Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament
When Filbert P. Horsefeathers walks into George Crum's restaurant, he tells the waitress, ?I have a hankering for a heaping helping of potatoes.? Fine cook that he is, George prepares a serving of his most scrumptious, succulent and sublime potato wedges, only to have Filbert send them back. ?Too thick,? he says. So, George makes thinner wedges. But his picky customer sends them back again. And again. Feeling a bit mischievous, George decides to use his sharpest knife to cut paper-thin potato slices, which he fries until they are crackling and then showers with salt. At last, Filbert is satisfied, proclaiming, ?Perfection!? Which they are. Because, quite by accident, George Crum has invented potato chips! This fictional picture book tale by Anne Renaud is based on a real man named George Crum, a cook in Saratoga Springs, New York, in the 1850s, who is purported to have created the first potato chip in response to a demanding customer. Included at the back of the book is a historical note with a list of sources describing the legend and the remarkable and inspiring story of Crum, a trapper of mixed Native American and African American descent, who supplied restaurants with fresh game, then became a chef and successful restauranteur himself. Felicita Sala's gorgeous illustrations accurately portray the historical period but with a lighthearted touch. They work beautifully with Renaud's playful language and quirky characters for a lively and deliciously fun read-aloud. This book is an excellent choice for lessons on inventions and inventors, history, or why we eat the foods we do.

Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament Details

TitleMr. Crum's Potato Predicament
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 5th, 2017
PublisherKids Can Press
ISBN-139781771386197
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Biography

Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament Review

  • Carla Johnson-Hicks
    January 1, 1970
    They say that necessity is the mother of invention, and this story is another example. Have you ever wondered where the Potato chip came from? Mr. Crum was a real man who came up with this food item. This story is a fun fictional story based on George Crum.Mr. Crum was a wonderful cook who was known far and wide as a wonderful cook. Everyone loved his food, that is until Filbert P. Horsefeathers came into his restaurant. He wanted an order of potatoes. Three times, Mr. Crum cooked him potatoes a They say that necessity is the mother of invention, and this story is another example. Have you ever wondered where the Potato chip came from? Mr. Crum was a real man who came up with this food item. This story is a fun fictional story based on George Crum.Mr. Crum was a wonderful cook who was known far and wide as a wonderful cook. Everyone loved his food, that is until Filbert P. Horsefeathers came into his restaurant. He wanted an order of potatoes. Three times, Mr. Crum cooked him potatoes and he sent them back because the slices were too thick. He finally got what he wanted, Potato Chips! This is a cute story with wonderful illustrations. The back of the book has a short biography of the real George Crum. This book could be used in many ways with children. It could be an introduction to inventions/inventors, used to discuss not giving up, even as a discussion about healthy foods, where various food comes from and how to prepare different food. I think kids will enjoy this one. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book via netgalley.
    more
  • Wayne McCoy
    January 1, 1970
    'Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament' by Ann Renaud with illustrations by Felicita Sala takes a story that may be more legend than fact and makes it a fun story for young readers.When Filbert P. Horsefeathers walks into George Crum's restaurant, he only wants potatoes. When the potatoes he gets aren't right, he keeps sending them back until chef Crum invents a new thin, crunchy, salty snack: the potato chip!In a great postscript to the story, we find out that there was a George Crum who is credited wi 'Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament' by Ann Renaud with illustrations by Felicita Sala takes a story that may be more legend than fact and makes it a fun story for young readers.When Filbert P. Horsefeathers walks into George Crum's restaurant, he only wants potatoes. When the potatoes he gets aren't right, he keeps sending them back until chef Crum invents a new thin, crunchy, salty snack: the potato chip!In a great postscript to the story, we find out that there was a George Crum who is credited with inventing the potato chip. Whether he did or not, he was apparently a great chef in the Saratoga area where they were known as Saratoga chips. There are some photos of the real George Crum and an early box of potato chips. There is also a list of sources for the story that is told. I found it a fun story and I loved the illustrations.I received a review copy of this ebook from Kids Can Press and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.
    more
  • Elevetha
    January 1, 1970
    **An ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review*Very cute picture book, with decent illustrations and a fun (and somewhat historical) story!
