(Don't) Call Me Crazy
Who’s Crazy?What does it mean to be crazy? Is using the word crazy offensive? What happens when such a label gets attached to your everyday experiences?In order to understand mental health, we need to talk openly about it. Because there’s no single definition of crazy, there’s no single experience that embodies it, and the word itself means different things—wild? extreme? disturbed? passionate?—to different people.(Don’t) Call Me Crazy is a conversation starter and guide to better understanding how our mental health affects us every day. Thirty-three writers, athletes, and artists offer essays, lists, comics, and illustrations that explore their personal experiences with mental illness, how we do and do not talk about mental health, help for better understanding how every person’s brain is wired differently, and what, exactly, might make someone crazy.If you’ve ever struggled with your mental health, or know someone who has, come on in, turn the pages, and let’s get talking.

(Don't) Call Me Crazy Details

Title(Don't) Call Me Crazy
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherAlgonquin Young Readers
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Short Stories, Anthologies, Health, Mental Health

(Don't) Call Me Crazy Review

  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    I only wish someone had told me not that I was "crazy" but that I was sick, and there was a way to get better. This book made me cry, but for all the right reasons.When you start putting parts of yourself out there on the Internet, people begin to wonder about you and to form their own stories. I've seen theories about me circling on Goodreads and Twitter. How I am an evil villainess waiting to tear down the latest YA book. How I review books to be mean or contrarian, or because I am too stupid I only wish someone had told me not that I was "crazy" but that I was sick, and there was a way to get better. This book made me cry, but for all the right reasons.When you start putting parts of yourself out there on the Internet, people begin to wonder about you and to form their own stories. I've seen theories about me circling on Goodreads and Twitter. How I am an evil villainess waiting to tear down the latest YA book. How I review books to be mean or contrarian, or because I am too stupid to do anything else. But here's the truth: reviewing books is my way of surviving.I am mentally ill. I have depression and anxiety. I am a suicide survivor. I have spent many many years of my life wondering what was wrong with me. I am, if you will, crazy. And that word is fine with me. I recently found out that a lot of the social problems and strange habits I had as a young child (and still have to some extent) are because of high functioning autism - things I remember, like my tendency to not "get" jokes and sarcasm, and things I don't remember, like covering my ears, throwing myself on the floor, and screaming when my parents first tried to take me into a busy preschool class. I didn't know for so long why I was bad at existing and interacting in ways that are considered socially acceptable. It was two years after my suicide attempt that I discovered Goodreads. I was not in a good place at that time, but this site turned out to be exactly what I needed. Thinking deeply about how books made me feel and turning that into reviews was the perfect food for my weird analytical brain. And I'm still here because this place has been better for me than any of the meds I've ever taken.I'm telling you this because we need to talk openly about mental illness. And I am so so thrilled that the brave writers, actors and artists in (Don't) Call Me Crazy came together to open up this discussion. From Holstrom's piece on trichotillomania to Kuehn's misophonia to S. Jae Jones' examination of the manic pixie dreamgirl to Meredith Russo's experience of mental illness as a transwoman, this book talks in a frank open way about the realities of mental illness and its treatment options. Sometimes I'm okay. Sometimes I am very far from okay. It's both fun and heart-wrenching, breaking up beautiful and important pieces on PTSD, substance abuse, BPD and eating disorders with funny inspirational artwork and reading lists.Not surprisingly, (Don't) Call Me Crazy takes us to the dark depths of mental illness at times - what V.E. Schwab describes as a "black hole" and Libba Bray calls the "rituals" of anxiety and OCD - but I think, ultimately, it's an uplifting book. As Shaun David Hutchinson tells us in the opening piece, mental illness does not define a person, and there are many many treatment options available. We just need to break down the stigma around mental illness and talk about it. People need to be educated about it, not only so those with mental illness can understand themselves, but so that the people around them can offer compassion and understanding instead of a "You're crazy!" And I believe that what Kelly Jensen says in her piece is true of pretty much everyone, mentally ill or neurotypical: I am a person figuring out how to be the best version of myself, one step at a time. It's certainly how I feel every day.Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
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  • Victoria Schwab
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote an essay for this anthology on mental black holes.
