shaped Shallan. Here, in Oathbringer, it is Dalinar’s turn. His past has so far been the most painful to read about in my opinion, because the man he used to be is so vastly different from the man he is today. Something I really appreciated was the fact that we were getting his flashback scenes as he himself remembered them, allowing readers to feel like they were truly making this journey step for step with Dalinar. His past is both fascinating and incredibly disturbing.However, as with the preceding books, Dalinar is far from the only perspective we receive. We get more of Kaladin, Shallan, Adolin, and others who I won’t list because I don’t want to spoil anything. One thing I absolutely loved was the inclusion of Bridge Four chapters, from the perspectives of various bridgemen. This was a wonderful gift Sanderson included for his fans. Watching the Knights Radiant expand and grow and even take squires was absolutely wonderful to behold. Yet again, the Words spoken were powerful and varied and moving. I love the Ideals Sanderson has created here, as I think they make for incredibly powerful words to live by for both character and reader. But sometimes those Words feel impossible to say, and we’re unable to choke them out. I like that this struggle isn’t shied away from in the series. Saying the Words isn’t easy; if it was, everyone would be a Radiant. What makes someone Radiant potential is the immense pain they’ve experienced and their ability to rise above it, even as they continue to struggle.There was an immense amount of character development in this book, for both our main characters and side characters. Some characters struggled with their identity, incapable of accepting themselves for who they are. Depression was battled, and it wasn’t always conquered. Addictions reared their ugly heads and refused to be ignored. Demons from the past plagued their hosts and laughed at the pain they inflicted. Decisions were questioned and regretted. Everything the characters went through made them feel so incredibly alive. Sanderson showed us raw, real people, and he exposed their pain and struggles to us. But he also showed us their triumphs, which were made all the more poignant because we witnessed the fight to attain them. In my opinion, the central theme of this book was one of forgiveness and acceptance, mostly of yourself. It’s about knowing your flaws and accepting them as part of you. It’s about not hiding who you are, even if you don’t like who that person is. It’s about owning up to your mistakes and learning from them. It’s about knowing that you’re broken, perhaps beyond repair, and loving yourself anyway. It’s about people’s powerful ability to heal other people, and in the process lessen their own pain. It’s about sharing the pain with friends, because no one can shoulder a bridge alone. It’s about crying when you need to and finding a way to laugh through the tears. It’s about flinging your arms wide and letting the sun shine on your scars when you’d rather wallow in the shadows. It’s about accepting that life is hard and imperfect and unfair and embracing it anyway."Accept the pain, but don't accept that you deserved it."This book moved me. I laughed and cried and raged. Its over 1,200 pages passed by too quickly, but reading it was an incredible experience. Yes, now the waiting game begins for book 4, but if the first three books are any indication, it will be well worth the wait.I’d like to thank my marvelous friend TS for not only sending me this beautiful book as an early Christmas gift, but for being there to laugh and cry and rage with me as I read. She made an already incredible experience even more wonderful.Original review can be found at Booknest.
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  • ☽Luna☾
    January 1, 1970
    *screams for eternity over this wonderfully glorious cover* This book will end my life.I expect to have a heart attack after finishing this.Counting the days until release in November..
  • Liam Degnan
    January 1, 1970
    **UPDATE: Because ever since I read this book it has completely wrecked me from making significant progress on anything else. It's the sign of a great book when a month and three other books can pass, and your mind is still trapped by this one. Read at your own risk 😭😭😭😭.** “The question is not whether you will love, hurt, dream, and die. It is what you will love, why you will hurt, when you will dream, and how you will die. This is your choice. You cannot pick the destination, only the path.” **UPDATE: Because ever since I read this book it has completely wrecked me from making significant progress on anything else. It's the sign of a great book when a month and three other books can pass, and your mind is still trapped by this one. Read at your own risk 😭😭😭😭.** “The question is not whether you will love, hurt, dream, and die. It is what you will love, why you will hurt, when you will dream, and how you will die. This is your choice. You cannot pick the destination, only the path.” A Full Five Stars: ✰✰✰✰✰ So here's the thing - I'm a slow reader, and also a slow writer, so this review is coming behind a myriad of other reviews singing this book's praises. I’ve almost been hesitant to even write a review because of that. I can't say anything beyond what has already been said - mainly, that this book is simply outstanding, surpassing my expectations and more. But I can talk about why this book was special and significant to me personally. Really - seriously - this book was amazing, in so many different ways, but it's not just the great world building, epic plot, and compelling characters that would make me recommend this book or this series. I will recommend The Stormlight Archive to literally everybody I know because of the impact it has made on me personally, and that’s not something I can convey in a five star rating or by talking about what I think is really the artistic genius of Brandon Sanderson. Each of these books was released at a time in my life when I was going through some huge transition phases, and times of confusion in a lot of ways. Including this book. It's actually a little creepy haha. The Way of Kings came out when I was fourteen, dealing with insecurity, isolation, and major depression. I didn't have any friends, because nobody liked me - and I couldn't blame them - but I wanted to change, and this time of my life was hugely formative because of that. Words of Radiance came out when I was 17 and starting out in the career I have now (insurance sales), while finishing my degree online - which was completely daunting to me at the time. I remember being in one of my insurance classes, reading my huge hard cover of Words of Radiance during every break that we had, and it took me literally two months to finish it because I was still taking my regular online classes as well.And then there's this book. I'm now 21, and I (at least I think) have become an emotionally healthy person haha; I have loads of experience in a career I've managed to make work, am married to my best friend, and we now have a baby on the way, which has brought about another huge transition phase for us. I hold really unique emotional ties to a lot of the characters in these books, and even certain aspects of the story, that I've never felt before with any other book series. Reading about Kaladin coming to terms with past hurt, and dealing with his pain and depression in the present, was always something that encouraged me. I needed those kinds of reminders - that it's possible to overcome, even after being brought so low. Reading Shallan's story helped me as I was fighting to become somebody better than who I was. It reminded me that the only way we can become the person we're supposed to be is by admitting to the wrongs of our past, accepting even the painful things of life, and then learning to truly confront it, rather than push it under the surface. Because sometimes it's okay to hurt.Reading about Dalinar, in a different sense, made me so thankful for redemption. That we are not defined simply by who we were, but by who we choose to be: “Sometimes a hypocrite is nothing more than a man in the process of changing.” I can't really even put into words why these things are so meaningful to me. Even just putting the books aside, these are lessons that have worked their way into the heart of who I am as a person, and finding a book (or a series) that resonates with me like this just doesn't happen. I don't want to give away any spoilers, but this book in particular added A LOT, not just to the incredible story, but also to the themes that were previously developed in the first two books. This will probably always be my favorite series of all time because of this.*cough* Okay, now that my emotional dump is finished, I'll say a few more technical things about this book. Normally I'd have a bunch of quotes in my review, but there were SO MANY GOOD QUOTES that were unfortunately also minor spoilers, so I didn't want to include anything that could be a potential giveaway. But this book surprised me. Sanderson took the story in a direction that I actually wasn't expecting, with a lot more tension, a whole lot of blood and brutality, and plenty of twists and turns along the way. This was by far the most intense book yet in this series. The characters were developed even more fully than the prior books, with a spotlight on Dalinar and flashbacks into his life. Honestly, my favorite POV from this book was Bridge Four. Getting a little glimpse from the POV of several of my favorite characters from Bridge Four was awesome, and I only wish we would have had a little bit more than what we got. The worldbuilding, as always, was top notch. This is Sanderson's masterpiece in this regard, and it just keeps getting better with each and every book. In Conclusion: You'll hear a lot of people saying that "this book was better than the first two" or "this book wasn't as good as the first two", and while I can understand where those people are coming from, each of these books is different enough that it's extremely hard to compare them. All three of them sit pretty equally with me because of that, and the quality of the writing, worldbuilding, and character development never varies at all. This is Sanderson at his best. If you have not yet started this series, I literally can't emphasize enough how highly I recommend them. If you have read the first two books but have reservations about book number three - fear not haha. You will not be disappointed. For this review and more, check out my blog: Thoughts of a Thousand Lives. Happy reading =].
