The War I Finally Won (The War That Saved My Life, #2)
When Ada’s clubfoot is surgically fixed at last, she knows for certain that she’s not what her mother said she was—damaged, deranged, crippled mentally as well as physically. She’s not a daughter anymore, either. What is she?World War II continues, and Ada and her brother, Jamie, are living with their loving legal guardian, Susan, in a borrowed cottage on the estate of the formidable Lady Thorton—along with Lady Thorton herself and her daughter, Maggie. Life in the crowded cottage is tense enough, and then, quite suddenly, Ruth, a Jewish girl from Germany, moves in. A German? The occupants of the house are horrified. But other impacts of the war become far more frightening. As death creeps closer to their door, life and morality during wartime grow more complex. Who is Ada now? How can she keep fighting? And who will she struggle to save?

The War I Finally Won (The War That Saved My Life, #2) Details

TitleThe War I Finally Won (The War That Saved My Life, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 3rd, 2017
PublisherDial Books
ISBN-139780525429203
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Childrens, Middle Grade, Fiction, Young Adult, War, World War II

The War I Finally Won (The War That Saved My Life, #2) Review

  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I *loved* The War That Saved My Life and friends, this is a worthy sequel. I am in awe of Kimberly Bradley's ability to create characters that are so real, feeling emotions that are so raw that the reader can't help but feel them, too. The growth and development of these characters through the story is masterful. I just loved it. I wished it was longer, which was a thing I NEVER wish because finishing a book and marking it as "read" is one of my great pleasures. But I would spend all the time in I *loved* The War That Saved My Life and friends, this is a worthy sequel. I am in awe of Kimberly Bradley's ability to create characters that are so real, feeling emotions that are so raw that the reader can't help but feel them, too. The growth and development of these characters through the story is masterful. I just loved it. I wished it was longer, which was a thing I NEVER wish because finishing a book and marking it as "read" is one of my great pleasures. But I would spend all the time in the world with Ada. Read the first one first. You need to. (And it is also awesome, so why would you skip it?) But then scoop this one up in October when it publishes. If you love character-driven historical fiction, you will not want to miss this!
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  • ☘Misericordia☘ ✺❂❤❣
    January 1, 1970
    The War I Finally Won (The War That Saved My Life, #2) A very cool kids' book. :PQ:You can know things all you like, but that doesn’t mean you believe them. (c)Q:Mam hadn’t been much for words, and there was a limit to how much I could teach myself, looking out the one window of our flat. (c)Q:The Swiss Family Robinson got shipwrecked onto a beautiful island where everything turned out splendid for them. Jamie loved the story. I had always disliked it. I hated it now. Jamie and I were shipwrecke The War I Finally Won (The War That Saved My Life, #2) A very cool kids' book. :PQ:You can know things all you like, but that doesn’t mean you believe them. (c)Q:Mam hadn’t been much for words, and there was a limit to how much I could teach myself, looking out the one window of our flat. (c)Q:The Swiss Family Robinson got shipwrecked onto a beautiful island where everything turned out splendid for them. Jamie loved the story. I had always disliked it. I hated it now. Jamie and I were shipwrecked, but we hadn’t been rescued after all. We hadn’t reached an island. We were still struggling not to drown in the storm-tossed sea. (c)Q:When things were very bad I could go away in my head, to a place where no one could touch me. I went away to Butter’s pasture, to galloping through the green fields on Butter— (c)Q:I tried to speak but no words came. I choked and then I was sobbing, and Susan rocked me back and forth, back and forth as if I was a little baby, as if she loved me, as if she always had. (c)Q:A place to go and think about her. To think about the good memories.”I would have to think hard to find any good memories. (c)Q:“Keep going,” Susan said. “The only way out of this is straight through." (с)Q:“I needed a doll a long time ago,” I said. “It’s too late for me to have one now.” (c)Q:I’d survived Christmas. That was gift enough. (c)Q:On one side hills rose covered in brown winter grass. On the other, the ocean spread flat and clean. I took a deep breath, and filled my lungs with the scent of the ocean. I felt the wind on my face. The sky seemed safe. (c)Q:If I started letting myself feel afraid I would never be able to stop. (c)Q:What’s right and what’s permitted are sometimes different things. (c)Q:I’d become the person I’d longed to be. (c)Q:I stored this information in my head in the bulging file titled “Things I Wished I Didn’t Know.” It included what it felt like to walk on a clubfoot for ten years, and what it sounded like to have your mother say she never wanted to see you again. (c)Q:“If only the blackout didn’t have to be black.”“It doesn’t,” I said, in sudden realization. “Not on the inside.” (c)Q:He couldn’t say, but that didn’t mean we couldn’t try to ferret it out of him. (c)
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  • Scott Fillner
    January 1, 1970
    Trying to put this review into words is so difficult. The story, the characters, the history...it was all done SO well. Kimberly allows us to see Ada to her core. She begins to help us understand the impact of neglect and abuse, the gravity of war, and depth of beginning to understand a concept that is too deep to put into a simple conversation with children. I cannot highly recommend this book enough. I cannot wait for Ss to have this book in their hands come October.
