Moonrise
'They think I hurt someone. But I didn't. You hear?Coz people are gonna be telling youall kinds of lies.I need you to know the truth.'From one-time winner and two-time Carnegie Medal shortlisted author Sarah Crossan, this poignant, stirring, huge-hearted novel asks big questions. What value do you place on life? What can you forgive? And just how do you say goodbye?

Moonrise Details

TitleMoonrise
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 7th, 2017
PublisherBloomsbury Childrens
ISBN-139781408867808
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Poetry, Contemporary

Moonrise Review

  • Maddie (Heart Full Of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    All of the characters in this felt so strong and unique, even though you were only reading about them in around 150 word bursts! The plot really worked with the verse form, and the shift between past and present events was well managed.
  • Alessandra Crivelli
    January 1, 1970
    "we aren't the worst things we didor the worst things that happened to us. We're other stuff too.Like.. the times we made cereal or watched Buffy the vampire slayeror helped an old lady off a bus. We're the good, the bad, and the stupid."I missed Sarah Crossan writing so much. This is a story about unfairness and life. About how much is fucked up the system.This book actually made me think about my idea of death penalty. "Moonrise" is a realistic story of life and death. It is a book that it wil "we aren't the worst things we didor the worst things that happened to us. We're other stuff too.Like.. the times we made cereal or watched Buffy the vampire slayeror helped an old lady off a bus. We're the good, the bad, and the stupid."I missed Sarah Crossan writing so much. This is a story about unfairness and life. About how much is fucked up the system.This book actually made me think about my idea of death penalty. "Moonrise" is a realistic story of life and death. It is a book that it will make you think about family, life, death and forgiveness. It is a story that it will definitely touch your soul.
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  • Rebecca T
    January 1, 1970
    My heart.
  • Claire (Book Blog Bird)
    January 1, 1970
    'They think I hurt someone.But I didn't. You hear?Coz people are gonna be telling youall kinds of lies.I need you to know the truth.' Oh my god. Sarah Crossan has hit it out of the ballpark yet again with this beautiful story of Joe Moon who travels to Texas from New York to see his older brother, Ed, who is on Death Row. But it's also a book about love in all its forms, and about life and injustice and hope in hopeless situations.I don't know how she does it, because I am agressively opposed to 'They think I hurt someone.But I didn't. You hear?Coz people are gonna be telling youall kinds of lies.I need you to know the truth.' Oh my god. Sarah Crossan has hit it out of the ballpark yet again with this beautiful story of Joe Moon who travels to Texas from New York to see his older brother, Ed, who is on Death Row. But it's also a book about love in all its forms, and about life and injustice and hope in hopeless situations.I don't know how she does it, because I am agressively opposed to free verse poetry (in fact, if I'm honest, I hate all poetry) but her words are just so beautiful and readable and her characters are so real and complex and vulnerable, I literally can't get enough of this author's writing.There is romance in the book, but it complements the main story instead of overshadowing it or seeming to be included for the sake of it. While Moonrise is a criticism of police brutality and of capital punishment, but it never goes overboard with condemnation. This bookshould be required reading for everyone (*coughs* Daily Mail *coughs*) who has ever said 'Bring back hanging'. Crossan pitches her arguments perfectly for maximum effect using exactly the right words to leave you feeling like you've been put through the emotional wringer and stillbegging for more. I read Moonrise in one heartbreaking sitting and two weeks later I'm still thinking about it.I can smell a Carnegie Medal in the air. Just saying.I was given a copy of Moonriseby the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Anisha (sprinkledpages)
    January 1, 1970
    THIS WAS SUCH A GOOD BOOK I CANNOT EVEN STRESS THIS ENOUGH. I felt it covered such an important issue with such care and it made me so so so grateful I live in Australia. I was absolutely crying my eyes out and it is just so lovely and has to be read!
