The New Voices of Fantasy
Ready for the next big thing?The New Voices of Fantasy spotlights nineteen breakout writers who are reinventing fantasy right now. Usman T. Malik, Sofia Samatar, Eugene Fischer, E. Lily Yu, Ben Loory, Maria Dahvana Headley, Ursula Vernon, Max Gladstone, and other emerging talents have been hand-picked by fantasy legend Peter S. Beagle (The Last Unicorn) and genre expert Jacob Weisman (Treasury of the Fantastic). International, crosscultural, and fearless, many of these rising stars have just or are about to publish their first novels and collections. They bring you childhood stories gone wrong, magical creatures in heat, a building that’s alive and full of waiters, love, ducks, and a new take on a bloodsucking fiend.Table of Contents:“Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” by Alyssa Wong“Selkie Stories are for Losers” by Sofia Samatar“Tornado’s Siren” by Brooke Bolander“Left the Century to Sit Unmoved” by Sarah Pinsker“A Kiss with Teeth” by Max Gladstone“Jackalope Wives” by Ursula Vernon“The Cartographer Wasps and Anarchist Bees” by E. Lily Yu“The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate” by A. C. Wise“The Tallest Doll in New York City” by Maria Dahvana Headley“The Haunting of Apollo A7LB” by Hannu Rajaniemi“Here Be Dragons” by Chris Tarry“The One They Took Before” by Kelly Sandoval“Tiger Baby” by JY Yang“The Duck” by Ben Loory“Wing” by Amal El-Mohtar“The Philosophers” by Adam Ehrlich Sachs“My Time Among the Bridge Blowers” by Eugene Fischer“The Husband Stitch” by Carmen Maria Machado“The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn” by Usman T. Malik

The New Voices of Fantasy Details

TitleThe New Voices of Fantasy
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 1st, 2017
PublisherTachyon Publications
ISBN1616962577
ISBN-139781616962579
Number of pages336 pages
Rating
GenreFantasy, Short Stories, Anthologies

The New Voices of Fantasy Review

  • Melanie
    May 2, 2017
    ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I love supporting under-hyped books and authors, and these are nineteen up and coming fantasy authors that each contributed a short story for this anthology. I mean, how could I not request an ARC of this? I absolutely love the thought that went in to this, and I'm so very thankful that Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weisman curated this.Yet, I do think that these curators are being very liberal with the word "new". Some of ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I love supporting under-hyped books and authors, and these are nineteen up and coming fantasy authors that each contributed a short story for this anthology. I mean, how could I not request an ARC of this? I absolutely love the thought that went in to this, and I'm so very thankful that Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weisman curated this.Yet, I do think that these curators are being very liberal with the word "new". Some of these short stories were released in 2014 and 2015. Some of these authors are very well known and published. I didn't let this impact my rating or reading experience, but I think it's important to note it is a very loose term here. I also feel like this would be a perfect October/Fall read, because even though this is pitched as a fantasy collection, which it is, but I couldn't help but feel like it had much more of an eerie, almost horror, vibe. Most all of the stories are set in our world, in our time, so if you're looking for dragons, dwarfs, fae, and elves, you've come to the wrong anthology. Yet, a few of these short stories completely captured my heart and very quickly made me a new fan of the authors. The Tallest Doll in New York City by Maria Dahvana Headley, Jackalope Wives by Ursula Vernon, and Wing by Amal El-Mohtar were some of my favorites and I gave each story a perfect five stars. These stories just felt a tier above most and were just so impactful and beautifully written. I am a sucker for lyrical prose, and all three of these authors completely delivered.My personal favorite in the whole collection is, hands down, The Husband Stitch by Carmen Maria Machado. I am in awe of this story and its utter perfection. One of the best feminist works I've ever read in my life, and one of the most powerful pieces of art, too. If you can only read one short story of these nineteen, please pick this one. It's life changing and so very important. I'm going to break down each short story with my thoughts, opinions, and individual star rating! Also, all but three of these short stories can be found and read online for free. I will include a link in the title of the story that will direct you to a source that will allow you to read it for free if you are interested.➽ Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers by Alyssa Wong - ★★★★This first short story completely hooked me. A girl uses Tinder to find dates who are petty criminals and feeds off their impure thoughts. Yet, she gets more than she bargained for when she becomes addicted to feasting off an actual killer. Now her hunger knows no bounds, and to protect the girl she secretly likes she has to find another way to sate her hunger. ➽ Selkie Stories are for Losers by Sofia Samatar - ★★This one for sure feels like it could dip into the horror category, too, but it never really got scary. It is sort of story of stories and the whole theme revolves around the mythical folklore creatures, selkies. Selkies are seals who are able to shed their skin and turn human to dwell on land among us. Sadly, this just didn't work for me, and the buildup left a lot to be desired. ➽ Tornado’s Siren by Brooke Bolander - ★★★This is a very unique short about a girl that has caught the attention of a tornado one stormy evening. She is only nine at the time, but it follows her periodically through her growing up to become an adult. After years of attempted normalcy, our main character realizes that she doesn't want to be normal after all. I enjoyed this, and I loved the open ending, but it wasn't my favorite in the collection. ➽ Left the Century to Sit Unmoved by Sarah Pinsker - ★★★This is a very, very short little story about a local pond where only the bravest of townsfolk jump off a waterfall into it. There are rules to jumping in this pond, and this pond is said to just take people. They can dredge it up, but no bodies are every found, only the swimsuits that float to the surface. Our main character is obsessed with jumping in it, ever since her brother went missing after his jump. This story is beautifully written, and the message very strong, especially with the length of this one. ➽ A Kiss with Teeth by Max Gladstone - ★This story was so difficult for me to read. I didn't connect with the writing style whatsoever, and it felt ungodly longer than the rest of the stories in this collection. This story focuses on a modern day version of Vlad the Impaler, where he is trying to live a normal life, and raise a normal son, while also trying to control his urge to function as a vampire. He becomes obsessed with his son's teacher, and begins to literally stalk her. To drink from? To kill? To fuck? Who knows, but it is supposed to be a "you can work out your problems if you love each other enough, while still being able to be who you are" story, but it didn't work in the slightest for me. Also, I'm just personally so sick of Vlad the Impaler retellings. ➽ Jackalope Wives by Ursula Vernon - ★★★★★Good Lord, this story was so close to perfect! I absolutely loved and adored it. Twist and turns throughout, with a perfect ending, all wrapped up in such a short tale. This story is about jackalope rabbits, which can turn into very beautiful women, who love to dance the night away. Many men desire to make them their wives, and by stealing the rabbit coats they shed while dancing, but by doing so you will also be trapping them into not being able to shift back into their rabbit forms. Some very cruel men burn their skins, while forcing them to be humans forever. ➽ The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees by E. Lily Yu - ★★★★This was the first story in the collection that every aspect felt like fantasy. We are thrown into this amazingly beautiful, but ruthless, community of bees and wasps and a couple other insects. We get to see the hierarchy within the wasps, and the demands they make of the bees. We get to see, as the title suggests, their uses of maps and how they take note of the events happening in their world. I really enjoyed this, and the writing was superb. ➽ The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate by A. C. Wise - ★This is exactly what the title implies, a section by section guide on how to buy a residence if you are a witch. Now, I'm sure this will be super cute, charming, and funny to many readers out there, but it totally fell flat for me. It just felt very forced, while trying to be funny, but it just came across as cringey. Plus, (not that I am the expert on witches buying or creating homes) it felt very basic with its "witch knowledge". I feel really bad saying this, but I didn't enjoy this at all. ➽ The Tallest Doll in New York City by Maria Dahvana Headley - ★★★★★Be still, my heart! This was so amazingly unique! I loved it! This story is set in New York, where the tall buildings and structures move on their own. This tale is told on Valentine's Day, and the storyteller is a waiter in a club that works high up inside one of these moving buildings. I loved seeing all these iconic structures choose one another and pair up for Valentine's Day. And the story is told so beautifully, whimsically, and romantically, that you can't help but fall in love with it. ➽ The Haunting of Apollo A7LB by Hannu Rajaniemi - ★★★A woman is dealing with the death of her lover from her past, when she gets a knock on her door from that person's moon suit, that she helped sew, which is a little scary because that person has died. At first sight, she believes it to be his ghost, but soon realizes that there is someone else inside of it. The suit is compelling him to do things that he normally would never do, and now it has showed up on her doorstep. This short story definitely talks about differences in races and classes and how far we still need to go, but also about love and how far we are willing to go for the ones we love.➽ Here Be Dragons by Chris Tarry - ★This is easily my least favorite in the whole collection. Trigger warnings for child abuse, even though it's written about in a disgustingly light way. This story is about two men who are pretty much medieval con-artists, who "slay dragons" for wealth and fame. Well, now they have come home to actually be fathers to their children, while their wives work, but they can't deal with that apparently, because, you know, sexism, and then they both have separate epiphanies that they aren't cut out for this father thing, when they could have fame, glory, and prostitutes. I understand not every story has to have likable main characters, but I literally hated both of these men from start to finish. ➽ The One They Took Before by Kelly Sandoval - ★★★★This story was just the perfect about of ominous and eerie. It all starts with a rift in the universe and an ad on Craigslist in Seattle. Our main character is constantly battling her inner feelings whether or not she wants to return to her abductors that are not from our world. It was such a good balance of realistic and whimsical, and my only real complaint is that I wish there was more that I could read. ➽ Tiger Baby by JY Yang - ★★I feel somewhat torn about rating this story. This short is about a girl who is being constantly haunted by her dreams of being a tiger, which she also believes is her "true form" and aspires to become it. She doesn't have the best life and constantly feels so much different than her peers. All of this, and the many metaphors, could have packed a big punch, but instead it fell short because our main protagonist isn't a teenager feeling like an outcast that can't connect with anyone, instead she is over thirty years old and refuses to seek out help.