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  • Niki Hawkes - The Obsessive Bookseller
    January 1, 1970
    While trying to compose a review that will do this series justice, the question becomes not whether Oathbringer was an amazing installment in the Stormlight Archive series, but how do I explain how fiercely I loved it without gushing like a fangirl? Suffice to say it’s on a pedestal. I can see so many of the brilliant ideas within it shaping fantasy works for decades to come. It truly is the next evolution in the genre similar to that brought on by the likes of Jordan and Tolkien. At least, that While trying to compose a review that will do this series justice, the question becomes not whether Oathbringer was an amazing installment in the Stormlight Archive series, but how do I explain how fiercely I loved it without gushing like a fangirl? Suffice to say it’s on a pedestal. I can see so many of the brilliant ideas within it shaping fantasy works for decades to come. It truly is the next evolution in the genre similar to that brought on by the likes of Jordan and Tolkien. At least, that’s how I feel about it.Expansive world building always wins me over, and I can think of very few worlds as impressive as Sanderson’s Roshar. Stormlight Archive is a series that encompasses many different cultures across this island continent. Sanderson provides a constant infusion of these races by highlighting their differences (and celebrating their similarities). This variety of humanity is easily my favorite element. I’ve experienced so many exotic places in this series alone – it truly is a wonder. It is world building like this that makes me ecstatic to be a reader.I especially loved learning more about each culture through the diverse cast of characters within Bridge Four (even if I am just an “airsick lowlander”). I’ve always loved the characters in this series, but I think Oathbringer is the first book I’ve also appreciated their complexity/duality. They’re definitely not cookie-cutter profiles with mildly interesting back-stories, but deeply flawed individuals with more than just the external conflicts to overcome. If the first two books delved into Kaladin and Shallan’s past, respectively, then book three was an exploration of the events that shaped Dalinar. Even minor characters in this series are rich and interesting, and I eat up all new information revealed about every single one of them. There were a few new characters that got to share the limelight in Oathbringer (brought in from the interludes in previous books) and I delighted in how they changed the dynamics of the story.If I’m honest, I’ll admit that there were a few moments throughout Oathbringer where I wondered if the pacing was a little too slow (keeping in mind that I didn’t have a single issue with pacing for the first two 1000+ page novels). It had me considering if it was enough of an issue to take away from my enjoyment of all the other amazing elements. Ultimately, it wasn’t because every time I thought it, something profound would happen to reel me back in. Then the snowball climax of the story hit and all of my hesitations were swept away. The book felt different than the first two, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it was weaker. My friend Liam, over at Thoughts of a Thousand Lives, summed up my internal debate perfectly: “…each of these books is different enough that it’s extremely hard to compare them. All three of them sit pretty equally with me because of that, and the quality of the writing, worldbuilding, and character development never varies at all.”And that’s the crux of it – all of the things I’ve come to expect from a Sanderson novel were there in abundance. Overall, Oathbringer contained all of the plot advancement and amazing moments I’d hoped to get out of it. Multiply that with the fact that the tome itself is a gorgeous piece of art filled with sketches and diagrams that enhance the story, and you have a reading experience unlike no other. I applaud Sanderson’s ambition and commitment to this project, as I could see how he could have easily wrapped it up in this third book and left a few things unresolved (as many authors have done). What a delight that one of my favorite series on the market continues strong with many more novels to come. If you haven’t ventured into this series yet, you are sorely missing out!I want to say a HUGE thank you to the publicists at TOR/Forge and Brandon Sanderson for sending me an early copy of Oathbringer for review. You made my year! :DVia The Obsessive Bookseller at www.NikiHawkes.com Other books you might like:
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  • Leah Steele
    January 1, 1970
    Soo I just saw that there are going to be ten books in this series. Ten? 10?! TEN?!! So, what you're telling me is that I'm going to be in my mid 40's before I get to see the end of this story... damn
  • Warda
    January 1, 1970
    THE PROLOGUE HAS BEEN RELEASED AND IT IS FUCKIN PERFECTION!!!!!!! Can someone read it so we may fangirl like lunatics?! Thanks!Link: https://www.tor.com/2017/08/22/oathbr...---------------------------------------------------YOU GUYS WE HAVE A COVER!! THE UK COVER IS PERFECTION! P-E-R-F-E-C-T-I-O-N! I want to cry endlessly! This series is probably the best fantasy story out there and I CANNOT WAIT TO REREAD THE FIRST TWO BOOKS AGAIN! I still remember how I felt reading them! FUCKIN GLORIOUS! NOVE THE PROLOGUE HAS BEEN RELEASED AND IT IS FUCKIN PERFECTION!!!!!!! Can someone read it so we may fangirl like lunatics?! Thanks!Link: https://www.tor.com/2017/08/22/oathbr...---------------------------------------------------YOU GUYS WE HAVE A COVER!! THE UK COVER IS PERFECTION! P-E-R-F-E-C-T-I-O-N! I want to cry endlessly! This series is probably the best fantasy story out there and I CANNOT WAIT TO REREAD THE FIRST TWO BOOKS AGAIN! I still remember how I felt reading them! FUCKIN GLORIOUS! NOVEMBER HURRY PLEASE!!!
