Good and Gone
When Lexi Green’s older brother, Charlie, starts plotting a road trip to find Adrian Wildes, a famous musician who’s been reported missing, she’s beyond confused. Her brother hasn’t said a nice word to her or left the couch since his girlfriend dumped him months ago—but he’ll hop in a car to find some hipster? Concerned at how quickly he seems to be rebounding, Lexi decides to go along for the ride.Besides, Lexi could use the distraction. The anger and bewilderment coursing through her after getting dumped by her pretentious boyfriend, Seth, has left her on edge. As Lexi, Charlie, and their neighbor Zack hit the road, Lexi recalls bits and pieces of her short-lived romance and sees, for the first time, what it truly was: a one-sided, coldhearted manipulation game. Not only did Seth completely isolate her, but he took something from her that she didn’t give him permission to. The farther from home they get, the three uncover much more than empty clues about a reclusive rocker’s whereabouts. Instead, what starts off as a car ride turns into an exploration of self as each of them faces questions they have been avoiding for too long. Like the real reason Charlie has been so withdrawn lately. What Seth stole from Lexi in the pool house. And if shattered girls can ever put themselves back together.

Good and Gone Details

TitleGood and Gone
Author
ReleaseNov 14th, 2017
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN-139780062348425
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Travel, Road Trip, Realistic Fiction

Good and Gone Review

  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.)This was a contemporary road trip story, about three teens looking for a missing pop star.I liked Lexi in this and I felt bad for what had happened to her. I liked the way she looked out for her brother though, especially when he wasn’t acting like himself. The storyline in this was about Lexi, her bother Charlie, and their next-door-neighbour Zack going off on a road trip looking for a missing pop star. Th (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.)This was a contemporary road trip story, about three teens looking for a missing pop star.I liked Lexi in this and I felt bad for what had happened to her. I liked the way she looked out for her brother though, especially when he wasn’t acting like himself. The storyline in this was about Lexi, her bother Charlie, and their next-door-neighbour Zack going off on a road trip looking for a missing pop star. They travelled around meeting some different people, and generally having a bit of an adventure, while Charlie worked through this depression, and Lexi came to terms with what had happened to her, all whilst searching for Adrian Wilde.The ending to this was pretty good, and I was pleased with the way things were wrapped up.7 out of 10
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  • Sophie Elaina
    January 1, 1970
    This book left me feeling so emotional. Even though it took a while to really get invested in the story and these characters, I did eventually and I really enjoyed the ride.The book follows protagonist Lexi. A girl who's been through some tough situations. While working on how to cope with what has happened to her she realises that other members of her family aren't doing too good either. Like her brother Charlie, she doesn't know why he's acting so differently but she sees that he needs help, t This book left me feeling so emotional. Even though it took a while to really get invested in the story and these characters, I did eventually and I really enjoyed the ride.The book follows protagonist Lexi. A girl who's been through some tough situations. While working on how to cope with what has happened to her she realises that other members of her family aren't doing too good either. Like her brother Charlie, she doesn't know why he's acting so differently but she sees that he needs help, the help she didn't get. So when out of the blue he decides he wants to go on a road trip to find a missing pop star without much thought she decides to go with him. But soon she realises that Charlie wasn't the only reason she was so happy to up and leave.I thought it was interesting the way the book takes place after a lot has already happened and we find out about the past through the main character and her reflections on what has happened. While skipping back and forth between snippets of the past and the current journey Lexi, her brother Charlie and their friend Zack are on. The one thing I didn't quite like about the format was that the reflections weren't really in the order that the events happened, as it was a little confusing. However I feel like it represented the way our minds skip back and forth when it comes to memories. We don't remember everything in the order it happens. So even though I found it hard to get my head around at times I also think it was a good decision on the author's part.'...there is no wizard in Oz, and there is no protection and no starting new. You have to find your code, your costume, your mask, your armour: the way to keep yourself safe even in a dangerous world.'At the beginning of the story I wasn't completely convinced I was going to enjoy the book as there were a couple of instances that I didn't like the way language was used. I got caught up on the words, and it took me away from what was actually happening. But the more I read the better it got. It felt forced to begin with but as I progressed through the book the writing got better. It was like I could see the author's writing style developing before my eyes. The character's were intriguing, especially Lexi. Although I don't agree with some of the things the character says as she narrates the story I do see what the author was trying to do and where she was coming from. It was uncomfortable to read at times but felt very real. Which is one of the things I enjoyed most about this. The way the characters were represented was very realistic and even though certain subject