➽ The Duck by Ben Loory - ★★★★This was short and cute and extremely unexpectedly powerful. On paper, this is a story about a duck that fell in love with a rock, but it's truly a story about helping people you love and understanding and accepting them for who they are. With true friends, we can accomplish so much and we can help heal others and make so many people happy. This was really good, and I highly recommend. ➽ Wing by Amal El-Mohtar - ★★★★★This might be the most beautiful story in the whole collection. This short story is so romantic and so expertly written. My interruption is that soul mates are rare, but always worth the wait, and sharing yourself body and soul with someone else is something indescribable. We will have many loves in our lives, but when you find that person who you can share all your secrets with you will realize why it never worked out with anyone else. I loved this so very much, and I loved the imagery in this, and I loved picturing a girl with a book of secrets around her neck. Seriously, this was perfection. ➽ The Philosophers by Adam Ehrlich Sachs - ★★This is three mini stories; all surrounding a discussion about boys and their fathers. It's about becoming what they expect you to be, becoming what you have no powering to not become, and how one day the boy will become the father. If I'm being honest, this wasn't bad, but it just tried too damn hard to sound prolific. And it wasn't that I couldn't relate, but I just didn't care to read three stories of different father and son relationships. ➽ My Time Among the Bridge Blowers by Eugene Fischer - ★★This was just ungodly boring. It's about a man, traveling with another man, to a village tribe that's unlike anything he's ever known, and then closes very mysteriously and very open-ended. Maybe there is some very introspective meaning here that just went over my head, but I just didn't enjoy this. ➽ The Husband Stitch by Carmen Maria Machado - ★★★★★Oh my God. This was the best short story I have ever read in my entire life. I'm writing this review in tears, because it was so immensely powerful. My hands are shaking, because this story is so real and so relevant. My stomach is in knots, because I'm not sure any combination of words I will create will do this story justice. This story is very feminist and very sexually explicit, but so damn important. It's about the life of a woman, who gives everything to men and never is allowed to keep anything for herself. It's about life's expectations on women, and how society shapes the choices we do and do not have. It's about how, no matter what, giving everything will never be good enough as a woman. It's about enjoying and exploring your sexuality, yet trying to cope with the shame. It's about never fully being able to become the person you are, but becoming the person your husband and/or family require you to be. It's about having children, who will just repeat the same vicious and unfair cycle. I wish I could put this story in everyone's hands. ➽ The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn by Usman T. Malik - ★★★★This story was so very long, but was rather enjoyable. It's about a boy, who has been obsessed with a story his grandfather has told him since he was young, about a princess, her two sisters, and a jinn that protected them all. This family lives in the states now, but the story is from Pakistan. After a few turn of events, the boy, now a man, picks up his life and goes to Pakistan to see if his grandfather's story was just a story. Also, this story has such a beautiful ending. I gave The New Voices of Fantasy 3 stars overall, because out of a possible 95 stars (5 stars possible for each of the 19 stories) this collection accumulated 60 stars (63%). Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch
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  • Hannah
    July 6, 2017
    Sadly uneven. While there were a few really beautiful stories, overall I found this anthology not as great as it could have been. Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weismann collected short stories by authors they think will influence the future of fantasy. As such this is a very varied anthology with different outlooks on what constitutes "fantasy" as a genre. There were some really innovative story telling techniques employed and some stories I really adored - but some felt flat for me. I guess that is Sadly uneven. While there were a few really beautiful stories, overall I found this anthology not as great as it could have been. Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weismann collected short stories by authors they think will influence the future of fantasy. As such this is a very varied anthology with different outlooks on what constitutes "fantasy" as a genre. There were some really innovative story telling techniques employed and some stories I really adored - but some felt flat for me. I guess that is always going to be the case when it comes to anthologies this broad. It took me a while to get into this collection as the first five stories did not particularly wow me. While I thought "Tornado's Siren" (about a tornado who is in love with a girl) had a really interesting premise, the execution, especially in regards to the characters, fell flat for me; whereas "A Kiss with Teeth" just bored me to death - a vampire as a urban dad with midlife crisis just is not something I am very interested in. This is exemplary of how much of the collection read for me: many stories were just boring or not as well rounded as I would have liked. But still, there were some stories I really, absolutely, completely adored:Jackalope Wives by Ursula Vernon: wimsy, sad, poignant, and reminiscent of classical fairy tales with a twist: very much my thing.The Haunting of Apollo A7LB by Hannu Rajaniemi: funny, quiet, political, unexpected, and wonderfully hopeful.The One They Took Before by Kelly Sandoval: mean, sad, wonderful, difficult to get into at first but very rewarding in the end (oh the ending was so beautiful and hopeful and sad).The Husband Stitch by Carmen Maria Machado: stunning, weird, feminist, sad, dark, wonderful. My absolute favourite of the bunch. And I am glad because I have been wanting to read her forthcoming debut collection for a while and now I cannot wait. This is just my type of dark magical realism that I adore in short stories. If you only read one of those stories: read this one.I think this collection is broad enough to offer something for everybody - while this is a strength it also is a weakness as I found the anthology too uneven for my taste.____I received an arc of this book curtesy of NetGalley and Tachyon Publications in exchange for an honest review. Thanks for that!
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  •  Charlie - A Reading Machine
    July 5, 2017
    Review to come on Fantasy faction but this really is a fantastic collection of stories
  • Margaret
    July 20, 2017
    An excellent collection of contemporary fantasy short stories. I'd already read 8 out of the 19 stories, but I enjoyed rereading them. I'd also already read 15 of the authors, so it's nice to know I'm keeping up with new fantasy authors!If you're on the hunt for some new authors, this is a great collection to read. It's also interesting to note that of the 19 stories, only 2 were 2nd world fantasy. The other 17 stories were rooted in this world. But what all of these stories tend to do is use fa An excellent collection of contemporary fantasy short stories. I'd already read 8 out of the 19 stories, but I enjoyed rereading them. I'd also already read 15 of the authors, so it's nice to know I'm keeping up with new fantasy authors!If you're on the hunt for some new authors, this is a great collection to read. It's also interesting to note that of the 19 stories, only 2 were 2nd world fantasy. The other 17 stories were rooted in this world. But what all of these stories tend to do is use fantasy as a metahpor for something about living, and I love that. There are some really powerful stories in this collection.“Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” by Alyssa Wong: A lot of Wong's short stories (if not all) deal with a monstrous feminine and relationships among women. This is no exception. I mistakenly thought I'd read this before, so I'm glad it was in this collection. 4/5“Selkie Stories are for Losers” by Sofia Samatar: And the protagonist has good reason for thinking so (the title). I really enjoy this story. This is my third time reading it, I believe. 4.5/5“Tornado’s Siren” by Brooke Bolander: So good! A tornado falls in love with a little girl, and follows her the rest of her life. Such a fantastic story. 5/5“Left the Century to Sit Unmoved” by Sarah Pinsker: In a small town, a waterhole sometimes swallows people, and a folklore has developed around it. A teenage girl dares to jump regularly. I've read this before, but had forgotten I had because the title doesn't really hint at the story. I really don't like the title, but the story is great. 4.5/5“A Kiss with Teeth” by Max Gladstone: A vampire tries to live a normal human life and do the right thing for his family. Fun story. 4/5“Jackalope Wives” by Ursula Vernon: Animal transformation story set in the West. I love this story so much. Also a re-read for me, but it's just perfect. Moves me every time. 5/5“The Cartographer Wasps and Anarchist Bees” by E. Lily Yu: A political allegory between bees and wasps. Cool concept. A reread that was better the 2nd time around. 4/5“The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate” by A. C. Wise: A handbook about the ways witches can go about finding a house. I would choose 'Taming.' Another reread, but still cute. 4/5“The Tallest Doll in New York City” by Maria Dahvana Headley: The Chrsyler Building takes a walk in the 1930s, and waltzes with the Empire State Building. A reread. 3/5“The Haunting of Apollo A7LB” by Hannu Rajaniemi: A old spacesuit is haunted, and when a rich internet mogul smuggles it, it insists on visiting an old acquintance. First time reading this author. 3/5“Here Be Dragons” by Chris Tarry: A retired fake dragon hunter returns home to be a stay-at-home dad. But can he settle down to this life? New author for me, and I really enjoyed it. 4/5“The One They Took Before” by Kelly Sandoval: Oh, those faeries and their pet humans. This short story tells of woman after she returns home from a year in Faerie. How can she ever return to normal? 4/5“Tiger Baby” by JY Yang: A woman feels she's more tiger than human. 3.5/5“The Duck” by Ben Loory: A fable about a duck that falls in love with a rock. 3/5“Wing” by Amal El-Mohtar: A woman wears a book necklace with a secret written inside. Lovely language, as always with Amal. 4.5/5“The Philosophers” by Adam Ehrlich Sachs: A recursive story about sons translating a book as they slowly acquire a disability that leaves them unable to speak or move anything but a single body part. 2/5“My Time Among the Bridge Blowers” by Eugene Fischer Original Story: A quasi-anthropologist travels to a remote village to learn the customs of its people, people his culture has attempted to colonize. Good story that felt like something larger. 4/5“The Husband Stitch” by Carmen Maria Machado: A modern retelling of the folktale "The Girl with the Green Ribbon," one of my favorites growing up. This was my third time reading this short story, and the most effective. I kept thinking about the man who murdered his wife recently on a cruise ship, for laughing at him. 4.5/5“The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn” by Usman T. Malik: A grandfather tells his grandson a story of a Princess and a jinn, and when the grandson grows into an adult and his grandfather dies, he discovers the story may be a lot more complicated and magical than his grandfather led him to believe. Another reread. 4/5Thanks to Netgalley and Tachyon Press for providing me with a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kavya
    July 11, 2017
