The Man Who Could Be King
When young Josiah Penn Stockbridge accepts the position as aide-de-camp to George Washington at the beginning of the Revolutionary War, he thinks only of the glory and romance of battle. He is unprepared for the reality of America’s bloody fight for independence. The Continental Army is starving, underpaid, and dangerously close to mutiny, and Washington fights not just to defeat the British but to maintain order and morale among his own men.As anonymous letters by officers calling for revolt circulate through camp in Newburgh, New York, Washington must make a choice: preserve the young republic by keeping civilian control of the military, or reshape the new government by standing in solidarity with his troops and assuming greater power for himself.During one fateful week in American history, Josiah will watch a conflicted general become a legend and will discover for himself that the greatest struggles of war are those within the hearts and minds of fallible men.

The Man Who Could Be King Details

TitleThe Man Who Could Be King
Author
FormatPaperback
ReleaseAug 15th, 2017
PublisherLittle A
ISBN1477820191
ISBN-139781477820193
Rating
GenreHistorical, Fiction, North American Hi..., American History

The Man Who Could Be King Review

  • Elyse
    June 4, 2017
    I'm on a roll.... since reading "John Adams" , ( ebook), I've started listening to the audiobook "Truman", by David McCullough. Given that it's 54 hours long -I've yet to make a dent and may at some point switch to the ebook - but I'm enjoying the audiobook so far ( early farming background days of Truman so far). I've also started - the ebook, "Destiny of the Republic": A Tale of Madness, Medince, and Murder of a President..... but then I stumbled across a 'freebie' novel about George Washingto I'm on a roll.... since reading "John Adams" , ( ebook), I've started listening to the audiobook "Truman", by David McCullough. Given that it's 54 hours long -I've yet to make a dent and may at some point switch to the ebook - but I'm enjoying the audiobook so far ( early farming background days of Truman so far). I've also started - the ebook, "Destiny of the Republic": A Tale of Madness, Medince, and Murder of a President..... but then I stumbled across a 'freebie' novel about George Washington....( June Kindle monthly-Free Pick), by John Ripin Miller. Granted.....I have nothing to compare this George Washington 'novel' to.....( not being known as a 'history-buff' girl)....however, for what my opinion is worth: I thought this book was completely engaging: both enjoyable and informative. I zipped through it. My eyes were opened. Much of this book focuses on the Revolutionary War. I saw how difficult it was to imagine the hold the Revolutionary War had on Americans in the first half of the 19th century. Veterans who had served were idolized.....and children in schools and or by their grandparents, ( me included), were being taught watered down stories of George Washington. Where my eyes opened in this historical novel was learning more about the period after Yorktown and before the peace treaty, 1781 to 1783. The author, John Ripin Miller, painted a great visual for me by using a fictional 'aid-de-camp', Josiah Penn to be the narrator of the "retelling of history". I saw Josiah Penn as an unbiased aid to the General ( Washington had 32 aids but only 1 was at his side the entire time). All other aids mentioned in the book existed. They were part of the 33 who served the General during the Revolutionary War. I enjoyed reading about Washington's personal life with Martha. Martha was a bright woman - like John Adams wife ... yet different. Martha came from a wealthy family for one thing - Abigail came from a farming family. But...... I laughed - both woman were short petite women.... haha... like myself? However, where readers got to FULLY ENJOY letters written between John Adams and his wife Abigail ..... Martha BURNED HER LETTERS to Washington after he died. She did not want us to read her personal correspondence years later. Hm??? Martha gave birth to 4 children. It's sad, she outlived them 'all'. Martha was married to Daniel Parke Custis for 7 years before he died. Washington relied heavily on "The Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation". It was his constant 'guide'. He took them seriously. 1781 was the low point of American morale during the Revolution. "The people are disconnected," George Washington wrote to John Laurens in early 1781, "but it is with the feeble and oppressive mode of conducting the war, not with the war itself". Washington believed it was critical for the United States and its French allies to achieve military victory in 1781 or all might be lost because of the state of American public opinion. Washington could not have foreseen the events that eventually unfolded that year.....It was only when strategic activities of General Nathanael Greene in North Carolina forced British General Cornwallis to march into Virginia did an opportunity open for Washington to achieve military victory he had hoped for the start of that year. I saw that the significance of the British surrender at Yorktown was never fully appreciated by contemporaries. For another couple of years, Washington continued his efforts to keep the Continental Army intact..... ready to fight if necessary. The peace talks between the British and American diplomats got underway ....and by 1782....American negotiators John Jay, John Adams, and Benjamin Franklin were key leaders in those difficult negotiations--- without French interference. The Preliminary Articles of Peace was signed on November 30, 1782. Until the peace treaty was signed, the United States was still technically at war. I learned the greatest danger to the Revolution was the officers in the Continental Army. They were fed up with Congress regarding their pay. Officers encamped at Newburgh, New York. Washington diffused the threat by his 'personal' prestige and by continuing to lobby Congress in behalf of his officers. So....George Washington chose not to be 'King'. He felt he risked too many men's lives while fighting for independence-- he returned the power to the people and representatives they elected. He wanted a free, democratic and United country.Maybe???? OUR PRESENT PRESIDENT WOULD TAKE A LESSON...... shhhh ( you didn't hear me say that), lolOne book leads to another ... a little knowledge opens the door to want to know more.....I have a lifetime on ongoing study of U.S History and our past Presidents.... ( and their 'wives) SO FAR: Two of the wives have been 'shorties' like me. I just may start keeping statistics on the 'height' of each Presidents past wife - for fun! Short women just may have value and rock-and-roll our world after all!!!!! :)GREAT LITTLE FREEBIE FINE! As Mikey says, "I like it" 4.5 stars! ....*This review was written at 3am... from the Shattuck Hotel in Berkeley. Book Festival weekend!
