The Glovemaker's Daughter
FROM THE ACCLAIMED AUTHOR OF THE LAST PEARL AND DANCING AT THE VICTORY CAFE , this is a beautiful novel about dark family secrets, betrayal, love and redemption.1666. A child is born in the farmhouse at Windebank, in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Named Rejoice (Joy) by her dying father, Joy grows up witness to the persecution of the farming community for following a banned faith. Defying the authority of the local priest, she joins a group of Yorkshire pioneers travelling to the New World to form a colony close to Philadelphia - a passionate, rebellious and courageous woman fighting against the constraints of the time. Will she find peace and love?  2014. A leather-bound book is found buried in the walls of the Meeting House in Good Hope, Pennsylvania. Its details trace the owner back to a Yorkshire farm in the Dales.  And so a correspondence begins between Rachel Moorside and the man who found the journal, Sam Storer, as Rachel uncovers the tumultuous secrets of her family’s history.Praise for Leah Fleming 'I enjoyed it enormously.It's a moving and compelling story about a lifetime's journey in search of the truth' RACHEL HORE 'A born storyteller' KATE ATKINSON

The Glovemaker's Daughter Details

TitleThe Glovemaker's Daughter
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 10th, 2017
PublisherSimon & Schuster UK
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, United States Of America, European Literature, British Literature, Mystery, Cultural, Fiction

The Glovemaker's Daughter Review

  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    4.5★sIt was 2014 when Sam Storer was notified of a carefully wrapped parcel which had been buried within the walls of the Meeting House in Good Hope, Pennsylvania, and his excitement rose immediately. With professional care, the book which was enclosed in wrap had its pages painstakingly separated. What was revealed between those pages was the life of Rejoice Moorside (Joy) which began in 1666 at a farmhouse in Windebank, Yorkshire. Sam contacted a woman by the name of Rachel Moorside and togeth 4.5★sIt was 2014 when Sam Storer was notified of a carefully wrapped parcel which had been buried within the walls of the Meeting House in Good Hope, Pennsylvania, and his excitement rose immediately. With professional care, the book which was enclosed in wrap had its pages painstakingly separated. What was revealed between those pages was the life of Rejoice Moorside (Joy) which began in 1666 at a farmhouse in Windebank, Yorkshire. Sam contacted a woman by the name of Rachel Moorside and together they explored the history of the journal; the harsh lives of the Quakers and as it turned out, Rachel’s own family history from the long ago past.When Joy was only fifteen years old, she left the care of her aunt and uncle who had been her only parents since birth. The Friends faith was deeply indoctrinated into her being, and she was horrified and overwhelmed at the prejudice and persecution of her family and friends at the following of their beliefs. The beatings; being thrown into a cell; the fines which most were unable to pay – defiant and angry, she was eventually removed from the family. But it was when Joy was twenty two years of age that she joined the travellers who embarked on a journey to the New World of America.With trials and tribulations, Joy and the group of Friends made their way to Philadelphia – their granting of land and the forming of a township nearby was mired by hardship; but they worked together as was their way. But would Joy eventually find peace and contentment? Or was her constant rebellion set to continue?The Glovemaker’s Daughter by Leah Fleming is a fascinating look at the harsh, terrible times and lives of the Quakers in the seventeenth century. Trauma and tragedy were a part of their lives on an almost daily basis; but though they didn’t understand why, they knew they had no choice but to put up with it. An exceptional, moving and emotional novel, The Glovemaker’s Daughter is one I highly recommend. With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for my digital ARC to read and review.
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