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  • Melina Souza
    January 1, 1970
    Resenha no canal: https://youtu.be/RWJABtug0yM :DAmei!Chorei!Feliz por saber o que aconteceu com Ada depois do primeiro volume.
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Bawled my way through this one as well. Happy and sad, and adds a new dimension (or two) to Ada's war. (Both her personal war, and the actual war with Germany.) So interesting to see what it was like for children, on the ground in England. So much is written (or at least, most of what I've read) is either about children in America, or in Germany. So interesting to see how far along the war was for England before the US joined, and their attitude toward Hitler and the Germans. And of course, the Bawled my way through this one as well. Happy and sad, and adds a new dimension (or two) to Ada's war. (Both her personal war, and the actual war with Germany.) So interesting to see what it was like for children, on the ground in England. So much is written (or at least, most of what I've read) is either about children in America, or in Germany. So interesting to see how far along the war was for England before the US joined, and their attitude toward Hitler and the Germans. And of course, the story of the new-hatched almost-family of Ada, Jamie, and Susan . . . *sobs uncontrollably* It's just so good!
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  • Vikki VanSickle
    January 1, 1970
    THE WAR THAT SAVED MY LIFE is a hard act to follow but I think I have liked this follow-up even more! The bonds of family and friendship are tested and strengthened again as the war continues to wreak havoc on Ada's life. Bradley does not shy away from writing about Ada's anger and confusion and her supporting cast is fully realized and allowed story arcs of their own. I was particularly touched by the portrayal of Lady Thornton, forced to live in close quarters with Ada and her new family, who THE WAR THAT SAVED MY LIFE is a hard act to follow but I think I have liked this follow-up even more! The bonds of family and friendship are tested and strengthened again as the war continues to wreak havoc on Ada's life. Bradley does not shy away from writing about Ada's anger and confusion and her supporting cast is fully realized and allowed story arcs of their own. I was particularly touched by the portrayal of Lady Thornton, forced to live in close quarters with Ada and her new family, who has moments of utter ignorance and borderline cruelty yet grew into one of my favourite characters at the end. There is a touch of Frances Hodgson Burnett about this duology- not to be missed!
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  • Raquel Moritz
    January 1, 1970
    CHOREI BALDES, mas baldes mesmo, com essa continuação, escrita de maneira tão delicada e verdadeira. O amadurecimento da Ada e as coisas que ela precisa enfrentar pra aprender a viver livre de verdade, aprender a vencer a guerra dentro dela, é digno de nota. Vale cada página <3
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  • Eve
    January 1, 1970
    "Love isn't as rare as you think it is...You can love all sorts of people, in all sorts of ways. Nor is love in any way dangerous."I've devoured this series within a week of "discovering" it, and now don't know what to do with myself. Thoroughly enjoyable and edifying. I would eat it if I could. I loved all of the historical elements that Bradley weaved into this story, an account of war in the English countryside from the perspective of a young girl evacuated from East End London. Though she's "Love isn't as rare as you think it is...You can love all sorts of people, in all sorts of ways. Nor is love in any way dangerous."I've devoured this series within a week of "discovering" it, and now don't know what to do with myself. Thoroughly enjoyable and edifying. I would eat it if I could. I loved all of the historical elements that Bradley weaved into this story, an account of war in the English countryside from the perspective of a young girl evacuated from East End London. Though she's healed physically, the internal struggles with fear and anger Ada is in the process of overcoming, were written in such a charming manner. I forgot many times that I was reading a middle grade novel. Pssssh. This hit a heart spot in the way only shows like Home Fires, Call the Midwives, and Anne with an E can. I hope deep down that there will be a sequel to the sequel. One can dream, can't they?"You can know things all you like, and someday you might believe them."