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  • Aimee
    January 1, 1970
    review to come
  • George Lester
    January 1, 1970
    WHY CAN I NOT GIVE MORE THAN FIVE STARS?! IT'S A CONSPIRACY AND THIS BOOK IS DESERVING OF ALL OF THE STARS!!! ALL!! ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐In all seriousness, this book is absolutely incredible. Sarah Crossan has knocked it outside of the park AGAIN with Moonrise. A heartbreaking, beautiful gut punch of a book. Outstanding! WHY CAN I NOT GIVE MORE THAN FIVE STARS?! IT'S A CONSPIRACY AND THIS BOOK IS DESERVING OF ALL OF THE STARS!!! ALL!! ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️In all seriousness, this book is absolutely incredible. Sarah Crossan has knocked it outside of the park AGAIN with Moonrise. A heartbreaking, beautiful gut punch of a book. Outstanding!
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  • Amy's Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    GRADE: A-4.5 STARSWhen Joe is seven his beloved older brother and protector Ed ends up on death row. Ten years later, an execution date is set and Joe heads to Texas to spend time with Ed, whom he hasn't seen since Ed's arrest. Joe wrestles with his childhood memories of poverty and neglect as well as questions about Ed's claimed innocence.MOONRISE is my second Sarah Crossan novel in verse. I enjoyed ONE with points of view from two conjoin twins. Crossan is my favorite verse writer due to her a GRADE: A-4.5 STARSWhen Joe is seven his beloved older brother and protector Ed ends up on death row. Ten years later, an execution date is set and Joe heads to Texas to spend time with Ed, whom he hasn't seen since Ed's arrest. Joe wrestles with his childhood memories of poverty and neglect as well as questions about Ed's claimed innocence.MOONRISE is my second Sarah Crossan novel in verse. I enjoyed ONE with points of view from two conjoin twins. Crossan is my favorite verse writer due to her ability to make characters come alive and feel like real people, despite the challenges of the format. MOONRISE is told from Joe's first person POV. I could easily see how he developed his questionable ethics and I wanted to give him a hug. Ed was equally complex. Though he claims innocence, I had reasons to think he was probably guilty and probably innocent and that he should have never been on death row regardless.MOONRISE made me feel and root for both flawed brothers.
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  • Tissy
    January 1, 1970
    Gosh this book has worn out my poor heart. My nerves are frazzled but it was brilliant AND devastating. In this story the narrator chronicles the harrowing count down (as the brother) of a young man on death row. As a result it gives a refreshing and provocative perspective that allows the idea of 'victims' of crime to be turned on its head. Important elements are woven in that will hopefully make the reader digest the duplicity behind a justice system that seemingly thrives on the notion of an Gosh this book has worn out my poor heart. My nerves are frazzled but it was brilliant AND devastating. In this story the narrator chronicles the harrowing count down (as the brother) of a young man on death row. As a result it gives a refreshing and provocative perspective that allows the idea of 'victims' of crime to be turned on its head. Important elements are woven in that will hopefully make the reader digest the duplicity behind a justice system that seemingly thrives on the notion of an 'eye for an eye'. As a slight con the writing was good but the style can be distracting and this is mainly because I'm not a fan of stories told in verse. However, fortunately this is one of those rare occasions where I could look past the style and just enjoy the story. A definite worthwhile but heartbreaking read.
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  • Abbie
    January 1, 1970
    (I received a copy from Netgalley, In exchange for an honest review.)Actual rating - 3.5This was a decent read, which managed to keep my interest throughout. A lot more enjoyable for me than one of the authors other books, Breathe. Overall, A decent read.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    A novel written in verse about how powerless we are when faced with the justice system, and the emotional toll it can take on a person and their family.
  • Bridget
    January 1, 1970
    I've been thinking about this book a lot since I finished it yesterday. The story of Ed and Jo Moon and their family is very moving, well it would be, given Ed is on death row and due to execution in the very near future. Sadly the odds of saving Ed are stacked against him. Even though he didn't commit the crime that he is accused of and his lawyer is working hard to save him it doesn't seem like there is going to be a last minute reprieve. This is Joe's story, the story of how he deals with the I've been thinking about this book a lot since I finished it yesterday. The story of Ed and Jo Moon and their family is very moving, well it would be, given Ed is on death row and due to execution in the very near future. Sadly the odds of saving Ed are stacked against him. Even though he didn't commit the crime that he is accused of and his lawyer is working hard to save him it doesn't seem like there is going to be a last minute reprieve. This is Joe's story, the story of how he deals with the horror of the looming death of his brother, how he relives the memories of his childhood with Ed in flashbacks. Joe has always looked up to Ed, the much older brother who was kind to him, a support for him while their mum was being flakey and someone to look up to. Now Joe is all alone in a prison town, he is drawn to be with Ed, he has no money and and he knows nobody in the town. Luckily for him he falls on his feet and even finds a kindred spirit. This is a wonderful book. A book that will stay with you and haunt you, it will make you consider the impact of the death sentence on those left behind. Those who physically put the person to death and all the people on the periphery. Sarah Crossan is a wonderful writer, the prose style makes this very easy to read and the language is perfect. An excellent book.
