A Kind of Freedom
Evelyn is a Creole woman who comes of age in New Orleans at the height of World War Two. Her family inhabits the upper echelon of Black society and when she falls for no-name Renard, she is forced to choose between her life of privilege and the man she loves. In 1982, Evelyn’s daughter, Jackie, is a frazzled single mother grappling with her absent husband’s drug addiction. Just as she comes to terms with his abandoning the family, he returns, ready to resume their old life. Jackie must decide if the promise of her husband is worth the near certainty he’ll leave again. Jackie’s son, T.C., loves the creative process of growing marijuana more than the weed itself. He finds something hypnotic about training the seedlings, testing the levels, trimming the leaves, drying the buds. He was a square before Hurricane Katrina, but the New Orleans he knew didn’t survive the storm, and in its wake he was changed too. Now, fresh out of a four-month stint for possession with the intent to distribute, he decides to start over—until an old friend convinces him to stake his new beginning on one last deal. For Evelyn, Jim Crow is an ongoing reality, and in its wake new threats spring up to haunt her descendants. A Kind of Freedom is an urgent novel that explores the legacy of racial disparity in the South through a poignant and redemptive family history.

A Kind of Freedom Details

TitleA Kind of Freedom
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseAug 8th, 2017
PublisherCounterpoint LLC
ISBN1619029227
ISBN-139781619029224
Rating
GenreFiction, Historical, Cultural, African American, Family, Literary Fiction, Novels

A Kind of Freedom Review

  • Jessica
    May 25, 2017
    I love love love this book. The author tells a beautifully tragic story of young love, upward mobility, ambition, success, unrealized potential, and even mental illness across three generations of a New Orleans family. Throughout, she delicately and expertly balances heavy themes of race, class, and colorism within a moving and suspenseful plot. I have read tons of novels and I enjoy jumping into the lives of characters and imagining what might happen when the written story ends. While reading, I love love love this book. The author tells a beautifully tragic story of young love, upward mobility, ambition, success, unrealized potential, and even mental illness across three generations of a New Orleans family. Throughout, she delicately and expertly balances heavy themes of race, class, and colorism within a moving and suspenseful plot. I have read tons of novels and I enjoy jumping into the lives of characters and imagining what might happen when the written story ends. While reading, I was left wondering--worrying even--about the characters when I had to put the book down to sleep. Upon finishing, I came away a little sad, but mostly hopeful for the characters she portrayed. Unlike many novels, this one did not leave me disappointed at the end.One of my favorite aspects of 'A Kind of Freedom,' was the honest and unapologetic portrayal of New Orleans. Many people, myself included, visit New Orleans without leaving the French Quarter. We eat overpriced po'boys, binets at Cafe du Monde, and drink our way through the city, never bothering to really explore the city. The author subtly educates us on the disenfranchisement of many Black New Orleans residents within the context of internal and external racism. And while many have forgotten about Hurricane Katrina, this novel reminds us that Katrina devastated and displaced entire communities of people--some of whom were never able to return.'A Kind of Freedom' is raw, intimate, and touching. A definite must-read for lovers of thought-provoking fiction.
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  • Rachel León
    July 25, 2017
    I've been a bit more generous with my star ratings lately, but this novel is fully deserving of every single star. I'm reviewing this one for CHIRB and I'm trying to figure out how to possibly do this remarkable book justice. Another worthy contender for best book of the year. (I'll post the link to my review when it runs.)
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  • Jamie
    February 1, 2017
    This is a remarkable book, covering three generations of an African American family in New Orleans. In the 40s of World War II, Evelyn - well off daughter of a doctor - falls in love with a poor but striving boy and has to manage her family's expectations as well as his deployment in the war to become her own person. In the 80s, her daughter Jackie navigates how well she can trust her husband, a recovering crack addict who comes back into her life when their son is still an infant. And in the po This is a remarkable book, covering three generations of an African American family in New Orleans. In the 40s of World War II, Evelyn - well off daughter of a doctor - falls in love with a poor but striving boy and has to manage her family's expectations as well as his deployment in the war to become her own person. In the 80s, her daughter Jackie navigates how well she can trust her husband, a recovering crack addict who comes back into her life when their son is still an infant. And in the post-Katrina New Orleans of 2010, Jackie's son T.C. emerges from prison to try to make something of himself in the eyes of his family and his pregnant girlfriend, only to find the system and old friends from the neighborhood make it hard to pull himself up. Despite the systemic oppression the characters face, they have hope; even though as a reader you're infuriated at the cycles of poverty, drug abuse, imprisonment, etc, you can't help but root for the characters. Side note: I read a very early bound manuscript; much of the Goodreads plot description is inaccurate.