  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    Mental illness anthology written with Victoria Schwab, Adam Silvera, and Libba Bray! Who else is HYPED
  • Hari ~Brekker-Maresh~
    January 1, 1970
    They had me at Victoria Schwab and Adam Silvera.But the idea of this is amazing!
  • destiny ♎ [howling libraries]
    January 1, 1970
    As someone who struggles with her own mental health, I’ve appreciated the recent uptick in representation in the YA book world—as it’s so necessary and I think it can do so much good, especially for young readers coming to terms with their own mental health—but there are two things I’ve found sorely lacking: nonfiction presented in an interesting and approachable manner from authors that readers already know and love, and representation that reflects even the more marginalized segments of the me As someone who struggles with her own mental health, I’ve appreciated the recent uptick in representation in the YA book world—as it’s so necessary and I think it can do so much good, especially for young readers coming to terms with their own mental health—but there are two things I’ve found sorely lacking: nonfiction presented in an interesting and approachable manner from authors that readers already know and love, and representation that reflects even the more marginalized segments of the mental illness community. With this in mind, you can imagine how ecstatic I was when I learned that (Don’t) Call Me Crazy would fill both of those needs. “Crazy” is not a singular—or definitive—experience.—Kelly Jensen The first thing I have to rave about is the wide variety of representations offered in this book. Not only are there authors from so many different backgrounds—queer, trans, bi/multiracial, Latinx, and/or Native, to name a few—but there are so many important diagnoses and topics discussed. I have significance, for I am a human being, entire.—S. Jae-Jones There’s Dior Vargas’ discussion of how hard it is to be a person of color with a mental illness in a society that depicts MI as a “white” issue, S. Jae-Jones’ narrative of what it feels like to be the Manic Pixie Dream Girl, Mike Jung’s relation of autism (and the fact that it is not an illness to be cured, no matter what certain “activism groups” claim)… In fact, I’m just going to include a list at the bottom of this review. They did not know the extent of my talent for smiling when I was a tornado inside.—Amy Reed Something else I loved about this collection is that there are so many different viewpoints on healing/coping. There are stories encouraging, others encouraging therapy or meditation, and even one I related very strongly to, where Heidi Heilig discusses feeling like “A Bad Crazy” for choosing not to medicate or to strongly pursue a “cure” for the time being. No writer ever vilifies another path to coping or healing; the general theme is that we do what we need to do in order to survive and pursue peace in life. The finishing piece from s. e. smith, “Call Me Crazy”, even talks about reclaiming slurs and hurtful terms, fighting back against stigmas, and being proud of ourselves—mental illnesses and all. Nothing is as powerful as a woman who embraces herself, without apology.—MILCK This may go without saying, but please practice self-care while reading this collection, as there are certainly quite a few triggering topics. There are discussions of sexual assault, abusive family members, eating disorders, hospitalizations, self-harm (including the comic by Yumi Sakugawa, which depicts a cartoonish character harming themselves), transphobia, racism, sexism, suicidal ideation, attempted suicide, ableism, and more. People do not tend to know when I am pretty freakin’ unwell. For a lot of reasons. I don’t want anyone to feel uncomfortable or burdened or—often, I just don’t want to talk about it.—Emery Lord Finally, I just wanted to share a few of my stand-out favorites and the ones that meant the most to me on a personal note:→ Ashley Holstrom’s thoroughness in branching off from a discussion of trich to describe its sister illness, dermatillomania, which I have dealt with literally as long as I can remember and have never seen depicted in a book, nonfiction or otherwise.→ S. Jae-Jones’ commentary on how the romanticization of mental illness in women causes an environment that is not conducive to women seeking and receiving the help they need.→ Heidi Heilig’s admittance that she considers herself “A Bad Crazy” for not seeking out a cure or treatment for her mental illness—I think a lot of people will be able to relate to this.→ Amy Reed’s story of her struggles with addiction, in which she reminds us that healing is a forever process.→ Jessica Tremaine’s history of her disordered eating habits and the desperate need for control that they stemmed from.→ MILCK’s narrative around the combination of anorexia and depression—and just as notably, the underlying message that nothing is stronger than a woman who is brave enough to love herself in a society that tries to tear her down.→ Emery Lord’s incredibly relatable piece on depression, numbness, and the general lack of desire to exist—I literally feel like Emery Lord and I are mental illness soul sisters after reading this, and I cried, a lot, because talk about feeling seen.