Now Is Everything
Now Is Everything is a stirring debut novel told in alternating THEN and NOW chapters, perfect for Sarah Dessen and Jennifer Niven fans, about what one girl is willing to do to protect her past, present, and future.The McCauleys look perfect on the outside. But nothing is ever as it seems, and this family is hiding a dark secret.Hadley McCauley will do anything to keep her sister safe from their father. But when Hadley’s forbidden relationship with Charlie Simmons deepens, the violence at home escalates, culminating in an explosive accident that will leave everyone changed.When Hadley attempts to take her own life at the hospital post-accident, her friends, doctors, family, and the investigator on the case want to know why. Only Hadley knows what really happened that day, and she’s not talking.

Now Is Everything Details

TitleNow Is Everything
Author
ReleaseNov 7th, 2017
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN-139780062495730
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Realistic Fiction

Now Is Everything Review

  • Ruth Lehrer
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to receive a free ARC of Amy Giles’s November 2017 YA novel. NOW IS EVERYTHING IS not an easy read—for me this book was painful reading because of the content. The power Hadley’s misogynistic father holds over the women in this family kept making me furious and I’d have to take a break. Almost a thriller, this book is a sensitive look at an abusive family and the bravery of a trapped girl. Hadley’s loyalty to her sister and even to her mother, who is complicit, rounds out her I was lucky enough to receive a free ARC of Amy Giles’s November 2017 YA novel. NOW IS EVERYTHING IS not an easy read—for me this book was painful reading because of the content. The power Hadley’s misogynistic father holds over the women in this family kept making me furious and I’d have to take a break. Almost a thriller, this book is a sensitive look at an abusive family and the bravery of a trapped girl. Hadley’s loyalty to her sister and even to her mother, who is complicit, rounds out her character and has us rooting for her throughout.Told in two time settings—then and now—Giles handles these switches with ease. The withheld information alternately increases tension and leads the reader to constantly make predictions that may or may not be correct. The writing skillfully builds suspense and slowly reveals plot but also reveals the complexities of an abusive household.Come November 2017, the world will be a better place for having this book in it.
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  • Nicole Sewell
    January 1, 1970
    This book is just so amazing on so many levels. I read the early drafts and loved it from day one. The writing is so raw and intense and emotional, you're right there with Hadley the whole time. I don't usually have "feels" when reading a book. This one was an exception.I don't want to go into too much for fear of spoiling it. Suffice it to say, I named my daughter after Hadley's little sister and I will probably always be in love with Charlie.
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  • Amber Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful and haunting, NOW IS EVERYTHING explores the complexities of family and abuse, as we follow one girl on her courageous journey to choose love over hate and hope over fear. I couldn't put this book down - it really is a must-read! *I received an advance copy*
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  • Sally
    January 1, 1970
    I could not put down this book. 17 yr old Hadley bears the brunt of her father's emotional and physical abuse, in trying to spare her young sister. Her mother's emotionally checked out. The family is a wealthy, suburban one, a glossy surface that belies all the pain. The writing style is fabulous -- everything rings true, from the witty banter of teens in the hallway, to Hadley's poetic depths of despair, to the inner language of a family abused/abusive. When the mother criticizes Hadley re: her I could not put down this book. 17 yr old Hadley bears the brunt of her father's emotional and physical abuse, in trying to spare her young sister. Her mother's emotionally checked out. The family is a wealthy, suburban one, a glossy surface that belies all the pain. The writing style is fabulous -- everything rings true, from the witty banter of teens in the hallway, to Hadley's poetic depths of despair, to the inner language of a family abused/abusive. When the mother criticizes Hadley re: her father, saying, "Why do you provoke him?" I was profoundly moved -- I went through lots of emotional abuse from my own dad, growing up, and these were the very exact words I'd hear from my own mom. In sum, this book rings true. The reluctance to tell. The shame.The set-up with "then" and "now" chapters, where we try to puzzle out past events, worked great to build suspense. This was an amazing book. The best I've read in quite a while. *read from free ARC*
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  • Stephanie Elliot
    January 1, 1970
    Usually when I settle in to read a book, it takes me quite a while to get into it. As a busy mom I don’t get much personal reading time. I was so invested in reading Now Is Everything that I finished it in less than 24 hours, in two sittings! Amy Giles has done a bang-up job with her debut, a story about a girl who has survived a terrible accident (and more!). Readers are taken along for the ride, with chapters of “Then” and “Now” so we are drawn into Hadley’s story, of her life with an abusive Usually when I settle in to read a book, it takes me quite a while to get into it. As a busy mom I don’t get much personal reading time. I was so invested in reading Now Is Everything that I finished it in less than 24 hours, in two sittings! Amy Giles has done a bang-up job with her debut, a story about a girl who has survived a terrible accident (and more!). Readers are taken along for the ride, with chapters of “Then” and “Now” so we are drawn into Hadley’s story, of her life with an abusive father, a not-all-there mother, and her precocious little sister, who she is trying to protect. A sweet and caring yet forbidden boy rounds out the drama of the novel, and I found myself turning pages as fast as I could to find out the why, the who, and the how of Giles’ very intriguing, very mystifying debut!