matters are hard hitting, horrible things do happen in life and I think it was great that the author didn't shy away from confronting those things. I would like to leave a trigger warning and say that if you're planning to pick this book up there are instances of emotional and sexual abuse, so if you like to stay away from books that include those kind of subject matters I would stay clear of this. But otherwise I think it is an important story to be heard and feel like a lot of people could take something from this.'He pulled me out from under that ice. He will pull me out again, and I will be there to pull him back too.'The representation was fabulous and I thought everything was addressed really well, although I can't say for sure because I can't relate on a personal level. There is a character battling PTSD, a character suffering with depression and an openly gay main character. From what I took from the book though, was that the subjects seemed to be very well written and felt very realistic as I was reading. 'The cold is instant and so severe that it comes and vanishes almost in half a moment. My bones freeze. My heart freezes.'It was refreshing to read a book with little to no romance, there are hints of something later on but nothing major, and I thought it was really great that the author tackled many different relationships that weren't romantic. Overall it's a very honest account of some very hard hitting subjects that need to be addressed more. I enjoyed reading this and would definitely recommend you pick it up.Thank you to Harper Collins for sending me an ARC to read and review.RATING: 4 StarsFor more reviews and bookish posts; check out my website/blog: https://www.sophieelaina.com/
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  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. What a tangle of emotions. In the best way. There is an unguarded truth to this story, an earnest rawness that is at times hilarious and heartbreaking. It touches on so many important points - unhealthy abusive relationships, mental health and depression, and when it is time to let go and when it is important to hang on with all your might. When Lexi's brother Charlie suggests a road trip to locate missing pop star, Adrian Wildes, Lexi is shocked. Charlie hasn't moved from the couch since h Wow. What a tangle of emotions. In the best way. There is an unguarded truth to this story, an earnest rawness that is at times hilarious and heartbreaking. It touches on so many important points - unhealthy abusive relationships, mental health and depression, and when it is time to let go and when it is important to hang on with all your might. When Lexi's brother Charlie suggests a road trip to locate missing pop star, Adrian Wildes, Lexi is shocked. Charlie hasn't moved from the couch since he broke up with his girlfriend and dropped out of college. So despite Lexi's scepticism, despite the hurt she has been feeling, she agrees. Along for the ride (and actually providing the means of transport for this road trip) is their neighbour, Zack. As Lexi, Charlie, and Zack hunt for the elusive pop star, they begin to work through the emotions, hurt, and actions of the past year. Lexi doesn't start as a very likeable character. She is angry, judgemental, hurting. She doesn't want to understand what her brother is going through or feeling, she just wants him back to his old self. But as I kept reading, I began to understand that her attitude stems from her own hurt. Her lack of understanding isn't malicious, she just doesn't understand. And that's okay. That's all part of her journey. And this book is all about journeys. A road trip journey across north eastern USA. A journey to find a missing pop star. A journey of sibling relationships. A journey over the past six months, from then to now, detailing Lexi's new view of the world, relationships, men and herself. A journey that encounters many characters and places, as road trips often do. The story is written from Lexi's perspective, and as such, readers are presented with her side of the story. Her thoughts towards her brother might not be agreeable to the average reader, but they are Lexi's and her journey to understanding him, understanding herself are so important. The chapters also switch between the present events and the past, as 'Now' and 'Before'. The Before sections jump around a little, but it gradually becomes clear that Lexi has recently experienced an abusive and manipulative relationship, has lost her friends and has survived an assault. It makes her suspicion about life and strangers, her want to help others, her inability to connect with her brother so much clearer. I enjoyed watching Lexi's growth and character development. I also really, really loved her snark. Her verbal remarks, her conversations with her mother has me ROFL. Literally. (Sorry, that's an inside joke, but it certainly brought a refreshing humour to the story.) There is no romance in this book. At first I thought Zack, the neighbour who accompanies Lexi and Charlie on their road trip, would be a romantic interest for Lexi. But it's made clear very early on that this isn't going to happen - Zack is gay - and for that I am glad. It was better that relationships in general and not just a romantic one, take the focus. Relationships that are healthy and unhealthy, relationships that span months and relationships that happen in just a few hours. Relationships that must be ended and relationships that are worth fighting for, worth everything, no matter what. Good and Gone surprised me with its depth and the raw, unguarded way in which it presents its story. It's messy and a little icky (just like the backseat of Zack's car), but it's also honest, and that makes it a strong and important book.The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    Too young adult for my group. Lots of introspection, plus some salty language early on. A surprise from this author. Decent road trip book with high school/college problems, though.