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  • Jahanzaib Asim
    January 1, 1970
    A NEW SARAH CROSSAN BOOK?? SIGN ME THE FUCK UP
  • Michelle (Fluttering Butterflies)
    January 1, 1970
    Cried. Of course I did.
  • Alisha Wells
    January 1, 1970
    I sobbed. This broke my heart. Full review is live alishaswords.wordpress.com
  • Graine Milner
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing!Once again, Sarah Crossan smashes my heart into tiny pieces. If you've ever had any doubts at all about how very wrong the death sentence is, read this book. And cry. Sarah Crossan's message comes across loud and clear - it's obviously something she feels passionate about - but she does it in such a lyrical way that you will never feel it's a lecture. Just stunning. Predict this will be on next year's Carnegie shortlist.
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  • Cass - Words on Paper
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5?Finally I can move on. This book actually put me in a reading slump, I haven't felt like reading as much and I knew that I wouldn't be able to get past this until I reread it. Thankfully I wasn't reduced to a blubbering mess, hunched into the foetal position this time around. 'Moonrise' spoke to me on so many levels, but I still find myself incapable of really delving in and speaking about it at length.I finished this book feeling overwhelmed, frustrated, dissatisfied and devastated by the 4.5/5?Finally I can move on. This book actually put me in a reading slump, I haven't felt like reading as much and I knew that I wouldn't be able to get past this until I reread it. Thankfully I wasn't reduced to a blubbering mess, hunched into the foetal position this time around. 'Moonrise' spoke to me on so many levels, but I still find myself incapable of really delving in and speaking about it at length.I finished this book feeling overwhelmed, frustrated, dissatisfied and devastated by the injustice of it all. And that's the point. Sarah Crossan's verse was easy to sink into, the characters not highly specific but sympathetic all the same. It just hit all the right spots for me, but it still leaves me feeling numb in the end. Definitely a worthwhile read that will make you think... but brace yourself, it's not an easy read.4??/5I don't have any words, how can you possibly review such a book? what annoys me most is the e-galley provided through Netgalley. They screwed up and so the book is doubled. Meaning I got to the end at 50%, expecting some form of justice, but that was it. I am le sad. :(((This is the first time since starting reviewing again that will require time... I just can't possibly write anything about this book right now. I love Sarah Crossan, but I'm starting to think she gets pleasure out of inflicting emotional pain onto her readers and I am not okay. I think I'll take a few days to just read non-fiction...
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  • Carys
    January 1, 1970
    (3.5 stars) Sarah Crossan's books never fail to move me and Moonrise was no exception. I found that the verse form resulted in some beautifully constructed images and added to the poignancy at just the right moments, forcing me to dwell on the idea of the idea of the death sentence and how unjust the system surrounding it can be. The flashbacks to the character's childhoods also added to this. I didn't love it quite as much as I loved One, hence why I'm rating it slightly lower than I rated that (3.5 stars) Sarah Crossan's books never fail to move me and Moonrise was no exception. I found that the verse form resulted in some beautifully constructed images and added to the poignancy at just the right moments, forcing me to dwell on the idea of the idea of the death sentence and how unjust the system surrounding it can be. The flashbacks to the character's childhoods also added to this. I didn't love it quite as much as I loved One, hence why I'm rating it slightly lower than I rated that, but I've already gone back and reflected on this story several times since completing it, so I think it's definitely going to be one that stays with me for a long time to come. I'd definitely recommend picking this up, especially as it deals with a topic that I've never read about in YA before.