    more
  • Dee Arr
    June 1, 2017
    This is not your run-of-the-mill historical novel. While the story is based upon the events of the Revolutionary War, much of the action is a retelling of history through the eyes of Washington’s aide, Josiah (who is a compilation of all the aides assigned to Washington during the war). Thus the book takes on more of the feel one might experience when reading Bruce Catton or Thomas Fleming. This is history in an entertaining form.Undoubtedly, there might be some who will state that the portrayal This is not your run-of-the-mill historical novel. While the story is based upon the events of the Revolutionary War, much of the action is a retelling of history through the eyes of Washington’s aide, Josiah (who is a compilation of all the aides assigned to Washington during the war). Thus the book takes on more of the feel one might experience when reading Bruce Catton or Thomas Fleming. This is history in an entertaining form.Undoubtedly, there might be some who will state that the portrayal of Washington is a product of hero worship, though I would argue against that. While author John Ripen Miller does indicate the possibility that Washington might have had more of a hand in many of the decisions that have been assigned to others, he merely hints at the possibility that Washington may have influenced those decisions. If this was true of Washington, this is nothing more than what great and learned men have done throughout the centuries, allowing others to reap the glory if the decisions were instrumental in achieving the end goal. This is the mark of a strong leader. You certainly have to consider that an author who would spend enough time to ensure that his writing style and tone were consistent (which it is) would also spend at least as much time on ensuring that the story was based upon facts.While I am not an expert on Washington lore, I found much of the book to fit within the framework of what I knew about Washington, both in acts and character. The fact that Josiah is relating the story sixty years after the Revolutionary War allows the author to focus on the Newburgh Conspiracy while filling the pages with flashbacks on what occurred previous to that week. Mr. Miller has taken a moment in history and turned it into a historical novel that informs as well as entertains. At the very least, he gives us some thoughts to contemplate, and I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys history, especially when it is mixed with the flavor of a good story. Five stars.
    more
  • Hillary
    June 11, 2017
    Actually, I'm not finished. But I've decided to quit. This was a Kindle first book for June and I thought I'd give it a try. It's just not my cup of tea. I like historical fiction, but this reads more like a term paper albeit with a fictional narrator. Where's the plot? Where's the character development? Why does Josiah speak like a modern day guy? His language clashes from with the texts from the day and it's kind of jarring.I did enjoy the little notes about life in 18th century America. There Actually, I'm not finished. But I've decided to quit. This was a Kindle first book for June and I thought I'd give it a try. It's just not my cup of tea. I like historical fiction, but this reads more like a term paper albeit with a fictional narrator. Where's the plot? Where's the character development? Why does Josiah speak like a modern day guy? His language clashes from with the texts from the day and it's kind of jarring.I did enjoy the little notes about life in 18th century America. There was some good stuff about Washington and who he was as a man. But it was presented in a fairly dry way, rather than through anecdotes and stories. As for the other characters, they were also explained with what would be more formal, academic language rather than allowing us, the readers, to get to know them personally. Even Josiah--at least through the first 23%--is a bit of a cipher. We know he's a Quaker, he has great respect for Washington, and war scares him. That's about it.Perhaps others will enjoy this book. As for me, I'm on to something else.
    more
  • Marietta Slater
    June 10, 2017
    This is Miller's first novel. I'm giving it 5 stars because of the accuracy of the book. While a novel, it still reads in places like a history book. I didn't mind that, but others might.Setting is one week in March, 1783 known as the Newburgh Conspiracy. Although it is an entire week of Washington's life, Miller sheds light on other events of the Revolutionary War. While Washington wanted praise and loyalty from men, he did not want to be king. Some were chanting exchanging one George (king of This is Miller's first novel. I'm giving it 5 stars because of the accuracy of the book. While a novel, it still reads in places like a history book. I didn't mind that, but others might.Setting is one week in March, 1783 known as the Newburgh Conspiracy. Although it is an entire week of Washington's life, Miller sheds light on other events of the Revolutionary War. While Washington wanted praise and loyalty from men, he did not want to be king. Some were chanting exchanging one George (king of England) for another George, but luckily Washington did not want that. This novel which is well documented takes the reader inside the War. It is written in the first person, Josiah, who in reality is a composite of 32 of Washington's closest aids.