  • Marian
    January 1, 1970
    Lexi and her brother Charlie go on a road trip, searching for a missing rock star. At first it seems like they are going in order to escape thoughts of their failed relationships. As the book progresses, the reader begins to realize there's a lot more than a couple of teenage breakups going on. Very, very good YA fiction.
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    Good and Gone delivered a more complex story than I was expecting, and I loved every second of it. This was an important road trip for the Greene siblings, because it helped them find a way back to each other and themselves.•Pro: Sibling stories - love them! Lexi and Charlie's relationship was quite strained at the onset of the story, but while on the road trip, they reminisced and also confessed the secrets they were harboring and this precipitated their reconciliation. •Pro: There was a lot of Good and Gone delivered a more complex story than I was expecting, and I loved every second of it. This was an important road trip for the Greene siblings, because it helped them find a way back to each other and themselves.•Pro: Sibling stories - love them! Lexi and Charlie's relationship was quite strained at the onset of the story, but while on the road trip, they reminisced and also confessed the secrets they were harboring and this precipitated their reconciliation. •Pro: There was a lot of great banter and discussion in this book. I would expect no less from the children of two college professors. Well done, Ms. Blakemore!•Pro: I am a fan of the Then and Now format. I had a good idea from the very beginning what was wrong with Charlie, but I knew there was more to Lexi's bad attitude. Slowly, through the alternating timeline, we learned about Lexi's relationship with Seth. Blakemore did something interesting with the Then portion too, it wasn't in chronological order. The jump around was a great way to keep the source of Lexi's anger a secret for a little longer, but I also felt like I had more time to witness her conflicted feelings and confusion regarding her role in what had happened. A lot of the Then parts were difficult as I watched what should have been something beautiful for Lexi turn into something toxic. •Con: It bothered me that Seth was not confronted and punished. I guess maybe that didn't fit with the overall goal of the story, but I needed him to pay for what he had done. •Pro: There were a lot of things that happened in the story that seemed random, but eventually, all those small random things were tied together, and I loved it when I had my "a-ha" moment. •Pro: The Greene parents were present in this book. They were all wrapped up in Charlie's issues, but fairness to then, they had no idea what Lexi was dealing with. They did reach out though, and often reminded their children that they were there for them, and that they loved them. •Pro: I really appreciated how Gwen was used, in the Then and Now. It was important for me to see that there were parts of Lexi's pre-Seth life that were still salvageable. •Pro: I really felt Lexi's wide range of emotions, and the author captured her fear and self loathing especially well. •Pro: This book touched on some really serious topics, but Blakemore handled the topics in such a way, as to keep the book from becoming too heavy. There were some moments with a lot of gravity, but they were balanced out with humor and happier moments. Overall: A story of a shattered girl, who slowly put herself back together, piece by piece, mile by mile. *I would like to thank the publisher for the review copy of this book. BLOG | INSTAGRAM | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Jazmen
    January 1, 1970