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  • DaNae
    January 1, 1970
    Whoa, one of the few books of this year I longed to return to and mourned its end. Ada's prickly voice shines. Lady Thorton more than makes up for the one-note Mam of the first book. A thornier Marrila Cuthbert.
  • Kirsten
    January 1, 1970
    A perfect historical novel. Kimberly Brubaker Bradley seamlessly combines WWII realities--ration books, fire watching, displaced Jewish Germans in the village (or the home), Anderson shelters, Land Girls, air raids, secrecy--with the fictional story of Ada and Jamie, orphans after their mother's death during the London Blitz, struggling to embrace and accept an unexpected, unconventional, long-suffering and ultimately supportive family. Great writing, wonderful story arc, simply beautiful.With a A perfect historical novel. Kimberly Brubaker Bradley seamlessly combines WWII realities--ration books, fire watching, displaced Jewish Germans in the village (or the home), Anderson shelters, Land Girls, air raids, secrecy--with the fictional story of Ada and Jamie, orphans after their mother's death during the London Blitz, struggling to embrace and accept an unexpected, unconventional, long-suffering and ultimately supportive family. Great writing, wonderful story arc, simply beautiful.With a second reading for our mother/daughter book group, this novel is still as amazing and beautifully crafted as the first time through. Maybe even more so! One of my favorite two-book middle reader series of all time! Love, love, LOVE this book. Read it.
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  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    IM NOT CRYING, YOU'RE CRYINGOH NO MY BAD, I'M CRYING. I'M CRYING SO MUCH. I'M CRYING SO MUCH IT'S MAKING YOU CRY TOO.BUT LIKE IN A GOOD WAY THOUGH.
  • Text Publishing
    January 1, 1970
    ‘With a satisfying yet realistic ending, The War I Finally Won is a great way to end Ada’s battle.’Book Muse‘Heart-wrenching and heartwarming at the same time…Ada’s story tells us that there is hope, there are people of goodwill, and perseverance is always worth the struggle.’Good Reading ‘This absorbing adventure, with its gentle humour and fearless characters, will captivate you. It is as exciting as it is poignant and wise and deserves to take its rightful place among the classics of children ‘With a satisfying yet realistic ending, The War I Finally Won is a great way to end Ada’s battle.’Book Muse‘Heart-wrenching and heartwarming at the same time…Ada’s story tells us that there is hope, there are people of goodwill, and perseverance is always worth the struggle.’Good Reading ‘This absorbing adventure, with its gentle humour and fearless characters, will captivate you. It is as exciting as it is poignant and wise and deserves to take its rightful place among the classics of children’s wartime literature.’Reading Time Ada’s voice is honest and authentic and true…A novel to curl up with on a rainy day; it took me back to the novels I read and loved as a child.’Steph Bowe, author of Night Swimming‘Achingly lovely…Nuanced and emotionally acute.’Wall Street Journal‘An inimitable, robust, yet lyrically written bildungsroman. Its gentle humour is poignant and heartwarming.’The Australian‘Ada’s transformation from an angry young woman into a confident lady is imaginatively drawn.’Australian Women’s Weekly‘A stunning story that will pluck you into its events and carry you along to its brilliant ending as if you were a feather on a strong, steady breeze.’School Magazine‘Brubaker Bradley is unsparing in her rendition of the human toll that wars incur. But it is a book, like its predecessor, that teems with beauty…Both books leave a profound afterglow and establish themselves firmly as classics to be loved and revisited.’Magpies‘A deeply satisfying novel.’Readings Best Middle Fiction 2017‘A fitting sequel.’NZ Listener, 50 Best Books for Kids
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  • Mitticus
    January 1, 1970
    Tenian razon , me gusto mas que la primer parte.me hizo reir y llorar.aun doy vueltas que poner por aqui.