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  • Amanda Jasper
    January 1, 1970
    As Amy's CP I got to read this book very early. And I LOVE it. It was my favorite read of 2015, and my husband and all of my friends had to listen to me talk very enthusiastically about how amazing it was. Our Cosmic Second is tense, suspenseful, filled with amazing characters. Hadley, Charlie, especially Lila. Your hearts will break! I'm so beyond overjoyed that the world will get to read this amazing novel.
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  • Joanne O'Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    A page-turning, gut-punching read! Giles creates authentic characters in Hadley and her friends, including a swoony love interest, all while maintaining electric tension throughout the story. The abuse that Hadley suffers seems very real (I admit that I loved that the horrible abusive father was a hedge fund manager because that's how I see those people : ) This is an absorbing, engrossing read that keeps you guessing right till the end!
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  • A.V. Geiger
    January 1, 1970
    Don't let the blue sky on the cover fool you! This is a dark and suspenseful story about the secrets lurking beneath the surface in a wealthy suburban family. Seventeen-year-old Hadley's struggle feels all too real, and it makes this book difficult to read in places, but gripping and haunting throughout.
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  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure I will be able to write this review without crying. And I'm not sure if they would be tears of heartbreak, overwhelming relief, or joy. Simple words will not do justice to this incredible book. It captured my attention, enthralled my curiosity, and, most of all, worked its way into my heart. There is something so important in this book, so vital we must share it and shout it from roof tops. The survival, the resilience, the importance of friendship and love in this book, the display I'm not sure I will be able to write this review without crying. And I'm not sure if they would be tears of heartbreak, overwhelming relief, or joy. Simple words will not do justice to this incredible book. It captured my attention, enthralled my curiosity, and, most of all, worked its way into my heart. There is something so important in this book, so vital we must share it and shout it from roof tops. The survival, the resilience, the importance of friendship and love in this book, the display of emotions and fear and strength is truly amazing. It all makes Now Is Everything such a vibrant, heartbreaking, and incredible book.Now. Hadley faces the aftermath of a deadly plane crash. There are people investigating, but Hadley isn't talking, not about the crash, not about life before the crash. Then. Hadley wakes every morning, faces every day with the single purpose of protecting her younger sister. Hadley must get perfect grades, captain a successful lacrosse team, be a good friend, and hide the truth of her home life - from everyone. She never expected to get a chance with her long-time crush, Charlie Simmons. She never expected to fall for him the way she does. She never expected the way he would understand her and become such an important part of her life. But the situation at home is escalating, and Hadley knows she is running out of time and options.Now Is Everything is written from Hadley's perspective, both from 'now', after the plane crash, and 'then', back months ago leading up until the events of 'now'. This was done superbly. There are far more 'then' sections than 'now', but the balance was perfect. My curiosity was piqued right from the start. I was constantly asking, 'what happened?' We readers are slowly fed pieces to the mysteries of this novel. And just when I thought I had it all figured out, the whole thing would shift, a new layer would be added, and my heart would break all over again.This book was beautifully written. It was so easy to get into Hadley's head. And despite at first not fully understanding the extend of events and her life, my heart went out to her. There was a wonderful balance between lighthearted moments and true pain and despair. The themes of surviving, speaking up, and providing support against violence, abuse, and neglect is so important for YA literature. And Now Is Everything is an exemplar. The romance is an incredible part of this book. It is intense and consuming, but in no way does it detract from the gravity of the main storyline and themes. Instead, it only adds to the brilliance of this novel. It gives Hadley something else for which to fight. Charlie is so incredibly sweet and supportive. I loved it when he would get nervous or awkward when trying to woo Hadley. He isn't perfect, but he is perfect for Hadley, and I loved the way he both pushed and supported her, was patient but never ignored or stayed silent about the important things. Friendship also plays a huge role in this story. Hadley is fortunate to have two supportive best friends. But she is equally good at hiding everything from them, just like she protects and hides the truth from her sister. Hadley continually risks herself to protect those around her, and in that lies the true message of this novel. With Now is Everything, Amy Giles delivers a stunning debut that is both thrilling and romantic. Now Is Everything offer timely themes, strong characters, and an incredible story of one girl's strength, bravery, and resilience. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    In Amy Giles’s luminous YA debut, NOW IS EVERYTHING (which I actually devoured in one feverish sitting), we meet Hadley McCauley, a 17-year-old high-school lacrosse player who seems to have it all: great grades, caring friends, and a tight-knit nuclear family. The problem is, appearances can be deceiving. Hadley’s charming hedge-fund manager dad, Miles, terrorizes his family by ruling with an iron fist—literally. Not only does he abuse Hadley physically, he forbids her to date or to think indepe In Amy Giles’s luminous YA debut, NOW IS EVERYTHING (which I actually devoured in one feverish sitting), we meet Hadley McCauley, a 17-year-old high-school lacrosse player who seems to have it all: great grades, caring friends, and a tight-knit nuclear family. The problem is, appearances can be deceiving. Hadley’s charming hedge-fund manager dad, Miles, terrorizes his family by ruling with an iron fist—literally. Not only does he abuse Hadley physically, he forbids her to date or to think independently. Hadley chafes under her father’s control, but she has suffered his abuse since childhood and knows not to make waves. She also knows not to say anything about her new boyfriend, Charlie, who she’s seeing behind her father’s back, or the fact that she doesn’t want to attend her father’s alma mater, Cornell. If she plays the game, Hadley believes, no one will get (further) hurt. But then, when her father sets his abusive sights on her adored little sister, Lila, Hadley fears for Lila’s safety and begins to question the status quo. With dramatic twists and turns along the way, and gorgeous, lyrical writing, Giles’s novel will appeal to fans of John Green and Sarah Dessen. A dazzling, edge-of-your-seat debut. Highly and enthusiastically recommended!
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  • Sharon Metcalf
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars Wow, what an incredible debut novel Amy Giles has produced. Now is Everything drew me into the drama in its very first paragraph and did not relinquish it's hold on me, the intensity continuing to increase page after page, until the concluding passages. The blurb described the book as being about what one girl is willing to do to protect her past, present, and future. Suggested for Jennifer Niven fans and recommended for ages 14 and above, I expected to enjoy this and I did - no questi 4.5 stars Wow, what an incredible debut novel Amy Giles has produced. Now is Everything drew me into the drama in its very first paragraph and did not relinquish it's hold on me, the intensity continuing to increase page after page, until the concluding passages. The blurb described the book as being about what one girl is willing to do to protect her past, present, and future. Suggested for Jennifer Niven fans and recommended for ages 14 and above, I expected to enjoy this and I did - no question. I would however question whether some of the content was suitable for a 14 year old, and warn any reader that this book contains strong (view spoiler)[ child abuse/domstic violence, (hide spoiler)]themes which made for diificult reading at times.The story was revealed in alternating chapters titled "Then" and "Now". In the "Now" there has been a life and death accident. We learn about the protaganist, 17 year old Hadley McCauley, through police interviews with various friends and acquaintances. We gradually get an understanding of her personality, her likes and dislikes as well as a feel for her home life. The "Then" chapters are in the first person from Hadleys perspective. Not only do we share her first love and sexual experiences, her insecurities and fears but we also have an inside look at the important realationships in her life. Her friends, her family. As the two story lines progressed it became evident that the situation at home was becoming untenable and I was continually trying to second guess what had lead to the accident. I loved the way Hadley was so protective of her younger sister Lila, always stepping in to spare her from the inordinate pressure and controlling ways of their father, nurturing her when their mother failed to. The tension in their household was palpable and kept me on edge throughout as Hadley took risks, told fibs and challenged her boundaries.This is a difficult book to review without spoiling however if you don't mind YA fiction with a touch of suspense and a sweet romance tempered with some very difficult themes, I wholeheartedly recommend you try it for yourself. Many thanks to author Amy Giles for an excellent book, to the publishers Harper Collins, and Edelweiss for the opportunity of reading this digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Robin Roe
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get an early copy of Now Is Everything, and I'm so glad I did! Amy Giles' debut is a gripping, suspenseful, and moving story that asks the question: what are you willing to do for the people you love? Both heart-breaking and heart-restoring, Now Is Everything grabbed me from the very first line and never let go. Read this book!!!!