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  • Vanessa Motley
    June 10, 2017
    If you are a lover of stories with expertly crafted prose, deeply complex characters and emotionally moving storylines, then A KIND OF FREEDOM is a must read! The author brilliantly navigates through three generations of a black family living in New Orleans and details both the family and societal pressures that have a profound impact on each individual’s decisions and ultimate path in life. The story is told from three different perspectives, and I truly enjoyed uncovering details about each ch If you are a lover of stories with expertly crafted prose, deeply complex characters and emotionally moving storylines, then A KIND OF FREEDOM is a must read! The author brilliantly navigates through three generations of a black family living in New Orleans and details both the family and societal pressures that have a profound impact on each individual’s decisions and ultimate path in life. The story is told from three different perspectives, and I truly enjoyed uncovering details about each character’s life and timeline through the eyes of another character’s experience. In addition to the three main characters of the novel, the city of New Orleans itself exists as a fourth character, allowing you to journey through time with each storyline and witness the challenges (and repercussions) of war, racism, drugs, fractured families, and natural disaster on the city. You also bear witness to the complexities and dynamics of families through sections that are both heart-warming and gut-wrenching. Possibly some of the most brilliantly crafted elements of the novel are the parts of the story that remain untold (either because they are inferred or they are unknown). It serves to make the novel feel more realistic (as often times with families you don't always have a complete picture of a person's past or even present, and are instead led to fill in the blanks). A KIND OF FREEDOM is a raw, intricate and bittersweet story of family that comes with my strongest recommendation.
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  • Beverly
    July 24, 2017
    This was a 4 - 4.5 read for me.Thoughts coming shortly
  • Lori
    June 20, 2017
    I was a goodreads giveaway winner of " A Kind of Freedom" This book takes place over three generations of a family. It starts with Evelyn a Creole woman in New Orleans. It is the mid 1940s. Evelyn lives with her parents and sister Ruby. She starts dating a man Renard. She comes from privilege and Renard does not. Her family does not approve of the relationship. She must choose from the approval of her family and the man she loves. The next generation is Jackie, Evelyn's daughter. This is set in I was a goodreads giveaway winner of " A Kind of Freedom" This book takes place over three generations of a family. It starts with Evelyn a Creole woman in New Orleans. It is the mid 1940s. Evelyn lives with her parents and sister Ruby. She starts dating a man Renard. She comes from privilege and Renard does not. Her family does not approve of the relationship. She must choose from the approval of her family and the man she loves. The next generation is Jackie, Evelyn's daughter. This is set in 1986 Jackie just gave birth to T.C. Again Jackie has her own issues to deal with. Her husband has been a drug addict. Jackie's family wants her to leave her husband. Generation three takes place in 2010. T.C. is grown, has a girlfriend and is facing his own problems and decisions to make. All generations come together. The book goes back and forth during the time eras with the characters. I found this to be a good story about family, and decisions you have to make. Glad I got the chance to read this book.
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  • Rachel Watkins
    May 25, 2017
    Here's the thing about this debut: while the story Margaret Wilkerson Sexton tells of three generations in New Orleans is absolutely brilliant, the prose so beautiful at times I underlined phrases, what is most remarkable are the parts that she didn't include. It takes great skill to satisfy a reader and also leave them puzzling over the untold parts. Margaret Wilkerson Sexton's A KIND OF FREEDOM is quietly epic. I dare you to not fall in love with Evelyn, Jackie, and T.C. (And I'm secretly wait Here's the thing about this debut: while the story Margaret Wilkerson Sexton tells of three generations in New Orleans is absolutely brilliant, the prose so beautiful at times I underlined phrases, what is most remarkable are the parts that she didn't include. It takes great skill to satisfy a reader and also leave them puzzling over the untold parts. Margaret Wilkerson Sexton's A KIND OF FREEDOM is quietly epic. I dare you to not fall in love with Evelyn, Jackie, and T.C. (And I'm secretly waiting for the film rights to be sold; it would be a brilliant movie, if done right!)