  • Alex (not a dude) Baugh
    January 1, 1970
    When last we left our evacuees, Ada Smith and her younger brother Jaime, they had been taken away from Susan Smith (no relation), with whom them had been living after being evacuated from London, and brought back to London by their mother despite the constant bombing. Sure enough, one night during an air raid, they don’t make it to the shelter because of Ada’s severely clubbed foot, and in the midst of everything, Susan appears to take them back to her house in the countryside.Now, with her club When last we left our evacuees, Ada Smith and her younger brother Jaime, they had been taken away from Susan Smith (no relation), with whom them had been living after being evacuated from London, and brought back to London by their mother despite the constant bombing. Sure enough, one night during an air raid, they don’t make it to the shelter because of Ada’s severely clubbed foot, and in the midst of everything, Susan appears to take them back to her house in the countryside.Now, with her club foot surgically corrected, thanks to the generosity of her best friend’s wealthy parents, Lord and Lady Thorton, Ada returns to the country with Susan and Jaime. And, since Susan’s house has been destroyed by a bomb, they will be living in a cottage on the Thorton estate. Then word comes that Ada’s mother was killed in a bombing raid, and Ada finally begins to feel that maybe she isn’t the terrible person her mother always said she was. When Susan becomes their legal guardian, Jaime immediately begins to call her Mum, but Ada can’t bring herself to do that, and actually resents that Jaime could do it so easily. Calling Susan Mum would require a level of trust that she will always be there, and as Ada knows all too well, you just can’t count on that during a war.When the government requisitions the Thorton manor for war use, the very formidable Lady Thorton moves in with Susan, Ada and Jaime. And when Ruth, a Jewish refugee from Germany is brought there by Lord Thorton to receive math instruction from Susan, so that she can eventually join him in his secret war work in Oxford, things really get tense. Ada and Jaime are convinced that Ruth is a spy, but Lady Thorton takes an immediate dislike and intense to Ruth, seeing her only as a enemy German, and the reason her son Jonathan had joined the RAF and put his life in danger. Ruth and Ada don’t hit is off, either, until they discover a mutual love for horses. But Lady Thorton refuses to let Ruth anywhere on the estate property, except the cottage, and especially the stables. When Susan gives her horse Butter to Ada as a gift, Ada lets Ruth ride her in secret and slowly the two girls develop a fragile friendship.There is lots going on in The War I Finally Won, which I liked. War is a chaotic, confusing, demanding time and Bradley has really captured that. At the same time, the characters that appeared in The War That Saved My Life have the same feel to them, as they should, and even Jaime, whom I felt was a little thin as a character before has become a more developed personality. The thing I found most interesting was the relationship between Susan and Ada. In the first book, it seems so clear cut, but now, Ada keeps Susan at an unexpected distance. Why? With her mother dead and gone (no, that is not a spoiler), I had expected that the three of them would form a nice, lasting family unit. But, ironically, it will take more loss, more sorrow and the realization that anything could really be gone in the blink of an eye for Ada to finally see the need to let herself trust more and that is the war she must finally win. The War I Finally Won is so more than just a satisfying coming of age sequel. While it explores the theme of trust, within that theme, it also explores the idea of how we define family. For those who haven’t read the first book, The War That Saved My Life, I would highly recommend doing so (though it isn’t necessary to enjoy this second book). Luckily, The War I Finally Won won’t be available until October 3, 2017, so there’s still plenty of time to read, or for some to re-read book 1.This book is recommended for readers age 9+This book was an EARC received from the publisher
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  • JonathanT
    January 1, 1970
    I waffled between three and four, but I’m feeling generous today and I don’t believe in half stars so four it is. XD This was excellently written, with a much better plot than the last book. I did call the main plot twist from MILES away, but somehow that didn’t detract from it. The storyline is still slow, like the last book, but it’s much more complex and engaging. Plus, Ada’s voice and character development was really, really well-done. I like how this author sticks with middle-grade level pr I waffled between three and four, but I’m feeling generous today and I don’t believe in half stars so four it is. XD This was excellently written, with a much better plot than the last book. I did call the main plot twist from MILES away, but somehow that didn’t detract from it. The storyline is still slow, like the last book, but it’s much more complex and engaging. Plus, Ada’s voice and character development was really, really well-done. I like how this author sticks with middle-grade level prose to get us inside Ada’s world. The whole atmosphere of this book was kinda cool, also. The main negative is that the characters muse about death/heaven a lot and reach some unbiblical conclusions. For the most part, the author avoids making any DIRECT assertions, but that could still be confusing for younger readers. The Bible makes it clear that if Jesus’ blood doesn’t cover your sins, then you’re not going to Heaven when you die.So not necessarily a new favorite, but still well-written, and with a great cast of characters. :D
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  • Mary Lee
    January 1, 1970
    I think this is my favorite book so far this year. I could hug it. I could start right over at page one and read it again in another big gulp.The way Bradley explores how different characters process trauma and loss is masterful. Woven throughout the whole book there are also such strands of joy and beauty.