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  • Robin (Bridge Four)
    January 1, 1970
    5 "Sometimes a hypocrite is nothing more than a person who is in the process of changing" StarsSpoiler Free Section:I always feel like I get more when I read a Sanderson book. Not only is the story fantastic but the book itself is always beautiful. The art inside the book, maps and the cover jacket are always exquisite and make owning the hardback a necessity. Then there is the audio which is always well performed and makes something this size even more enjoyable when you can switch back and for 5 "Sometimes a hypocrite is nothing more than a person who is in the process of changing" StarsSpoiler Free Section:I always feel like I get more when I read a Sanderson book. Not only is the story fantastic but the book itself is always beautiful. The art inside the book, maps and the cover jacket are always exquisite and make owning the hardback a necessity. Then there is the audio which is always well performed and makes something this size even more enjoyable when you can switch back and forth. This will be another Sanderson book I end up having in 4 different formats.Oathbringer was my most anticipated book of 2017 and it just about lived up to every expectation I had even if it wasn’t in the ways I thought it would.For one it is a bit darker than the prior installments. Dalinar, Shallan, Kaladin and Renarin all had moments that were quite depressing and character wrenching. This surprised me a little because I really thought I’d see Adolin struggling with the events at the end of Word of Radiance but I guess not.I ADORE Dalinar, he is one of my favorite written characters of all time and it was hard to see him as The Blackthorn and reconcile them as the same man. Mostly because The Blackthorn is a pretty big jerkface. Good thing I got to know Dalinar first since that other guy could have ruined our love.Some of the things I liked the most are that I’m always surprised in a Sanderson book. There are things you just know are going to be a big deal and then they are thrown out just randomly without fanfare. Then there are other moments that you had no idea would be HUGE and important and then they come along and hit you right up side the head with a huge thwack. Parts IV and V of the book I was on the edge of my seat, couldn’t possibly sleep, must know what will happen.In this there was/were:- Reunions that made me cry- Moments that made me cheer- A character, or two actually, I might hate more than Sadeas- The resolution to a potential love triangle (whew)- Cross Over Characters I was so happy to see- My new favorite duo/threesome ever (view spoiler)[Lift/Szeth/Nightblood (hide spoiler)]- Jasnah as a badass. Seriously she rocked it so hard.- Kaladin and Syl Hugging I SHIP IT!!! really it has no hope but I ship it anyway.- Conversations with the Stormfather These were some of the most enlightening parts of the story- Scary Unmade- And Much Much More.There is too much to tell. This remains my favorite EPIC Fantasy series of all time to date.The spoilery section is coming soon. There will be so many spoilers.
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  • Sean Gibson
    January 1, 1970
    It’s self-evident that if you’re reading book three of a series that requires a Sherpa to place each volume on your bookshelf and that is part of a series that has, as of yet, SEVEN unpublished volumes to come (don’t you die on us, Sanderson—DON’T YOU DIE!), you probably enjoyed the first two (in my case, check and check). So, if you’re reading this and wondering if you should dive into this series despite the fact that there are rumors (as yet uncorroborated, though we’re working on it) that OJ It’s self-evident that if you’re reading book three of a series that requires a Sherpa to place each volume on your bookshelf and that is part of a series that has, as of yet, SEVEN unpublished volumes to come (don’t you die on us, Sanderson—DON’T YOU DIE!), you probably enjoyed the first two (in my case, check and check). So, if you’re reading this and wondering if you should dive into this series despite the fact that there are rumors (as yet uncorroborated, though we’re working on it) that OJ Simpson used a hardcover copy of the second book to kill a cocktail waitress and a pool boy, then the answer is yes, you absolutely should. Sanderson is as mind-blowing a world builder as there is in fantasy today, and his writing chops are more than solid. I’ll note that I’ve liked each successive book in the series slightly less than its predecessor, but, given that I’d still call book three “really freaking good,” that shouldn’t be taken as a suggestion to stay away. Book three tailed off a bit for two minor reasons (I’m still disturbed by the blatant eye color-related prejudice and I’m mildly worried that he blew his plot wad too early) and one bigger one, which I’ll delve into below. But, suffice it to say, if you’re on the fence about taking the plunge, throw caution to the wind, take out a life insurance policy on Mr. Sanderson, and dive in. Now then: about that length…(If I had a nickel every time I’d heard THAT from someone…well, I’d have five cents, which would be pretty swell. But, I digress.)Look, I love a massive, sprawling epic as much as the next fantasy reader. I had a concentration in Victorian lit as an English major in undergrad, which should tell you something about my affinity for things that are overwritten and far longer and more complex than they need to be (see, for example, my review of The Turn of the Screw and, oh, the entire first half of The Camelot Shadow). But, and it’s a big but (unlike my own, which, sadly, is flatter than a portable hole and offers no appeal for those who are inclined toward juicy doubles), things are getting out of control in epic fantasy land.I blame George Martin (and his editor), at least in part, as each subsequent volume of A Song of Fire and Ice kept getting bigger and bigger and slaying more forests and selling more copies—that gave editors the idea that bigger is better, which has unleashed an entire generation of epic (and grimdark) fantasy writers who are padding page counts, Sanderson foremost among them. And, yes—it’s the length and depth of those stories that gives them their appeal, and it’s clearly not turning readers off, based on how well Sanderson/Rothfuss/Lynch/Goodkind/etc. are selling. Sanderson, whose prodigious output once allegedly caused a thousand monkeys to not only throw out their typewriters, but to swear off ever even trying to write Hamlet again, is the undisputed word count champ amongst this group, and one wonders if his vast intellectual horsepower and burgeoning reputation as a fantasy titan are scaring his editors away from suggesting that he maybe do a little judicious pruning to speed things up a bit here and there. Now, I’m not a professional editor, but even I could have hacked 150 pages out of Oathbringer without diminishing the quality of the story (and likely improving it). Sanderson makes it work because his characters are, by and large, sufficiently compelling that you’re okay hanging out with them for extended periods of time where just tweezing nose hairs and Q-tipping out some earwax* while they banter, but there are multiple stretches in the book where I found myself feeling like I was at the part of a Def Leppard concert at the County Fair where they go, “And now we want to play you something off our brand new album!” and everyone goes to the bathroom so they can get back in time for the closing Rocket/Hysteria/Pour Some Sugar on Me triptych. I don’t want to pee when I’m reading Sanderson (I mean, I know I NEED to pee at some point over the course of the 1,200+ pages, but you know what I mean). A little editing goes a long way, so consider this a polite plea to consider the plight of the full-bladdered reader, the guy at the Def Leppard concert in Kalamazoo who’s about seven Bud Lights deep into the evening and is so relieved when the band cues up some hackneyed, watered-down 2018 retread of Have You Ever Needed Someone So Bad (which, incidentally, is an epic and awesome song—fact) that they nearly pee themselves on the way to the urinal, only to get the stage fright when they get there because they have to pee into the trough and they find that they just can’t pee when their hip is sandwiched between (and touching) two other dudes’ hips, like there’s a pee-stop button embedded in his hip bone. Because I don’t want to be that guy (again). Regardless, looking forward to book four. I’m off to send Mr. Sanderson some vegetables so we can keep him healthy and, failing that, to look into cryogenically freezing his head…*There was no actual tweezing or Q-tipping, but there probably could have been and his editors would have left it in.
