Far from the Tree
A contemporary novel about three adopted siblings who find each other at just the right moment.Being the middle child has its ups and downs.But for Grace, an only child who was adopted at birth, discovering that she is a middle child is a different ride altogether. After putting her own baby up for adoption, she goes looking for her biological family, including—Maya, her loudmouthed younger bio sister, who has a lot to say about their newfound family ties. Having grown up the snarky brunette in a house full of chipper redheads, she’s quick to search for traces of herself among these not-quite-strangers. And when her adopted family’s long-buried problems begin to explode to the surface, Maya can’t help but wonder where exactly it is that she belongs.And Joaquin, their stoic older bio brother, who has no interest in bonding over their shared biological mother. After seventeen years in the foster care system, he’s learned that there are no heroes, and secrets and fears are best kept close to the vest, where they can’t hurt anyone but him.

Far from the Tree Details

TitleFar from the Tree
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 3rd, 2017
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN-139780062330628
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary

Far from the Tree Review

  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished reading this book, and I honest to goodness cannot stop crying thinking about it. What a beautiful, raw, honest portrayal of families in a way I've never really encountered before. What an amazing sibling story. The relationships, the characters, the story - all just so wonderful, and this is def my fave Robin Benway book as of right now.
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  • Gaby
    January 1, 1970
    Me? Obsessed with a Robin Benway book? That sounds... like an understatement, TBH. Many hearts-in-eyes over FAR FROM THE TREE and with all of the complicated family-ness, tricky teenage situations, and scenarios unlike everything else in contemporary YA, I hope you'll love this one as much as I do.
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  • Alexis (TheSlothReader)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsThis book was so beautiful. It follows three biological siblings as they discover each other. They're all dealing with their own heap of issues and they're all such unique characters. I absolutely loved each of the siblings and I especially loved getting to watch them grow together as people and as family. Maya, the youngest, is a lesbian and I loved how accepting every character was of her sexuality. She felt so authentic and she was hilarious. Grace, the middle child, absolutely broke 4.5 starsThis book was so beautiful. It follows three biological siblings as they discover each other. They're all dealing with their own heap of issues and they're all such unique characters. I absolutely loved each of the siblings and I especially loved getting to watch them grow together as people and as family. Maya, the youngest, is a lesbian and I loved how accepting every character was of her sexuality. She felt so authentic and she was hilarious. Grace, the middle child, absolutely broke my heart every chapter since she was dealing with the aftermath of having given up her newborn baby for adoption. Joaquin, the oldest, had such a sad story and watching him undergo a healing process with Grace and Maya's help was so beautiful. This book is a quiet novel that packs such an emotional punch as it deals with family and overcoming the ways in which people have wronged you in order to conquer your past.I didn't give it full marks because there were certain parts when I was invested in some characters more than others, but I highly recommend this book.
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  • Kindling Micky
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsRobin Benway has once again made me into a snot-ridden, emotional mess. The feelings evoked by FAR FROM THE TREE are mighty and it is unlikely that any reader would be immune to the emotional content of this read. FAR FROM THE TREE is told from the POV of three siblings, Grace, Maya and Joaquin, each a biological sibling having just found one another. This book starts with a punch, the punch that is the impetus to these brothers and sisters finally meeting. In some ways, Grace, Maya and 4.5 starsRobin Benway has once again made me into a snot-ridden, emotional mess. The feelings evoked by FAR FROM THE TREE are mighty and it is unlikely that any reader would be immune to the emotional content of this read. FAR FROM THE TREE is told from the POV of three siblings, Grace, Maya and Joaquin, each a biological sibling having just found one another. This book starts with a punch, the punch that is the impetus to these brothers and sisters finally meeting. In some ways, Grace, Maya and Joaquin were so different but their burgeoning bond was beautiful to observe."Grace was beginning to wonder if her sister was really a humorless robot, but she assumed that even robots knew how to send the winking emoji.""But then they told me about you, too? And I was like. 'Get. Out.' I mean, its like insta-family, right? Just add water. Like sea monkeys." Whilst this is about sibling relationships growing, it is also about the families surrounding these characters and each branch of the story line was rich and deep. I think I cried fairly consistently from 80% for a range of reasons. There is a sprinkling of romance in this book, just a sprinkling and honestly it was perfectly pitched and didn't overwhelm the real story here, which was the siblings and their connections.I need to speak to the diversity in this book. This family had plenty of it but without trying too hard. There was definitely a theme of finding identity but there were so many stumbling blocks in the way. Anyway, I congratulate the author on the richness of character development.I became a fan of Robin Benway with Emmy & Oliver, but FAR FROM THE TREE has solidified my fandom. These two books have moved me hugely, I'd say that this book was even more of an emotional read.A copy of this book was provided by the publisher through Edelweiss, in return for a honest review.Reviewed for Jo&IsaLoveBooks Blog.