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  • Ellie
    January 1, 1970
    😭Warning, you will need tissues for Sarah Crossan's next book! Moonrise's sparse yet beautiful free verse tells the story of Joe whose brother is on death row. It follows Ed's final weeks as well as flashbacks to their childhood, which builds up your compassion for the family.Like many awaiting execution at the hands of the state, Ed is going through the appeal process. Initially he couldn't get a good lawyer but now that his execution date has been set, he has pro bono help. Joe travels to Texa 😭Warning, you will need tissues for Sarah Crossan's next book! Moonrise's sparse yet beautiful free verse tells the story of Joe whose brother is on death row. It follows Ed's final weeks as well as flashbacks to their childhood, which builds up your compassion for the family.Like many awaiting execution at the hands of the state, Ed is going through the appeal process. Initially he couldn't get a good lawyer but now that his execution date has been set, he has pro bono help. Joe travels to Texas to spend what time he can with his older brother. He's not sure if he is innocent, he's never asked, but he knows he doesn't want to lose him.This book will make you angry about the US justice system. Coming from a country without the death penalty, death row seems incredibly cruel, not just for the convicted but for their families. Told from the brother's point of view you see the impact, not only the grief but the perception of the relatives. Joe feels like the state is murdering his brother. I strongly believe that prison should be about rehabilitation, not just punishment.What kind of system lets a vulnerable teenager be interrogated without legal representation, by people who are emotionally connected to the victim? I didn't care if he was guilty, I just felt rage at those cops. Ed might technically be an adult at eighteen but most parents would see him as a child still, and his background should say he needs more help, not less. Should we not give people second chances?It would be easy to hate Aunt Karen too, but I think she is doing the best she can to protect her sister's children. With their father dead and their mother a mostly absent alcoholic, Karen is the closest thing they've got to a parent. She cuts Joe and Angela off from Ed to save them pain. She is sure he is guilty and there's nothing that can be done for him, but she can help the rest of the family.Don't let the free verse put you off, you can read Sarah's books as if they were prose. They are stunning and so very effective at stabbing you in the heart.Review copy provided by publisher.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    An incredibly moving, terribly sad and beautifully written story about a brother trying his best to make the most of the time he has left with his big brother. His big brother who is on Death Row, and the date is set for his execution. Joe is a really great protagonist because he is so very human - and normal. He doesn't inherently believe his brother is innocent of the murder he is accused of. In fact, he questions him even though his loyalty would remain unwavering. This really struck me as ve An incredibly moving, terribly sad and beautifully written story about a brother trying his best to make the most of the time he has left with his big brother. His big brother who is on Death Row, and the date is set for his execution. Joe is a really great protagonist because he is so very human - and normal. He doesn't inherently believe his brother is innocent of the murder he is accused of. In fact, he questions him even though his loyalty would remain unwavering. This really struck me as very honest and I loved the way Crossan has created Joe. The story is written in verse, but not lyrical, so you will speed through it in a matter of hours; this is also clever because it feels like you're actually living out Joe's thoughts and memories.The topic itself is really thought-provoking. To see what it might be like for the families of those accused of an unforgivable crime in this way was refreshing. The media are really great at making the criminal the face of the news story, but actually I've often forgotten to explore the bigger picture. What must it be like if you are wrongly accused? How do you make the most of your last moments? What would it be like to know you have so little time to say goodbye to someone who means everything to you, regardless of whether they have been rightly or wrongly accused. Family, and loyalty, stretches far beyond the justice system and I think that Crossan really shows that off beautifully. It didn't matter to Joe, he just wanted to know the truth, he still would have loved his brother regardless. He still would feel the same gravity of loss.A really powerful, cleverly written book that I wouldn't hesitate to recommend.ARC provided free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Suze
    January 1, 1970
    Joe hasn't seen his older brother Ed in ten years. Ed is in prison in a different state, because of a crime he's assured Joe he didn't commit. Joe is seventeen years old now and finally has the chance to see Ed after all this time. Ed is on death row and Joe is determined to spend as many hours as he can with the brother he had to miss for most of his life. Does Joe really have to say goodbye to Ed now that they've found each other again?Moonrise is a beautiful heartbreaking story. Joe hasn't ha Joe hasn't seen his older brother Ed in ten years. Ed is in prison in a different state, because of a crime he's assured Joe he didn't commit. Joe is seventeen years old now and finally has the chance to see Ed after all this time. Ed is on death row and Joe is determined to spend as many hours as he can with the brother he had to miss for most of his life. Does Joe really have to say goodbye to Ed now that they've found each other again?Moonrise is a beautiful heartbreaking story. Joe hasn't had an easy childhood. He had to deal with a lot and sometimes he doesn't know what to do with all the anger he's carrying around with him as a result. Missing loved ones is tough and even though Joe tries to make the best of things he knows he hasn't been very lucky so far. I had tears in my eyes when I read about his situation. I admired his strength, his determination and his will to keep going. Joe has strong principles and has plenty of hard lessons to learn at a young age, which makes stunning, moving reading.Sarah Crossan's writing is fantastic. Her sentences are perfectly formed, she's an unbelievably skilled free verse writer and she knows how to describe feelings. Those things together are making her books difficult to put down. Moonrise is a story about family, making mistakes, forgiveness and imperfections. Sarah Crossan has found a brilliant way to express herself, she tackles a challenging topic with a large dosage of empathy and realism and finishes Moonrise in an incredibly impressive way that left me speechless. I highly recommend this amazing thought-provoking book.