    Road tripping with a purpose, Good and Bad is a journey, the reader won't soon forget. Lexi's brother, Charlie, is in a slump. One day he was away at school, the next, he's a permanent fixture in the house, on the couch, and in every crevice of the house--dripping depression on every crevice of the house.But, Lexi is dealing with her own stuff--and she has no time to coddle her older brother--who she believes is only heartbroken over a recent breakup. She was terrible, he should be relieved, so Road tripping with a purpose, Good and Bad is a journey, the reader won't soon forget. Lexi's brother, Charlie, is in a slump. One day he was away at school, the next, he's a permanent fixture in the house, on the couch, and in every crevice of the house--dripping depression on every crevice of the house.But, Lexi is dealing with her own stuff--and she has no time to coddle her older brother--who she believes is only heartbroken over a recent breakup. She was terrible, he should be relieved, so why isn't he? Why hasn't he shaken this yet?Then out of the blue, her brother decides to go find, now-missing pop star, Adrian Wildes. So, Charlie, Zack, and confused Lexi going on a road trip to find him.Every part of the road trip is an awakening, a moment to reflect over moments of Lexi's life with Seth, her now ex. All of the would've, should've, could've's come to plague Lexi on this journey. Brilliantly woven in the story, is the juxtaposition of then, and now. Who Lexi is now, and what happened then--all comes to a shattering, and heartbreaking conclusion by the end. But ultimately, it leads to healing , self-discovery, acceptance, and forgiveness.What's really enjoyable about the book--although it's pretty much a sad story--is Lexi's ability to humorous--despite it all. It's a little sliver of light in an otherwise dark room.Overall, the characters are pretty solid, all seemingly written with purpose. Each of their stories stand up, without the support of the other--but when together make total sense.The parents in this book are quietly present, and I appreciated that despite the fact that they weren't core characters--they were still there--both of them, caring in the background.It's a solid-read, with a meaningful story--great for teens and adults alike.
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  • Miranda Geszvain
    January 1, 1970
    Good and Gone is a story of a young teen girl who journeys with her brother and homosexual, quirky, next door neighbor to find the famous musician Adrian Wildes. The main character is Lexi, she narrates the story switching back and forth from “Then” to “Now”. Throughout the story, Lexi struggles with presently trying to work out the rocky relationship she has with her brother and the man and very wrong doings her ex boyfriend did to her. Lexi just cannot handle the pressure of ex boyfriend, ex f Good and Gone is a story of a young teen girl who journeys with her brother and homosexual, quirky, next door neighbor to find the famous musician Adrian Wildes. The main character is Lexi, she narrates the story switching back and forth from “Then” to “Now”. Throughout the story, Lexi struggles with presently trying to work out the rocky relationship she has with her brother and the man and very wrong doings her ex boyfriend did to her. Lexi just cannot handle the pressure of ex boyfriend, ex friends, brother, and mental issues. On the trio’s journey they endure many challenges; the obvious not finding Adrian Wildes anywhere they went, Lexi and her brother fighting, car troubles, people trying to rob them, and Lexi almost dying. Although, they are not finding what they traveled all this way to find they experience and learn so much. All hope is lost when the three have traveled to every possible location they can think of where Adrian could be but have no luck. Do they find Adrian? What happened to him? Do we even find out as readers? You have to read to find out. I recommend this book to all teens. I would suggest this book to anyone who likes authors similar to John Green. If you struggle with a sibling or sibling you will relate to this book. If you enjoy stories with just enough mystery with a mixture of drama and humor, you won’t be able to put this book down. I enjoyed Good and Gone by Megan Frazer Blakemore very much.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Road trip novel that feels a little bland, too many issues going on here for anyone to clearly get resolution. The FTC requires that I disclose that I received a free copy of the book from the publisher.