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  • Jen Ryland
    January 1, 1970
    I've loved all Robin Benway's books. But I have to admit, I wasn't super-excited about reading this one based on the description, which made the book sound a little drama-filled for my reading taste.And I was right - it was, but in a good way.There aren't many issues this book doesn't touch on. The kids in the story have a lot to deal with. Adoption, teen pregnancy, alcoholism, bullying, the foster care system, racism, divorce, self-esteem and mental health issues, anger management issues. It' I've loved all Robin Benway's books. But I have to admit, I wasn't super-excited about reading this one based on the description, which made the book sound a little drama-filled for my reading taste.And I was right - it was, but in a good way.There aren't many issues this book doesn't touch on. The kids in the story have a lot to deal with. Adoption, teen pregnancy, alcoholism, bullying, the foster care system, racism, divorce, self-esteem and mental health issues, anger management issues. It's a lot, but I'm sure there are kids out there who've been through as much as the three kids -- all relinquished for adoption by the same bio mother -- who narrate this story. The underlying theme of the story is family -- mainly sibling relationships, but parent/child relationships too. I loved that the book showed that family can take so many different forms.I've read YA books that deal with adoption, but never one quite like this. Far From the Tree looks at all different aspects of the process, from the mothers who put their babies up for adoption to the adoptive parents, to siblings connected through adoption. (I loathed Grace's parents, though, after I found out they knew she had a sibling when they adopted her but "just couldn't" take him too and, even worse, DID NOTHING TO CHECK TO MAKE SURE HE'D BEEN ADOPTED OR TO KEEP THE TWO IN TOUCH. There is no excuse; they are TERRIBLE. I think the book wanted me to forgive them (?!!?) but I was having none of it.)I do think three different narrative voices can be a lot. As the book began, the voices of the three narrators felt very distinct, but at times they blurred together for me. Rafe (not a POV character) completely cracked me up with his humor (if you remember Roux from the AKA books, you'll know what I mean). But toward the end of the book, almost every character started sounding like Rafe -- chatty and wise-cracking. Not exactly a complaint; just an observation.At times really heartbreaking, at times really funny, this book and its characters will definitely tug at your heartstrings. Definitely recommended for those who love contemporary books that have you laughing one minute and tearing up the next. And for fans of The Fosters!Read more of my reviews on JenRyland.com or check out my Bookstagram!I received a free advance copy of this book from the publisher for possible review.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    What a kick in the feels THAT was. <3
  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    Robin Benway has just solidified herself as one of my favorite YA contemporary authors. Like, top three. Her books are what YA contemporary should be.This story follows three teens - Maya, Grace, and Joaquin. The three were given up by their mother as children and the story follows them meeting for the first time and reconnecting.I adored my first Benway book, Emmy & Oliver, and one thing I remember loving about it was the amazing friend group.Benway writes the best group dynamics. The way t Robin Benway has just solidified herself as one of my favorite YA contemporary authors. Like, top three. Her books are what YA contemporary should be.This story follows three teens - Maya, Grace, and Joaquin. The three were given up by their mother as children and the story follows them meeting for the first time and reconnecting.I adored my first Benway book, Emmy & Oliver, and one thing I remember loving about it was the amazing friend group.Benway writes the best group dynamics. The way these siblings interacted and supported each other...gah, my heart!It’s also very diverse - there is a POC main character and love interest, as well as Maya being gay. It was really refreshing