    I received this copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest reviewA collection to highlight upcoming voices in fantasy. I know a lot of these authors from being a fan of some of these authors. They all write in what could be considered a new era of fantasy, one that tries to push the boundaries of the already fantastical. A couple of these stories I'd read before and loved. I enjoyed quite a lot of them, although I am not sure a few are fantasy as much as about human nature, and some are on t I received this copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest reviewA collection to highlight upcoming voices in fantasy. I know a lot of these authors from being a fan of some of these authors. They all write in what could be considered a new era of fantasy, one that tries to push the boundaries of the already fantastical. A couple of these stories I'd read before and loved. I enjoyed quite a lot of them, although I am not sure a few are fantasy as much as about human nature, and some are on the border of speculative, scifi and fantasy, which I'm not too much of a stickler to care about. Individual story reviews below. My favorites were Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers, Tornado's Siren, Left the Century to Sit Unmoved, A kiss with Teeth, Jackalope Wives, The Tallest Doll in New York City, The One they took before, The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn. Overall, a great collection that encapsulates the breadth of what is being done with fantasy in today's publishing. Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers by Alyssa Wong is one of the best stories in the collection, an extraordinary idea written well, a protagonist who can see, and likes to eat, the dirty/evil thoughts of others. Selkie Stories are for Losers by Sofia Samatar I didn't like this much, mostly because I tend to sympathize with Selkie's and hope for their escape, whereas this protagonist holds a grudge against her mother for doing so.Tornado's Siren by Brooke Bolander I'm still marveling at how well this worked. A Tornado fall in love with a girl. Just the kind of strange idea is perfect in short fiction.Left the Century to sit unmoved by Sarah Pinsker - I loved this one. About a pond that occasionally takes people who dive into it, a missing brother, and why we risk things.A Kiss with Teeth by Max Gladstone - It's no secret that I love everything Max writes. I've read this one before, a tale about Dracula, the seven year itch, and being true to yourself. Jackalope Wives by Ursula Vernon. So So good. Reminded me of Pocosin, another story by her, since they both have grandmothers.Old powers, myths and sense.The Cartographer Wasps and The Anarchist Bees by E. Lily Yu. Really well written, but I felt like I missed the point of this. Story as per title, about Cartographer Wasps that colonize a beehive.The Practical Witch's Guide to Acquiring Real Estate by A.C. Wise. Written like an actual guide. Cute but forgettable.The Tallest Doll in New York Cityby Maria Dahvana Headley. 1920's voice, story about how the Chrysler building decides to confront her crush on Valentine's day. Brilliant, fanciful, I'm now in love with Maria Dahvana Headely's writing.The Haunting of Apollo A7LB by Hannu Rajaniemi. A smalls story about a haunted spacesuit and its maker.Here be Dragonsby Chris Tarry. I actually really liked this one. Biting examination of male toxicity and fatherhood through the tale of two con men who pose as dragon hunters.The one they took before I haven't read enough fae stories to be bored by them yet. A fascinating short story of the signs of fae taking people in urban landscape.by JY Yang. Well written, but I couldn't sympathize with the protagonist, who believe's she is a tiger, not a person.The Duckby Ben Loory. A cute little fable about love.Wing by Amal El-Mohtar. Prettily written, but I feel like I missed the point again. About books and secrets and meeting a person to share them with.The Philosophers by Adam Ehrlich Sachs. A set of 3 stories, and I didn't think they were fantasy at all, except for the last which was more scifi by association. All examining the father son relationship.My time among the bridge blowers by Eugene Fischer. Written well and imagined, but felt a little lacking of a point. Literally a small travelogue by a man wanting to study the bridge blowers, a hidden community that can suspend themselves in air by blowing.The Husband Stitch by Carmen Maria Machado. A creepy body horror story. Immersive, but not my kind of thing.The Pauper Prince and Eucalyptus Jinn by Usman T. Malik. Read last year and considered as one of the best short stories I have read. Its a gorgeously written story set in our time, about a family secret, art, and a creation myth. It leaves you in awe.
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  • Mike
    May 10, 2017
    This is a collection of stories by authors who have recently hit the upper levels of speculative fiction writing - publication in the top venues, award nominations, and so forth. I'd read several of these before, mostly in the The Long List Anthology Volume 2: More Stories From the Hugo Award Nomination List; some of them were good enough that I read them again. I skipped Alyssa Wong's "Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers" (which was more horror-like than I prefer), Carmen Maria Machado's "The This is a collection of stories by authors who have recently hit the upper levels of speculative fiction writing - publication in the top venues, award nominations, and so forth. I'd read several of these before, mostly in the The Long List Anthology Volume 2: More Stories From the Hugo Award Nomination List; some of them were good enough that I read them again. I skipped Alyssa Wong's "Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers" (which was more horror-like than I prefer), Carmen Maria Machado's "The Husband Stitch", a magic-realist story that didn't have a strong enough payoff for me to want to read it again, and Usman T. Malik's "The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn," which was good but, let's say, took a lot of words for the amount of story in it. I did re-read Maria Dahvana Headley's "The Tallest Doll in New York City," a lovely Runyonesque that I'd previously read in the Tor.com anthology, and Max Gladstone's "A Kiss with Teeth", which I'd read twice before in other anthologies. It's that good. His novels are, for me, a frustrating blend of brilliant and flawed, but this story is excellent. Even though a lot of its excellence is in the masterfully maintained tension, and even though I (obviously) already knew the ending, it rewarded rereading. The other story I re-read was Sofia Samatar's "Selkie Stories Are for Losers", which, the first time I read it, didn't do much for me. I appreciated it more on a re-read; like most of these stories, what it's about is human relationships, and it takes an allusive and indirect approach that, for me, needed a second read to get. As I write this review, I'm partway through reading Event Horizon 2017, a collection of stories by authors eligible for the Campbell Award - that is, people who've recently made their first professional sale. I'm trying to figure out what the difference is between those stories and the ones in this volume; haven't quite put my finger on it yet, but it's something to do with having a second level to the story, and and extra degree of skill in weaving it together. While I didn't necessarily like every story in this volume, I appreciated the authors' ability.
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  • Coolcurry
    July 13, 2017
    What a great collection!The New Voices of Fantasy is a collection of recent (2010 or later) fantasy short stories by emerging authors, as selected by Peter S. Beagle, author of The Last Unicorn. I picked the collection up because I already recognized some of the names on the front and adored their work. Turns out some of my favorite short stories were already included!For instance, “Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” by Alyssa Wong. I loved this short story when I read it last year. It’s dark What a great collection!The New Voices of Fantasy is a collection of recent (2010 or later) fantasy short stories by emerging authors, as selected by Peter S. Beagle, author of The Last Unicorn. I picked the collection up because I already recognized some of the names on the front and adored their work. Turns out some of my favorite short stories were already included!For instance, “Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” by Alyssa Wong. I loved this short story when I read it last year. It’s dark, haunting, and utterly unforgettable. “A Kiss with Teeth” by Max Gladstone was one of the first stories I read when I started exploring short SFF fiction online. It’s a story about marriage and fatherhood, but centered around a vampire. In “Jackalope Wives” by Ursula Vernon, the memorable Grandma Harken is left to deal with the results of her grandson’s folly. These three stories were already among my favorite short fiction of recent years, and I was glad to see them included.I was also familiar with some of the other authors, but their stories were new to me. “The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate” by A.C. Wise is an utterly delightful piece about the relationship between a witch and their house. The story starts with a discussion of how the word “acquiring” can be problematic when it comes to real estate (as it implies that the house isn’t choosing the witch!) and gets even better from there. “Selkie Stories Are for Losers” by Sofia Samatar is a slice of life narrative about a girl who’s mother is a selkie and her developing friendship with a girl with a suicidal mother. It’s a lovely story, and I immediately went to include it in a recommendation list of queer paranormal short stories. In “Tornado’s Siren” by Brooke Bolander, a tornado falls in love with a woman and she has to decide if normal is what she really wants. It’s a unique concept, and Bolander pulls it off admirably well, creating a charming short story. JY Yang presents a tale of a woman who dreams of tigers with “Tiger Baby.” Whenever she closes her eyes at night, she’s running on four paws, a sleek orange and black shadow. But while she may believe herself to be a tiger, there’s another truth to what she is. JY Yang is a truly talented author, and I look forward to reading more stories by them. Amal El-Mohtar was another author who’s inclusion in this collection I was excited about. However, “Wing” didn’t prove to be a very memorable story. It’s a beautifully written story about book lovers, but I didn’t find it to have the staying power of some of the other stories.I’d read at least one other short story by E. Lily Yu, but after reading “The Cartographer Wasps and Anarchist Bees,” I know I need to read more by her. It was hands down one of the best stories in the collection. It’s just got so many layers! In this story, a nest of wasps conquers a hive of bees, and the epic tale of these insects comes to involve colonialism and differences in political systems.The rest of the authors were relatively new to me, although I may have read a few stories by some of them here and there. Some of the stories were intriguing and others weren’t to my tastes. Mind you, I wouldn’t say any are bad stories, and if I were rating each story individually, I don’t think any would get less than three stars. “The Tallest Doll in New York City” by Maria Dahvana Headley is one of the stories that left me cold. In this tale, two skyscrapers go courting on Valentine’s Day. In “The Haunting of Apollo A7LB,” a haunted spacesuit returns to the woman it’s owner loved… regardless of the fact that a living human is now wearing it. “The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn” by Usman T. Malik is a lengthy story (novella length?) that took up about a fifth of the collection. In it, a middle aged academic uncovers his grandfather’s past and the tale of a impoverished princess. In “Here Be Dragons” by Chris Tarry, two fathers who made a living pretending to be dragon hunters find themselves out of work and now stay at home dads. “The Philosophers” by Adam Ehrlich Sachs is a collection of three flash fiction stories about the relationships between fathers and sons, often told in an offbeat way. For instance, a son who partitions the different aspects of his relationship with his deceased father by literally wearing different hats. “The Duck” by Ben Loory is a short story about a duck who falls in love with a rock, told almost as if it was a fable.Other stories worked a bit better for me, although I still had mixed feelings about some of them. “The Husband Stitch” by Carmen Maria Machado is a powerfully feminist story about a woman who gives everything of herself over to her husband — except for the ribbon she wears around her neck. Yet, he isn’t content until he has all of her. This may have been my favorite story by a new to me author. One of the others I enjoyed was “Left the Century to Sit Unmoved” by Sarah Pinsker, the tale of a small town with a pond where people who dive into it sometimes disappear. Despite the risks, residents still take the chance of diving in. In “The One They Took Before” by Kelly Sandoval, a musician tries to figure out how to live after being returned from the world of the fae. “My Time Among the Bridge Blowers” by Eugene Fischer is perhaps the story I’m most conflicted by. A self styled anthropologist ventures to a remote village where the inhabitants can walk on air. I believe that the story’s meant to be a criticism of the sort of cultural imperialism that can go along with this, but I don’t know if it was entirely successful in that regard.Overall, The New Voices of Fantasy is a very strong collection and one that I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend. It is perfect for anyone who looking to discover some of the newest talent in the genre, as well as for anyone who just loves a good story.Originally posted on The Illustrated Page.I received an ARC in exchange for a free and honest review.