→ Victoria Schwab’s explanation for why she stays so busy. Her reasoning is precisely the same as my own need to constantly be doing something, even if it’s at the risk of “being present”—and her struggles with obsessive thoughts even began in the same way that mine did, by revolving around an all-consuming fear of losing her parents as a child. From another kid who grew up compulsively listening for the sounds of my parents continuing to breathe while they slept, I see you, Victoria. ♥Those are just a few of the gems in this collection, though, and I think there is honestly something in this book for everyone and anyone who has any experience with mental illnesses of their own. I cannot recommend this collection highly enough, and hope that it will become a staple item in teen libraries everywhere. Between the stories of hope and healing, the resources offered, and even the uplifting comics and fun lists of movies and books with healthy rep, this is a fantastic resource and one that I will be recommending to friends and loved ones for years to come.Representations—listed by author, in order of appearance:Ashley Holstrom: trichotillomania, dermatillomaniaDior Vargas: imposter syndrome, borderline personality disorder (BPD)Sarah Hannah Gomez: OCD, bipolar IIStephanie Kuehn: misophonia/4SMike Jung: autismChristine Heppermann: phobias, abuseS. Jae-Jones: bipolarMonique Bedard (Aura): erasure of MI in Native communitiesHeidi Heilig: bipolarEmily Mayberry: PTSDAmy Reed: addictions, abuseJessica Tremaine: anorexia, bulimiaReid Ewing: body dysmorphiaSusan Juby: alcoholismMILCK: anorexia, depressionLibba Bray: OCD, anxietyEmery Lord: depression, suicidal ideationGemma Correll: anxiety (multiple comics)Clint Van Winkle: PTSD/PTSEsme Weijun Wang: anxietyVictoria/V. E. Schwab: obsessive thoughtsKristen Bell: depressionMary Isabel: PTSD, abuseLisa Jakub: anxietyMeredith Russo: depression, suicidal ideation, attempted suicide, body dysmorphia, experiencing transphobiaYumi Sakugawa: self harm (comic)Kelly Jensen: depression, anxietyAdam Silvera: depression, suicidal ideationHannah Bae: paranoiaS. Zainab Williams: depression (comic)Nancy Kerrigan: disordered eatings. e. smith: depression, misdiagnosed BPD, “craziness”NOTE: I took notes while reading, but apologize if I missed anything represented in any specific stories. I opted not to include the authors’ races or sexual/gender identities in most of these because I wasn’t familiar with all of the authors and did not want to make any assumptions or out anyone without their consent.Thank you so much to Algonquin Young Readers for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a huge advocate for the idea that we need to talk more openly about mental health. People with mental ilness need to know they matter and that they can get better. People without it need to know they can help. In the last year, this idea has become an increasingly important part of both my personal and professional life. I try not to be a nudge and talk about my job on here, but I work for the children's book imprint of the American Psychological Association, and it's unbelievably rewarding I'm a huge advocate for the idea that we need to talk more openly about mental health. People with mental ilness need to know they matter and that they can get better. People without it need to know they can help. In the last year, this idea has become an increasingly important part of both my personal and professional life. I try not to be a nudge and talk about my job on here, but I work for the children's book imprint of the American Psychological Association, and it's unbelievably rewarding to say that I can connect people to tools that can address mental health concerns. I wish my parents had these resources when I was a kid; maybe it would have saved me a lot of money in therapy bills as an adult.But I'm also getting braver at telling people about my own mental health issues. I started writing about it here, which remains relatively distinct from my offline life, and talking with other friends I know are in therapy for similar things. But I recently stood up in front of all 600 APA co-workers and talked about it, I've started talking about it on Facebook, and I talk about it more with friends who aren't struggling themselves. It relieves some of the pressure off my own head, and I feel like it relieves some of the pressure off of others who needed permission to start their own conversations. I hope so, anyway. These kinds of conversations are going to save lives, so thank you to Kelly Jensen for this collection. You're helping to make it easier to talk about this stuff. Not every essay in the collection worked for me, but it's important that it's out there. It's going to work for someone. One essay that did get to me so hard was Adam Silvera's piece on hope in the face of suicidal ideation. I recently wrote a review of his latest book that boiled down to "You know how to burrow beneath my skin in a way few others do and it's amazing." But his essay burrowed beneath my skin in a way that I wrote him an email to thank him for it. I've never written a fan letter in my life, but I wrote one about being depressed. Guys, read this book. Give it to people you love, especially teens. Learn how to talk about this shit and it's going to help someone get better.