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  • destiny ☠ howling libraries
    January 1, 1970
    Brutal, but fantastic. RTC
  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book in less than 24 hours. NOW IS EVERYTHING has perfect pacing. It never felt slow, and every word was important. I never skimmed. I soaked up each word and each piece of information that Amy Giles strategically placed throughout the story to help us unravel Hadley's mystery. Equal parts heart-wrenching and hopeful, Hadley's story is one that will stick with you long after you close the book. I can't recommend this book enough.
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  • Be A Rebel
    January 1, 1970
    Now Is Everything is a novel that thoroughly engages readers as it unspools a little at a time. When the novel begins readers find out that Hadley has been in a plane accident and that her mother is dead. The novel then flips back to the past and readers learn about Hadley's authoritarian/abusive father, negligent/alcoholic mother and firecracker of a younger sister. As the reveals keep coming readers get glimpses into the present day as well as the past and wonder: Why did the plane crash happe Now Is Everything is a novel that thoroughly engages readers as it unspools a little at a time. When the novel begins readers find out that Hadley has been in a plane accident and that her mother is dead. The novel then flips back to the past and readers learn about Hadley's authoritarian/abusive father, negligent/alcoholic mother and firecracker of a younger sister. As the reveals keep coming readers get glimpses into the present day as well as the past and wonder: Why did the plane crash happen? Who survived the plane crash other than Hadley? Will any authority ever figure out what is really going on inside the facade of Hadley's family? Will Hadley ever have the courage to break free of the tyranny of her father? How do Hadley's best friends and new boyfriend factor into the escalating family drama? In Now Is Everything, Giles has constructed a well-paced and intriguing plot with characters that are fully developed. This is a gem of a book and readers will look forward to more books by this first time author.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    What I loved about this book was that, although I am years beyond Hadley's age, the author's imagery transported me back to being a teenage girl again. I FELT the butterflies Hadley felt around Charlie. I FELT the anguish she felt when when he father was abusive. I understood why she felt so powerless in her situation. As I was reaching the end of the book I found myself slowing down. I knew that by reaching the end I would be saying goodbye to Hadley, and thereby going back to being my 50+ self What I loved about this book was that, although I am years beyond Hadley's age, the author's imagery transported me back to being a teenage girl again. I FELT the butterflies Hadley felt around Charlie. I FELT the anguish she felt when when he father was abusive. I understood why she felt so powerless in her situation. As I was reaching the end of the book I found myself slowing down. I knew that by reaching the end I would be saying goodbye to Hadley, and thereby going back to being my 50+ self again. READ this book, get reacquainted with your younger self. I promise you will be glad you did.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    See my full review and much more on my blog KissinBlueKaren The pacing for this book was so smooth it felt effortless switching between timelines. I can honestly say that the author didn’t pull any cheap tricks to make me want to rush the story to get to the “good part”. This whole story was the good part. Hadley is easy to love and understand even though she is going through this awful time in her life. Part of her experience unfortunately, felt familiar to things I have faced in my own life. See my full review and much more on my blog KissinBlueKaren The pacing for this book was so smooth it felt effortless switching between timelines. I can honestly say that the author didn’t pull any cheap tricks to make me want to rush the story to get to the “good part”. This whole story was the good part. Hadley is easy to love and understand even though she is going through this awful time in her life. Part of her experience unfortunately, felt familiar to things I have faced in my own life. It was refreshing to see an author take this on without apologizing.This story also contains a beautiful love story between Hadley and a boy named Charlie. This romance kept the story from being too depressing and gave Hadley so much too look forward to in this bleak time of her life. I loved Hadley and Charlie together. Where they end up is a question that kept me turning pages even as other characters’ fates were revealed. I so wanted a happy ending for Hadley.There really wasn’t anything about this book I didn’t like. I would highly recommend this book without a “trigger warning” because beneath it all there is a serious message of hope and a resources list from the author at the ending. This book is meant to create a dialogue or extend a lifeline, and I hope it does. I really hope it does.