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  • Bob Milne
    June 6, 2017
    Unless they're connected by a theme, I tend to be hesitant about multi-author anthologies like this, especially when I've only really heard of two of the authors. The first four stories did nothing for me, but "A Kiss With Teeth" by Max Gladstone was fantastic - quite a bit better, and rather more accessible, than his Craft Sequence novels. The next two fell flat as well, but then along came "The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate" by A. C. Wise, which was just as much fun as I exp Unless they're connected by a theme, I tend to be hesitant about multi-author anthologies like this, especially when I've only really heard of two of the authors. The first four stories did nothing for me, but "A Kiss With Teeth" by Max Gladstone was fantastic - quite a bit better, and rather more accessible, than his Craft Sequence novels. The next two fell flat as well, but then along came "The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate" by A. C. Wise, which was just as much fun as I expected of her. When the three following stories disappointed, despite having some of the most intriguing titles in the collection, I decided I was done.
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  • Tori
    June 8, 2017
    ****I received a copy of this ARC from NetGalley and Tachyon Publications in exchange for an honest review!****I really enjoyed most of these stories, especially "Hungry Daughters of Starving Mother's", "The Practical Witch's Guide to Acquiring Real Estate" and "The Haunting of Apollo A7LB". These three in particular just felt so unique and well-crafted. Some of the other stories didn't seem to be too different or it felt like I'd heard them before, but overall had good writing. The ones I did e ****I received a copy of this ARC from NetGalley and Tachyon Publications in exchange for an honest review!****I really enjoyed most of these stories, especially "Hungry Daughters of Starving Mother's", "The Practical Witch's Guide to Acquiring Real Estate" and "The Haunting of Apollo A7LB". These three in particular just felt so unique and well-crafted. Some of the other stories didn't seem to be too different or it felt like I'd heard them before, but overall had good writing. The ones I did enjoy, were good enough to make me want to look out for those specific authors, but there weren't enough strong ones to get more than 3 stars from me, unfortunately.
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  • Katharine (Ventureadlaxre)
    July 29, 2017
    So many authors are the reason I picked this one up - it would probably be easier to list those I haven't yet come across yet. This is however a collection of people fairly new to the scene (last four or so years until now), and an excellent starting point for people who may not have come across them yet - get in on the ground floor, type of thing, so you can follow what are sure to be excellent bibliographies.“Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” by Alyssa WongIt would drive you crazy if you c So many authors are the reason I picked this one up - it would probably be easier to list those I haven't yet come across yet. This is however a collection of people fairly new to the scene (last four or so years until now), and an excellent starting point for people who may not have come across them yet - get in on the ground floor, type of thing, so you can follow what are sure to be excellent bibliographies.“Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” by Alyssa WongIt would drive you crazy if you could see the thoughts of anyone you concentrated on - especially if you focused on their worst thoughts and memories. Imagine it's what you digest - what you feed on.We see Jen on a tinder date who notes her date wants to split her open and glory at her insides. It's just as well for the rest of the women on tinder that Jen has the ability to suck out every thought in his mind and leave him a maybe-dead mess in an alleyway - something she's seemingly inherited from her mother who has a home filled with 'hissing (...) ugly, bottled remains of her paramours'. Who wouldn't want to read more? Jen's problem is she has a sweet friend, Aiko, who's becoming more and more alluring. Scared that she won't be able to resist hurting her, she pushes her away instead and retreats to her mothers home, and distracted, then gets herself into a whole lot of trouble.This is sweet and perfectly delivered. Wong is certainly someone to keep an eye on - every piece she's had published so far it a wonder to read and sometimes a little hard hitting.“Selkie Stories are for Losers” by Sofia SamatarA girl loses her mother the usual selkie way - comes across a certain coat by accident, and never sees her mother again.She looks after herself best she can. It's almost easier for her to look out for Mona, a girl she meets through work, who cries sometimes and worries her suicidal mother is going to drag her back to Egypt. They plan instead to go to Colorado together. They're together in their grief, both abandoned by their parents.This is a beautiful piece of work - totally normal in its everyday life of going to work, avoiding creeps, driving out late at night and sneaking back home. You can't help but wish them both the best, and hope they make it to The Centennial State.“Tornado’s Siren” by Brooke BolanderRhea can talk to tornados. The first time is when she's nine, alone at home through some sort of mixup with her family, but living in a wild weather area she knows what to do. She drags the cat and supplies into the bathtub and huddles down for the wait... and it's only when the roof is ripped free and she screams, that it goes away.Tornadoes come and go on other significant moments of stress in her life, and as soon as she can he marries young and escapes to sunny California because it's not normal to be chased by lovelorn winds of terror, is it?This is an awesome piece. As someone who lives in a place that was totally flattened by a cyclone a few years before I was born (so going to places like England where they actually have history in beautiful old buildings is like a drug to me), I can fully appreciate the power of the weather and how it can move you.“Left the Century to Sit Unmoved” by Sarah PinskerA hungry and deep water pool will take you if you dive instead of jump, or tempt it by saying 'one more jump'. Always go with a buddy, and jump one at a time so if one is taken, the others can escape. Shay knows many who've been taken - Kendra, Grant... and her own brother, Nick.Shay pieces together what Nick left behind, and what she knows from others. And like the story before this, it captures at what mercy we are at when it comes to nature, and ends on a punch that's both beautiful and eerie at the same time - as well as full of hope, if you look at it in a certain way. It's becoming increasingly harder to pick a favourite from this anthology.“A Kiss with Teeth” by Max GladstoneVlad is a vampire. He's lived through much - countless lifetimes, and has experienced all there is to experience. Now, though, he lives in a concrete jungle with a wife and 7yo son, he works as an accountant, and plays catch in the evenings. His son is struggling with school, and so he meets with his teacher in order to discuss what can be done. And from here lies disaster.This is a good, strong story - twisting certain tropes and giving depth and feeling to the usual vampire/midlife crisis story. It's elegant, and gives strength to the usual vampire myth, making it seem as though they really are ancient and powerful beings who can sit silently in the shadows and observe us.“Jackalope Wives” by Ursula Vernon'A little magic is worse than none,' is probably one of the best lines I've read in ages.Jackalope wives. Long legged girls who dance in the moonlight, all curves and firelight, until they're spooked and they dart away into the nothing, never to be caught. Until one is, and like most fantasy, there's a tinge of horror in the good ones.There's a human boy with a little magic in him. He's tall and dark and causes the girls to swoon - though he's not swoon worthy, and that's the difference. He does something that either proves he's too kind to a fault, or not kind enough... but definitely too cruel. His grandma will make everything alright again though.And she does. This story is even more perfect than you think possible, as it defies what you hope will happen and manages to give you an ending even better than you were hoping for.“The Cartographer Wasps and Anarchist Bees” by E. Lily YuThis short story is too big to be summarised in a simple paragraph review and nothing I can write will do it justice. An envoy of wasps are moved on by heartless humans, and their new residence encroaches on an established bee hive, who will struggle to share the natural resources. The wasps have higher learning - their homes are beautiful maps that are true masterpieces, whilst the bees have never known of paper and ink until now.The title reveals enough - there are anarchist bees, and slowly, generation by generation (as anarchy is hereditary you see) the wasps' undoing is beautifully orchestrated. This entire piece is beautiful, and a tale to be savoured slowly.