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  • S.
    January 1, 1970
    I have an essay in this anthology! It's about bipolar disorder, manic pixie dream girls, Korean fairy tales, and writing Wintersong.
  • Heidi Heilig
    January 1, 1970
    Hey, I just met youAnd this is (NOT) crazyBut here's my essaySo read it maybe
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    We have a cover! Add (DON'T) Call Me Crazy to your to-read shelf & preorder a copy from your favorite book store. Let's crack open this conversation about mental health.
  • Ashley Holstrom
    January 1, 1970
    Incredible. I cannot wait for the world to get to read this collection. I’m so honored to have been included in it. Mental health is just as important as physical health, kiddos. Let’s end the stigma. January 2017: It's not done yet, but I'm writing an essay for this bomb-ass anthology of essays about mental health for young adults. It'll be about my life with trichotillomania, and, I hope, all the words I needed to read when I was 13 and pulling out my eyebrows without knowing why.
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  • Dylan
    January 1, 1970
    I requested this basically only because my favorite author has an essay in it, but I ended up really enjoying all of the essays I read. I'm choosing not to read all of them just because a few are a *bit* too triggering for me.I'm choosing not to rate the book since mental health is obviously a very personal topic, so I don't feel right about rating personal experiences, but I will say that it would be great if a little more diversity as in race, religion, and sexualities. This has a lot more div I requested this basically only because my favorite author has an essay in it, but I ended up really enjoying all of the essays I read. I'm choosing not to read all of them just because a few are a *bit* too triggering for me.I'm choosing not to rate the book since mental health is obviously a very personal topic, so I don't feel right about rating personal experiences, but I will say that it would be great if a little more diversity as in race, religion, and sexualities. This has a lot more diversity as a few other anthologies, but it's not perfect by any means.(Also apparently the editor has said some gross things about ace people, as someone who is on the spectrum, this is hurtful, so now I'll always be thinking about that when I see the book on my shelf, so thanks a lot, jensen.)