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  • Mila B
    January 1, 1970
    March 2014: Wait, what? 2015? Brandon just published Words of Radiance, and he is giving us Skybreaker a year and maybe some later? So soon? I got so used to waiting on Martin that I can hardly believe how efficient Brandon it.
  • Choko
    January 1, 1970
    *** 4.75 ***This book was all about accepting the journey and the multitude of faults and falls it consists of, rather than look at where it has gotten you and what the destination was to begin with... The first book was the journey of Kaladin, the second Shallan's, and this one is all about Dalinar, the Blackthorn! I might write a review, eventually, when I am more capable of gathering all my thoughts, but for now I just need to say - READ THIS SERIES! IT IS AWESOME!!! "...“You are not a hereti *** 4.75 ***This book was all about accepting the journey and the multitude of faults and falls it consists of, rather than look at where it has gotten you and what the destination was to begin with... The first book was the journey of Kaladin, the second Shallan's, and this one is all about Dalinar, the Blackthorn! I might write a review, eventually, when I am more capable of gathering all my thoughts, but for now I just need to say - READ THIS SERIES! IT IS AWESOME!!! "...“You are not a heretic, Dalinar Kholin. You are a king, a Radiant, and a father. You are a man with complicated beliefs, who does not accept everything you are told. You decide how you are defined. Don’t surrender that to them. They will gleefully take the chance to define you, if you allow it.”..." This series, this author, this Cosmere Universe .... All of it is something no fan of a good story should miss! "...“I will take responsibility for what I have done,” Dalinar whispered. “If I must fall, I will rise each time a better man.”..."
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  • Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁ Rabid Reads-no-more
    January 1, 1970
    Inner-cover artwork from OATHBRINGER (b/c Tor sent me a final copy of the book for review):(view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] <— — not really a spoiler, but I tagged it anyway, just in cases someone doesn’t want to see the artwork before the actual book is in their hands.My other reviews for this series: The Way of Kings (The Stormlight Archive, #1) Words of Radiance (The Stormlight Archive #2)
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    Review for Way of Kings Review for Words of Radiance No surprise here that a Stormlight book clocks in at 5 stars. I think this book really establishes Sanderson as THE preeminent epic fantasy writer of our day (and I will Internet fight you if you disagree). Before diving into spoilery analysis of the book let me say this was on level with the previous two books: amazing world building (natch), nuanced character development, wonderful story punctuated by excellent plot twists, and a weaving to Review for Way of Kings Review for Words of Radiance No surprise here that a Stormlight book clocks in at 5 stars. I think this book really establishes Sanderson as THE preeminent epic fantasy writer of our day (and I will Internet fight you if you disagree). Before diving into spoilery analysis of the book let me say this was on level with the previous two books: amazing world building (natch), nuanced character development, wonderful story punctuated by excellent plot twists, and a weaving together of all these elements for maximal impact. In other words: Classic SandersonSo now join me, if you will, as I dive into some spoilery details.(view spoiler)[So, just like all the other books, this one focuses on the backstory of a character. In this case it is Dalinar, the book boyfriend of many of my GR friends apparently. We already know he has a somewhat troubled past whose memories he asked a powerful being to remove from him. As they slowly return we develop a deeper appreciation of how Dalinar and his brother forged together the Kingdom as well as the tragedy around his wife, his spiral into alcoholism, and the emotional devastation he suffers anew as his memories return. And this doesn't just happen in a vacuum. The effects of his returning memories have significant impacts on the course of events and also alter how Dalinar views leadership and coalition forging. Sanderson's deft touch merges these two threads together seamlessly to deliver a pivotal and emotional story arc.In fact that seems to be the theme among most of the major characters, they are all, in their own way, broken. We already have seen the brokenness of Kaladin and Shallan but we get to see how other characters also struggle with their own weaknesses: Teft, Nale, Elhokar, Szeth, Adolin, Taravagian, Moash. Oathbringer is about the journey, about knowing that no matter where you are in life you are not at the end, you can push on and become a better person. Once again Sanderson deftly integrates this individual journey into the wider story and uses the personal struggles of the characters to propel the story forward.I very much enjoyed the introduction of Odium as a character. Before we only knew him as a nebulous force, now we know more of his personality and what drives him. It is fascinating that his deal seems to be to relieve his followers of their guilt. He offers himself as the cause for all the terrible things that have befallen them and offers a sort of absolution for their past sins in exchange for fealty. It is a very seductive offer and is the antithesis of the book's theme of striving for self-improvement and self-forgiveness.But by far the biggest game changers of the book were the revelations that humans were the originally Voidbringers, travelers from a distant world that had destroyed their own world through surgebinding (the powers of the Radiants). This throws the entire conflict into a new moral light. No longer is it a conflict between humans defending their realm from invading voidbringers, it is now a conflict of the indigenous population fighting to overthrow their invaders and oppressors. I must admit this turn threw me for a loop (not that I should be surprised, this is Sanderson after all). The fact that it was humans who brought Odium to the world and then changed allegiance to Honor was just another fascinating wrinkle we have all come to expect from Sanderson.And then, on top of all of this, Sanderson goes and humanized the Parshendi. They are, not surprisingly, just like humans and even have traits similiar to the local culture. They live, they love, they fear, they just want to get along without anyone bothering them (or, in