“The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate” by A. C. WiseThis one is a lot of fun, being exactly what it says in the title. Wise takes us through a practical guide for buying, squatting, or growing a house with hints and tips, do's and do not do's, and it's all a bit of fun.There's not much to review - other than saying it's well written and enjoyable, and probably one of my favourite pieces in the book so far!“The Tallest Doll in New York City” by Maria Dahvana HeadleyPossibly the most unique story in this collection, which is saying something after reading The Cartographer Wasps and Anarchist Bees. Set in New York, as we can see from the title, the story is told by a waiter in one of the fanciest buildings there is. It's Valentine's Day, and in this the buildings have life. On this special day, they match up, and overall it's really quite magical - something you can only see happening in a magical city such as New York, or perhaps London.I've been keeping an eye out for Headley's work ever since getting an ARC of Magonia and whoa - this is just as special. Surreal and beautiful, this sets out to achieve a lot, and absolutely manages it.“The Haunting of Apollo A7LB” by Hannu RajaniemiHazel is sitting in her house, in mourning, when her evening is interrupted with something literally from her past. She has a history with NASA, and uses the skills she learned there to get the facts out of this stranger that's turned up on her doorstep - it doesn't hurt that she was involved in making the spacesuit this guy is wearing, and that she probably understands more that's been happening in his life than he does.There's a lot to this, and being Rajaniemi some of it is subtle, at least for the majority of the short piece. It's really quite wonderful, and it makes me want to re-watch Hidden Figures because it's just so good.“Here Be Dragons” by Chris TarryTrigger warnings. Don't like how the subject was handled at all. Hard pass.“The One They Took Before” by Kelly SandovalKayla knows exactly what's going on when people start to disappear - she's experienced it before, and she's back now, but everything aches at her to return against all sense. Her cats help, but food barely sates her and she can't play her guitar, can't apply for jobs, can't do anything. To return would be losing, but what kind of living is she in now?A beautiful take on those who step into the world of the fae and what it's like to return. Such a relief to be back here after the previous, and goes very nicely if you're also recently reading Seanan McGuire's Wayward Children series.“Tiger Baby” by JY YangA woman is plagued by dreams of what she feels is her true self - a tiger - and it juxtaposes against her real life which isn't overly great. She yearns to be able to leave everything behind and be who she should be, as someone born in the year of the tiger and not compatible with this world. Somehow I felt this one fell a little flat, as while I can relate to the character from everything of not really fitting in and being born in the same year, I didn't really feel relief or happiness for the character for the ending. It seemed a little too easy, somehow. I am however really looking forward to her work from Tor that's coming out soon.“The Duck” by Ben LooryA duck somehow falls in love with a rock, and though the other ducks laugh at him (well, all but one), he has to ask himself what will happen, as his love is so great something has to, otherwise he feels he'll explode. One duck, the one who didn't laugh, tries to help. She agrees that something has to be done, and so she calls the rest of the ducks to hep (which they do, for all ducks are brothers - I loved that line), and together they try to carry it to a cliff. They'll throw it off, and something will - it just has to happen!This is a lovely tale, and I really enjoyed it. It was a bit cute, a bit funny, and didn't take itself too seriously. Just made you smile throughout, which is sometimes uncommon with short stories. “Wing” by Amal El-MohtarA girl drinks her tea and reads a book in a cafe. A girl sits beneath a chestnut tree and reads, and shares bread and honey with another girl when approached. But to neither does she tell her secret. This she only shares with one, who does the same - the boy with a matching book on a cord, secured around his neck. Amal's words are always beautiful and this is some of her best. It's right up there with The Truth About Owls, and makes you just want to shove it at people saying 'if you only read one, please read this one!' The less said about it the better, as it's such a lovely tale you need to come to it yourself, and find the meaning you want in it. “The Philosophers” by Adam Ehrlich SachsThe relationships of a boy and their father, presented in a triptych fashion. Good writing, but didn't really present anything 'wow' to me that I can review. All about expectations, choosing whether to try to live up to them or not, and whether you will be who you will be, or who someone else wants you to be, or shapes you that way.“My Time Among the Bridge Blowers” by Eugene FischerA man travels, searching for the Bridge Blowers, and what we have are his travel notes as if we're watching a travel documentary by Palin or Lumley. For fans of Marie Brennan, this was quaint and peaceful and a bit of a character study, but not much else to say about it other than that.“The Husband Stitch” by Carmen Maria MachadoI confess I'm a little confused at the ordering of the short stories in the collection, as putting this piece after two fairly simple stories that don't really have much you can say about them, after Amal's which is beautiful, and this one which, again, you need to come to it yourself to find whatever meaning you wish from it, but it is undoubtably powerful and feminist and deserves all the applause. I'd love an audio version of this, and to see/hear it performed at Worldcon. This piece is a little more horror-bent than the majority of the collection, which only works even more in its favour. I'm certainly going to be keeping an eye on whatever else Machado has out already, and what she comes out with next. “The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn” by Usman T. MalikA boy grows up listening to a story his grandfather tells, of a pauper princess who had a tea store in the shade of a eucalyptus tree, in which a jinn resided. The tale tells of a place that seems a very long way from where they now reside in Florida, where even when they speak to each other in Urdu it's like they're in another world entirely.Possibly the longest piece in this collection, but being Usman it manages to be worth it. As the grandfather's story dominates the boy's life, it overwhelmed the story too (in a good way) for the little it takes up, and pages and pages after are about the boy - now grown up - and his journey to find answers, meanings, an end to the story that sustained him as a kid. It's a grand ending to this anthology, and lovely throughout.
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  • Brad
    May 16, 2017
    Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC!I really liked, sometimes loved the stories in this volume. A lot of them are reprints, if not all, and I remember a number of them quite fondly from previous reads, such as, and especially, Alyssa Wong and Brooke Bolander.However, there were a number of newcomers (the definition is flexible) that I really enjoyed or I've already had the pleasure of reading some of their actual novels, such as stories from Hannu Rajaniemi, Sofia Samatar, and Max Gladstone. Hannu i Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC!I really liked, sometimes loved the stories in this volume. A lot of them are reprints, if not all, and I remember a number of them quite fondly from previous reads, such as, and especially, Alyssa Wong and Brooke Bolander.However, there were a number of newcomers (the definition is flexible) that I really enjoyed or I've already had the pleasure of reading some of their actual novels, such as stories from Hannu Rajaniemi, Sofia Samatar, and Max Gladstone. Hannu is a personal favorite author of mine, and Max is rapidly getting there, too, for me.Let me tell you... I really loved the one from Max. Dracula in the modern city. It was far from being overdone, rather, it was absolutely delightful. :)Ben Loory's short of "The Duck" was an awesome surprise, and I'm really beginning to look forward to every Ursula Vernon story I'm running across, too. All in all, though, I am very impressed and pleased by this collection and if its primary intention is to say, "Hey, look at these authors and revel in their glory!", then I think it did a wonderful job. Most of them have quite a few awards under their wings, too.I totally recommend this for all modern fantasy lovers. (And btw, there's a TON of great OLD fantasy retellings, usually quite unique and unusual tales in their own right. If you love hard to find legends retold for modern sensibilities wrapped and layered in fantastic characters, this is ALSO your book.)