to see Maya having a family who was so supportive of her sexuality!While there isn’t a strong mental health component, I really appreciated the positive therapist portrayal.This book also has the best balance of emotions. The story would break my heart and then say something hilarious on the next page. So many relatable moments as well!Though there are gut-wrenching moments, for the most part, this is a heartwarming story about family. While I am not adopted, the way each character dealt with being given up was so interesting to see.All of the characters have romantic plotlines, and while a few felt unrealistic, the romances were so adorable that I could easily forgive the unlikeliness. Rafe was the most adorable love interest ever!New go to contemporary recommendation here! While it’s not quite fluffy, it’s one of the more lighthearted contemporary books that I like, so I can’t wait for this book to come out and everyone to love it as much as I do!
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  • Ren (A Bookish Balance)
    January 1, 1970
    THIS BOOK IS ALL HEART AND FEELINGS. I picked this one up on a whim, Indigo was having a pre-release sale and I thought "why not?". We follow three main characters, Grace, Maya, and Joaquin (Wok-keem), who all share the same mother but are unaware of each others' existence. Grace and Maya were adopted into different families when they were babies, and Joaquin has unfortunately spent the majority of his life in the foster care system. Each of the siblings is facing their own private battles. Grac THIS BOOK IS ALL HEART AND FEELINGS. I picked this one up on a whim, Indigo was having a pre-release sale and I thought "why not?". We follow three main characters, Grace, Maya, and Joaquin (Wok-keem), who all share the same mother but are unaware of each others' existence. Grace and Maya were adopted into different families when they were babies, and Joaquin has unfortunately spent the majority of his life in the foster care system. Each of the siblings is facing their own private battles. Grace is pregnant and wants to put her child up for adoption, Maya's parents won't stop arguing and they're probably going to get a divorce, and Joaquin can't come to terms with his past, or accept that he's finally found parents that want to keep him. This novel is more drama in a YA contemporary than is usually to my liking, that being said, I think the content was very well handled. The story progresses in a way that always feels natural, and issues the characters are facing never feel like they get a quick instant fix. The author really takes her time with letting you get to know each of the characters, their good points and bad. I've never cried happy tears during a book until now, but that's what I mean when I say this book is all heart. Everyone has their ups and their downs and it is such a pleasure to experience it all with them. You are never confused about who's talking when dialogue comes up because each character is so unique. Near the middle of the book I did start to feel extremely annoyed with Maya, but I'm glad I kept going because Maya experiences some really great character development (while still staying true to her character). That isn't to say that Grace and Joaquin don't go through character development either, because they do and it is a slow and satisfying process. I would also like to point out that Joaquin is half Mexican, there is a Mexican love interest, and Maya is a lesbian, so thumbs up in terms of representation! I loved the way that race was handled in this novel, especially when it came to Joaquin and how his adoption (or lack thereof) was discussed. My only criticism is that I would have liked to hear more about the adoption process and foster care system as they both play a very large role in the story. If you're looking for a book that deals with heavier subject matter, but still makes you feel good and hopeful then this is definitely something to check out!
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the best family stories I've read in a long time. I loved Robin Benway's previous novel Emmy & Oliver, but Far From the Tree has proven that she's one of my new favorite and auto-but authors. My heart can't even handle how much I loved this book.