the case of the Azish Parshendi, filling out the necessary forms). Of course the ancient Parshendi souls that seek revenge on humans from thousands of years ago have different plans for them. And isn't that the way it is more most wars? The people doing the fighting aren't the ones who started the war in the first place and certainly aren't the ones who will benefit from the spoils of war. At its heart war is an exploitative undertaking, crushing the little guy to enrich those in power. Even at the beginning of the series it was the common soldier on the Shattered Plains that fought, bled, and died so the lighteyes could reap the wealth of gemhearts. Granted the coming Desolation will likely be a fight for species survival (though who knows, Sanderson has pulled plenty of quick ones on the readers before), the Fused will likely disproportionately benefit from any eventual Parshendi victory.All in all Oathbringer upped the Stormlight game on many levels: story, world building, character development. Obviously I want the next seven books now but we don't live in a perfect world. Still, I am eagerly waiting for the next one (and, to be honest, all of Sanderson's upcoming books). (hide spoiler)]And if you STILL aren't sure about picking this book up after reading 2,000+ pages in this series already Tor has been kind enough (or crazy enough) to offer up the ENTIRE FIRST PART for free:Prologue Chapters 1-3Chapters 4-6Chapters 7-9Chapters 10-12Chapters 13-15Chapters 16-18Chapters 19-21Chapters 22-24Chapters 25-27Chapters 28-30Chapters 31-32
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  • Bookwraiths
    January 1, 1970
    Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths.Having recently finished a binge read of the first three novels in The Stormlight Archive, I can honestly say my mind is filled with this intricately detailed, amazingly epic story, so much so that I am finding it difficult to put into words my feelings for this series and, specifically, its third installment: Oathbringer. Mainly, this is due to the distinct originality and uniqueness of this book, which is hard to adequately describe. The world of Roshar far d Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths.Having recently finished a binge read of the first three novels in The Stormlight Archive, I can honestly say my mind is filled with this intricately detailed, amazingly epic story, so much so that I am finding it difficult to put into words my feelings for this series and, specifically, its third installment: Oathbringer. Mainly, this is due to the distinct originality and uniqueness of this book, which is hard to adequately describe. The world of Roshar far different from Tolkien’s LoTR, Martin’s ASoIF, or even Jordan’s WoT yet still terribly familiar. Roshar’s characters seemingly the normal standard bearers of legendary epics until Brandon Sanderson’s molds them into very different configurations. The plot here following the tried-and-true fantasy tropes only to turn them upside down, sending a reader flailing about in delightful ignorance of what is coming next. And due to all this, I believe the best way for me to summarize my feelings about Oathbringer is to merely say it is one of the most magnificent fantasy books I’ve ever read and leave it at that.For those unfamiliar with ,The Stormlight Archive, it – like so many epic fantasy series – is centered upon the coming end of the world, as the cyclical Desolation Event comes upon the world of Roshar once again. The heralds of this cataclysm (the Voidbringers) having appeared along with the forces of Odium, and our band of “heroes” called upon to somehow, someway hold back the end of the world. Dalinar Kholin, Kaladin the Stormblessed, Shallan Davar, and Adolin Kholin finding themselves in far over their heads, no matter their pedigree and experience.Where The Way of Kings was centered upon Kaladin and Words of Radiance focused on Shallan, Oathbringer’s main character is Dalinar. This novel spending a great deal of time comparing and contrasting the Dalinar of the present with the Dalinar of the past. The honorable, noble and principled would-be savior of Roshar revealed to have been a far different, more ruthless individual in the past; this history going a long way in explaining the reaction of so many people to Dalinar’s attempts to make of them allies in his crusade against the Desolation.This focus on Dalinar does not mean the other characters of the series are left out in the cold however. In fact, Brandon Sanderson finds page time to weave compelling stories for Kaladin, Shallan, Adolin and many more. Each of these individuals dealing with new roles, emotional issues, and tough choices with long term repercussions. Some characters embrace their new identities, dealing with depression and addiction, but there are others who can’t or won’t, which causes them to have to deal with the pain of failure and fumble around to find other ways to change and grow as the world around them forces them to adapt to the evolving circumstances. All of this character development very raw, very real, and even more poignant and compelling due to this realism.As for the world building in Oathbringer, it is just as superb as you’d expect from Sanderson. The world of Roshar, its people, its places, and its secrets mesmerizing in the extreme. The author finding new twists to add to the mix, revealing even more epic places, and adding to the legends and lore of this immense world. There is even time spent continuing to evolve the nature of the Desolations, the Heralds, the Oathpact, and everything else touched upon in the tale up to this point, leaving readers with the firm assurance that there is still much they do not know about Roshar.Without a doubt, Oathbringer has raised the bar even higher for the already amazing ,Stormlight Archive, making me desperately wish I had the next installment of the series sitting before me so I could dive into its pages right now. Yes, there has been some tense moments, epic struggles, and riveting reveals in the series up to this point, and maybe I need a break from it, but I do not wish for one, since I know there is still a long ways to go before this ride ends and many more amazing things to come. So everyone out there who hasn’t read this series yet, trust me, it is time to go ahead and begin your reading journey with The Stormlight Archive, because you do not want to miss out on this epic fantasy masterpiece!I received this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. I’d like to thank them for allowing me to receive this review copy and inform everyone that the review you have read is my opinion alone.