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  • Marie Andrews
    January 1, 1970
    Review also posted here: https://lotsoflivres.com/2017/07/13/m... Moonrise by Sarah Crossan tells the story of Ed Moon, who has been sent to Death Row with a conviction of murdering a cop. His brother, Joe Moon, goes to visit him before his upcoming execution date and does everything he can to save and comfort his brother in such a troubling time. I've read most of Sarah Crossan's other books including One, The Weight of Water and Apple and Rain, and Moonrise is definitely my favourite! It's gre Review also posted here: https://lotsoflivres.com/2017/07/13/m... Moonrise by Sarah Crossan tells the story of Ed Moon, who has been sent to Death Row with a conviction of murdering a cop. His brother, Joe Moon, goes to visit him before his upcoming execution date and does everything he can to save and comfort his brother in such a troubling time. I've read most of Sarah Crossan's other books including One, The Weight of Water and Apple and Rain, and Moonrise is definitely my favourite! It's great to read a YA book which focuses on the close ties in a family, especially with such a unique and challenging situation. I also really liked the various flashbacks to Ed and Joe's childhood which allowed us to gain a better insight into their relationship and personalities.I'm not usually a huge fan of romance within a novel but I feel the relationship between Joe and Nell added an interesting aspect to the book which later raised the issues and morale of the death sentence, especially when there is a corrupt system in place and the difficulties this brings when trying to get justice. To get an insight into how complicated and hard it is to get the answers in the legal system, yet written beautifully in free verse which captures the emotions and turmoil surrounding the situation is an amazing feat!Moonrise is a very moving, heartwarming read and Sarah Crossan never disappoints. A lyrical masterpiece that I highly recommend!(Also this cover is gorgeous!) <3 *I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Read3r'Z Re-Vu
    January 1, 1970
    A heart wrenching story that asks huge questions like how do you say goodbye to the one person who was everything in your life?Told from the perspective of a young boy, Joe, Joe is from a dysfunctional family and has had to face the cold, harsh reality of dealing with his brother being on death row. An incredible story that gives insightful detail on a situation we never really think about – how does an adolescent deal with not only being misloved by his own mother but losing his brother to pris A heart wrenching story that asks huge questions like how do you say goodbye to the one person who was everything in your life?Told from the perspective of a young boy, Joe, Joe is from a dysfunctional family and has had to face the cold, harsh reality of dealing with his brother being on death row. An incredible story that gives insightful detail on a situation we never really think about – how does an adolescent deal with not only being misloved by his own mother but losing his brother to prison for a crime he may or may not have committed and then facing a dreaded possibility of his brother’s execution? How do you deal with a dysfunctional family, dealing with a brother on death row and the convoluded justice system that may or may not prevail justice. The story really demonstrates the domino effect this has on a family and those around them.Told in short verse, it is definitely a book I wont forget in a hurry. Never have I felt so wrapped into a story. I’m not normally someone who has an emotional reaction to fiction but this one really takes the cake and when you have a reaction like that, you know it’s a fantastic read. I found this book really put me in Joe’s mind. It was thought provoking – so many questions running through my head at the time – how!? why!? what!? It definitely is a heart wrenching read..Many thanks to Bloomsbury Publishers for sending me an Advanced Review Copy in exchange for my honest review.-Annie
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  • Katy Noyes
    January 1, 1970