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  • Andreea Marin
    May 17, 2017
    The New Voices of Fantasy is an anthology compiled by Peter. S. Beagle (famously known for his work The Last Unicorn) and Jacob Wiseman. All the stories in this collection have been previously published between 2010 and 2017 in short story magazines like Clarkesworld, Uncanny, Strange Horizons, and Tor.com. In 2010 Beagle edited another anthology The Secret History of Fantasy exploring the merging of genre fantasy and mainstream markets into a new form of literary fantasy. Wiseman asserts that “ The New Voices of Fantasy is an anthology compiled by Peter. S. Beagle (famously known for his work The Last Unicorn) and Jacob Wiseman. All the stories in this collection have been previously published between 2010 and 2017 in short story magazines like Clarkesworld, Uncanny, Strange Horizons, and Tor.com. In 2010 Beagle edited another anthology The Secret History of Fantasy exploring the merging of genre fantasy and mainstream markets into a new form of literary fantasy. Wiseman asserts that “this anthology constitutes something of a sequel.”Beagle begins his introduction to this anthology with a block quote:“Jules Verne, who always considered himself a scientist, was distinctly put out by the work of the younger writer H.G. Wells. ‘Il a invente!’ the author of From the Earth to the Moon sniffed at the author of The War of the Worlds. ‘He makes things up!’”What Verne could not accept was that Wells invented machines beyond what was mechanically possible—unlike what Verne did in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea with the submarine—Wells expanded by creating a time machine. Beagle relates an anecdote from his experience as a young writer where one of his older teachers, Frank O’Connor, could not accept Beagle’s storytelling in the writing class back in the ‘60s because he was a fan of realism and classics. Beagle writes: “I was outraged at O’Connor’s rigidity.” Later on Ursula K. Le Guin tells Beagle:“all of us [fantasy writers] feel, to one degree or another, that mainstream fiction has been stealing our ideas—and even our classic clichés—for generations, and selling them back to us as ‘Magical Realism.’”Realism is not everything, and fantasy under a different name does not become more ‘literary’ or significant. Beagle and Le Guin ask us to open our eyes and see that it was Fantasy all along.What Beagle does with this anthology is an elegant passing of the writing pen to a younger generation of fantasy writers, and he presents them to us, the readers, without rigidity as his teachers before him have. He accepts them as they are and is in awe of their risk-taking, creativity, and courage. I cannot imagine how many works Beagle must have read through to select these top 19 stories, but I had a hard time selecting my favourites, as each one of them brings something completely unique to the Fantasy cornucopia. His selection includes a great balance of men and women writers, as well as various backgrounds.The stories featured in this anthology are as follows:• “Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” by Alyssa Wong• “Selkie Stories are for Losers” by Sofia Samatar• “Tornado’s Siren” by Brooke Bolander (opening line: “Rhea is nine years old when she first meets the tornado that will fall in love with her:)• “Left the Century to Sit Unmoved” by Sarah Pinsker• “A Kiss with Teeth” by Max Gladstone (featuring Dracula as a suburban dad so worth reading)• “Jackalope Wives” by Ursula Vernon• “The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees” by E. Lily Yu• “The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate” by A.C. Wise• “The Tallest Doll in New York City” by Maria Dahvana Headley• “The Haunting of Apollo A7LB” by Hannu Rajeniemi• “Here Be Dragons” by Chris Tarry• “The One they Took Before” by Kelly Sandoval• “Tiger Baby” by JY Yang• “The Duck” by Ben Loory• “Wing” by Amal El-Mohtar• “The Philosophers” by Adam Ehrlich Sachs• “My Time Among the Bridge Blowers” by Eugene Fischer• “The Husband Stitch” by Carmen Maria Machado• “The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn” by Usman T. MalikI know that most of these stories can be found for free online as they have been previously published, but in support of Beagle and his work I would recommend this anthology as an individual codex because it is cohesive and works well as a collection with the choices Beagle has made.I recommend this anthology to anyone who loves fantasy and wants to try some of the new emerging voices. I have no doubt that each one of these writers will continue to write and publish larger works in the future, and this anthology is a great introduction to them. I would especially recommend this to readers who are new to fantasy and want to sample shorter works without committing to an entire series and/or trilogy.
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  • Elise (thebookishactress on wordpress)
    July 21, 2017
    Collection Started: July 21stI'll be mentioning thoughts on each story separately!!♔ Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers by Alyssa Wong - ★★★★★This one is a little terrifying. A girl uses Tinder to find dates and feed off their gross thoughts about her body. Yet on one date, she feasts off a murderer and becomes addicted. There's also a maybe-romance between her and her best friend. I adored this story, although I felt that the end fizzled a little. The writing and atmosphere is pitch-perfect, Collection Started: July 21stI'll be mentioning thoughts on each story separately!!♔ Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers by Alyssa Wong - ★★★★★This one is a little terrifying. A girl uses Tinder to find dates and feed off their gross thoughts about her body. Yet on one date, she feasts off a murderer and becomes addicted. There's also a maybe-romance between her and her best friend. I adored this story, although I felt that the end fizzled a little. The writing and atmosphere is pitch-perfect, I adored the characters... just great. You can read this here. ♔ Selkie Stories are for Losers by Sofia Samatar - ★★★This follows– um, I'm not quite sure, because this really didn't feel resolved or completed. I liked the writing and the atmosphere, but the execution of the storyline was mediocre. Also appreciate that both of the first two stories were a little gay. ♔ Tornado’s Siren by Brooke Bolander - ★★★This follows a girl in love with a tornado. It's... weird. I love the idea, but I didn't emotionally connect with anything here. The magical realism feel is nice, at least. ♔ Left the Century to Sit Unmoved by Sarah Pinsker - ★★★★This is a slice-of-life about people living near a pond in their small town. I LOVED the beginning. Absolutely adored the writing, loved the themes, was so excited to see what the solution is. I thought this would blow my mind. It unfortunately didn't. These open endings have got to go. ♔ A Kiss with Teeth by Max Gladstone - ★★★It's a coming of age story, but with a really old vampire instead of a teen. I was honestly kind of surprised I enjoyed this, after I found the beginning badly written and slightly stalker-ish. But this quickly turned into an interesting story about accepting faults in love. I especially loved reading about Vlad and Sarah's little family. ♔ Jackalope Wives by Ursula Vernon - ★★★★This is a story about wanting what you can't have and having what you can't want. It's... eerie. I feel like this will be polarizing, but I loved it. And yes, it is about jackalope wives. Go figure. ♔ The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees by E. Lily Yu - ★★★I don't think I understood this? The themes about human empowerment are clear, but there's no thesis to it, I guess. It is very well-written. ♔ The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate by A. C. Wise - ★★Meh. I think I have to agree with Melanie when I say this was kind of pointless. It's a guide for witches building houses. ♔ The Tallest Doll in New York City by Maria Dahvana Headley - ★★★★This was so weird but so creative and atmospheric. It follows a group of buildings that are dating. I said weird, don't blame me. I don't even know if I understood all of it; is it time neutral or something? Yet I ended the story with happiness rather than with a desire for more. ♔ The Haunting of Apollo A7LB by Hannu Rajaniemi - ★★★★The first line of this story is brilliant; I actually planned to take a break from this collection until I saw the first line. And thankfully I really enjoyed this!! It's a story of lost love and dreams. Be warned it's far less creepy than its blurb. ♔ Here Be Dragons by Chris Tarry♔ The One They Took Before by Kelly Sandoval♔ Tiger Baby by JY Yang♔ The Duck by Ben Loory♔ Wing by Amal El-Mohtar♔ The Philosophers by Adam Ehrlich Sachs♔ My Time Among the Bridge Blowers by Eugene Fischer♔ The Husband Stitch by Carmen Maria Machado - ★★★★I read this earlier due to Melanie's awesome recommendation. This is a story about being consumed by men and losing your own agency. It's a story about how much you can give before you break. And that's all I'm really going to say about it. This is one you really have to experience on your own. One thing is clear, though; it's worth the read. You can read this story here. ♔ The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn by Usman T. Malik
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  • Cristina
    July 7, 2017
    Publicado aqui https://osrascunhos.com/2017/07/12/th...O mercado anglo-saxónico de ficção especulativa vai-se renovando, seguindo novas tendências, estilos e culturas, gerando cruzamentos impensáveis entre géneros em contos que reflectem as preocupações do seu próprio tempo. Ao longo dos anos vão surgindo novos autores que começam a ser conhecidos pelos contos destacados por prémios ou em antologias de melhores do ano. Este volume pretende reunir algumas histórias destes novos autores e destacá- Publicado aqui https://osrascunhos.com/2017/07/12/th...O mercado anglo-saxónico de ficção especulativa vai-se renovando, seguindo novas tendências, estilos e culturas, gerando cruzamentos impensáveis entre géneros em contos que reflectem as preocupações do seu próprio tempo. Ao longo dos anos vão surgindo novos autores que começam a ser conhecidos pelos contos destacados por prémios ou em antologias de melhores do ano. Este volume pretende reunir algumas histórias destes novos autores e destacá-los como promissores para os próximos tempos.A antologia começa com um conto de Alyssa Wong, a quarta história publicada da autora, com a qual venceu o Nebula e o World Fantasy Award (a mesma história que foi, também, nomeada para um Shirley Jackson, um Bram Stoker e um Locus Award). Claro que prémios e nomeações não são garantia de boas histórias, mas este conto, Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers contém detalhes de horror e fantástico num cenário actual onde a corrupção alastra, resultado do consumo imediato e da fome interminável.Selkie stories are for losers é a história seguinte da autoria de Sofia Samatar, uma autora que não é propriamente uma voz emergente, antes uma autora já reconhecida no género com histórias como A Stranger in Olondria que venceu vários prémios. Cruzando lendas diversas sobre mulheres que se mantém entre os humanos até ao momento em que alguém encontra a sua antiga pele (ou descobre que são algo mais do que parecem), esta história quase banal consegue surpreender pela estrutura e desenvolvimento.Depois de tornados apaixonados por raparigas (em Tornado’s Siren de Brooke Bolander que apenas possui como elemento distintivo o tornado capaz de sentimento) encontramos Left the century to sit unmoved de Sarah Pinsker que nos traz um fenómeno local, um lago que faz desaparecer totalmente algumas pessoas sem critério específico – mesmo depois de drenado o lago apenas se encontram os objectos e roupas da pessoa.Max Gladstone também não é propriamente um autor desconhecido, escrevendo sobretudo fantasia urbana. Em A Kiss With Teeth não foge ao género mas apresenta uma das melhores histórias do conjunto, com um tom levemente cómico sobre as preocupações de um pai que vê o seu filho ter más notas. Como pai tenta perceber o que se passa, mas a sua própria natureza torna difícil ajudar sem dicas da professora, a presa perfeita. Ah. É que o pai é um vampiro reformado que tenta passar por humano, simulando os nosso gestos e forma de andar.Em The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees de E. Lily Yu explora-se uma premissa que não é totalmente nova. Recordo que em The Bees de Laline Paull já se apresentava a vida numa colmeia apresentando aspectos sociais da hierarquia e como esta poderia ser subvertida por um único elemento. Confrontando as abelhas com as vespas possuidoras de uma tecnologia mais avançada este conto de E. Lily Yu consegue ser um relato apaixonante sem necessitar de se centrar num único elemento, e comparar vários sistemas de sociedade.A. C. Wise traz-nos outro dos melhores contos do conjunto, um guia cómico de como a bruxa pode arranjar uma casa. Começando com as formas aborrecidas como aquisição e ocupação, passa por nos apresentar como se pode domar uma casa ou fazer crescer uma, expressando para cada método os cuidados a ter (os humanos podem não gostar muito de ter uma bruxa dentro de casa e podem tentar queimá-la, por exemplo, ou a casa pode pregar partidas a quem a tenta influenciar).Depois de Hauting o Apollo A7LB (um conto que já conhecia da excelente colectânea do autor Hannu Rajaniemi), segue-se uma história irónica de Chris Tarry, Here be dragons, onde dois homens simulam a existência de dragões para extorquírem dinheiro das vilas mostrando depois entranhas de vários animais como prova de uma chacina. Um dia esta trapaça pode voltar-se contra os supostos salvadores – de mais formas do que o leitor imagina.Mais juvenil, mas enternecedora pela forma inocente e desiludida como nos apresenta o amor de um pato por uma rocha, The Duck de Ben Loory é um dos contos que vale a pena ler, nem que seja para ver a forma como transforma este premissa simples e aparentemente idiota numa boa história.Publicado no The New Yorker, The Philosophers de Adam Ehrlich Sachs traz uma história demente de problemas genéticos hereditários que supostamente não trariam problemas psicológicos. Geração após geração, os homens desta família perdem na idade adulta todos os movimentos e passam a comunicar com os restantes recorrendo ao piscar de olhos com o intuito de transmitir as próximas palavras do seu livro. Arrepiante, claustrofóbico e assustador pela degradação, é um bom conto que vai elevando a premissa ao extremo absurdo .Esta colectânea termina com uma novela mais longa, The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn, de Usman T. Malik, que se centra na problemática da emigração e da integração cultural sob uma fábula contada pelo avô (talvez demente) que recorda interacções com princesas e génios e que foi mudando de país em país até atingir determinados objectivos. Demonstrando como existe sempre muito para revelar da vida dos nossos antepassados, segredos dolorosos que ficaram enterrados, feitos que se silenciaram pelas circunstâncias, esta é uma novela excelente.Ainda que não tenha apreciado todos os contos de igual forma, até porque os estilos e géneros são muito diversos, esta colectânea possui uma qualidade narrativa bastante elevada. Nem todas as histórias apresentam elementos que se destaquem pela originalidade, mas todos se encontram bem escritos e estruturados. São, na sua maioria, contos que possuem o necessário para envolver, mas sem excesso de detalhes que quebrem o ritmo ou desbalanceiem a história. Para os interessados em se actualizar para o que tem sido publicado recentemente, eis uma boa aposta.(esta colectânea foi fornecida pela editora via NetGalley)
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  • E.P.