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  • Philip
    January 1, 1970
    3.75ish stars.After three books, I think I pretty much have a feel for this series, and I think it’s safe to say that it will never be a 5-star series for me. Not that it’s not great (I will continue to have the next installments pre-ordered on audible), and it will consistently be a solid 3.5-4 stars, maybe even 4.25 eventually, but Brandon and I just aren’t soul mates. To quote Matthew Quann’s great review, “Sanderson isn't writing the most poetic fantasy in the game, but he's arguably doing t 3.75ish stars.After three books, I think I pretty much have a feel for this series, and I think it’s safe to say that it will never be a 5-star series for me. Not that it’s not great (I will continue to have the next installments pre-ordered on audible), and it will consistently be a solid 3.5-4 stars, maybe even 4.25 eventually, but Brandon and I just aren’t soul mates. To quote Matthew Quann’s great review, “Sanderson isn't writing the most poetic fantasy in the game, but he's arguably doing the most insane world-building.” The world-building is easily 5 stars. I mean, he has created a World. He’s thought of everything; the detail and nuance is awesome (honestly, there’s so much stuff to keep track of. I appreciate all of the epic world-building but I wish I could keep everything straight. Something will happen at the beginning of the book and by the end I’ve completely forgotten about it. Personal problems). The writing style and characterization, however, are closer to a 3.5, and I can’t even put my finger on why I feel that way. None of the characters come close to how I feel about my favorite literary heroes and villains. And the ones I like the most are relegated to supporting status. Why isn’t Jasnah the main character always. Why put her on the cover of the book and then only include her in like eight scenes. 😤😤😤 Dalinar did make great strides in this book, and I even almost sort of maybe liked Shallan a little bit. Something else I struggle with is the tone of the books. It’s far from grimdark but still takes itself so seriously a lot of the time. When there’s humor it’s super corny - I’m just waiting for Shallan to find a “clever” way to refer to herself as a (view spoiler)["semi-Kholin" after her marriage to Adolin har har ;;; (hide spoiler)] - although I did love Pattern acting as chaperone. Even if it did give us this interaction:Shallan: That is someone who watches two young people when they are together, to make certain they don't do anything inappropriate.Pattern: Inappropriate? Such as... dividing by zero? 🧀🧀🧀 Then there’s Wit who is at a whole nother level:Wit: Yes, yes. Aim for the sun. That way if you miss, at least your arrow will fall far away, and the person it kills will likely be someone you don't know. 🧀🧀🧀 The Epic length contributes to the Epic and expansive feel, but I don’t need this much of it. As with each of the books, I’m interested for the first five hours of audio before I start to drift. There’s some sporadically cool stuff during the middle 45 hours that’s more informative and interesting than truly engaging (Shadesmar yaaawn), until the Epic five hour final conflict which always ends up elevating the book .5 stars. Like I said, great, solid 4-ish star books that don’t strike my personal fancy as much as others. Random spoiler-y thoughts:- I was rooting for Shadolin the entire time #relationshipgoals. They don't have the same light and easy chemistry as Shaladin, but I think they bring out the best in each other. And, I mean, if things couldn’t work with Kabsal, this is the next best thing jk.- Shallan has matured a lot since the beginning and has also become kind of fascinating. I’ll be honest, I think a lot of the reason I struggle with her is because I don’t like Kate Reading’s voicing of her (or Pattern, uggghh). - I love that Jasnah is now the Monarch of Alethkar. She makes more sense than anyone else, and should be a very competent ruler, even if I’m surprised she was allowed to ascend so easily.- Anyone interested in a bizarre love triangle between Jasnah, Kaladin, and Veil?- The description for book #4 says that Eshonai will be a focus character. Did I miss something? I mean, I assumed that she wasn’t really dead, but was that ever made explicit? - I would probably be a Skybreaker. I identify a lot with Szeth. I’m interested to continue learning about him and his spren, especially.- Interesting stuff with Renarin, kind of surprising, but explains a lot in retrospect.Posted in Mr. Philip's Library
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  • Scott Hitchcock
    January 1, 1970
    Another amazing volume in this epic series. I find myself at a point much like in Book of the Fallen where how do you review this without giving away spoilers or just reviewing all the events? So much has happened. So much has changed. I think at times this book outshined its predecessors it terms of action, suspense, unforeseen reveals and especially character development. After three tomes to deliver new nuances into beloved iconic characters is truly special. Dalinar, Kaladin and Shallan who Another amazing volume in this epic series. I find myself at a point much like in Book of the Fallen where how do you review this without giving away spoilers or just reviewing all the events? So much has happened. So much has changed. I think at times this book outshined its predecessors it terms of action, suspense, unforeseen reveals and especially character development. After three tomes to deliver new nuances into beloved iconic characters is truly special. Dalinar, Kaladin and Shallan who have been the big three to this point in the series all grew and yet were shown to have even greater flaws. The bridgemen received a much needed voice in this series. We saw into their hopes, dreams and flaws sometimes in horrific or sorrowful fashion. The Heralds became, somehow, at the same time more mortal, ethereal, fragile, everlasting and human all at once. Odium has a voice and a face as does Cultivation. Szeth and Lift grew into their roles. Taravangian, Moash and Ammeran all once again play major roles and not what you might think. Sanderson for the first time, for me anyway, crossed over into Grimdark. It wasn't Erikson bleed you out with empathy, Lawrence dark or Fletcher caustic but he did offer the bait of happiness to snatch it away in a NO it can not end that way bitterly ironic fashion that left you reeling. One of the other marks of a truly great series is the trail of breadcrumbs left from the start leading you to things. The balance between overt to the point of there being no reveal and obscure to the point of lacking meaning is a constant balance. Sanderson has it down. The ending was nonstop action that surpassed the first two books in scope, ramifications for the future, heartbreak, double crosses and of course "the thrill" of they finally got what was coming to them. Yet for all that I'm going to say it wasn't as good as the first two books. It was close but I felt there were some missed opportunities to make certain events especially in Shadesmar and Kolinahr truly epic when they were merely good. I think it's a bit of quibbling since compared to everything else out there this was definitely a 5* effort but much like in my other favorite series there's the 5* and then there's the beyond 5* books that truly need their own category. Even for that I feel the urge to do an instant reread to see what little breadcrumbs I missed for the future.