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  • H.Lee
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't sure what to expect going into this read but came out pleasantly surprised by what I had found.The book revolves around three young adults that were separated when their mother gave them up for adoption. They are able to reunite and each of them find out that their lives are not as perfect as everyone around them thinks it is. They each have their fair share of issues and they each have hidden secrets that they need to find the courage to let the others aware of.I loved the dynamic of t I wasn't sure what to expect going into this read but came out pleasantly surprised by what I had found.The book revolves around three young adults that were separated when their mother gave them up for adoption. They are able to reunite and each of them find out that their lives are not as perfect as everyone around them thinks it is. They each have their fair share of issues and they each have hidden secrets that they need to find the courage to let the others aware of.I loved the dynamic of the three POV's and found the writing very easy to follow. The characters were well developed and definitely relatable. I cannot state whether I had a favorite character because I loved each of them for different reasons.Grace was very sweet and really wanted to the best she could for "peach". This time in her life was very traumatic and one that will stay with her forever.Maya wanted to be perceived as strong when she really was falling apart. She felt that she needed to hold everything together for everyone else but what she finds out is that it is okay to ask for help.Joaquin was so protective over his sisters, which I LOVED, and was always worried about getting too close to people. He was cut a really raw deal but seemed like he might be okay.Three completely different kids finding out where they come from and dealing with the after math of their families difficulties together as a united family. **swoon**Thanks to the publisher for the review copy!
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  • Nicole Suder
    January 1, 1970
    This book was fantastic! Maya, Grace and Joaquin were all likable characters and I was captivated by their stories, both individual and as siblings. The ending was lovely and really warmed my heart.
  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a beautifully character driven story. It's all about who is family and what it means to be a family. I LOVED Grace, Maya, and Joaquin. All three siblings were so easy to connect to. Each one is so resilient and strong, while allowed to be emotional and upset. The family dynamics we get to see were also great - I loved that there was a wide representation of family experiences. Each character is going through such an emotional journey, that it's so easy to become invested in these c This was such a beautifully character driven story. It's all about who is family and what it means to be a family. I LOVED Grace, Maya, and Joaquin. All three siblings were so easy to connect to. Each one is so resilient and strong, while allowed to be emotional and upset. The family dynamics we get to see were also great - I loved that there was a wide representation of family experiences. Each character is going through such an emotional journey, that it's so easy to become invested in these characters and I loved seeing their sibling relationship develop! And while romance was very much on the backburner for the story, there was some really cute (and real) moments between Maya and her girlfriend, Claire, and Grace's budding relationship with Rafe.As a character driven reader, this was everything I could have wanted. I loved the dynamics and the development we get to see. And I was completely invested. This is a beautiful and emotional journey of family, love, and finding yourself.I received a copy of the book from HarperTeen via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Yet again, YET AGAIN, I am crying my eyes out and my chest feels full and empty at the same time. Can Robin Benway PLEASE never stop writing books?
  • Book
    January 1, 1970
    So far the best book of 2017 for me. Absolutely beautiful.