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  • Chloe
    May 29, 2017
    Wilkerson Sexton's debut novel follows three generations of a New Orleans family from the depths of 1940s Jim Crow up through the ravages of Katrina and the War on Drugs. Despite being only 250 pages long, the novel has massive range and Wilkerson Sexton weaves amongst the three story lines effortlessly, giving us depth and connection in short vignettes. The narrative arc is heartbreaking and riveting, and the depiction of New Orleans is nuanced and almost as interesting as the characters' evolu Wilkerson Sexton's debut novel follows three generations of a New Orleans family from the depths of 1940s Jim Crow up through the ravages of Katrina and the War on Drugs. Despite being only 250 pages long, the novel has massive range and Wilkerson Sexton weaves amongst the three story lines effortlessly, giving us depth and connection in short vignettes. The narrative arc is heartbreaking and riveting, and the depiction of New Orleans is nuanced and almost as interesting as the characters' evolution.The novel starts us off in the thick of WWII with Evelyn falling for Renard, an orphaned, penniless student and disappointing her father, a black doctor who wants more for his daughter. Renard goes off to war to help fund his education and to try to build a space for himself in an America that seems to reluctant to claim him. This sets up the two central tensions of the novel: the private push and pull of parents and their children and the historic riptide of racism and discrimination which drags the characters back no matter how hard they strive for more.I was so so so impressed with this novel--with its scope and its specificity, with the joy and the pain contained therein. Read it! Tell your friends to read it! Push it on your friends who read only dead white dudes! In a world where the "bootstraps" narrative continues to rear its ugly head in discussions of race and inequality, it's a powerful, well-written reminder that hard work is rarely enough.
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  • Tonstant Weader
    July 18, 2017
    A Kind of Freedom is a three generational exploration of America’s broken promises as seen through one African American family in New Orleans. There is Evelyn in 1944, falling in love with Renard, a man who hopes his military service and that of other black men will lead to a future with equality. Her father, a physician, is disappointed in her choice of Renard, hoping his standing and hard work could lift his children up out of poverty and struggle. Evelyn’s daughter Jackie is married with a yo A Kind of Freedom is a three generational exploration of America’s broken promises as seen through one African American family in New Orleans. There is Evelyn in 1944, falling in love with Renard, a man who hopes his military service and that of other black men will lead to a future with equality. Her father, a physician, is disappointed in her choice of Renard, hoping his standing and hard work could lift his children up out of poverty and struggle. Evelyn’s daughter Jackie is married with a young child in 1986. Her husband is struggling with crack addiction, losing his job, and not being able to find and keep another. In 2010, her son T.C. is just getting out of prison for dealing marijuana. This family, despite all the good will, hard work and striving is on a downhill slide from upper middle-class gentility to poverty and prison.The reasons for that slide are many, but among them are the despair and alienation caused by systemic racism. Jackie’s husband starts taking drugs along with his white co-workers, but only he loses his job. Once the doubt begins, it takes over his life, his family doubts him and he doubts himself. After Katrina, in the ruins of black New Orleans, jobs and opportunities are few and far between. In 2010, Jackie’s son, T.C. grows marijuana and his story opens with his release from prison.Characters make poor choices, but there is no latitude for poor choices in an unequal world. A slightly higher percentage of White Americans use drugs than Black Americans, yet Black people are incarcerated at wildly disproportionate rates. There really is a different criminal justice system for Whites and Blacks, the one offered diversion and therapy, the other sent to prison. One of the elements of white privilege is the luxury of making dumb decisions. These people have no such latitude and each generation spirals downward.A Kind of Freedom succeeds in showing the humanity, the love, and the connections of these three generations. Despite all that happens, there is always hope and this family keeps hope alive despite their struggles. Even in his prison cell, T.C. hopes for a better future for him and for his son, the next generation whose story is still unknown. Hope is such a human emotion and it rises new and fresh in every generation.A Kind of Freedom will be released on August 8th. I received an e-galley from the publisher through Edelweiss.★★★★http://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpres...