  • Caroline Fosse
    January 1, 1970
    TW: RAPE, DEPRESSION, SUICIDAL THOUGHTS, EMOTIONAL ABUSEGood and Gone by Meghan Frazer Blakemore is the story about Lexi Green who decides to join her older brother on a road trip to find Adrian Wilders, a famous musician who’s been reported missing. They haven’t talked much since his girlfriend dumped him, and Lexi could use the distraction. This book is based around the disappearance of Adrian Wilders, and joining her brother was her own decision, yet she doesn’t really ask why and continuousl TW: RAPE, DEPRESSION, SUICIDAL THOUGHTS, EMOTIONAL ABUSEGood and Gone by Meghan Frazer Blakemore is the story about Lexi Green who decides to join her older brother on a road trip to find Adrian Wilders, a famous musician who’s been reported missing. They haven’t talked much since his girlfriend dumped him, and Lexi could use the distraction. This book is based around the disappearance of Adrian Wilders, and joining her brother was her own decision, yet she doesn’t really ask why and continuously complaints throughout. I get that she wanted to protect her brother and spend time with him after his breakup, and to get her mind off of things, but still. It’s very weird to join someone and travel for hours without even getting an explanation, especially when you're going to be judgmental and rude the whole way.«You say you aren’t an idiot, but your world view is so limited, you can’t see an inch beyond yourself.»I am sorry, but the truth is, he’s got a point. Throughout the book she judges other people, she even judged her own brother when he opened up and responded with some annoying comment. Then, after talking to Seth, she says «Are you really trying to get me to feel bad for Charlie right now?» when he’s trying to explain how depression works, and that it could affect anyone no matter where they come from or what has happened in the past.Trust me, she’s struggling herself, but that doesn’t make others pain any less valid. What happened shouldn’t be an excuse to be mean towards other people, and it’s sad to see a character that is so judgmental and mean, even though she says it like a joke. (view spoiler)[However, she puts the blame on everybody else. She blames Charlie for not picking her up, or others for not driving her to school, when in reality she knows she should blame is the rapist. We can’t control what other people do, sometimes things just happens, and it fucking sucks, but we can’t blame things on other people because things might have turned out differently.Also, Charlie saved her life and she makes excuses and comes with rude comments about it, because she blames him for not picking her up. I just think it was really sad to see how she treated her friends. (hide spoiler)]I understand her behavior, and I understand why she acts the way she acts, but it was sad to read about and I wished things were different for both her and her brother. She constantly said he’s got no reason to be depressed, and therefore she doesn’t really believe him or his feelings, and it made me very annoyed.
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  • Angel (by my bookshelf)
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from Edelweiss in exchange of an honest review. Good and Gone was not exactly an easy read but it was blunt and I liked it. The story played with my emotions and made me realize that is probably exactly what I will think in a given situation.I was annoyed at first at Lexi's brother Charlie because she thinks he is the way he is because of his ex. I did not understand why Lexi kept reminding me of her relationship with her ex. However, these events led up to a satisfying explan I received an ARC from Edelweiss in exchange of an honest review. Good and Gone was not exactly an easy read but it was blunt and I liked it. The story played with my emotions and made me realize that is probably exactly what I will think in a given situation.I was annoyed at first at Lexi's brother Charlie because she thinks he is the way he is because of his ex. I did not understand why Lexi kept reminding me of her relationship with her ex. However, these events led up to a satisfying explanation.I thought the book could be a great movie. I found the overall feel of the book to be quite movie-like. The way the book was written allowed me to vividly imagine the events that took place in each chapter.While the explanation behind the siblings' personalities were surprising, I found that Charlie's situation was not well-explained. Lexi's, however, I found very realistic. Relatable, even.Each chapter was way too long. During the first few chapters, I had to divide my reading into half chapters since there was too much information for each chapter.The flashbacks were confusing. I lost track of the flashbacks since they just mixed up with the "Now" and I even think the ARC I was provided was not yet proofread since some headings that divided the flashbacks and the present were missing.Overall, Good and Gone may be a long read but once you reach the ending, you will realize that everything, and I mean every-dragging-moment, was necessary to build the story.angel 💋Blog | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Bloglovin'
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  • John Clark
    January 1, 1970
    Fifteen year old Lexi has been so busy building walls in the past few months, it takes her a while to realize her older brother, Charlie has not only not been functioning, but has maybe dropped out of college. Thinking his funk is the result of being dumped by his long time girlfriend, she, because of the reasons causing her to build most of her emotional fortress, thinks he should just get over it. When a popular singer, Adrien Wildes, disappears from his tour bus in Pennsylvania, Charlie becom Fifteen year old Lexi has been so busy building walls in the past few months, it takes her a while to realize her older brother, Charlie has not only not been functioning, but has maybe dropped out of college. Thinking his funk is the result of being dumped by his long time girlfriend, she, because of the reasons causing her to build most of her emotional fortress, thinks he should just get over it. When a popular singer, Adrien Wildes, disappears from his tour bus in Pennsylvania, Charlie becomes obsessed with going from their home in New Hampshire to find him. By this point, Lexi has started to have some real concerns about her brother's mental health. She takes her stash of cash and after convincing gay friend Zack to be their wheels, they head out with little more than Charlie's vague clues assembled from Google searches. What follows is an excellently multilayered odyssey. It has some Kerouac-like elements, snarky moments, sometimes bordering on vicious, between Lexi and her brother, and a gradual revealing through a fairy tale allegory and flashbacks from Lexi's time with her ex-boyfriend, Seth. It's that combination of layers, allowing readers to understand why both Lexi and Charlie are a mess, coupled with intriguing people they meet along the way, not to mention the quest for the mysteriously missing Adrian, that make this a real page turner. What happened to Lexi, sadly happens a lot and I wish lots of teens, especially girls, get to read this book because, while Lexi's story is one that left her confused and unsure what was real for a long time, those reading the book might be able to learn a lot from it. Definitely a book that should be in many school and public libraries.