  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    FANBOY POV:As far as I know, nobody reads my reviews of Miss Benway's books anymore, because I have nothing but good things to say about her novels. I mean if you read her books, you know what I am talking about. CRITIQUE POV:The novel feels so real! Sometimes, I have to remind myself that it is fiction. That is the power of research. THE REVIEWWRITING STYLE:As a writer and a reader, I am a huge, huge fan of Miss Benway. Mainly because I want to write like her. She makes simple sentences beautif FANBOY POV:As far as I know, nobody reads my reviews of Miss Benway's books anymore, because I have nothing but good things to say about her novels. I mean if you read her books, you know what I am talking about. CRITIQUE POV:The novel feels so real! Sometimes, I have to remind myself that it is fiction. That is the power of research. THE REVIEWWRITING STYLE:As a writer and a reader, I am a huge, huge fan of Miss Benway. Mainly because I want to write like her. She makes simple sentences beautiful without trying too hard. The symbols are everywhere too. The novel is simple and easy to read, but Miss Benway will make you work to find and read the symbols. I am not going to say the symbols that I've found. You need to work and find them. That is one of the joys of reading Far From the Tree. PACE:Chapters are well balanced. When I first open the book, I brain went, "uh-oh... shifting POVs." I am not usually a big fan of switching POVs (The novel is 3rd POV, but it changes the focalizer every chapter) because it is hard to balance the characters. Most of the time, you just want to read the chapter of your favorite character. But this is different. Since the three main characters Maya, Joaquin, and Grace have different struggles, I find myself drawn to all of them. Not to mention, I root for all of them, because I want all three of them to work together as a team and overcome all the challenges being thrown at them. CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT:Grace, Maya, and Joaquin were all holding back something at the beginning of the novel. You can see that they are afraid to fly and fight the massive storm ahead, but as the three siblings learn from each other, they see that they need each other in order to fly alone and strong. What I mean is they find out that it's okay to be afraid-- fear will always be there if you want to face challenges, but once you see that there are people who are ready to catch you, that fear is nothing. PLOT:I don't know how many times I've cried in this book. The novel is full of love, and it feels like you are guiding the characters to find the love that they need and deserve. If you don't know why readers call the emotions that they get from reading as "feels," you will find out here. Trust me on that. MY VERDICT:The moment this novel hit the shelves, buy it! Experience what it's like to be a girl who experiences judgment every day just because of a simple mistake she's made for falling in love, what it's like to be a boy who feels unwanted, and what it's like to be a girl who feels like a stranger in a place she calls home. RATING BREAKDOWNWRITING STYLE: +1 STAR(S)PACE: +1 STAR(S)CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT: +1 STAR(S)PLOT: +1 STAR(S)MY VERDICT: +1 STAR(S)
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  • Liz Overberg
    January 1, 1970
    Three teens who share a biological mother get to know each other over the course of the most difficult few months of their lives.This one gave me a lot of feelings. Definitely one of my favorite YA books of the year.
  • Rachel Strolle
    January 1, 1970
    oh my god i am SOBBINGif this isn't on your TBR yet PUT IT THERE
  • Peppermint
    January 1, 1970
    4,5/5This book broke my heart, filled it with warm fuzziness and then stitched it back together.
  • Sandie, Teen Lit Rocks
    January 1, 1970
    I'm such a sucker for well-written sibling stories, and I think this one is particularly exceptional because it also weaves in adoption, which is so, so difficult to capture in an authentic way. Loved this book.
  • Andrea at Reading Lark
    January 1, 1970
    Review Posted on Reading Lark 9/25/17: https://readinglark.blogspot.com/2017...High school hasn't gone the way Grace planned. She never expected one of the star athletes to fall for her nor did she expect to end up pregnant with his child before her Junior year ended, but life has a way of keeping us on our toes. Grace's life crumbles after finding out she's pregnant. She never hesitates though - she knows that she must put the baby up for adoption. As much as she loves the child growing within Review Posted on Reading Lark 9/25/17: https://readinglark.blogspot.com/2017...High school hasn't gone the way Grace planned. She never expected one of the star athletes to fall for her nor did she expect to end up pregnant with his child before her Junior year ended, but life has a way of keeping us on our toes. Grace's life crumbles after finding out she's pregnant. She never hesitates though - she knows that she must put the baby up for adoption. As much as she loves the child growing within her, she doesn't feel it would be fair to keep the baby when Grace can't provide a stable home. She