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  • Cary
    June 27, 2017
    You will be blown away by this novel—please do yourself a favor and put this at the very top of your to-read list.There is a sensation that I seek out constantly when I read and only experience every few years when I luck upon a novel of this calibre; the feeling that when you pick up the book you plunge fully into the lives of the characters. You are not reading words on a page but watching the lives of people—people you feel as though you know, people you care about—unfold in real time in fron You will be blown away by this novel—please do yourself a favor and put this at the very top of your to-read list.There is a sensation that I seek out constantly when I read and only experience every few years when I luck upon a novel of this calibre; the feeling that when you pick up the book you plunge fully into the lives of the characters. You are not reading words on a page but watching the lives of people—people you feel as though you know, people you care about—unfold in real time in front of you. I found (after my third night of staying up far later than my husband, reading by the dimmest possible light) that my shadowy bedroom felt somehow less real than the New Orleans Wilkerson paints for the reader.This novel is more than just expertly written and beautifully executed, the poignant and at times heartbreaking story gives context and weight to topics we as a society need to be educated on, reminded of, and discussing today. Wilkerson's characters experience the blatant racism of the 1940s and the subtle yet potent systemic and institutionalized racism of modern day; they live through the devastation of the black community in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, the "war on drugs", and embody the lack of opportunity and choice experienced by so many in the black community. In short: this is a must read.
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  • Amy Morgan
    June 25, 2017
    Thank you Edelweiss for my review copy of this book. A beautifully told story that spans 3 generations. Evelyn is a young black woman growing up during WWII. Her family is more well to do than other african-american families at the time as her father was a well respected doctor. Evelyn falls for a man below her father's expectations for her but marries him in spite of that. Their daughter Jackie struggles as a single mother after drugs ripped her marriage apart. Jackie's son T.C. sees changes in Thank you Edelweiss for my review copy of this book. A beautifully told story that spans 3 generations. Evelyn is a young black woman growing up during WWII. Her family is more well to do than other african-american families at the time as her father was a well respected doctor. Evelyn falls for a man below her father's expectations for her but marries him in spite of that. Their daughter Jackie struggles as a single mother after drugs ripped her marriage apart. Jackie's son T.C. sees changes in his neighborhood in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina and finds himself changed from a square kid who occassionally gets picked on to a kid in jail for drugs after he gets in some trouble from growing and selling marijuana. A Kind of Freedom is a raw and touching portrayal of a family and a city affected by war, racism, drugs and natural disasters. No one is the same after these events have touched the 3 generations of this family. Their love and loyalty to one another is tested time and again and while it may have wavered it never broke. A timleless story that shows the love, heartache, disappointments and triumphs of families this is a book everyone should read!
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  • Patrick Connelly
    June 19, 2017
    I was excited to discover Wilkerson Sexton’s debut novel after reading about it on Huffington Post. I was even more excited when I finished it! Evelyn’s story was not something I could initially relate to, but after only a few pages, her experience was. I was enthralled with her optimism and hopeful of her family’s success even in the face of its potential demise. What struck me most was Wilkerson Sexton use of language to show social standing, wealth and generational understanding in a way I ha I was excited to discover Wilkerson Sexton’s debut novel after reading about it on Huffington Post. I was even more excited when I finished it! Evelyn’s story was not something I could initially relate to, but after only a few pages, her experience was. I was enthralled with her optimism and hopeful of her family’s success even in the face of its potential demise. What struck me most was Wilkerson Sexton use of language to show social standing, wealth and generational understanding in a way I have never experienced before. It captivates the experience of the character’s story to create a more personal experience with ease. It moved the story in a way that was unexpected and fulfilling and created a direct and thoughtful way to a complex story. It was truly unique.While I don’t expect you will left with optimism for what comes next for Evelyn’s family, I am sure you will be left with a deep connection to her family and personal narrative. For me, this story embodies the larger reality of the current American experience teased with optimism but weighed down by uncertainty and doubt. I strongly suggest you pick this up.
