Someone to Love
Constantly in the spotlight thanks to her politician father's rising star, Olivia Blakely feels the pressure to be perfect. As the youngest girl in her class, she tries hard to keep up and to seem mature to the older boy she's crushing on, even as she catches his eye. But the need to look good on camera and at school soon grows into an all-consuming struggle with bulimia. As Liv works toward her goal of gaining early admission to art school, including taking part in an upcoming student show, her life spirals out of control. Swept up in demands to do more than she's ready for, to always look perfect and to succeed, Liv doesn't know who she is anymore. It will take nearly losing her best friend and even her life for Liv to learn that loving herself is far more important than earning the world's approval.

Someone to Love Details

TitleSomeone to Love
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 2nd, 2018
PublisherHarlequin Teen
ISBN-139780373212361
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Realistic Fiction

Someone to Love Review

  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HQ and NetGalley.)This was a YA contemporary story about a politician’s daughter with bulimia.I felt quite sorry for Liv in this as she seemed to have so much going on, and seemed to be completely self-destructing as the book went along. The storyline in this was about Liv’s life struggling with her eating disorder, and trying to live up to her parent’s expectations of her. She struggled with her bulimia, she struggled with self-harm, (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HQ and NetGalley.)This was a YA contemporary story about a politician’s daughter with bulimia.I felt quite sorry for Liv in this as she seemed to have so much going on, and seemed to be completely self-destructing as the book went along. The storyline in this was about Liv’s life struggling with her eating disorder, and trying to live up to her parent’s expectations of her. She struggled with her bulimia, she struggled with self-harm, and she struggled with her relationships with her family, friends, and love interest. I did think that the author did a good job of representing someone with an eating disorder, but I also found it quite difficult to get into the story.The ending to this was okay, and I was pleased that Liv was finally getting some help. ★★★★★★☆☆☆☆6 out of 10
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  • Kat 🦋
    January 1, 1970
    The is actually the first book my Melissa De La Cruz and for me it was just okay, I didn’t know exactly what it was about 100% I just have seen people rave about Melissa’s other work so requested it based on that knowledge.Trigger warning for self-harm and an eating disorder as that it what this book is centred around mostly.I think it’s a tough subject to write about in books and as I haven’t suffered from either of the subjects so I can’t comment on it too much but I think she tried to portray The is actually the first book my Melissa De La Cruz and for me it was just okay, I didn’t know exactly what it was about 100% I just have seen people rave about Melissa’s other work so requested it based on that knowledge.Trigger warning for self-harm and an eating disorder as that it what this book is centred around mostly.I think it’s a tough subject to write about in books and as I haven’t suffered from either of the subjects so I can’t comment on it too much but I think she tried to portray it as best she could in these books – this books for me was one of those books that I knew I probably should put it down since I wasn’t enjoying it that much but the more I got sucked into Liv’s story the more I needed to read.I’m trying to write this without it being spoilery but it’s quite difficult – what I don’t like about this is that everyone seems to ignore it? Those who find out about it seem to just leave her to it which I didn’t really like, especially since they were her family. Her dad I really didn’t like, he seemed to care more about his campaign than his own daughter. ☹Other than Sam and Olivia (occasionally) I didn’t really find any connection with any of the other character, they all fell a little flat to me.This book wasn’t for me, I don’t think I’m going to let it stop me reading some of her other work but I really didn’t enjoy this very much.➡️ thank you to Netgalley for the arc.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, I just want to put a trigger warning on this book for anyone who suffers with an eating disorder or self harms. You might want to proceed with caution.Books about eating disorders are sort of like when you see a really disturbing image on the telly, and you don't want to look but you just can't stop yourself. I've suffered from anorexia for around 5 years now, and spent 2 of those years in a psychiatric hospital, and while I'm better and eating now, I still get triggered really eas First of all, I just want to put a trigger warning on this book for anyone who suffers with an eating disorder or self harms. You might want to proceed with caution.Books about eating disorders are sort of like when you see a really disturbing image on the telly, and you don't want to look but you just can't stop yourself. I've suffered from anorexia for around 5 years now, and spent 2 of those years in a