    June 5, 2017
    "The New Voices of Fantasy" is an eclectic mixture of diverse fantasy authors, featuring a multitude of subgenres in stories set around the globe. Although the short story format means that the worlds and cultures the authors have created appear only in snippet form, which is not normally my favorite way to experience fantasy, this collection is filled with beautifully written stories, and was a good way to sample the styles of authors I either had been considering reading but had not gotten aro "The New Voices of Fantasy" is an eclectic mixture of diverse fantasy authors, featuring a multitude of subgenres in stories set around the globe. Although the short story format means that the worlds and cultures the authors have created appear only in snippet form, which is not normally my favorite way to experience fantasy, this collection is filled with beautifully written stories, and was a good way to sample the styles of authors I either had been considering reading but had not gotten around to, or had never encountered before at all.Like all anthologies of this type, some stories will be more to a given reader's taste than others, but all of them of them are well-crafted. The authors all have impressive credentials, including multiple awards and training at various MFA programs or at places like Clarion West and Iowa. Unsurprisingly, the stories do tend to have that "MFA feel" to them, full of symbolism and finely honed language, which is a specific writing style that either you like or you don't. So while fantasy, this collection is definitely highbrow fantasy, and it's up to you whether that's your thing or not. However, given that this is a collection of short stories, the commitment to each individual story is not great, so this is a good opportunity to browse and try something different.And there are certainly some excellent pieces of fantasy fiction here, spanning everything from folk tales to dark fantasy/horror to sci fi with a fantasy edge. Some particularly standout stories for me were Ursula Vernon's "Jackalope Wives," a distinctly American take on the story of the skinchanging wife, E. Lily Yu's "The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees," a Chinese-infused fable/allegory about insect communities, and Usman T. Malik's "The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn," about a first-generation American son of Pakistani immigrants who discovers mystical secrets about his past. But every single one of the stories included in this collection was highly worth reading, and I would recommend this anthology to anyone interested in trying out some "literary" and multicultural fantasy by up-and-coming authors.My thanks to NetGalley for providing a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Kiera
    May 16, 2017
    I really enjoyed this collection. It had a nice balance of stories – most of them not too long - showing a good array of work from upcoming authors and somehow maintained a consistent tone despite the variety of authors and tales.I was familiar with many of these stories from previous anthologies and publications. At first I was disappointed by that, until I thought about the target audience for this book and realised that not only was that perfectly fine - it was what I’d want to be seeing.This I really enjoyed this collection. It had a nice balance of stories – most of them not too long - showing a good array of work from upcoming authors and somehow maintained a consistent tone despite the variety of authors and tales.I was familiar with many of these stories from previous anthologies and publications. At first I was disappointed by that, until I thought about the target audience for this book and realised that not only was that perfectly fine - it was what I’d want to be seeing.This book is aimed at readers who aren’t up to their eyeballs reading the latest issues of SFWA-recognised magazines, who aren’t voting in or following the big awards, and who may not typically follow SFF short fiction at all. It’s aimed at people who want to read a good collection of the key pieces from upcoming authors to watch out for in the future.In that regard this collection delivers really well.For an anthology like this you’d hope the stories and authors that would be included would be the big ones you’d think of straight off the bat like Alyssa Wong and Brooke Bolander, right? You’d hope that they’d have some of your favourite short stories from the last few years like Carmen Maria Machado’s “The Husband Stitch”, Ursula Vernon’s “Jackolope Wives” and Max Gladstone’s “A Kiss With Teeth”. You’d hope there were a few outsider surprises, too, like “The Duck” or “Here Be Dragons”. The editorial team has done a great job and I found their selections are well-balanced.If I had a friend who asked me for an introduction to what’s good in current fantasy short fiction, this would be up there in my recommendations. It’s a good overview, introduces a lot of the key names to keep an eye on, and gives the reader a place to start and work out from.In short, this collection does everything it says it will on the tin and it does it very well.An advance copy of this book was kindly provided by Tachyon Publications and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jen
    June 1, 2017
    Full disclosure: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.This was an excellent anthology of new authors who are the rising stars of the genre. Many are already winning impressive awards for their work. In many cases, the stories reprinted in this volume are the very ones for which they won those awards. Because of this, if you pay much attention to short fiction in fantasy and sci-fi, you may have read many of the stories collected in this book before. Seve Full disclosure: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.This was an excellent anthology of new authors who are the rising stars of the genre. Many are already winning impressive awards for their work. In many cases, the stories reprinted in this volume are the very ones for which they won those awards. Because of this, if you pay much attention to short fiction in fantasy and sci-fi, you may have read many of the stories collected in this book before. Several of them were familiar to me. I didn't think that was a downside to this volume, though. If you've been wanting to read these authors' work but feel daunted at the prospect of tracking down individual stories spread out across a wide variety of publications, this is the book for you. Granted, many are available for free elsewhere because they were nominated for awards, but it's nice having them in one place here.I recommend this book to anyone who wants to become familiar with new, up-and-coming fantasy authors in a convenient, low-risk way. You may not like all of them, but they're all highly skilled authors playing around with interesting concepts and themes and this is a good representation of where I think the genre seems to be heading.My personal favorites were "A Kiss With Teeth" by Max Gladstone, "The Cartographer Wasps and Anarchist Bees" by E. Lily Yu, "The Tallest Doll in New York City" by Maria Dahvana Headley, and "The Philosophers" by Adam Ehrlich Sachs. "Tornado’s Siren" by Brooke Bolander and "The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate" by A. C. Wise made me laugh.
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  • Jackie
    July 2, 2017
    This review originally appeared on http://fictionistmag.com.★★★★★ They bring you childhood stories gone wrong, magical creatures in heat, a building that’s alive and full of waiters, love, ducks, and a new take on a bloodsucking fiend.Nineteen emerging fantasy voices brought together by Peter S. Beagle shine in this new anthology. That sounded like a PR tagline, but I swear, this anthology is great. It's honestly a breath of fresh air. I'm anti-spoiler in these reviews, and since these stories a This review originally appeared on http://fictionistmag.com.★★★★★ They bring you childhood stories gone wrong, magical creatures in heat, a building that’s alive and full of waiters, love, ducks, and a new take on a bloodsucking fiend.Nineteen emerging fantasy voices brought together by Peter S. Beagle shine in this new anthology. That sounded like a PR tagline, but I swear, this anthology is great. It's honestly a breath of fresh air. I'm anti-spoiler in these reviews, and since these stories are so short, it's hard to talk about them at all without giving anything away. Suffice it to say that these stories range from entertaining to creepy to thought-provoking, and the writing is top notch. These little stories stick in your mind like popcorn sticks in your gums. You'll try to shake one story off before you read the next one, but by page two of the next story, you're hooked on that one too. The best part about a good anthology is that there's no 'book two.' You don't have to wait a year to know what happens -- in fact, you'll only have to wait 20 pages or so to find out what happens in these stories. Reading so many stories at once also made me feel pretty accomplished, especially after reading so many full-length novels week after week. If you need a palate cleanser, or if you're craving some unique fantasy stories, or if you need some shorter reads -- no matter the reason, definitely pick up The New Voices of Fantasy. Five stars from me. Perfect, bite-sized pieces of beautifully-crafted fantasy morsels. 