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  • Reagan
    January 1, 1970
    This book was very raw and dove right into ideas and circumstances that are very complex and deep. Overall, it was very good! The characters were very multi-dimensional and you could see how they developed and began to figure out themselves as the story progressed. While I loved the book I did have several problems with it: I felt like the synopsis took away the mystery of the book and gave too much information, taking away that “mystery” aspect of Lexi and Seth’s past. I also feel as if there c This book was very raw and dove right into ideas and circumstances that are very complex and deep. Overall, it was very good! The characters were very multi-dimensional and you could see how they developed and began to figure out themselves as the story progressed. While I loved the book I did have several problems with it: I️ felt like the synopsis took away the mystery of the book and gave too much information, taking away that “mystery” aspect of Lexi and Seth’s past. I also feel as if there could have been more dialogue resolution between Lexi and her brother. Maybe this was just me?? But I felt like I needed MORE in general, a more firm resolution on their arguments and a conversation about what happened with Adrian in the end. I️ felt like the ending got kind of rushed so maybe that is what pushed me to feel this way— is it just me?? Even after this qualms I have, overall the concept of the book was amazing!! I, myself found it kind of hard to relate to a lot of it, but I feel like the topics addressed were very real and important to share and Good and Gone somewhat helped to address the complexity of them! (SIDE NOTE: I just love this idea of going after Adrian! To me, he stood as this symbol for what Zach, Lexi, and Charlie wanted out of life and wanted to fix with their lives and almost acted as a “solution” to these problems, but the reality was that Adrian wasn’t TRULY what they wanted in the end— it’s about the journey, not the destination, right? On a conceptual level how Adrian and this running motif of the princess through just pulled the book together for me and added to the depth of the characters feelings.)
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  • Cidney Mayes
    January 1, 1970
    A road-trip novel by Maine author, Megan Frazer Blakemore, tackles issues of depression and sexual abuse. Missing pop star Adrian Wildes is the impetus for siblings Lexi and Charlie, along with their gay neighbor Zack, to being their trip during February vacation. The spontaneous road trip is Charlie's idea, and Lexi doesn't understand his motives for suddenly springing off the couch which he has been glued to for the past few months after seemingly dropping out of college. Lexi assumes it is du A road-trip novel by Maine author, Megan Frazer Blakemore, tackles issues of depression and sexual abuse. Missing pop star Adrian Wildes is the impetus for siblings Lexi and Charlie, along with their gay neighbor Zack, to being their trip during February vacation. The spontaneous road trip is Charlie's idea, and Lexi doesn't understand his motives for suddenly springing off the couch which he has been glued to for the past few months after seemingly dropping out of college. Lexi assumes it is due to a break up with his long-time girlfriend, but since her parents aren't talking about Charlie's new behavior she is not quite sure. Anyway, she has her own problems to deal with. Lexi is the narrator of the story and through a series of flashbacks, the reader learns that she was raped by her boyfriend and has never told anyone. Lexi is edgy and angry, but becomes more likeable as the reader begins to understand her vulnerability. Each chapter begins with a piece of a fairy tale that compliments the narrative, and a line in the fairy tale is added at the beginning of each chapter. Female characters are strong, and there are multiple conversations about female empowerment and feminism without coming off as preachy or hokey. A great companion book to Laurie Halse Anderson's Speak .