psychiatric hospital, and while I'm better and eating now, I still get triggered really easily. So reading this book? Not my greatest idea. I just want to start off by saying that I think Melissa de la Cruz meant well. I think she tried her hardest to write a book about eating disorders (which are incredibly difficult to write about, by the way. Even I struggle to explain what it's like living with it on a daily basis), but it just...I don't think it worked, and I think I've come to the conclusion that books like this that detail the lives of eating disorder sufferers are dangerous in the wrong hands. I don't want to talk about me and my experiences a load (this is a book review, not a Kate review), but I just want to explain where I'm coming from. When I was at my worst, at the beginning of my hospital admission, I would do anything to get rid of a few calories. I hid food in every single place possible and constantly had food crumbs in my bra. I was always looking for new ways to lose weight, whether that be from the pro-ana websites, or from books like Wintergirls, which is possibly the most dangerous and triggering ED book ever written. So the detail in which Melissa goes into when describing how Olivia purges...it's not good. And it's something that vulnerable, anorexia-consumed Kate would have lapped up. The above comment is also relevant to recent films like To The Bone. It's dangerous. Yes, awareness needs to be spread. But I think the better way to spread awareness is in the form of memoirs or autobiographies, from people who know what it's like and can offer wisdom and encouragement for coming through the other side; people whose job is to inform, and not just entertain people for a few hours in the form of a YA book. Another thing I didn't like about Someone to Love was how Olivia's bulimia was brushed off by nearly everyone. Nobody seemed to take it seriously. Olivia's mother knew that she had an eating disorder, but what did she do? Nothing. She let her daughter spiral out of control, not even talking to her daughter about it. When Olivia's dad finds out about her ED, he asks her mother if she knew what was going on and she said:"Yes, it's very common among teenage girls."......I'm going to shout it so the people at the back can hear; EATING DISORDERS ARE NOT TEENAGE GIRL PHASES. They do not discriminate, they are SERIOUS, and should NOT be ignored and allowed to sort themselves out. They are fucking terrifying, and isolating, and they aren't taken seriously enough.There's one other thing that I want to bring to attention: when Olivia is getting help at the end of the book, her doctor confides to Olivia she herself used to cut herself. And you know what she said?She said that she was a much "more violent cutter" than Olivia.You what?HOWFUCKINGTRIGGERINGWOULDTHATBE?!?!That is basically saying that Olivia's problem isn't as serious as hers was. Self harm can easily be turned into a competition, and you can also easily convince yourself that you don't have a self harm problem by telling yourself that others do it more severely than you. I know. Believe me.Deep breath, Kate. Deep breath.So, the writing? The characters? Yeah, they were decent. Olivia irritated me a lot in the end, but I could also relate to her a lot when she was comparing herself to other girls. That is something that was realistic; Olivia's fascination with other girls, and her struggle to not dislike them because they were skinnier than her. That is something that ED patients struggle with a lot; when I was first admitted to the ED ward, I was in a wheelchair, and nobody spoke to me because I was the skinniest person there. And that's not me or my illness blowing my own trumpet, that's literally what I was told by the other patients, and the nurses. Don't get me wrong, those girls are lovely and I still speak with them. But eating disorders are nasty, manipulative things. The other characters (minus Sam) really irritated me at one point or another, but not enough that I need to start another essay about them.I'm going to wrap this review up because it's ridiculously long, but I needed to vent. I appreciate Melissa taking on a really difficult subject, but there were a lot of things that just didn't ring true for me. I obviously don't speak for everyone; there will probably be some ED recovered patients who like this book. I personally, though, didn't. *I received an e-arc via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Olivia (The Candid Cover)
    January 1, 1970
    Someone to Love by Melissa de la Cruz is a YA novel that digs deep into the issues surrounding bulimia. While there is some enlightening information contained in this book that will educate its readers about a serious and often ignored topic, there are too many other topics that this book also attempts to address, which seems to detract from the original theme. The main character is one that can be empathized with, but she is not one that I found to be particularly enjoyable. This book contains Someone to Love by Melissa de la Cruz is a YA novel that digs deep into the issues surrounding bulimia. While there is some enlightening information contained in this book that will educate its readers about a serious and often ignored topic, there are too many other topics that this book also attempts to address, which seems