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  • Shawn
    January 1, 1970
    I can't even remember the last time I was brought to tears by a book, but I was profoundly moved by the beauty and sadness of this amazing audiobook (and its predecessor, The War That Saved My Life.)Read or listen to them both immediately, but don't say I didn't warn you. This is one of the best novels of 2017.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars isn't enough for the sequel to Ada's story. Beautiful from beginning to end!
  • Leona Carstairs
    January 1, 1970
    this gets 3.5 stars and two thumbs up from me!What was I expecting? I really couldn't tell you but I sure as hell wasn't expecting to CRY. I didn't full out sob but I did tear up a couple times. I liked this one better than the first and I am really glad I read it and finished this duology. Both are sweet books and very enjoyable.Soooo I mentioned that Ada (the MC) annoys me and well she did in the beginning, but I think she gets better, I actually preferred her in this installment. I also reall this gets 3.5 stars and two thumbs up from me!What was I expecting? I really couldn't tell you but I sure as hell wasn't expecting to CRY. I didn't full out sob but I did tear up a couple times. I liked this one better than the first and I am really glad I read it and finished this duology. Both are sweet books and very enjoyable.Soooo I mentioned that Ada (the MC) annoys me and well she did in the beginning, but I think she gets better, I actually preferred her in this installment. I also really love Jonathan, and Susan! I liked the other characters as well. All their stories are interesting and they all go through well done development. The writing was good, the story was good, the pacing was good, the characters were good. It was just a good book in general okay! I really liked this one, and if you're a fan of MG, or historical fiction, GO AHEAD AND PICK IT UP.
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  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    Personally sometimes I think you just need to read a WWII book and cry, and this is a FANTASTIC one to do that with. Also. Found families.
  • Sarah Levy
    January 1, 1970
    I find this series by Bradley to be seriously “unputdownable”! I love love love her writing and I love Ada’s story. This was a start & finish in one snow day kind of book for me ❤ I find this series by Bradley to be seriously “unputdownable”! I love love love her writing and I love Ada’s story. This was a start & finish in one snow day kind of book for me ❤️
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  • Kate Forsyth
    January 1, 1970
    The sequel to Kimberley Brubaker Bradley’s Newbery-Honor-winning book The War That Saved My Life, this lovely children’s novel continues the story of Ada, crippled from birth with a clubfoot and cruelly mistreated by her mother. Ada and her little brother Jamie have found refuge in the country with Sudan, a clever and sharp-tongued woman with a lot of love to give. She arranges for Ada to have the surgery she needs to correct her deformed foot, but the scars from Ada’s childhood are clawed deep The sequel to Kimberley Brubaker Bradley’s Newbery-Honor-winning book The War That Saved My Life, this lovely children’s novel continues the story of Ada, crippled from birth with a clubfoot and cruelly mistreated by her mother. Ada and her little brother Jamie have found refuge in the country with Sudan, a clever and sharp-tongued woman with a lot of love to give. She arranges for Ada to have the surgery she needs to correct her deformed foot, but the scars from Ada’s childhood are clawed deep into her psyche, and there is no surgery for emotional wounds. Ada must learn to trust others, and to understand the hidden hurts of those around her, all while living through the horrors of the Blitz. I had not thought the sequel could possibly live up to the power and beauty of the first book, but The War I Finally Won had me blubbering like a baby. These books are destined to be classics of children’s World War II evacuee stories, up there with Carrie’s War, Goodnight, Mister Tom and When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit.