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    This fast paced novel shifting from the past to present details Hadley’s life pre and post surviving a plane crash. Hadley’s childhood was anything but serene. In order to protect her little sister Lila from her father, Hadley makes herself the center of attention and does everything possible to appease her strict and abusive father: running miles each morning at 4.30am, making perfect grades, playing lacrosse despite hating it, taking flying lessons despite also hating it, and vowing to go to C This fast paced novel shifting from the past to present details Hadley’s life pre and post surviving a plane crash. Hadley’s childhood was anything but serene. In order to protect her little sister Lila from her father, Hadley makes herself the center of attention and does everything possible to appease her strict and abusive father: running miles each morning at 4.30am, making perfect grades, playing lacrosse despite hating it, taking flying lessons despite also hating it, and vowing to go to Cornell because it’s her dad’s alma mater.In the present, Hadley is in shock after the plane crash and winds up in a children’s psychiatric ward after attempting to take her own life. She refuses to speak of what happened that fateful day in the plane and what led it to crash, killing all passengers but herself.The ‘now’ and ‘then’ chapters were woven perfectly together, but the only thing I disliked were the random time gaps in between chapters ranging from a few days to weeks. I understood it was done that way to advance the timeline, but it felt like information was missing, reverberating the whole telling but not showing. Regardless, the showing was ample for each chapter, just not the time gaps in between.One thing I wished the author would have expressed was the shifting personality of Hadley’s mom. The flashbacks show a thoughtful and kind person, but in the present she neglects her children, shows zero love, and takes the father’s side whenever an event pops up that enrages him. I would like to have seen the moment or moments when her mindset changed to make her a meek and quiet character that resides to getting drunk on alcohol instead of taking care of and protecting her children. I received an ARC of Now is Everything from Edelweiss.
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  • Carlie Sorosiak
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, wow, WOW. I read Now Is Everything in one sitting, and it absolutely devoured me. If you like powerful love stories, this one's for you. If you like heart-wrenching tales of sibling relationships, this one's for you. If you want to be crying in your seat on an airplane, this one's for you. (Because I actually did the last one and had a flight attendant ask me if I was okay, but NEVER MIND ABOUT THAT.) No lie, I was supposed to be asleep but I literally COULD NOT PUT THIS BOOK DOWN so I'm ti Wow, wow, WOW. I read Now Is Everything in one sitting, and it absolutely devoured me. If you like powerful love stories, this one's for you. If you like heart-wrenching tales of sibling relationships, this one's for you. If you want to be crying in your seat on an airplane, this one's for you. (Because I actually did the last one and had a flight attendant ask me if I was okay, but NEVER MIND ABOUT THAT.) No lie, I was supposed to be asleep but I literally COULD NOT PUT THIS BOOK DOWN so I'm tired now, but it was worth it. Gah, it's just so good. Hadley is such a wonderful character, and you will deeply root for her. I loved every bit of this book, and it broke me. I can't wait for this to make a big splash on the shelves - and to read anything and everything that Amy Giles writes.