to detract from the original theme. The main character is one that can be empathized with, but she is not one that I found to be particularly enjoyable. This book contains scenes of self-harm, so I will caution anyone who is triggered by this topic.When I first came across this book, I was really intrigued by the fact that it address an eating disorder. This seems to be a topic that has gone by the wayside in YA to make room for other relevant issues of our times. It is a theme that, unfortunately, will always be important to learn about, as it affects so many individuals in our society. While I am not versed on all of the details and signs of bulimia, Melissa de la Cruz absolutely offers her readers lots of insight in recognizing someone who may be suffering from this disorder, and the inner and outer struggles they face. I found this aspect of Someone to Love to be very educational.As I was reading this book, it felt like there were too many other issues attempting to be addressed at the same time as the main theme of bulimia. The other topics seemed to make appearances, yet there was no resolution or any sort of deeper understanding brought into the story. Some examples of these other topics are immigration, slut-shaming, alcoholism, and coming out. I feel as though the novel would have progressed a lot smoother and felt less jumbled if it had stuck to the main issue at hand. Yes, these other topics are important, however they just seemed thrown into the story and were not really resolved or dealt with at all.Olivia is a character who is absolutely under a great deal of pressure. This aspect of her personality is one that the reader can understand and even empathize with. However, the whiny nature of this character just becomes a bit too much. Creating a character, such as Olivia, is difficult for sure, as there have to be some qualities that the reader doesn’t like or approve of. I have had experience reading other books that have a main character who is dislikable, however as the story unfolds, it becomes apparent that the character has some redeeming qualities and as the issues are worked out, the character becomes one that is admirable. I did not find myself feeling this way about Olivia at all.Someone to Love is a book that addresses an issue that is not seen very often in YA and de la Cruz has provided her readers with a great wealth of information on the issues surrounding bulimia. It would have been more enjoyable to read this book if it had stuck to its main purpose and not go off in tangents to add in other hot topics. There may have been more opportunities to give the character of Olivia some redemption for the reader as well.
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  • Claire (Book Blog Bird)
    January 1, 1970
    This was an okay book about a girl with bulemia who finds herself in the public spotlight when her dad decides to run for governor.The story was paced a little slowly but it rattled along okay and I guess it shed some light on topics that are relevant, like constantly feeling compared to other girls, self-harm, parental pressure and eating disorders. There were some aspects of the book that didn't feel so relevant, though. Like the problems Olivia has with being in the public spotlight (can't se This was an okay book about a girl with bulemia who finds herself in the public spotlight when her dad decides to run for governor.The story was paced a little slowly but it rattled along okay and I guess it shed some light on topics that are relevant, like constantly feeling compared to other girls, self-harm, parental pressure and eating disorders. There were some aspects of the book that didn't feel so relevant, though. Like the problems Olivia has with being in the public spotlight (can't see that being a major issue for 99.9%of the population) or being super-rich (yeah .....) or having a famous boyfriend.Just as a bit of background, I've never had an eating disorder so I can't speak from first-hand experience, but something about this story felt a bit off, like it didn't quite ring true. I think it was the way she seemed to recover from her bulimia so quickly at the end. I may not know much about eating disorders, but I do know it's not like tonsillitis. You can't just take a pill and get better. It takes months and years of therapy and support. I think the author was trying to do a really brave and worthy thing in writing about this, and I'm not saying that every story has to be like an own-voices thing, but it still has to have authenticity and some of the description of Olivia's bulimia just felt a bit ... functional.I really liked Sam in this story, but Olivia was a bit bland and naive. Zack was utterly charmless and I was zero-surprised when he turned out to be an arsehole. I wasn't a massive fan of Antonia either - she really pressured Olivia.The writing felt a bit tell-don't-show. Like this paragraph here:I love being around Antonia. She makes me feel so alive.Don't tell me these things - show me. There were two characters from one of the author's previous books included in this story. They weren't integral to the plot of this book and they didn't really have a proper story arc of their own, so it felt like they were just shoehorned in because the author wanted to catch up with them again.All in all, not a winner for me.