  • ☘Tara Sheehan☘
    January 1, 1970
    The illustrations are richly done and befitting the time period the author used for her story which is a fictional take on a probable historical event. Whatever artistic license was used in both story and art work was done well and the diversity used in the customers was nice to see.I had never heard of Mr. Crum or given much thought to how we have the modern potato chip so I appreciated not only how well the author has written a story that seems realistic but also provided the known and assumed The illustrations are richly done and befitting the time period the author used for her story which is a fictional take on a probable historical event. Whatever artistic license was used in both story and art work was done well and the diversity used in the customers was nice to see.I had never heard of Mr. Crum or given much thought to how we have the modern potato chip so I appreciated not only how well the author has written a story that seems realistic but also provided the known and assumed historical information so the reader can look more into this.I read this to my daughters, who now want me to try making our own potato chips, they liked the characters particularly Mr. Crum as they thought he was very patient and nice to put up with such demanding behavior.I think it’s a great book for schools and families as you are able to be educated while entertained. It makes a great opening to look into further food inventions and to discover the history behind the food we take for granted.
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and Kids Can Press for a review copy - all opinions are my own.Great read aloud for elementary classrooms! Based on a true story of a persnickety customer and an inventive and talented chef, Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament explains the origins of the potato chip. The text is fast paced and full of juicy vocabulary. The illustrations are so well done and are perfect complements to the upbeat tone of the story. The author's note perfectly addresses the question I always get asked Thanks to NetGalley and Kids Can Press for a review copy - all opinions are my own.Great read aloud for elementary classrooms! Based on a true story of a persnickety customer and an inventive and talented chef, Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament explains the origins of the potato chip. The text is fast paced and full of juicy vocabulary. The illustrations are so well done and are perfect complements to the upbeat tone of the story. The author's note perfectly addresses the question I always get asked at the end of stories like this: Did this really happen? Although at the end of this story, what everyone's going to be asking for is a potato chip! 4.5 stars, will be a good addition to classroom and school libraries.
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This is another picture book, in a good series of picture books, that talks about a short, quick point in history, and makes it fun. In this case, it was the invention of the potato chip. Hard to believe it didn't exist before, but as this factionalized version of the story unfolds, we. Have Mr. Crum making potatoe wedges, that everyone loves, until this one customer kept saying they were too thick, and sending them back, until the potatoes were razor thin, and then he approved them.It is clever This is another picture book, in a good series of picture books, that talks about a short, quick point in history, and makes it fun. In this case, it was the invention of the potato chip. Hard to believe it didn't exist before, but as this factionalized version of the story unfolds, we. Have Mr. Crum making potatoe wedges, that everyone loves, until this one customer kept saying they were too thick, and sending them back, until the potatoes were razor thin, and then he approved them.It is clever book about how sometimes inventions and things come about not by a straight path, but by accident.Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.
    more
  • Debra Schoenberger
    January 1, 1970
    What a deliciously, delightful story about one persnickity customer and a frustrated cook. The tongue-in-cheek humour as well as the luscious illustrations makes this a perfect read-together book.
  • Sabby Fox
    January 1, 1970
    This is a short story about how the potato chip came into play. It has adorable illustrations throughout the story that makes you want to continue reading.I had no idea how the potato chip came into being until I read this so it's very informative in a easy to read way.Thanks to Netgalley for the chance to read and review this book.