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  • Haselrig
    July 26, 2017
    I won this signed anthology from Goodreads Giveaways.This well-curated anthology showcases an all-star selection of up-and-coming speculative fiction writers and trend-setters in the genre. Starting with the gastronomical vampirism of Alyssa Wong's Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers and ending with a grandfather's Jinn in Usman T. Malik's The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn, the nineteen stories collected here are not (by-and-large) your grandfather's fantasy of elves, dragons and castle I won this signed anthology from Goodreads Giveaways.This well-curated anthology showcases an all-star selection of up-and-coming speculative fiction writers and trend-setters in the genre. Starting with the gastronomical vampirism of Alyssa Wong's Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers and ending with a grandfather's Jinn in Usman T. Malik's The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn, the nineteen stories collected here are not (by-and-large) your grandfather's fantasy of elves, dragons and castles, but represent a newer take on the genre. Sometimes bordering on urban fantasy or even horror.As is to be expected in any anthology, I found the stories to be a bit uneven in quality, but the highlights made up for any fallow patches I encountered along the way. The real strength of this collection for me was that it allowed me to touch base with a genre that I loved as a teenager but have grown a bit distant from since. Although each story did not rate five stars from me, the collection as a whole was strong enough that I feel comfortable giving it that rating.Special thanks to Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weisman who were both gracious enough to sign my copy. Thanks guys.
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  • Ann
    July 2, 2017
    What a great way to find new authors. This book of short stories has a wide array of characters and various genres. With 19 writers, many of whom I'm not familiar you find great diversity of style and length. Enjoy, Enjoy, EnjoyHungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” by Alyssa Wong“Selkie Stories are for Losers” by Sofia Samatar“Tornado’s Siren” by Brooke Bolander“Left the Century to Sit Unmoved” by Sarah Pinsker“A Kiss with Teeth” by Max Gladstone“Jackalope Wives” by Ursula Vernon“The Cartographe What a great way to find new authors. This book of short stories has a wide array of characters and various genres. With 19 writers, many of whom I'm not familiar you find great diversity of style and length. Enjoy, Enjoy, EnjoyHungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” by Alyssa Wong“Selkie Stories are for Losers” by Sofia Samatar“Tornado’s Siren” by Brooke Bolander“Left the Century to Sit Unmoved” by Sarah Pinsker“A Kiss with Teeth” by Max Gladstone“Jackalope Wives” by Ursula Vernon“The Cartographer Wasps and Anarchist Bees” by E. Lily Yu“The Practical Witch’s Guide to Acquiring Real Estate” by A. C. Wise“The Tallest Doll in New York City” by Maria Dahvana Headley“The Haunting of Apollo A7LB” by Hannu Rajaniemi“Here Be Dragons” by Chris Tarry“The One They Took Before” by Kelly Sandoval“Tiger Baby” by JY Yang“The Duck” by Ben Loory“Wing” by Amal El-Mohtar“The Philosophers” by Adam Ehrlich Sachs“My Time Among the Bridge Blowers” by Eugene Fischer“The Husband Stitch” by Carmen Maria Machado“The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn” by Usman T. Malik
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  • sleepywriter
    May 29, 2017
    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This is a collection of fantasy short stories written by up-and-coming authors. It's a little bit of an eclectic collection; there's stories that represent many different cultures, beliefs, and subgenres of fantasy. The collection does a great job at representation, both in the authors that were selected as well as the stories that were shared.While it's a decent collection, I found that the stories were either really, really g I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This is a collection of fantasy short stories written by up-and-coming authors. It's a little bit of an eclectic collection; there's stories that represent many different cultures, beliefs, and subgenres of fantasy. The collection does a great job at representation, both in the authors that were selected as well as the stories that were shared.While it's a decent collection, I found that the stories were either really, really good and engrossing or just fell flat. There seemed to be no real in-between for me. In fact, a few of the short stories really stretched the definition of "fantasy genre" for me. While I would like to say that the future of my beloved genre looks bright, I'd be lying. However, should some of the authors in this collection write a novel or two, it'd be something I'd be willing to check out from the library at some point in time.
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  • Joe Crowe
    May 15, 2017
    The best thing about anthologies is the one-stop shopping. You can find a dozen new authors all in one place. That's true of most, but this one in particular, since it says "new voices" of fantasy right there on the cover. So convenient. My favorite is Brooke Bolander's "Tornado's Siren." It's hilarious, with dialogue that would be at home in a good sitcom. And the following quote: "You're a tornado. You don't get to fall in love." I didn't expect so many of these stories to be funny. That's not The best thing about anthologies is the one-stop shopping. You can find a dozen new authors all in one place. That's true of most, but this one in particular, since it says "new voices" of fantasy right there on the cover. So convenient. My favorite is Brooke Bolander's "Tornado's Siren." It's hilarious, with dialogue that would be at home in a good sitcom. And the following quote: "You're a tornado. You don't get to fall in love." I didn't expect so many of these stories to be funny. That's not the kind of thing you usually get, unless the cover very clear says the stories are supposed to be funny. Many of the stories are also thoughtful and moving, so the anthology isn't just for the giggles. Wait! That doesn't mean the funny stories are not also thoughtful. You'll find plenty of good stuff here. With 19 authors, the odds are really good. Reviewed by Joe Crowe, on Twitter at RevolutionSF. (Review from a very early review copy.)
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  • Judith Moore
    June 6, 2017
    Full review up on my blog: http://bit.ly/2tDZwmqThis is a well thought out collection of short stories from writers who are ‘reinventing fantasy right now.’ I have never read a collection of works like this before and I’m still not sure how best to review it without writing 19 separate reviews…In the interest of brevity I’ll pick out some of the stories that really stuck with me.I adored ‘Tornado’s Siren’ which is a short story about a girl whom a tornado falls in love with. Yes, you read that r Full review up on my blog: http://bit.ly/2tDZwmqThis is a well thought out collection of short stories from writers who are ‘reinventing fantasy right now.’ I have never read a collection of works like this before and I’m still not sure how best to review it without writing 19 separate reviews…In the interest of brevity I’ll pick out some of the stories that really stuck with me.I adored ‘Tornado’s Siren’ which is a short story about a girl whom a tornado falls in love with. Yes, you read that right. The tornado falls in love with her. This should be an utterly ridiculous concept but it was written so wonderfully well I wanted to weep at the end!‘The Cartographer Wasps and Anarchist Bees’ is another story that completely captivated me. That title isn’t a metaphor. This is about wasps that make maps and bees that reject governance. A short story that, again, should not in any way work but it was phenomenally well written!“The Husband Stitch” by Carmen Maria Machado was possibly my favourite story. The voice in this story is just so gentle it lulls you away from reality. It’s not a pleasant story to read, however, and the jolt away from that lull is powerful.There were a few stories that were less my speed, though none of them were ‘bad’ as such. I think this is probably actually a strong selling point since there is bound to be at least one story in here that suits everyone.As I say I hadn’t read any collections like this before and it did send me into a bit of a reading slump just because the short story format doesn’t let me get my teeth into anything. Having said that, I think this is just me and someone else would probably get on much better with the format.I honestly won’t be surprised if, in a few years, a number of my favourite books have been penned by these authors, I am excited to see where they go next.My rating: 5/5 stars for the sheer variety!By the way, I received a digital advanced review copy of this title from the publisher (Tachyon Publications) in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Emily Moore
    July 22, 2017
    Many Takes on Fantasy — Many Aren't FantasticThe New Voices of Fantasy promises the next up and coming authors in the fantasy genre. Those who will shape and contribute to the genre. With a loose thread of what is considered fantasy - this collection of stories is unfortunately uneven and generally underwhelming. While I won't review every story individually, I will say some were much more engaging and successful as a short story than others. And another thing I noticed while I read was how much Many Takes on Fantasy — Many Aren't FantasticThe New Voices of Fantasy promises the next up and coming authors in the fantasy genre. Those who will shape and contribute to the genre. With a loose thread of what is considered fantasy - this collection of stories is unfortunately uneven and generally underwhelming. While I won't review every story individually, I will say some were much more engaging and successful as a short story than others. And another thing I noticed while I read was how much a few of the authors relied on existing lore: vampires, selkies, and even a retelling of the classic horror story of the Red Ribbon. (The Red Ribbon being one of my favorite horror stories.) It was these stories I actually found the least engaging and memorable from the bunch.While I enjoyed the insight into the editors thoughts of the who's next in the genre, I felt the book fell flat. Which is unfortunate for the few stories included that would do better standing alone.I'm providing this review in return for an ARC through NetGalley.
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  • DRC.Reviews
    May 26, 2017
    I can't wait to read more from these authors. This is an excellent collection of emerging voices that each bring something new and fresh to fantasy. And if you don't like one author's take or story, don't worry. There are plenty of stories to dive into.
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  • Dov
    July 18, 2017
    More of a 2.5 star for me.
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