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  • Deborah Obida
    January 1, 1970
    Life before deathStrength before weaknessJourney before destination N.B spoiler free review, wrote this immediately after reading the book so might edit for errors and to add some things I forgot.I know the year just started but I think this is going to be my best read of the year. I storming love everything about this book, its a 1000+ pages and I still feel as if its not enough. 2020 please come sooner cause I'd love to know how this continues.To say that I love this book is an understateme Life before deathStrength before weaknessJourney before destination N.B spoiler free review, wrote this immediately after reading the book so might edit for errors and to add some things I forgot.I know the year just started but I think this is going to be my best read of the year. I storming love everything about this book, its a 1000+ pages and I still feel as if its not enough. 2020 please come sooner cause I'd love to know how this continues.To say that I love this book is an understatement, I adore it, I want to reread the storming thing again. I sense a book hangover coming up, throughout the time I spent reading this book, most of my thoughts and conversation goes back to it, I can literally relate anything to Oathbringer. I know that Kaladin is not the only MC but I feel like he is, but Brandon decided to remind me of that, unlike the two previous books that he has more POV than the rest MC, this one is different, even Shallan had more POV than him here, so not fair.You might be wondering what is so special about this book, let me list a few.-the world, despite being at the brink of a desolation, scratch that, they are in a desolation but the author makes you wants to go there and live with them.-the magic system, what is that, its amazing, I don’t think Brandon Sanderson is a normal person, I mean how can he make all this up, where was I when God was giving people creativity?- The culture is so well depicted that you’ll think it actually exist, don’t even get me started on the originality.-The imperfect characters, all of them have baggage, they are not perfect and they know it, still they are such good people that you’ll want to be them.-The romance, yeah there is romance, cool ships that are sailing.-The storming plot.Let me stop there, I will have you know that that is just a brink of what makes this a great book, I stopped there to reduce an already lengthy review coming up.World building and WritingIf you are familiar with Brandon Sanderson then I need not tell you that he is a master of world building. If you are not then let me tell you, his worlds are like nothing you’ve read before. The portrayal, geography, culture, people and even the magic system is so well depicted, you’ll feel like there is a storming TV in your mind. He writes so well that nothing is confusing. This book has like a bazillion characters and lots of POV, but the POV shift is so well done that there is no way you’ll mistake the POVs.CharactersKaladin my number one book boyfriend, also my favourite in the book. Like I said earlier he is not perfect but he is such a good person. His character development is one of my favourite in the book, everyone loves him, Kaladin is neither proud nor arrogant but will tell you his opinion, despite who you are. He will do anything for people he loves, even strangers, he is a natural born leader and super hot, he is so hot that everyone admires him. Sylphrena Kaladin’s Siamese twin. She goes where he goes. She is by far my fav spren in the book. You’ll find out more about her past here since she is remembering more, also through an unexpected an unplanned trip in the book. Her conversations with Kaladin is just the best.Dalinar Kholin aka the Blackthorn. I’ve read so many books and never have I had a book father, but Dalinar changed that. This book features his backstory, you’ll find out why he is called the blackthorn, his marriage and the infamous lost memory. Dalinar did things in this book that has my jaw hanging, when I thought that yeah its over, there is no way he’ll surprise me then he’ll go and do something even more amazing than before. Now I know why his sons adore him, despite his past I still love him.Shallan really disappointed me, when I thought that we have resolved our issues in WoR because I didn’t like her in WoK, she undid that with lots of stupid decisions and secrets. She did try to exonerate herself but I still don’t trust her, she is too much like a chameleon and her order is so not helping. Hopefully in the next book she’ll learn.Adolin Kholin my favourite noble, he is handsome and so fashionable, he knows basically everything about fashion. Even with his rank and good looks he is a good man, so far in the book he has made just one mistake and I still support his decision, it was necessary. Adolin is kind to everyone, even servants, he doesn’t condescend which is very rare in nobility. The way he loves his younger brother is so cool that I want to have him as a brother.Bridge four wasn’t in this book like the previous books but there was a part that they all had POVs, it reminds me of old times. I love all bridge four members apart from him, I need not say his name, Rock and Lopen are my favs so far. Drehy is cool too, I want more of Rlain, Sigzil my fav lieutenant cause Teft can be Teft but that ending, storms!The Kholins I wish my family is as cool as theirs, they love themselves so much. I love Navani and Jasnah so much, I want to be them when I grow up. Renarin is who surprised me more in this book, storms he outdid himself and even surprised Adolin, so loving the new him.Szeth and Lift liked him from the first book, despite the fact that he was kind of not that good a guy, he wowed me here and I couldn’t be more proud of him. Lift is as crazy as ever and still calls her magic awesome, despite what her spren says. “Nobody will like everything, everybody dislikes something, someone loves that thing you hate—but at least being hated is better than nothing. P.S read Warbreaker before this, some characters from there made an appearance here. Will definitely edit this to add some more quotes, need more time to sort from my 228 highlights.
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  • Luffy
    January 1, 1970
    This is not my review but a guest contribution by my brother, at my behest.The first part of this review contains a minimal amount of spoilers. The second part though is fraught with them.I snapped into a familiar stance, honed by the perusal of thousands of pages worth of the Stormlight Archive already. It was here at last. Anticipation sprens would have had a field day around me. After gleaning as much information from the cover as I could (a Radiant Knight being, to quote Lift, awesome, and a This is not my review but a guest contribution by my brother, at my behest.The first part of this review contains a minimal amount of spoilers. The second part though is fraught with them.I snapped into a familiar stance, honed by the perusal of thousands of pages worth of the Stormlight Archive already. It was here at last. Anticipation sprens would have had a field day around me. After gleaning as much information from the cover as I could (a Radiant Knight being, to quote Lift, awesome, and a giant stone monster trying to cramp her style), my third journey into Roshar began.It started with the main intrigue of the story: Dalinar's endeavour of uniting the various kingdoms of Roshar. Unity predictably turns out to be more complicated to obtain than gemhearts from chasmfiends. No amount of bridgemen could help to connect the various nations separated by more than the mere rifts of the Shattered Plains. And I absolutely loved how Dalinar valiantly tried all sorts of creative means to try to achieve that nigh impossible goal, changing tact to appeal to the needs and sensibilities of different monarchs, while taking the utmost care to not be manipulative or forceful. Who would have thought that so much effort would have to be expended to convince people to help fight against such apocalyptic events?The pacing of the story was expertly controlled. The main story as usual was refracted into distinct plots which were each carefully crafted to advance the story almost imperceptibly, gradually building tensions till breaking point in an explosion of colours and fluctuating emotions that would propel the story in its next phase. Or something of that sort. Oathbringer is at