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  • Tukunjil Nayeera
    January 1, 1970
    I am emotionally drained! I read The War that Saved My Life last year and loved it. It was one of the best books I've ever read. Since last year I've been waiting eagerly for the second book of the series. Now that I've read it I feel awful! I was kind of hoping maybe this book wouldn't be as good as the first installment. However, I was wrong. Kimberly Brubaker Bradley once again won my heart!Firstly, I would like to mention that Kimberley was very good with Child Psychology. The way she und I am emotionally drained! I read The War that Saved My Life last year and loved it. It was one of the best books I've ever read. Since last year I've been waiting eagerly for the second book of the series. Now that I've read it I feel awful! I was kind of hoping maybe this book wouldn't be as good as the first installment. However, I was wrong. Kimberly Brubaker Bradley once again won my heart!Firstly, I would like to mention that Kimberley was very good with Child Psychology. The way she understood Ada was amazing! Ada had undergone a lot since her birth. She had a club foot and her mom was so hateful that just remembering her gave Ada stress disorder. Because of her terrible memories, Ada was not a very easy girl to love. She wasn't easy to reason with. Susan, however, understood her very well! She loved Ada dearly and made her feel safe for the first time in Ada's life! She also helped Ada to fix her club foot. And there was Maggie who too loved Ada like a sister. And there was Jonathan who was very kind and gentle and his inspiration was Ada. He was willing to name his Plane "Invincible Ada" after Ada! And there was Ruth who had been through a lot just because she was born in a Jewish family. And just because Hitler chose to hate Jewish people she had to leave her country Germany to England. I felt really sorry for Ruth while she was staying at Thorton's cottage. No one would trust her as she was a German. She didn't know whether her family members were safe. War could tear a family apart. Everyone had been through hell because of the Holocaust.In this book, Kimberley didn't just write about war but also draw a clear picture of Ada and her surroundings and her feelings. Ada had a hard time to cope with kindness and love for she has always been treated poorly. Her battle was against her personal insecurities and disbelief. I am glad finally she won her battle and able to love back!We all need something to lean on to make ourselves comfortable when we feel down. In Ada's case horse was her comfort zone! And it was true for Ruth as well. So, when Ruth was emotionally drowning Ada let Ruth ride on her horse, Butter, despite Lady Thorton's prohibition! It indeed was a very brave and kind thing to do! I never was a cat or a dog person. But I've always loved the idea of having a pony as a pet. Oh! Right this moment how much I wish to have a pony as my pet!!
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    I laughed, I cried. THIS is how you write a sequel. It’s brilliant.
  • Heather Taake
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't think a sequel could live up to The War That Saved My Life, but KBB has done a fantastic job of it. This book was as good as, if not better than, the first. I got to read an ARC of this, thanks to our fabulous school librarian, and I can not wait for it to come out for the students to enjoy!
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  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    This is the follow up to The War that Save My Life and dare I say I loved it even more. Ida was able to get her operation! The author packed in death, religion, and code breaking all in this book. If you haven't read the first one, you must! A true delight.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so good. It made me cry and laugh till the end.
  • Janssen
    January 1, 1970
    This was excellent. And one of those books where I read the sequel years after the first one and didn't feel frustrated the whole time by not being able to remember the first book.
  • Mr. Steve
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely wonderful. Even better than the first. Ada is one of my favorite characters in children's literature. Reading stories through her eyes is joyful. Other characters in the story, such as Susan, Lady Thornton, and Ruth, are just written perfectly. They are all broken in their own ways, but their stories are filled with hope - even as they don't realize it. I thought The War that Saved My Life should have won the Newbery two years ago, and The War I Finally Won should win this year. I can Absolutely wonderful. Even better than the first. Ada is one of my favorite characters in children's literature. Reading stories through her eyes is joyful. Other characters in the story, such as Susan, Lady Thornton, and Ruth, are just written perfectly. They are all broken in their own ways, but their stories are filled with hope - even as they don't realize it. I thought The War that Saved My Life should have won the Newbery two years ago, and The War I Finally Won should win this year. I can't imagine a more distinguished contribution to children's lit has been/will be published in 2017.
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  • Linda Williams Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully told story. I was honored to have the privilege of reading an ARC of this book via the #bookexpedition group on Twitter. I didn't get to spend as much time savoring this book as I would have liked, so I will have to sit with it again when it is published.
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