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  • Elizabeth Turner
    May 18, 2017
    A powerful, profound debut novel that blew me away. With elegant writing, complex characters, and a beautifully tragic plot, it drew me in immediately, cycling through three generations of a New Orleans family, each with its own success, love, pain, and heartbreak that unfold bit by bit as the reader goes back and forth through the three time periods. Each generation pulled me in and tugged at my heart. I was captivated by the lives and romances of two sisters during World War II, heartbroken by A powerful, profound debut novel that blew me away. With elegant writing, complex characters, and a beautifully tragic plot, it drew me in immediately, cycling through three generations of a New Orleans family, each with its own success, love, pain, and heartbreak that unfold bit by bit as the reader goes back and forth through the three time periods. Each generation pulled me in and tugged at my heart. I was captivated by the lives and romances of two sisters during World War II, heartbroken by the influence of drugs on the family in the 80s, and infuriated by the bad luck and choices of the family in present day New Orleans. Each generation's story weaves in historical moments, subtly reminding the reader of the forces outside the home that have influenced black families over the last century. I highly recommend this book to anyone who likes a good story, and especially to those who want to immerse themselves in tangled family relationships and wonderful - though flawed - characters, who you'll find yourself rooting for through some unimaginable pain. And for anyone who wants to better understand the systemic oppression and racism of our country through the experience of one family, this book is a must.
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  • Kay Dee
    July 10, 2017
    so this is a sad story. i am glad i read the stories separately. it would have ruined my enjoyment and the suspense of not knowing how things were going to turn out if i had read them the way they are in the book.like will Evelyn and Reynard defeat all the opposition and stay together?will Jackie take Terry back?will TC sell drugs?the stories were good and interesting but i did not enjoy the book like i do most novels. i read to escape and to learn about other lives and get different perspective so this is a sad story. i am glad i read the stories separately. it would have ruined my enjoyment and the suspense of not knowing how things were going to turn out if i had read them the way they are in the book.like will Evelyn and Reynard defeat all the opposition and stay together?will Jackie take Terry back?will TC sell drugs?the stories were good and interesting but i did not enjoy the book like i do most novels. i read to escape and to learn about other lives and get different perspectives. now yes i did learn some things and get some different perspectives but almost every main character reminded me of a member of my family. so yeah not much escapism. sigh. just made me sad and frustrated and disappointed to see the same cycle of mistakes in my own family in a fictional family.this is probably why i don't read much fiction based on black people in the USA. hits too close to home.
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  • Ang
    July 14, 2017
    This was super excellent, EXCEPT I got the sense that the author got towards the end and didn't really know what to do. I really loved it until the last 50 or so pages; Evelyn's sections were my absolute favorite, but Jackie and TC's portions were great too.Can't wait to give this one to patrons.Thanks to the publisher and to NetGalley for the ARC.
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  • Caroline Simonds
    July 31, 2017
    Highly engaging, thought provoking and well-written novel and story.This was a fantastic book written in a way that allows you to feel what life would have been like for three generations of a New Orleans family. It was thought to provoking to alternate between the time periods and reflect on the contrasts that the author painted. Black vs. white, men vs. women and relationship etiquette clashed in distinct contrast, while I became attached to the characters and their stories. As my curiosity pe Highly engaging, thought provoking and well-written novel and story.This was a fantastic book written in a way that allows you to feel what life would have been like for three generations of a New Orleans family. It was thought to provoking to alternate between the time periods and reflect on the contrasts that the author painted. Black vs. white, men vs. women and relationship etiquette clashed in distinct contrast, while I became attached to the characters and their stories. As my curiosity peaked with the story of one generation, the author pivoted to another, always leaving me with the desire to learn more (even after the book ends I still want to fill in the holes!). The book was engaging and left me with a sense of sadness that I always feel when recognizing the impact of racism. Read it for the incredible story, but know you are getting more than just that!
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  • Janis
    August 1, 2017
    A Different Kind of Freedom is heartbreaking, loving and passionate but above of all, it is hopeful. I loved every minute of this book and found myself not wanting the story to end. I have a soft spot for every character, but it was T.C. who I found myself following a little bit in love with. For me he represents the axiom of the past and the future: his anger, his pain, and his love for his mama. All these emotions are conveyed beautifully through Sexton’s multi-narrated pages and she gives ca A Different Kind of Freedom is heartbreaking, loving and passionate but above of all, it is hopeful. I loved every minute of this book and found myself not wanting the story to end. I have a soft spot for every character, but it was T.C. who I found myself following a little bit in love with. For me he represents the axiom of the past and the future: his anger, his pain, and his love for his mama. All these emotions are conveyed beautifully through Sexton’s multi-narrated pages and she gives carte blanche to all her characters to tell their own story – even when they don’t want to. Margaret Wilkerson Sexton is a fierce writer with enormous talent and she is definitely up there with all the other great novelists of our time. I am pleased to have read this novel and highly recommend that you do too. Enjoy!