isn't ready for the life of a single mom when she hasn't finished school and has no job prospects. She spends hours pouring over information about potential parents trying to choose the best possible mom and dad for her little girl. While she is struggling with these choices, her ex-boyfriend is dating a "good" girl and preparing for the homecoming dance. In those moments when Grace was suffering and overwhelmed, I despised Max and his parents. They tried to place all the blame for the pregnancy on Grace when it truly takes two. Max was able to go on with his life with no repercussions while Grace was forced to endure rude comments, bullying, and unfair treatment. Why do we have this double standard? Why is teen pregnancy so often seen as the problem of the mother?Grace's experience makes her crave a chance to find her own birth mother. Her parents have never made it a secret that she was adopted. They have always told her that when she was ready (if that day came) they would help her find answers to her questions. Grace gets far more than she bargained for when she learns that has an older brother, Joaquin, and a younger sister, Maya. She decides she needs to make contact with both of her siblings. In the beginning, for Grace, this is a way of finding redemption after making the choice to give her daughter up. She wants to know that her birth mother gave her up for good reasons in spite of loving her and wanting to keep her. She hopes her siblings feel the same.While Grace has been raised as an only child, her biological siblings have had different upbringings. Joaquin has been in foster care since the age of one. He feels like an abandoned sailboat left to the mercy of the waves. He has bounced from home to home and hasn't truly found where he belongs, but thinks it may be with his current foster parents, who truly seem to care about him. He is just as surprised as Grace to learn that he has biological siblings. Maya, on the other hand, appears to have a charmed life with her well off parents and younger sister, but she has her own share of demons lurking in the corners. She also isn't sure how to handle having biological siblings, but she doesn't cut their biological mom any slack. She firmly believes that there is no good reason for putting your kids up for adoption. Her staunch stance on the issue will cause a rift between her and Grace until things come to light. The siblings spend the novel learning what it means to be family and trying to decide if they want to look for their mother.The notion of family is an important concept in this novel. What truly makes a family? Is it biology? Is it love? Can your friends become your family? I think pondering this notion is intriguing and provides a theme that will resonate with young adult and adult readers alike.One Last Gripe: As mentioned in the review, I was frustrated by Max and his parents' response to Grace's pregnancy.Favorite Thing About This Book: The nature imagery that was scattered throughout the novelFirst Sentence: Grace wasn't one of those girls who was always fantasizing about homecoming.Favorite Character: GraceLeast Favorite Character: Max's Dad
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  • Tiger Oma
    January 1, 1970
    I received a complimentary copy of FAR FROM THE TREE through NetGalley. Thank you HarperTeen and NetGalley for making it possible for me to read this YA book.FAR FROM THE TREE is a book that will touch your heart in ways you never thought possible. This book is written in a way that every emotion possible can be experienced between its covers. There are times you want to jump up and shout for joy, sob for hours, scream your head off in anger, and times when you just want to sit and think. I real I received a complimentary copy of FAR FROM THE TREE through NetGalley. Thank you HarperTeen and NetGalley for making it possible for me to read this YA book.FAR FROM THE TREE is a book that will touch your heart in ways you never thought possible. This book is written in a way that every emotion possible can be experienced between its covers. There are times you want to jump up and shout for joy, sob for hours, scream your head off in anger, and times when you just want to sit and think. I really thought Robin did a great job with the characters. Each is unique but somehow the same. It is uncanny the way they are connected because they are biologically related, but each has traits that are influenced by their adopted parents and environment. A classic study in nature vs. nurture. Grace, Maya and Joaquin are so well written. There are times when you will laugh and cry with them and other times when you will want to throw the book at the wall because you are so mad at them. Family is what FAR FROM THE TREE is all about. Each family is different and each family member is unique, but together they make a home. Is family all about blood or is it about love? Just because you share blood with someone, does that mean they are family? This book should be in all high school libraries. Its raw reality of teen pregnancy, life after the birth, and dynamics of family is something that today’s teens need be exposed to. Life isn’t always roses, smiles, and happiness. It will make a great book club read. The discussion before, during and after reading this book will be amazing. It might be the book that opens doors of understanding for adopted teens and teens thinking of putting a child up for adoption. There is some language, but it is very realistically written and to write it without the language would take away the believability of the characters and their feelings.