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  • Kiwie
    January 1, 1970
    The plot of this is somewhat predictable, but I really enjoyed Blakemore's writing. The characters felt real to me, sometimes they said and did things that were inconsiderate or stupid, but they never tipped into unlikable. They were just dealing with stuff the best they could. They were sad or troubled, they made jokes about the bad things, they made jokes about good things, they were losing themselves in something else (except you can't really do that).Even though this book deals with some thi The plot of this is somewhat predictable, but I really enjoyed Blakemore's writing. The characters felt real to me, sometimes they said and did things that were inconsiderate or stupid, but they never tipped into unlikable. They were just dealing with stuff the best they could. They were sad or troubled, they made jokes about the bad things, they made jokes about good things, they were losing themselves in something else (except you can't really do that).Even though this book deals with some things that are harrowing the book doesn't revel in them (which other books I have read have done and I feel they veer into "explotation" territory). It's there and I certainly felt it (and for the characters). It's no surprise what is going on with either of them, but that's okay. This really is a book about trying to get unstuck, without going too far.
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book! However I did have some issues with it. Overall I sympathized with the main character Lexi. She's a likable character and as the book goes on you really understand why she is the way she is. I felt that the dynamic between her and her brother was really relatable and true to life.TRIGGER WARNINGS: rape, depression, suicidal thoughts, verbally/emotionally abusive significant otherI have not personally dealt with any of these triggers but I will say that I felt the depression I enjoyed this book! However I did have some issues with it. Overall I sympathized with the main character Lexi. She's a likable character and as the book goes on you really understand why she is the way she is. I felt that the dynamic between her and her brother was really relatable and true to life.TRIGGER WARNINGS: rape, depression, suicidal thoughts, verbally/emotionally abusive significant otherI have not personally dealt with any of these triggers but I will say that I felt the depression plot line was a bit underdeveloped and not represented accurately until the very end. SPOILER: I also didn't like how Lexi is trying to say that her brother's depression isn't valid because he doesn't have a reason. And while yes many people treat depressed people like this, I think it could have been handled differently in some aspects. END SPOILER.Overall I enjoyed the book!4 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Lexi's brother hasn't gotten off the couch in months, after being dumped and dropping out college. When he suddenly decides he cares deeply about the disappearance of celebrity, Adrian Wildes, Lexi has no choice but to watch over him as he drags them on a road trip of snark and discovery. An great, easy read about depression, identity, and relationship patterns. I wish we had gone further into Zack's life. It would have been nice to read a story about three struggling teens, instead of the story Lexi's brother hasn't gotten off the couch in months, after being dumped and dropping out college. When he suddenly decides he cares deeply about the disappearance of celebrity, Adrian Wildes, Lexi has no choice but to watch over him as he drags them on a road trip of snark and discovery. An great, easy read about depression, identity, and relationship patterns. I wish we had gone further into Zack's life. It would have been nice to read a story about three struggling teens, instead of the story of two struggling siblings and their friend.
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  • Carla A
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know why I expected more from this title. It had some good moments but over all pretty average. Spoiler: enters some interesting ground when the authors main protagonist reveals that she was raped by her boyfriend but stays with him. Very complex but too many weak parts in between to sustain interesting parts like the a fore mentioned.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    A book that is packed with timely issues for all teens to be aware of and talking about. It took me some time to warm up to Lexi but in the end, I understood her better. Lots of different emotions throughout this book!Thanks to the author for providing an ARC for my review.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    A classic YA road trip novel that tackles current issues. Blakemore does a great job with the dialogue. This felt very different than her other books. I liked the edgy wit. For fans of John Green and David Arnold.
  • Eleanor
    January 1, 1970
    Really nice road trip story, but the there were some holes in the plot and as much as I sympathized with the characters, they still got on my nerves.
  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    1.5 Stars
  • Rok!tsuperhero
    January 1, 1970
    Ummm.... Idk. This book didn't really get me in the feels like I thought it would. Had some good moments in it, but... It was an okay read. :/
  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 stars.
  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    I would have liked this book more if the main characters had had as much depth as the secondary characters.
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