    more
  • K.A. Wiggins
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the author, illustrator, Kids Can Press & the Goodreads Giveaways program for a review copy of this book! This is possibly the first picture book I've reviewed on Goodreads and the tl;dr is that I'm super impressed, it's a great read for slightly older kids, and I look forward to my nephew getting old enough to appreciate it.Not sure how people usually review picture books, but I'm gonna split this up into a few categories.First off, the language use is lovely. Tight yet lyrical, i Thanks to the author, illustrator, Kids Can Press & the Goodreads Giveaways program for a review copy of this book! This is possibly the first picture book I've reviewed on Goodreads and the tl;dr is that I'm super impressed, it's a great read for slightly older kids, and I look forward to my nephew getting old enough to appreciate it.Not sure how people usually review picture books, but I'm gonna split this up into a few categories.First off, the language use is lovely. Tight yet lyrical, integrated beautifully with the art and book design, fun yet not *too* silly, cheeky without crossing into irreverence, it's definitely aimed at slightly older kids with more sophisticated language, and the story might be a bit of a challenge for the really little kids, but probably ages 4-7+ would get something out of it. Story-wise, it's a light, fun and sly tale, not too challenging and not at all preachy. It's neat that there's a bit of a historical component, and it's a great touch that the chef in question is mixed-race POC (apparently he had African-American and First Nations heritage, and owned a successful restaurant in the mid 1800s - there's a history and references section at the back). It's informative yet enjoyable, not leaning too much into edutainment. Not particularly emotional or heartwarming, more comedic and a problem-solving rather than a personal-growth tale. Feels like a quick read, so it might do well with younger readers in that respect; not too many words, and you're not going to lose your voice trying to get to the end before bedtime.Moving on to the design and art, this is again a strong entry. In keeping with the light, funny tone, the art leans towards the comedic. It's attractive, detailed and engaging without being excessively busy. Love the book design, the way text was broken up for emphasis, with smart use of white space and stand-alone images as well as full-spread art. Healthy diversity represented; given the time period and location (NY state), there's a blend of what look like white and brown/black characters in a range of roles from staff to customers. I'm not particularly knowledgeable about art styles, but it's bright, fun, clear and maybe a bit comic, with a creative and fluid approach to perspective. Verdict: I'd recommend this to anyone with kids past the board-book stage, and I'll pass it along to my 6mo nephew because even if he can't quite follow, his foodie mama is going to love the culinary-language of this book and keep it in the rotation until he's old enough to appreciate it for himself.
    more
  • Ronda
    January 1, 1970
    Oh the many ways this clever book could be used! Elements of figurative language? Yep. Alliteration abounds in this tale of a tasty treat. Descriptive writing? Adjectives? Yep and yep. Synonyms? Certainly and assuredly. Genres? This story is introduced as a fictional account, but, with the biographical and historical information included at the end, this story could work nicely to encourage discussion of what makes something historical fiction vs. realistic or informative fiction and whether stu Oh the many ways this clever book could be used! Elements of figurative language? Yep. Alliteration abounds in this tale of a tasty treat. Descriptive writing? Adjectives? Yep and yep. Synonyms? Certainly and assuredly. Genres? This story is introduced as a fictional account, but, with the biographical and historical information included at the end, this story could work nicely to encourage discussion of what makes something historical fiction vs. realistic or informative fiction and whether students could consider this a biography or not and why. Another aspect to explore is fact vs. fiction and how to vet a research source. Indeed, many reviewers claim that George Crum did indeed invent the potato chip. Could a careful researcher prove or disprove that claim? Could students come up with other inventions whose inventors are in some degree of question? Lots and lots of avenues for discussion, all wrapped up in this colorfully illustrated, creatively written book that makes me want to go grab some salty, crunchy, crispy, chips. Oh, and though the story is fictional, it has an excellent example of non-fiction text features in the historical information at the end. This review is based on an ARC provided by NetGalley.
    more
  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    You want thinner potatoes? I'll show YOU! I'll cut em so thin and fry em up and add salt and see what you think then, Mr Horsefeathers! This book is the story of the invention of potato chips, when a restaurant patron keeps saying his potatoes are undercooked, too thick, and too bland. Felicita Sala's illustrations are colorful and lively; Anne Renaud's story is cheeky and fun, with a sprinkling of Big Words that manage to sound kind of silly and very smart at the same time. At the end of the bo You want thinner potatoes? I'll show YOU! I'll cut em so thin and fry em up and add salt and see what you think then, Mr Horsefeathers! This book is the story of the invention of potato chips, when a restaurant patron keeps saying his potatoes are undercooked, too thick, and too bland. Felicita Sala's illustrations are colorful and lively; Anne Renaud's story is cheeky and fun, with a sprinkling of Big Words that manage to sound kind of silly and very smart at the same time. At the end of the book, there is more information about the origin of potato chips. The real George Crum was of Native American and African American descent; the patrons at the restaurant in the book also include African Americans. I would definitely buy this book for my kids or for a birthday present for a kid. My 5 year old really digs it, and I think it would be good for kids younger and older. Reviewed on my blog. Thanks to Netgalley and Kids Can Press for providing an electronic copy of this book. My opinions are my own.