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  • Jessica Reeves
    July 31, 2017
    Wow - A masterpiece. Wilkerson Sexton's debut novel is sure to be an instant classic. This story takes the reader on an adventure in New Orleans through three generations, setting the background so that you actually feel what it was like to experience everyday New Orleans in the Jim Crow South, the Eighties, and Post-Katrina. As rich as the background is, the writing allows the reader to effortlessly envision the most minute details about the characters, while offering the complexity for the rea Wow - A masterpiece. Wilkerson Sexton's debut novel is sure to be an instant classic. This story takes the reader on an adventure in New Orleans through three generations, setting the background so that you actually feel what it was like to experience everyday New Orleans in the Jim Crow South, the Eighties, and Post-Katrina. As rich as the background is, the writing allows the reader to effortlessly envision the most minute details about the characters, while offering the complexity for the readers to place their own selves into the emotions and suspense that the characters face as their story unfolds. If you like great writing, you won't be disappointed. If you like classic tales, you won't be disappointed. If you like modern coming of age experiences, then you won't be disappointed.
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  • Kradcliffe
    August 1, 2017
    This is an exceptional book. I expect it will be on many short lists this year. A Kind Of Freedom offers that rare combination of heartbreak and hope. The writing is beautiful, crisp and clear-eyed. The characters will draw you in immediately. Wilkerson Sexton uses a braided narrative to expertly bring grace and depth across three generations, creating a novel that feels both epic and modern. And, behind the rich characters and their impossible life stories stands a quiet, poetic ode to New Orle This is an exceptional book. I expect it will be on many short lists this year. A Kind Of Freedom offers that rare combination of heartbreak and hope. The writing is beautiful, crisp and clear-eyed. The characters will draw you in immediately. Wilkerson Sexton uses a braided narrative to expertly bring grace and depth across three generations, creating a novel that feels both epic and modern. And, behind the rich characters and their impossible life stories stands a quiet, poetic ode to New Orleans. This book will make you think about American families and our assumptions of life betterment from one generation to the next. I highly recommend it.
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  • Pamela Steele
    August 1, 2017
    Here, Wilkerson Sexton documents the archaeology of an African-American family, the layers of its history skillfully excavated, examined and re-examined to reveal the finer details that connect its members. The narrative follows two sisters and subsequent generations through the WWII era into post-Katrina New Orleans amid the systematic racism that remains in America.A Kind of Freedom is a salient novel that doesn't read like the debut novel it is. Wilkerson Sexton's prose is confident, her dial Here, Wilkerson Sexton documents the archaeology of an African-American family, the layers of its history skillfully excavated, examined and re-examined to reveal the finer details that connect its members. The narrative follows two sisters and subsequent generations through the WWII era into post-Katrina New Orleans amid the systematic racism that remains in America.A Kind of Freedom is a salient novel that doesn't read like the debut novel it is. Wilkerson Sexton's prose is confident, her dialogue authentic. The reader can't help but feel the blood-love that flows through the narrative.
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  • Sita
    July 29, 2017
    I fell in love with this book within the very first few pages. I was struck by how beautiful the writing is, and found myself savoring certain passages before moving on. Very few books I read (and I read A LOT) make me stop in my tracks and want to languish in the story. The story is beautifully told, the characters interesting and complex, and the New Orleans scenery and culture palpable to the reader. Simply put, this book is a stunning debut and an instant "classic" for this lover of literary I fell in love with this book within the very first few pages. I was struck by how beautiful the writing is, and found myself savoring certain passages before moving on. Very few books I read (and I read A LOT) make me stop in my tracks and want to languish in the story. The story is beautifully told, the characters interesting and complex, and the New Orleans scenery and culture palpable to the reader. Simply put, this book is a stunning debut and an instant "classic" for this lover of literary fiction.
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  • Entrice
    August 1, 2017
    I felt like I was in New Orleans as I read this book. Margaret does an amazing job of telling each characters story and making you feel a part of the story. Her descriptions make this an exciting read as you connect with this African American family and their high's and lows. It is a well told story leaving you wanting more.
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  • Michele
    August 1, 2017
    Included in: http://bookriot.com/2017/08/01/must-r...
  • Ann Theis
    July 28, 2017
    PW
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