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  • Leslie Cohen Glascock
    January 1, 1970
    From the very beginning, this book drew me in. I loved how it shifted between the past and present, with each "past" chapter providing a little more insight, and clues as to what happened. I loved our very real protagonist, Hadley, who I often wanted to give a hug, or a high-five (thinking here of her love interest, Charlie, who I may love even more than Hadley). And, though I sure didn't "love" their characters, Hadley's parents were written very believably, where I often found myself wanting t From the very beginning, this book drew me in. I loved how it shifted between the past and present, with each "past" chapter providing a little more insight, and clues as to what happened. I loved our very real protagonist, Hadley, who I often wanted to give a hug, or a high-five (thinking here of her love interest, Charlie, who I may love even more than Hadley). And, though I sure didn't "love" their characters, Hadley's parents were written very believably, where I often found myself wanting to slug the father, and yell at the mother. I HIGHLY recommend this book. Between its suspense, tension, very real characters, young love, and quick pace, I couldn't put it down!
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    This book was impossible to put down. I wanted to put my life on hold to find out what happened. It's gorgeously written and the story will take you in and wrap itself around you and squeeze your heart. An important, unforgettable book.
  • Paige (Illegal in 3 Countries)
    January 1, 1970
    See more of my reviews on The YA Kitten! My copy was an ARC I got from the publisher via NetGalley.Trigger warning: Now is Everything is about child abuse and also features a brief but graphic moment of self-harm via a suicide attempt.Whoo, what a disappointment! Now is Everything had me excited to begin with, seeing as it opens with Hadley being pulled from the scene of a plane crash followed by pieces of interviews with her friends as investigators try to figure out what caused the crash. It d See more of my reviews on The YA Kitten! My copy was an ARC I got from the publisher via NetGalley.Trigger warning: Now is Everything is about child abuse and also features a brief but graphic moment of self-harm via a suicide attempt.Whoo, what a disappointment! Now is Everything had me excited to begin with, seeing as it opens with Hadley being pulled from the scene of a plane crash followed by pieces of interviews with her friends as investigators try to figure out what caused the crash. It doesn’t stay good for long. Instead, it devolves into a book flatter than the paper it’s written on.The characters are flat enough to be described by their roles rather than who they actually are. Hadley is the Main Character, Charlie the Boyfriend, Meaghan and Noah the Best Friends (Noah is the Gay Best Friend specifically), Claudia is the Slutty Mean Girl, and so on.Claudia’s characterization is especially appalling. I’ve gotten used to YA books that break down the boundaries of the trope and make sure the antagonistic role is filled by a more nuanced character readers can’t dismiss so easily as the Mean Girl. Meanwhile, we have Claudia, who very openly offers Hadley’s boyfriend a blow job while she’s drunk.Our most noteworthy example of bad characterization actually comes from Lila, Hadley’s angelic, precocious ten-year-old sister. Lila exists not as a character but as a plot device, something precious for Hadley to protect from their abusive, controlling father. There’s nothing wrong with her, but there’s nothing right either. I was dealing with bullies and getting my first school referral at ten, but Lila doesn’t seem to have anything of her own going on! She’s just kinda there and cute.There is some merit to the book as an exploration of parent-child physical and emotional abuse, but when other books can approach the same issue and actually draw you in with the skilled writing and deft characterization, why bother with this one?After half the book, I started skipping the more plentiful “Then” chapters to read the “Now” and it didn’t feel like I was missing much. I gathered what was going on: increasing tension between Hadley and her abusive father, her mom not helping, her little sister Lila being a sweet angel she wanted to protect, her friends and boyfriend being around, etc. But then Hadley realizes that her father is planning to make Lila “shape up” into a proper daughter now that she’s ten years old–the same age at which he literally beat Hadley into the perfect lacrosse-playing, plane-flying child he wanted, breaking her bones until what came back together was to his liking.She’s not going to let precocious little Lila go through the same hell she did.Set-ups like this are literally what Battered Woman Syndrome is made of! It promises a glimpse at how far an abused person will go to save either themselves or their most precious person–in Hadley’s case, Lila–from their abuser. In fact, we do see Hadley make preparations to do what she has to in order to keep Lila safe from years of beatings and conditioning and the loss of the little girl sweetness Hadley loves her so much for.But at this pivotal moment that offers the one point of moral complexity in the entire book, we lose it all. (view spoiler)[See, Hadley’s dad is deathly allergic to nuts. She bakes nutty muffins at home, cleans every last piece of cookware used to eliminate traces of nuts, and plans to switch out the muffins they typically get at the airport with her muffins when they fly. When he bites into one mid-flight, he’ll go into anaphylactic shock and the plane will crash, killing both him and Hadley herself.Except her mom doesn’t stay home to take care of Lila like Hadley plans for her to and Hadley backs out of