times a slow-boil in certain parts, I have to admit, but the pay-off is always worth it. Readers of this series will be familiar with the considerable amount of investigation going on. In this book it consists of exploring the many facets of the desolations by the "good guys" so as to be better informed of the best course of action that would need to be taken to fight the horrors they engendered. Time is spent also trying to size up the very few pieces of the puzzles of the past and present available in order to get to grips with not only the complex clusterfuck of the situation of the current times but also the very nebulous history of events such as the Recreance, and concepts such as the Ideals.The action was extremely thrilling, and quite varied. The Voidbringers being as able and more numerous than Radiants really upped the stakes in nail-biting, edge-of-seat sequences. The amount of emotional investment I had in the story meant that after all was said and done I felt drained by the (ahem) passions that it evoked in me. These were also clashes of ideals to decide who had the bestest head honcho of them all, whose vision of the world made more sense and was more fair, and even of who were the actual victims in the whole affair, and gave that much meaning to the fights when it became clear that pacifism was a clear no-no. The only apprehension I had regarding fights was that Stormlight repaired damages almost instantly and felt it would sap some of the tension away from fights. But that only meant that instead of being dealt a clean, instantaneous death, Radiants would need to be captured and tortured until they ran out of Stormlight and were again vulnerable. Which in turn meant that fights could be exponentially more gruesome.The characters were well handled in this book. As far as character development and progression was concerned, some characters obviously benefitted more than others. Some had their character progression deferred, and some had to come to terms with their own limitations. I can't discuss much more on characters and their fates here due to the spoilerish nature of the subject, so I will leave further "elaborations" on characters for the spoiler section of this review. But I will say this: the author did not adopt a superficial approach to characters. Losses resonated deeply within me, and Brandon Sanderson's ability to make even seemingly mundane characters stand out did not allow me the luxury of just shrugging off the fatalities that came to pass.And now for the climax of the book. Unadulterated excitement. Everyone got to be in the limelight, everyone had their time to shine (except for that one person on whom it reflected poorly). It was as grand as the Words of Radiance climax, but with a larger cast adding to its variety. Everyone with something to prove. Everyone with something to lose. Overall the book matched my expectations, but in ways I had not predicted. There are morally gray justifications for war on both sides and I was very grateful that the author took that route. Though picking a side is a no-brainer at this point (mainly due to the big baddie, Odium), it is hard not to see the point of the other side as well. The book has huge revelations concering Radiants and the world of Roshar as well. Oathbringer also prompted me to consider the power of forgiveness. This book has had a profound effect on me in that respect. Guilt is the self-flagellation of the soul. It may be easy to dismiss, by turning your back to it, but you'll always see its shadow looming above yours it the bright light of self-awareness. Dealing with it can be simple if you ignore it or bury it under an avalanche of sweet memories, but it is there for a reason: it makes you grow. Not acknowledging it makes you both intellectually and emotionally stunted. You may grapple with it all you want, but you would only be crushed you under its ever-increasing weight. Sometimes the simplest solution is also the hardest one to achieve. Such is the paradox of forgiving oneself.The spoilerful section starts here...Brandon, you cheeky bugger! You revealed Dalinar's upcoming, majestic feat of entering all planes at the same time! I had to reread the excerpts from Dalinar Kholin's Oathbringer which preceded some of the early chapters of Brandon Sanderson's Oathbringer. I had completely missed their significance.For me the dominating theme of this book is doubt. Kaladin's doubt about his Ideals and also about attacking those he perceived as friends. Shallan's existential crisis was a giant ball of doubt, being unsure at one point of who she actually was. Dalinar being beset with doubts after his memory of Evi and the unspeakable horrors he dished out of Rathalas comes back him, after Odium offers to take his pain away, after his initial attempts to unite the kingdom failed and he considered making them all an offer they could not refuse, after... well Dalinar is a just a bag of doubts in this book. Taravangian used it to great effect to undermine Dalinar's coallition and weaken it at its core. With what we have seen so far from the Fused being able to impersonate people à la Shallan, it is going to become harder for the characters to trust each other in the future, and doubt would sometimes inexorably prevail.About Kaladin, what do you think his fumbled Ideals were? I have my idea on this. Having already sworn to protect even those he hated I think the next step would be to swear to destroy those who are evil, even if he harbours love for them. At Kholinar, he couldn't bring himself to attack the parshmen he had befriended during his scouting mission, being paralysed during Moash's fatal attack on Elhokar. Even in Shadesmar he wavered. If Odium had succeeded in obtaining his champion, would he have been able to face off against Dalinar?Can I just say that I prefer Jasnah's way of putting down uppity idiots even better than Shallan's? I was glad to welcome her back into the fray, and man was she impressive in every scene she appeared. She displays so much confidence and presence of mind, much needed in the dire circumstances of the climax. I am really eager to see what she does now that she is on the throne. I mean, she did get to repair that wall but we can surely expect even greater things from her as a head of state. It would also be very interesting to see what the ardents think of all this.Lift's waggish personality even in the face of impending doom was also much appreciated in this book. Trickster at heart, she really showed her resourcefulness on the battlefield. There were had few laugh-out-loud moments for me in this book, but one of those was when someone who was supposed to guard her expressed how distraught he was that she kicked him in the "spheres" to escape. I was happy to see Renarin going all out in this book. I had already pegged him as one of those bespectacled, cool nerd-types from countless anime before, so try as I might I couldn't get rid of the glasses whenever I pictured him in this book. I was simply ecstatic to see him going up against that thunderclast, though I felt a little bad for Adolin at feeling left out. But the scene which touched me the most was when Jasnah forewent executing him. The way she reacted as she hugged him in a rare moment of tenderness from her, yet fiercely protective of Renarin, who was tarred by corruption from the enemy almost made me choke up.Navani and Dalinar make a nice couple. She his strength, his unflinching pillar, and if need be, able stand in. He her wubbly toy boy. There was one scene between them that I particularly loved. When Dalinar asked Navani to do “Something unconventional, perhaps uncomfortable” I was like, "Oh my Honor! No, way! Is the Blackthorn seriously going to ask her Lady to do ana...,” Dalinar: "I want you to teach me how to read.” "...lyses of one of the current writing systems in Roshar? Oh."The book answered three of the major questions I had: why the event at Feverstone Keep transpired, what happened during desolations, and what roles did the Heralds play during them. There is one thing that I understand even more pertinently now: there is so much more that I don't understand. How do the Fused obtain Voidlight? Does it get stored in their gemhearts during the Everstorm? What is Hoid's purpose in all of this? What the hell is happening to Moash, and just how powerful is he? And what's the deal with the Ghostbloods? I guess I’ll just do what Brandon Sanderson would say, and “RAFO”.
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