    more
  • Lori Greenlee
    June 12, 2017
    The book sparked my interest . It had some dry moments but the point of view it was told was from one of Washington's aids . It was a fictional aid. It backed up from other research . Washington was a man that could have easily been made King... but he was also a man that wanted for a simplistic life . He was a paradox
    more
  • Cayla
    June 10, 2017
    This is a very informative book. However, take your time to read it. It's a LOT to take in! I always thought of Washington as a "great President" simply because the school textbooks implied so. I still believe he was a great President, but I think this book makes him more human. Through the eyes of his aides, we are able to see Washington as "The General" and Washington as a man.General Washington tried very hard to get Congress to pay attention to the needs of his troops. In my opinion, Congres This is a very informative book. However, take your time to read it. It's a LOT to take in! I always thought of Washington as a "great President" simply because the school textbooks implied so. I still believe he was a great President, but I think this book makes him more human. Through the eyes of his aides, we are able to see Washington as "The General" and Washington as a man.General Washington tried very hard to get Congress to pay attention to the needs of his troops. In my opinion, Congress did not take this very seriously. I like to think that if they had given adequate food, clothing, medicine, and shoes to their own soldiers, it would have improved morale and fewer troops would have perished from disease and harsh winter conditions. But now I guess we'll never know!
    more
  • Gina
    June 18, 2017
    Leaves nothing to the readerThe story is told by Washington's fictional aide, Josiah, who conveniently has access to all GW's correspondence. Josiah relates the story as a recollection and uses frequent references to what he will get to later to foreshadow events. The two literary techniques are too transparent and get in the way of the story. Much effort was made to present the time period in a politically correct manner. The presentation is didactic and nothing is left to the reader to decide Leaves nothing to the readerThe story is told by Washington's fictional aide, Josiah, who conveniently has access to all GW's correspondence. Josiah relates the story as a recollection and uses frequent references to what he will get to later to foreshadow events. The two literary techniques are too transparent and get in the way of the story. Much effort was made to present the time period in a politically correct manner. The presentation is didactic and nothing is left to the reader to decide regarding characters or their motivations. Josiah does it all for us. Ultimately, the result is a simplistic tutorial.
    more
  • Carolyn
    June 18, 2017
    This is primarily well-researched history, with the use of a fictional aide to General George Washington during the Revolutionary War to carry the story. The climactic event is a threatened mutiny at Newburgh, New York. Many highly respected leaders had begged GW to take power and straighten out all the political nonsense of the Congress. The author's thesis is that GW had to have been tempted to become King, but resisted the temptation and inspired the troops with his own love of freedom and in This is primarily well-researched history, with the use of a fictional aide to General George Washington during the Revolutionary War to carry the story. The climactic event is a threatened mutiny at Newburgh, New York. Many highly respected leaders had begged GW to take power and straighten out all the political nonsense of the Congress. The author's thesis is that GW had to have been tempted to become King, but resisted the temptation and inspired the troops with his own love of freedom and integrity. It's an interesting bit of history we and our children have never learned in school.
    more
  • Bob Cooling
    June 11, 2017
    King George Washington?!?This novel, regarding an opportunity for our first elected President, prior to ascending to that high office, had opportunity and righteous justification to name himself king of the United States. Thankfully, he declined that opportunity and enabled the new nation of the United States to be free of the tyranny that was the standard for Europe in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. A "must read" for anyone wanting to have a comprehensive understanding and appreciation King George Washington?!?This novel, regarding an opportunity for our first elected President, prior to ascending to that high office, had opportunity and righteous justification to name himself king of the United States. Thankfully, he declined that opportunity and enabled the new nation of the United States to be free of the tyranny that was the standard for Europe in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. A "must read" for anyone wanting to have a comprehensive understanding and appreciation of our first and perhaps greatest president, George Washington.
    more
  • Hope Smith
    June 15, 2017
    Good ReadI did not know the story that this book told. It is a very easy read. I had finished it before I realized it. Note, the actually book is only 1\2 of the book. The last half is pictures and copies of actual documents that the author used. If you enjoy reading history, this book is for you.
    more
  • Brian Bigelow
    June 7, 2017
    Really good book on an interesting bit of history. One of my ancestors was actually part of one of mutinies mentioned later. I never knew it until I did some very in depth genealogy research.Yes, things could have gone a different way pretty easily.Great read!
    more
  • Eleon397
    June 8, 2017
    Anyone interested in learning more about George Washington and about the revolutionary war will find this a very readable yet factually based novel about the General and the war.
  • Lisa Neal
    June 17, 2017
    Not the best written book I have ever read but an interesting re-telling of an important event in the founding of our country and Gen George Washington.
  • Laura Green
    June 18, 2017
    reads like a history book.
  • Lee
    June 14, 2017
    Not badInformation was direct and the narration at a decent speed. I liked that it center around Newburgh but gave information regarding Yorktown and New York
  • Elizabeth Mcnair
    June 14, 2017
    The story of General George Washington through the eyes of his aide.
  • Allison Mudge
    June 8, 2017
    This book was a very...slow read, but it was so interesting. I learned so much more about Washington than ever. This is historical fiction but the author stayed as close to history as possible, I had a kick reading the appendix and finding out it all basically happened. All in all, for a free book from Amazon? It was good :)
    more
Write a review