    Desperately sad 'death row' story, told in verse, quite beautifulCrossan is one of my few order-on-sight authors, every book she's written has been a winner, so different yet so full of emotion and heart-tugging stories.I remember reading one review of 'One', I believe, where the reviewer said that each short chapter could be read as a poem in itself and I used that concept when reading this, and yes, they could be standalone poems, each ending with a meaningful thought, a bittersweet lesson lea Desperately sad 'death row' story, told in verse, quite beautifulCrossan is one of my few order-on-sight authors, every book she's written has been a winner, so different yet so full of emotion and heart-tugging stories.I remember reading one review of 'One', I believe, where the reviewer said that each short chapter could be read as a poem in itself and I used that concept when reading this, and yes, they could be standalone poems, each ending with a meaningful thought, a bittersweet lesson learnt, a sad turn of phrase. So clever.The verse structure works so well, you don't think about it after a while, it reads like any other story, but goes by so quickly, and does feel quite 'sparse' but with carefully chosen words rather than a lot of description and padding.It's the story of Joe, now 17, who at 7 saw his brother taken away to Death Row accused of the murder of a policeman. Now, his execution date looms and Ed has asked him to come spend his last days with him. Joe is so empathetic, I loved the flitting back and forth from his childhood memories to his current painful situation, and how he comes to reassess his big brother and what happened on the night of the murder.So so moving, this is very likely to follow its predecessors and be nominated/shortlisted for a Carnegie. It's also a very pertinent topic for classroom/book club discussion, and would work well as central to debates on the death penalty. One for ages 13 and above. With thanks to Netgalley for the advance e-copy.
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  • Charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    *This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review*Joe’s life was turned upside down when he received a phone call revealing that his brother, Ed, was going to prison on a murder charge. The family happens to live in a state where the death penalty is a punishment and when Ed’s execution date is confirmed, Joe struggles even more. Sticking to her usual unique style, Moonrise is another free verse novel from Sarah Crossan. The use of this format to tell the story creates *This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review*Joe’s life was turned upside down when he received a phone call revealing that his brother, Ed, was going to prison on a murder charge. The family happens to live in a state where the death penalty is a punishment and when Ed’s execution date is confirmed, Joe struggles even more. Sticking to her usual unique style, Moonrise is another free verse novel from Sarah Crossan. The use of this format to tell the story creates a simplicity that really hits you in the gut. The story doesn’t rely on fancy metaphors or deep imagery to make the reader feel something (though I want to express that using metaphors/imagery is not a bad thing either). It just further highlights Crossan’s talents. The story is told through snapshots in time. The reader gets an insight into Joe’s childhood and memories with his brother as the execution fate draws closer. This, along with the writing format, makes it impossible not to feel something. This is a heart-wrenching read tackling the idea of how to cope with losing a loved one.
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  • Adele Broadbent
    January 1, 1970
    Joe Moon has always looked up to his big brother Ed. He was there for him when their alcoholic mother wasn't, attending parent interviews, walking him to school or just taking him out for some fun.But Joe hasn't seen Ed for ten years. And now Ed's on Death Row, he needs Joe. His mother long gone, and his aunt pretending Ed doesn't exist, Joe goes to the small town and the prison that holds his brother.This is Joe's story of getting to know his brother again, asking him the questions he needs to Joe Moon has always looked up to his big brother Ed. He was there for him when their alcoholic mother wasn't, attending parent interviews, walking him to school or just taking him out for some fun.But Joe hasn't seen Ed for ten years. And now Ed's on Death Row, he needs Joe. His mother long gone, and his aunt pretending Ed doesn't exist, Joe goes to the small town and the prison that holds his brother.This is Joe's story of getting to know his brother again, asking him the questions he needs to ask, hoping when there is no hope left, for a stay of execution. Along the way he meets someone unexpected. Someone who shouldn't be there for him, but helps him deal with what is to come.Stunning. A tale of love and forgiveness - for everything and anything, and hope for one more month, one week, one hour, one minute....