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    *I received a digital review copy from Edelweiss*I wasn't sure if I was going to end up liking this book. I thought the beginning was a little slow and it wasn't until about 20% of the way through that I became invested in the characters and their stories. I really liked the characters and the different journeys they went on, both by themselves and with their siblings. Robin Benway did a good job in making the reader feel what the characters were feeling. I was angry at some points, happy in oth *I received a digital review copy from Edelweiss*I wasn't sure if I was going to end up liking this book. I thought the beginning was a little slow and it wasn't until about 20% of the way through that I became invested in the characters and their stories. I really liked the characters and the different journeys they went on, both by themselves and with their siblings. Robin Benway did a good job in making the reader feel what the characters were feeling. I was angry at some points, happy in others, and heartbroken by some situations. This book was pretty emotional, especially near the end. I really liked how this book was told. It was really effective to have the three siblings each have their own alternating chapters. I liked being able to see things from each perspective, although sometimes I would become invested in one person's story line only have to wait two chapters to see how it continued. The character development was also great. Grace, Maya, and Joaquin, all go through heavy stuff and they come out better in the end, especially Joaquin. His growth touched me the most. I really liked the heavy emphasis on family and staying together no matter what. While reading I was also pleased with the inclusion of therapy, and while some of the characters are hesitant to go and think it is unnecessary, they do seem to benefit from it. Overall, this was a great book about family. I loved seeing the sibling relationship between Grace, Maya, and Joaquin develop and how they grew to love and lean on one another. And while I do think the second half was stronger than the first, it is still worth the read.
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  • Mary Librarian
    January 1, 1970
    Grace, Maya, and Joaquin are three teens who are struggling with new challenges in their lives. Grace just gave a baby up for adoption (Peach), Maya's adoptive parents are getting divorced and mom drink too much, and Joaquin has been in the foster care system his whole life and at almost 18 he has the chance to be adopted.The premise that brings these three strangers together is that they are actually sibling that were given up by their mother. The teen quickly connect as siblings but have very Grace, Maya, and Joaquin are three teens who are struggling with new challenges in their lives. Grace just gave a baby up for adoption (Peach), Maya's adoptive parents are getting divorced and mom drink too much, and Joaquin has been in the foster care system his whole life and at almost 18 he has the chance to be adopted.The premise that brings these three strangers together is that they are actually sibling that were given up by their mother. The teen quickly connect as siblings but have very different perspecitves on their bio mom.I found each story compelling and the drama/trauma each faces is pretty realistic. The only thing that slightly bugged me was how quickly they identified as siblings and the neat and tidy ending related to their birth mother's decision to put them up for adoption. But since I like a happy ending this really didn't bother me to much.From advanced reader copy.
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  • Ryanna
    January 1, 1970
    Far from the tree is the story of 3 teens who unknowingly all share the same birth mom, but each have enormous struggles of their own. Joaquin has been stuck in the foster care system his whole life, and is scared by the prospect of finally get adopted. Maya's adopted mom's drinking problem cause Maya to push everyone she loves away. Grace got pregnant at 17, and after dealing with the loss of giving her baby away she decides to find her bio family, and bring them together. Far from the tree is Far from the tree is the story of 3 teens who unknowingly all share the same birth mom, but each have enormous struggles of their own. Joaquin has been stuck in the foster care system his whole life, and is scared by the prospect of finally get adopted. Maya's adopted mom's drinking problem cause Maya to push everyone she loves away. Grace got pregnant at 17, and after dealing with the loss of giving her baby away she decides to find her bio family, and bring them together. Far from the tree is an amazing story that will make you cry, laugh, and learn to love each of the characters as they work to overcome challenges while trying to become closer with their new bio siblings.