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  • Megan (YABookers)
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received this free from the publisher via NetGalleyDNF @ 20%I'm not really feeling this one at the moment. I'm in a bit of a slump recently, especially when it comes to contemporary. I may or may not go back to it later.
  • Sabrina Fox
    January 1, 1970
    Trigger Warning: Self-harm, eating disordersI'm not really big into contemporary, but this book was a welcome surprise. I received it in the mail, let it sit on my counter for a few days so I could finish another book, then picked this one up.At first I really thought I wasn't going to be able to get into it. It seemed so cliche, the main character, Liv, seemed too shallow.Fast-forward to a couple hours later: still in the same spot, still in the same position on the couch. Devouring this book.W Trigger Warning: Self-harm, eating disordersI'm not really big into contemporary, but this book was a welcome surprise. I received it in the mail, let it sit on my counter for a few days so I could finish another book, then picked this one up.At first I really thought I wasn't going to be able to get into it. It seemed so cliche, the main character, Liv, seemed too shallow.Fast-forward to a couple hours later: still in the same spot, still in the same position on the couch. Devouring this book.While I'm aware of eating disorders, I know I'm not knowledgeable enough to speak on them. Cruz invited me into a whole new and horrifying world of bulimia, and left me with more knowledge than I had before reading.It hurts me to know there are people out there suffering with this. It hurts me even more to know that I can't be there to help everyone, and that people fall victim to this horrible disease every day thinking that they're all alone in this world. This world is heavy and painful, and I wish it were a softer place for everyone so no one would have to deal with these things in their lives.I really like the theme of Olivia being an artist in her tightly-wound political family. The opening to the chapters included inspirational quotes by famous painters like Gogh or Kahlo. The chapters are short and easy to get through, so it spurs you on from one to the other.I feel like this is a book I should share with people who have really self-deprecating thoughts or mental illnesses, as it was a story of hope and wisdom to me that I really, thoroughly enjoyed.Disclaimer: I received this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions herein are of my own and are not swayed by any outside factors.
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  • Lara
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 3.5 Stars I can't decide whether this book deserves 3 or 4 stars so 3.5 it is!
  • Ailsa
    January 1, 1970
    A moving but timely novel about a subject unfortunately very close to a lot of young women's hearts, eating disorders.Olivia is the daughter of a politician and suffers from pressure from all sides - family, friends, school, relationships. Although her life is a little more glamorous than most of the readers will be, the struggles she deals with are ones which are almost universal to teenagers these days. I loved her friendships, especially with Antonia, and think this book will be very relatabl A moving but timely novel about a subject unfortunately very close to a lot of young women's hearts, eating disorders.Olivia is the daughter of a politician and suffers from pressure from all sides - family, friends, school, relationships. Although her life is a little more glamorous than most of the readers will be, the struggles she deals with are ones which are almost universal to teenagers these days. I loved her friendships, especially with Antonia, and think this book will be very relatable for a lot of young people.(I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review)
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  • Sydney Huff
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher I won a free advanced copy of this book here on Goodreads. I absolutely love everything that Melissa De La Cruz writes but my favorite so far has been the Witches of East End because I'm a big reader of fantasy and supernatural books. I usually don't read the typical romance novels because they usually don't keep my attention but this book surpassed those expectations. I'm very happy with it and how she wrote about the topic of bulimia. Eating disorders can kill and are c Thanks to the publisher I won a free advanced copy of this book here on Goodreads. I absolutely love everything that Melissa De La Cruz writes but my favorite so far has been the Witches of East End because I'm a big reader of fantasy and supernatural books. I usually don't read the typical romance novels because they usually don't keep my attention but this book surpassed those expectations. I'm very happy with it and how she wrote about the topic of bulimia. Eating disorders can kill and are complicated to talk about because it is something most people overlook. I love this book and how she finally can learn to start to love herself eventually. The character development is great in this book.
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