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  • Kav (xreadingsolacex)
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I was given an ARC in exchange for an honest review. This is no way impacted my review. Important Note: This anthology (and this review) contain talk of different mental illnesses and experiences with them, suicide/suicidal thoughts, self-harm, and more which can be potentially triggering to some readers. Please be aware of that before picking this anthology up.Anthologies are difficult to rate as each story is different. Furthermore, an anthology about mental health is even more di Disclaimer: I was given an ARC in exchange for an honest review. This is no way impacted my review. Important Note: This anthology (and this review) contain talk of different mental illnesses and experiences with them, suicide/suicidal thoughts, self-harm, and more which can be potentially triggering to some readers. Please be aware of that before picking this anthology up.Anthologies are difficult to rate as each story is different. Furthermore, an anthology about mental health is even more difficult to rate as I don't want to 'rate' people's personal experiences and how they recount them; therefore, this review is going to be a little bit different from my usual reviews.(Don't) Call Me Crazy is an anthology featuring 33 different voices, some authors and some not, who share essays, comics, lists, and more to recount their personal experiences with mental illnesses and mental health. The anthology is split into five different chapters:1) What's "Crazy?" focuses on beginning the conversation about mental health and stresses the individuality of experiences.2) Where "Crazy" Meets Culture is a chapter dedicated to portrayals of neurodivergence in media and how popular culture deals with mental illnesses.3) The Mind-Body Connection places emphasis on eating disorders and addictive behaviors and illnesses about control.4) Beyond Stress and Sadness is primarily about anxiety and depression - mental illnesses that go beyond the feelings of stress and sadness all people experience.5) To Be Okay is the final chapter and it recounts these contributor's personal experiences, but with hopeful endings that remind the reader to keep going forward.*Resources and information about the contributors are also available at the end of the anthology.*I loved the way this anthology covered many different topics. It really dug into the topic of mental health and I appreciated that in an anthology that was only meant to start the conversation but did so much more in my eyes.My personal favorite chapter was, without a doubt, To Be Okay. If I could take that chapter away and print it out and frame it I would. It is so powerful in how it manages to share the realities, which can even be horrors at times, of mental illnesses and, without romanticizing them, still provide the reader with hope going forward and remind the reader that happiness and "okay-ness" is achievable.Here are my highlights/favorite stories of this anthology:- Defying Definition by Shaun David Hutchinson was such a strong beginning to the conversation and I couldn't have picked a better way to open the conversation.- What I Know and What I Don't Know by Dior Vargas places a focus on mental health/mental illness in the lives of people of color which I appreciated. It is both personal to the writer and accessible to readers of color who struggle with mental illnesses like myself.- Being Heard and Hating Sound by Stephanie Kuehn talked about a diagnosis that I had never previously heard of and is not popularly known which I firmly appreciated.- Mike Jung's focus on autism was also an important addition to this anthology and I particularly appreciated his focus on labels and which he's okay with and which he's not okay with.- Manic Pixie Dream Girl by S Jae-Jones was a masterpiece. It was so well-written and so impactful and discusses both mental illness and feminism in a way.- Bless This Mess by Amy Reed discussed many important points that would take far too long to list and was one of the more powerful pieces of this anthology.- Reid Ewing's piece of body dysmorphia is such a necessary piece of work and I felt so strongly while reading it.- MILCK's piece to her 14-year-old self was so special because it showed perseverance and how things do get better.- Rituals by Libba Bray is so unique in how it is written and is so powerful in what it conveys.- Ways to Say "Anxiety" by Esme Weijun Wang was short, but impactful and relatable and I truly found it got the realities of the anxiety experience.- Black Hole by Victoria Schwab was, without a doubt, one of the best pieces of the anthology.- Coda by Meredith Russo was likely my second favorite piece in this anthology and it discusses transness, mistreatment/discrimination based on being trans, hospitalization, and more, and I felt everything reading it.- Happiness Goes On by Adam Silvera was my favorite piece in this anthology. No author has ever represented my exact experience with mental illness the way Silvera has and he continued to wow me with his newest essay. All I can say is, this one meant everything to me.- Call Me Crazy by s.e. smith was another unarguable impactful piece that discusses labels and stigmatization in-depth.As you can see, this anthology is powerful. I wanted to discuss these and more stories in-depth, but no one has the time or the energy to read that. All I can say is I am so thankful a piece of work like this exists in the world today. And I am so thankful to all the contributors who were willing to be honest about personal stories. This will change the lives of so many readers.Disclaimer: The editor of this anthology, Kelly Jensen, has been called out for problematic behavior in the past. I do not condone this behavior in any way (and will not be discussing it in the comments as I'm not trying to 'spill tea'), but I wanted to share that this has caused me to have negative feelings about her but this has not impacted my overall review in any way and I did not lower any ratings due to my personal feelings.
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  • Greyson [Use Your Words]
    January 1, 1970
    I saw this on twitter today, came here to add it and I already had??? Past Grey knows what she needs. I can’t wait for this! I’m gonna force it on all of my family members because Lord knows they fucking need it.