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  • Carole
    January 1, 1970
    I'm already a big fan of Sarah Crossan's books, but I think this would have to be my favourite. Joe's brother is on death row and his execution date is looming. Joe hasn't seen his brother for 10 years and it would be fair to say that his life during that time has been a struggle. Joe decides he has to spend some time with his brother just in case the final appeals aren't successful. The characters in this verse novel are real - not perfect but certainly doing their best given the circumstances. I'm already a big fan of Sarah Crossan's books, but I think this would have to be my favourite. Joe's brother is on death row and his execution date is looming. Joe hasn't seen his brother for 10 years and it would be fair to say that his life during that time has been a struggle. Joe decides he has to spend some time with his brother just in case the final appeals aren't successful. The characters in this verse novel are real - not perfect but certainly doing their best given the circumstances. The story is well crafted and delivers important messages about life, guilt/innocence, responsibility, justice and honour (among plenty of other things!). A great book, that is moving and thought provoking. Highly recommended for secondary school libraries.
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  • Rebekka
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This was one emotional ride ... I think it's so good that books like this one let us think about the injustice that happens everyday to a variation of people. What makes one person better than another? What makes one group of people more capable of something than another? Is it okay for one human being to decide about the end of another human being or animal for that matter? What makes something okay? A lot of questions with a lot of different answers to a lot of different people. But who's Wow. This was one emotional ride ... I think it's so good that books like this one let us think about the injustice that happens everyday to a variation of people. What makes one person better than another? What makes one group of people more capable of something than another? Is it okay for one human being to decide about the end of another human being or animal for that matter? What makes something okay? A lot of questions with a lot of different answers to a lot of different people. But who's right and who's wrong? If a book can make you think about all that it definitely deserves 4 stars!
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  • alice
    January 1, 1970
    This book really had no point. It starts off with Joe moving to Texas, to the city where his brother has been unfairly incarcerated for ten years and where his upcoming execution is going to happen, all for a crime Ed has supposedly never committed. Joe is supposed to support himself financially by finding a job. Does he? No, he finds a flat on his very first day in town, magically pays rent with no income and is fed by his maybe/future coworker. Joe is supposed to do something to change his old This book really had no point. It starts off with Joe moving to Texas, to the city where his brother has been unfairly incarcerated for ten years and where his upcoming execution is going to happen, all for a crime Ed has supposedly never committed. Joe is supposed to support himself financially by finding a job. Does he? No, he finds a flat on his very first day in town, magically pays rent with no income and is fed by his maybe/future coworker. Joe is supposed to do something to change his older brother's situation and somehow save him. Does he? No he doesn't, instead he takes morning runs and talks to a weird girl he inexplicably keeps running into. Joe is supposed to do something with his days. literally anything would work without just reminiscing the past and complaining about his life. Does he? Absolutely not. Overall this book had a very fragile plot and so many holes. I wasn't involved in Joe's story at all, I felt no empathy for his situation and couldn't care less about Ed. No character was particularly interesting, they were all pretty flat and predictable. The romance comes out of absolutely nowhere. The family's background story is soo predictable. The title and cover have NOTHING to do with the story and even Crossan's writing style seemed quite forced and out of place on this kind of novel. I'm really unsatisfied by this. ugh.
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  • Aoife
    January 1, 1970
    Sarah Crossan's Moonrise is one of those books that, when I realise that I have 50 pages left to read, I just KNOW I'm going to be an emotional WRECK by the end...In all seriousness though, Moonrise is stunning. As usual, Sarah Crossan has created something truly special. Her characters are heartbreakingly human and she teaches us to hope even when we believe hope to be impossible. And that no matter how much or how well we prepare ourselves for pain, it still punches us in the gut and leaves us Sarah Crossan's Moonrise is one of those books that, when I realise that I have 50 pages left to read, I just KNOW I'm going to be an emotional WRECK by the end...In all seriousness though, Moonrise is stunning. As usual, Sarah Crossan has created something truly special. Her characters are heartbreakingly human and she teaches us to hope even when we believe hope to be impossible. And that no matter how much or how well we prepare ourselves for pain, it still punches us in the gut and leaves us gasping. But we survive.A five star read that I will recommend to everyone.
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