    more
  • Beyondthebookends
    January 1, 1970
    This is a hilarious and adorable story that is inspired on a true story of the man named George Crum who is believed to have invented the potato chip. When a man comes into the restaurant demanding a plate of just potatoes, Mr. Crum thinks that this will be an easy customer. Boy is he wrong. As he tries to figure out the perfect potato dish, he inadvertently creates one of North America's favorite snacks.  This is a very cute story and the illustrations are fantastic. The alliterations in the bo This is a hilarious and adorable story that is inspired on a true story of the man named George Crum who is believed to have invented the potato chip. When a man comes into the restaurant demanding a plate of just potatoes, Mr. Crum thinks that this will be an easy customer. Boy is he wrong. As he tries to figure out the perfect potato dish, he inadvertently creates one of North America's favorite snacks.  This is a very cute story and the illustrations are fantastic. The alliterations in the book are fantastic along with the hilarious choice of words.  This is a must buy on my list.4.5 stars
    more
  • Kyra Nay
    January 1, 1970
    From the inscription, this "fictional tale with a helping of truth" tells the story of a finicky customer at George Crum's Saratoga Springs restaurant who kept sending his potatoes back to the kitchen, demanding thinner and more flavorful potatoes. Finally, a frustrated Chef George shaves a potato into thin slices, fries them in lard, and sprinkles them with salt. To everyone's surprise, the customer loves this batch of potatoes and the Saratoga Chip (now potato chip) is born. Backmatter explain From the inscription, this "fictional tale with a helping of truth" tells the story of a finicky customer at George Crum's Saratoga Springs restaurant who kept sending his potatoes back to the kitchen, demanding thinner and more flavorful potatoes. Finally, a frustrated Chef George shaves a potato into thin slices, fries them in lard, and sprinkles them with salt. To everyone's surprise, the customer loves this batch of potatoes and the Saratoga Chip (now potato chip) is born. Backmatter explains the origins further, acknowledging that the potato chip has multiple creators beyond George Crum, but also paying tribute to George's talent and reputation as a chef. 3.5 stars
    more
  • Charissa Wilkinson
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as part of the Goodreads First Reads Program for the purpose of a fair review.Overview: Mr. Crum can send anyone out of his restaurant with a smile. Now one customer seems determined to make chef lose his business. Is there any way to solve this problem.Likes: Ms. Renaud was smart enough to claim the book as fictional, so that she could include what is known about Mr. Crum’s situation. It was a perfect touch.Conclusion: This is a great book. Enjoy it with our young cooks.
    more
  • Hemdiva Dev
    January 1, 1970
    For kids who love food, fun, stories and potatoes!George crum opens his restaurant 'Crum's Place' because he loves to cook.His customers thought of him as the best cook in the country.One a customer orders for potatoes, only potatoes!Mr.Crum serves him potato wedges but that are sent back.So he cuts the potato even thin but again the customer complains that it's too thick and bland.When this happens for the third time, Mr.Crum with his playful nature comes up with an amazing idea!And everyone ab For kids who love food, fun, stories and potatoes!George crum opens his restaurant 'Crum's Place' because he loves to cook.His customers thought of him as the best cook in the country.One a customer orders for potatoes, only potatoes!Mr.Crum serves him potato wedges but that are sent back.So he cuts the potato even thin but again the customer complains that it's too thick and bland.When this happens for the third time, Mr.Crum with his playful nature comes up with an amazing idea!And everyone absolutely loves his new invention.
    more
  • Amanda Sanders
    January 1, 1970
    This book is based on a true story. A chef accidentally invents potato chips when a customer keeps returning his potatoes and asking for them to be thinner and crispier. From the facts at the end of the book and the story itself, it seems like the customer was aiming for potato chips with his requests so it is unlikely that the chef invented them, but it is a fun story and adults reading this story to children can make a guessing game out of it.