  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    Incredibly powerful. I felt this one deeply, and I can't encourage everyone to read this enough, regardless of whether mental health struggles is something you've dealt with. 4 1/2 stars
  • Paul Hankins
    January 1, 1970
    There is a lot that we could say about this anthology due for release in October (I wish that the release date were closer to the beginning of a traditional school year). The anthology works well when read section by section. It took me a few days to read through the work as I sticky-noted contributions from the authors, actors, artists, and athletes. I did not want to be surprised by the contributors as mental illness is a personal issue and I was afraid of a "Oh, wow. . ._____________ is deali There is a lot that we could say about this anthology due for release in October (I wish that the release date were closer to the beginning of a traditional school year). The anthology works well when read section by section. It took me a few days to read through the work as I sticky-noted contributions from the authors, actors, artists, and athletes. I did not want to be surprised by the contributors as mental illness is a personal issue and I was afraid of a "Oh, wow. . ._____________ is dealing with _______________" kind of response. What I found instead was an opportunity to read into brave shares by familiar figures. Your young adult readers will recognize more of these figures than I have being more connected to the culture and I think that this is a gift of the anthology. My other concern for reading through the anthology was a sense that I would want to read the contributions for the purpose of pulling them out for close-reading exercises or for the purpose of laddering a contributor's experience and share with a work or a character from a work we might be sharing in the classroom. Instead, I found myself carefully reading each contribution for the intent of the author's having shared it. And while there ARE connections to readings we might share in the classroom, the anthology presents, for the lack of a better term, stand-alone reads that explore HOW the author shares his, her, or their story. But, more than this, because of these contributions, we readers no longer have to stand alone. My ARC of (DON'T) CALL ME CRAZY is full of notes and connections. Yours will be too. We'll have more to say about this anthology as its release date approaches. I sense we will all be talking around this book this fall.
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  • Susie Dumond
    January 1, 1970
    This is a powerful, well-rounded, engaging introduction to conversations about mental health for young readers, with contributions from from great writers, illustrators, actors, and athletes. The only way to break down barriers and reduce stigma around mental health is to start having honest conversations like those included in (Don't) Call Me Crazy. I love the variety of formats and diversity of voices included, and the organization into sections makes it easy to read. I wish I had read this co This is a powerful, well-rounded, engaging introduction to conversations about mental health for young readers, with contributions from from great writers, illustrators, actors, and athletes. The only way to break down barriers and reduce stigma around mental health is to start having honest conversations like those included in (Don't) Call Me Crazy. I love the variety of formats and diversity of voices included, and the organization into sections makes it easy to read. I wish I had read this collection in high school!Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC in exchange for my honest review. NOTE: Kelly Jensen and some contributors to this collection are my colleagues at Book Riot.
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  • Erika
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished the ARC, and I can't wait until this is out in the world. I will definitley be adding it to my high school library collection. Such an open and honest depiction of so many different types and aspects of mental illness that often manifest in the teen years. The book is marketed for young adults, but everyone can benefit from reading it.
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  • Sami
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so incredibly grateful that such a thoughtful and nuanced resource like this has been written. It's hard enough for teenagers to talk about mental illness among themselves and to their parents; but now, they can see their literary heroes bare their souls and anxieties in a beautiful way. I desperately wish something like this had existed when I was a teenager, but I am bolstered by the fact that I can show this to anyone who needs to know that they are not alone.
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  • S. Zainab Williams
    January 1, 1970
    I contributed a comic to this anthology, and I CANNOT WAIT to check out everyone else's work.