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  • Misti
    January 1, 1970
    The fact that she was adopted has never been a huge deal in 16-year-old Grace's life... until she becomes pregnant and ends up giving up her baby for adoption. As she searches for her birth mother, she learns that she has biological siblings: younger sister Maya, who was also adopted, and older brother Joaquin, who has spent his life in the foster care system. The three start to forge a friendship, but each is keeping secrets from the others. When the truth starts coming out, they begin to explo The fact that she was adopted has never been a huge deal in 16-year-old Grace's life... until she becomes pregnant and ends up giving up her baby for adoption. As she searches for her birth mother, she learns that she has biological siblings: younger sister Maya, who was also adopted, and older brother Joaquin, who has spent his life in the foster care system. The three start to forge a friendship, but each is keeping secrets from the others. When the truth starts coming out, they begin to explore what it means to be a family.I enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to fans of realistic teen fiction.
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  • Carli
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to @harperteen @harpercollinsus and Edelweiss for the chance to read this e-galley.⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 for the heartfelt story of three half-siblings who find each other amid life crises.Grace is an adopted only child who just gave up her own baby for adoption. Maya was adopted too, but her parents also had a biological child, leaving Maya to sometimes feel like an outcast in her own home. Joaquin was never adopted, but has the chance to now and is afraid he will mess it up. The three find each other Thanks to @harperteen @harpercollinsus and Edelweiss for the chance to read this e-galley.⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for the heartfelt story of three half-siblings who find each other amid life crises.Grace is an adopted only child who just gave up her own baby for adoption. Maya was adopted too, but her parents also had a biological child, leaving Maya to sometimes feel like an outcast in her own home. Joaquin was never adopted, but has the chance to now and is afraid he will mess it up. The three find each other when they need it the most, and venture to find their birth mom.Heartbreaking and moving, this is a home run for high school collections. It's out 10/3!
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  • paula
    January 1, 1970
    Super-soapy. Looks at adoption from a lot of angles. Exceptional depiction of the heartbreak of a teen mother giving up her baby for adoption... but I got pretty hung up on whether it accurately reflects the experiences and feelings of a kid in foster care. And the central premise - a young mother who gave up not one but three children - hmmm. I know a couple women who went through that once, and the experience was so traumatic that they could NEVER do it again. So three babies? in three years? Super-soapy. Looks at adoption from a lot of angles. Exceptional depiction of the heartbreak of a teen mother giving up her baby for adoption... but I got pretty hung up on whether it accurately reflects the experiences and feelings of a kid in foster care. And the central premise - a young mother who gave up not one but three children - hmmm. I know a couple women who went through that once, and the experience was so traumatic that they could NEVER do it again. So three babies? in three years? Seems like a stretch.It's Robin Benway though, and her writing is always worth reading.
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  • Erica
    January 1, 1970
    Sobbing. Sobbing!! This book hit me right in the feels. Maya was a little hard, but even she got me in the end. I wanted to adopt all three of these kids. This book made me want to hug my kids and love them and never let them go. The writing was great, funny at times, and heartbreaking in the best way. I loved it. Now I think I'll go wash my mascara off my cheeks.
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  • Marie
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great book - also made me a little bit emotional, I'm not going to lie. Beautiful story about family, finding out who you are, where you come from and where you fit in.Full review coming closer to release date :)
  • Brittani
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best words I can think to describe this book is heart-wrenching. My heart ached for all the characters and I just wanted to wrap them up and protect them from the world - and from themselves - at times. This was such a lovely and heartfelt look at families and all their variations, both chosen and biological. Robin Benway has this way of making you want to cry but she balances it out with a lot of humor so her books aren’t sad. This book made my heart ache, but it also made me laugh. One of the best words I can think to describe this book is heart-wrenching. My heart ached for all the characters and I just wanted to wrap them up and protect them from the world - and from themselves - at times. This was such a lovely and heartfelt look at families and all their variations, both chosen and biological. Robin Benway has this way of making you want to cry but she balances it out with a lot of humor so her books aren’t sad. This book made my heart ache, but it also made me laugh. I was absolutely rooting from the characters from page one and their journeys - both individual and together - were wonderful to read. I just really loved this and I highly encourage you to pick it up on its release date or check it out from your library.I was provided a free copy of this book on Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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