    more
  • Cheriee Weichel
    January 1, 1970
    This review is posted on my blog at https://dickenslibrary.blogspot.ca/20.... Click on the link to see the missing images. We are warned in the endpapers. "The story you are about to savor is a fictional tale with a helping of truth."It sets the tone for this delectable reading adventure. Mr George Crum really was a renowned chef of mixed Native American and African American descent. Before he started cooking he had many other adventures, but those are not included in this book. He owned a famou This review is posted on my blog at https://dickenslibrary.blogspot.ca/20.... Click on the link to see the missing images. We are warned in the endpapers. "The story you are about to savor is a fictional tale with a helping of truth."It sets the tone for this delectable reading adventure. Mr George Crum really was a renowned chef of mixed Native American and African American descent. Before he started cooking he had many other adventures, but those are not included in this book. He owned a famous restaurant where people came from far away to taste his inventive "sorbets, souffles, stews, succotashes, ragouts, and goulashes." He introduced them to all kinds of strange delicacies. Then came the day Filbert P. Horsefeathers, a peculiarly dressed man, came into the cafe and ordered, "Just potatoes."George tried feeding him potato wedges fried in lard, but the customer sent them back. George then fried potatoes with thinner wedges. Again the man declined them. Eventually George created the perfect potato chip that satisfied the "finicky, persnickety Filbert Punctilious Horsefeathers."George Crum was known to have a playful sense of humour, and the illustrations in this book capture this spirit delightfully. I love the luscious language. I've given you a hint earlier on as to the alliteration, but the interjections used by Gladys, the waitress are just as priceless:Well, huckleberry biscuits!Well, flying flapjacks!I urge readers to search out the definition of horsefeathers and other words in the book. Never will using a dictionary be so much fun!The book begs to be read outloud. The reader will have as much fun, if not more, as the listeners. The backmatter contains additional (and authentic) information about this remarkable person. I hope the book inspires young readers to learn more about this fascinating person. It did me. That's how I learned all about what he did before he took to cooking!
    more
  • Connie Sahn
    January 1, 1970
    I won a copy of Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament through Goodreads. The book has illustrations related to that time period and however much of this story is true, it makes a fun read for children. The photos and history in the final pages of the book are interesting. I am a potato chip fan so I enjoyed the story.
    more
  • Jennybeast
    January 1, 1970
    I am a sucker for picture book histories, and this one is good fun -- the origin of the potato chip (perhaps), and a sweet homage to George Crum, who by all accounts was a darn good cook. Fascinating, fun, and lovely in the art department. Let's hear it for remembering obscure and interesting folks!
    more
  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    The story of this book is inspired by a man named George Crum who invented the potato chipby accident. The illustrations are super pretty and cute, and the story is very suitable for children. I really recommend this book!I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for my honest review
    more
  • Meg
    January 1, 1970
    My grandchildren and I have enjoyed reading this book multiple times after I received it as part of the Goodreads Giveaway program. The book tells the story of how potato chips were accidentally invented. It also illustrates how to overcome obstacles through hard work. A truly delightful book.
    more
  • Barbra
    January 1, 1970
    This is the story of the potato chip. Based on true events, Mr Crum faces a tough customer who proclaims the potatoes were too thick. Not realizing they would be a big hit he slices them super thin and to his surprise they were delicious.
  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    This fun book is about the invention of potato chips. I never knew they were invented as a joke. Want to get the joke, read the book. It’s fun, has great illustrations, and you learn something new.
  • Richelle Zirkle
    January 1, 1970
    This cute story with very nice illustrations is partly based on fact. If you've ever wondered how the potato chip was invented, this might answer your questions.I received an ARC in exchange for my honest review.
  • Laurie-Ève
    January 1, 1970
    Cute story with an interesting historical background. Great illustrations with diversity and various characters representations. Annoyed by the constant smile of the characters that provides them a certain credulity when they should be frustrated.
  • Donna Maguire
    January 1, 1970
    This was a nice story (based in part on historical facts), it had some nice images and it was easy to follow - 4 stars for this one.
  • Sherrie
    January 1, 1970
    Part legend and part fact this delightful book details how potato chips were thought to be invented. This book features wonderful illustrations and an engaging story.
  • Cat
    January 1, 1970
    True story the kiddies will enjoy! This is the first time I've seen the story of how potato chips came about in childrens book format! Very funny story and the illustrations were charming!
  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone who loves potato chips may wonder about the origin of this common snack. In her children's book, Anne Renaud tells the story about the possible origin in the kitchen of George Crum. With detailed and colourful illustrations by Felicita Sala, most young children would be able to retell the story just by following the pictures. The story is fun to read and we learn about the possible answer to the question of "who came up with our popular snack?"Thank you GoodReads for the book.
    more
  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    A fictionalized story about a real chef who may have invented potato chips told in a lively, engaging narrative and complemented with delightful illustrations.
Write a review