  • ✨ katharina ✨
    January 1, 1970
    Very very dear to my heart
  • Peppermint
    January 1, 1970
    I need this now
  • Jayme Carruthers
    January 1, 1970
    @NetGalley #partnerThank you to #NetGalley for the review copy of #(don')callMeCrazy. All opinions are my own.(Don't) Call Me Crazy is a collection of short, autobiographical stories of individuals suffering from mental health issues. In addition to speaking up about mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety, this book also has voices speaking on lesser known disorders such as trichotillomania, which I greatly appreciated.(Don't) Call Me Crazy is a great anthology to read if you are wantin @NetGalley #partnerThank you to #NetGalley for the review copy of #(don')callMeCrazy. All opinions are my own.(Don't) Call Me Crazy is a collection of short, autobiographical stories of individuals suffering from mental health issues. In addition to speaking up about mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety, this book also has voices speaking on lesser known disorders such as trichotillomania, which I greatly appreciated.(Don't) Call Me Crazy is a great anthology to read if you are wanting to know more about mental illnesses and how they affect a person. Instead of being a factual, scientific view on mental illnesses, these are real stories by REAL people. Books like this are important, especially in today's society where news of severe mental illnesses and suicide are common occurrences. This book could be the doorway to a much needed conversation and I would recommend it to any reader. This title is set to release October 2, 2018.#books #bookstagram #ARC #reviewer #mentalhealth
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  • Audrey Laurey
    January 1, 1970
    This is my new favorite anthology from young adult authors. Many current YA authors offer their own personal stories on mental illness, the different ways it manifests, and what mental illness means to the authors through their experiences. Many of the stories were relatable and funny, then heartbreaking. I think this is a really important and exceptional collection that I am going to be highly recommending to everyone.
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  • Audrey Laurey
    January 1, 1970
    This is my new favorite anthology from young adult authors. Many current YA authors offer their own personal stories on mental illness, the different ways it manifests, and what mental illness means to the authors through their experiences. Many of the stories were relatable and funny, then heartbreaking. I think this is a really important and exceptional collection that I am going to be highly recommending to everyone.
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  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    People need to talk about mental health more often. This book is very important and I'm glad it exists! It was cool to read about some authors that I've already read and their journeys.
  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    Diverse and extremely personal essays in this anthology. Mental illness, neurodiversity, suicide, and anxiety are covered with care and deep emotion. This collection is aimed at teens, but adults can get a lot out of this too. Learn from someone else who shares your diagnosis, or learn to be a more supportive friend, family member, human.Special note: there are extensive bibliographies and other resources scattered throughout and included at the end. A fantastic collection of resources for those Diverse and extremely personal essays in this anthology. Mental illness, neurodiversity, suicide, and anxiety are covered with care and deep emotion. This collection is aimed at teens, but adults can get a lot out of this too. Learn from someone else who shares your diagnosis, or learn to be a more supportive friend, family member, human.Special note: there are extensive bibliographies and other resources scattered throughout and included at the end. A fantastic collection of resources for those inspired by the text.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Jensen's first anthology about feminism blew me away and was visually stunning. This book about mental health is equally as engaging, visually appealing, and important. Add this to your YA nonfiction collection in October 2018.
  • Alessandra
    January 1, 1970
    This is an amazing book and it should be in every public library. The essays present a wide spectrum of mental illness experience, covering many different illnesses, the different relationships a person might have with their illness, and more. I made liberal use of my highlighter while reading, as I often found the authors eloquently expressing things that I have struggled to put into words. If there had been a book like this when I was a teen, I would have benefitted greatly (and I am still ben This is an amazing book and it should be in every public library. The essays present a wide spectrum of mental illness experience, covering many different illnesses, the different relationships a person might have with their illness, and more. I made liberal use of my highlighter while reading, as I often found the authors eloquently expressing things that I have struggled to put into words. If there had been a book like this when I was a teen, I would have benefitted greatly (and I am still benefitting greatly from this book as an adult). I cannot say enough positive things about this wonderful book.The following essays resonated particularly strongly with me:"Defying Definition" by Shaun David Hutchinson"Defining the Thing is the Trick" by Ashley Holstrom"What I Know and What I Don't Know" by Dior Vargas"What's, Well, "Crazy?"" by Sarah Hannah Gomez"The Lightbulb, the Broom, and the Work They Didn't Tell You About" by Kelly Jensen
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  • Kellie Marnoch
    January 1, 1970
    Ugh, this has authors I'm desperate to read, but others I don't wanna touch with a ten-foot bargepole.
  • Sarah Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote an essay for this! Cannot wait to read everyone else's.
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