giving her dad the nutty muffins. She gets their usual airport muffins again, making sure to confirm there are no nuts in them to create her own “alibi” of sorts, but testing after the accident indicates those airport muffins actually did have nuts in them due to contamination at the plant they came from! It’s the third such case out of that plant, in fact.So in the end, Hadley is absolved of her parents’ deaths and readers get the least interesting ending possible. Would it not have been more interesting for Hadley to give him the tainted muffin only for investigators to mistakenly attribute it to contamination at the plant the uneaten airport muffins came from? On the outside, Hadley expresses her relief at not being the one to kill him. Inside, she’s a tangle of emotions because she’s seriously getting away with murdering her abusive father.It’s just such a weak ending after so much tension, pain, and build-up! (hide spoiler)]There are better books out there that cover similar topics to Now is Everything, like Thicker Than Water by Kelly Fiore. Though it covers abuse by a sibling and drug addiction rather than abuse by a parent and the ending is similarly disappointing, its characters are more complex and the book remains memorable even a year and a half later! Even “tragedy porn” books like A List of Cages by Robin Roe does it better thanks to vivid characterization and an ending unafraid of letting characters suffer long-lasting consequences! Reader, you can easily find books more worth your time than this one.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    “The sky is black and unwelcoming outside my bedroom window. It tells my body to go back to sleep, but even the heavens have no jurisdiction in this house.” This was another emotional read - and it grabbed me by the heartstrings and pulled me in. Amy Giles’ debut Now Is Everywhere is the haunting story about survival. Told in a then-now format before and after a tragic accident, we follow Hadley McCauley as she tries to navigate life under the controlling thumb of her abusive father. I don’t “The sky is black and unwelcoming outside my bedroom window. It tells my body to go back to sleep, but even the heavens have no jurisdiction in this house.” This was another emotional read - and it grabbed me by the heartstrings and pulled me in. Amy Giles’ debut Now Is Everywhere is the haunting story about survival. Told in a then-now format before and after a tragic accident, we follow Hadley McCauley as she tries to navigate life under the controlling thumb of her abusive father. I don’t really want to say much more, because I think it’s really best to go into this book not really knowing much. Suffice it to say, I enjoyed this book. Things I Liked We get some interviews woven throughout the story that really show both character personality and backstory to the tragic event the story opens up with. They immediately hooked me and they were some of my favorite parts.I really liked the writing throughout the story! It was immersive and descriptive without being too lyrical. There’s nice creative almost poetic phrasing used in the “Now” sections of the story that sets it apart tonally without feeling disconnected. The then-now format really shows the full character journey of where started and where we end up. It drives the story well emotionally.Hadley was a really easy character for me to connect to. We really get to see her deal with some heavy stuff emotionally, but I loved seeing her be lighter with her sister, Lila, her friends, and Charlie. I also love that she loves watching Cupcake Wars and cheesy disaster movies, because I can relate. I really liked the romance we see develop between Hadley & Charlie. Their meet-cute is sufficiently adorable and filled with flirty banter, but we get to see them really open up to one another and develop feelings over time. I freaking LOVED that they discussed sex, birth control, and STI testing when they felt like they were ready to take that step in their relationship. And there is zero pressure from either side - it’s all very respectful and loving and I am so freaking here for safe sex and open communication in YA. Things I Didn’t Like Mean-girl Claudia was underdeveloped and one-dimensional. She honestly could have been left out of the story and it wouldn’t really have changed anything. Her role and it’s implications on other characters, could have been more fleshed out or left out, but she was mostly just there - being a nuisance.Hadley becomes a bit of an absent friend and sister once she starts her relationship with Charlie. I get the honeymoon stage and everything, but I feel like I didn’t get to know Meagan and Noah as much as I could have, if she didn’t go MIA after getting with Charlie. But I do like that she was called out on it - always a plus.Hadley’s dad is THE WORST. I can say nothing else about him, other than I wish him only bad things and he is one of the worst characters I have ever had the displeasure of coming across. He’s tied with Kiko’s mom from Starfish for worst parent ever awardThis book was honestly really hard to read at times, Hadley’s father is a controlling and abusive piece of work. But I deeply enjoyed seeing Hadley’s journey and struggle. I connected with the characters - always a plus, and I was invested in the romance, which is always fun. Despite the heavy topics in the story, there were happier moments that were well balanced and never detracted from the seriousness of the subject matter. Now is Everything is an emotional story of the overcoming abuse and finding love and happiness that pulls you in.Trigger warnings for verbal and physical child abuse and suicidal thoughts and attemptI received a copy of the book from HarperTeen in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    SO GOOD! I had a hard time putting this book down.
  • Bonnie Pipkin
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those books that you know you will miss the characters when you are done. I just finished and I already miss them! My heart was all in with this special book.
  • Jennifer Fenn
    January 1, 1970
    Amy Giles' debut novel "Now is Everything" contains some of the most vividly drawn and realistic characters I've read in a long time. Protagonist Hadley, her boyfriend Charlie, her friends Noah and Megan and her little sister Lila all seem like real people; their dialogue sounds extremely authentic. I basically read this whole novel (a quick read!) with my heart in my throat, because I was really liked these characters, and I dreaded seeing bad things happen to them! Ultimately, though, this boo Amy Giles' debut novel "Now is Everything" contains some of the most vividly drawn and realistic characters I've read in a long time. Protagonist Hadley, her boyfriend Charlie, her friends Noah and Megan and her little sister Lila all seem like real people; their dialogue sounds extremely authentic. I basically read this whole novel (a quick read!) with my heart in my throat, because I was really liked these characters, and I dreaded seeing bad things happen to them! Ultimately, though, this book is a hopeful story about finding inner strength and the power of friendship. I'd recommend "Now is Everything" for fans of "A List of Cages" by Robin Roe, and anyone looking for a contemporary novel that packs an emotional punch!
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  • K.L. Hallam
    January 1, 1970
    All seventeen-year-old Hadley wants is to protect her sister from the monster. The monster her mother won’t go against. The brut that pushes her at the gym, and laughs at any pain she suffers, and like a drill sergeant, has her up at the crack of dawn to run every day despite her injuries. The monster is her father.Hadley can take it. She can take just about anything he dishes out. So long as he stays away from Lila, her 10-year-old, spirited and carefree sister, who’s innocent of his torments, All seventeen-year-old Hadley wants is to protect her sister from the monster. The monster her mother won’t go against. The brut that pushes her at the gym, and laughs at any pain she suffers, and like a drill sergeant, has her up at the crack of dawn to run every day despite her injuries. The monster is her father.Hadley can take it. She can take just about anything he dishes out. So long as he stays away from Lila, her 10-year-old, spirited and carefree sister, who’s innocent of his torments, for the most part. Hadley wants to keep it that way and plans to enroll at a local college, instead of Cornell, her father’s alma mater. The college he’s forcing her to attend. Hadley doesn’t confide in anyone at school, she doesn’t tell her friends what’s happening at home. Hadley suffers alone. Until she meets Charlie. All the girls swoon over Charlie, kind, humble, and contentious. Hadley can’t understand why he likes her. They fall hard for each other. But her father’s on to him, becoming suspicious and even more controlling of Hadley until suddenly he’s not. The monster has found Hadley’s weakness and sets his sights. Then the next tragedy strikes; a tragedy that changes everything. Told in two timelines: then and now. Beautifully written, its subject difficult to read at times. There were many triggers for me, personally. Hadley’s emotional journey of being trapped in an abusive family was written with sensitivity and understanding—and suspense! It was also difficult to put down. 2017 Debut Author.
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  • Amanda Searcy
    January 1, 1970
    I stayed up way past my bedtime finishing this book. It keeps you guessing until the end. I loved the Then/Now chapters. Hadley is a great, developed character who’s in an impossible position. Everything about the book is so real; parts are difficult to read. But it’s an important book and a really engaging read. I would like to keep living with these characters and see where they go next!
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  • Nicole Hewitt
    January 1, 1970
    RTC...
  • Carol Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best books I've read in a long time.
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