The Incredible True Story of the Making of the Eve of Destruction
Arkansas, 1984: The town of Griffin Flat is known for almost nothing other than its nuclear missile silos. MAD—Mutually Assured Destruction—is a fear every local lives with and tries to ignore. Unfortunately that’s impossible now that film moguls have picked Griffin Flat as the location for a new nuclear holocaust movie, aptly titled The Eve of Destruction.When sixteen-year-old Laura Ratliff wins a walk-on role (with a plus-one!) thanks to a radio call-in contest, she is more relieved than excited. Mingling with Hollywood stars on the set of a phony nuclear war is a perfect distraction from being the only child in her real nuclear family—which has also been annihilated. Her parents are divorced. Her mother has recently married one of the only African-American men in town. Her father, an officer in the Strategic Air Command, is absent…except when he phones at odd hours to hint at an impending catastrophe. But isn’t that his job?Laura’s only real friend is her new stepbrother, Terrence. She picks him as her plus-one and manages to enrage both her fair-weather friends and film crew. (Now the script has to adjust for “another black.”) But that adjustment is nothing compared to what happens on set after the scripted nuclear explosion. Because nobody seems to know if a real nuclear bomb has detonated or not.

The Incredible True Story of the Making of the Eve of Destruction Details

TitleThe Incredible True Story of the Making of the Eve of Destruction
Author
ReleaseNov 13th, 2018
PublisherSoho Teen
ISBN-139781616959036
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Historical, Humor

The Incredible True Story of the Making of the Eve of Destruction Review

  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    The Incredible True Story of the Making of the Eve of Destruction is a story told in a moment. Not in a single moment. But it's located within a specific moment in history, 1984. When the cold war and fear of nuclear devastation is firmly rooted in the consciousness of the American public. Because of this, the book feels real and tangible. As if you could reach your hands into the pages and touch a fragment of history.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- Arkansas, 1984: The town of Griffin Flat is known for almost nothing other than its nuclear missile silos. MAD—Mutually Assured Destruction—is a fear every local lives with and tries to ignore. Unfortunately, that’s impossible now that film moguls have picked Griffin Flat as the location for a new nuclear holocaust movie, aptly titled The Eve of Destruction. When sixteen I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- Arkansas, 1984: The town of Griffin Flat is known for almost nothing other than its nuclear missile silos. MAD—Mutually Assured Destruction—is a fear every local lives with and tries to ignore. Unfortunately, that’s impossible now that film moguls have picked Griffin Flat as the location for a new nuclear holocaust movie, aptly titled The Eve of Destruction. When sixteen-year-old Laura Ratliff wins a walk-on role (with a plus-one!) thanks to a radio call-in contest, she is more relieved than excited. Mingling with Hollywood stars on the set of a phoney nuclear war is a perfect distraction from being the only child in her real nuclear family—which has also been annihilated. Her parents are divorced, and her mother has recently remarried. Her father, an officer in the Strategic Air Command, is absent . . . except when he phones at odd hours to hint at an impending catastrophe. But isn’t that his job?Laura’s only real friend is her new stepbrother, Terrence. She picks him as her plus-one for the film shoot, enraging her fair-weather friends. But their anger is nothing compared to what happens on set after the scripted nuclear explosion. Because nobody seems to know if a real nuclear bomb has detonated or not.As twelve-year-olds cannot join Netgalley, I requested this book for my nephew. This is his review:I really enjoyed this book although it made me very nervous about nuclear war. It was well written and I really enjoyed the story. It's a book that I would read again as I liked it that much although it does make me want to join Martin Sheen in a "no nukes" rally. Cool book!!
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  • OutlawPoet
    January 1, 1970
    This one gets an okay from me.I loved the 80's setting and think the author did a great job on it.I hated, hated, hated all the footnotes. I would have liked it if there was a little humor thrown into them, but they were just explanations of everything from War Games to Sixteen Candles. And there are a lot of them through the first half of the book!Our characters were terrific. The author has a gift for characterization and most of the characters were extremely vibrant.But...our plot.It takes a This one gets an okay from me.I loved the 80's setting and think the author did a great job on it.I hated, hated, hated all the footnotes. I would have liked it if there was a little humor thrown into them, but they were just explanations of everything from War Games to Sixteen Candles. And there are a lot of them through the first half of the book!Our characters were terrific. The author has a gift for characterization and most of the characters were extremely vibrant.But...our plot.It takes a long time for our big *thing* to happen and once it does, the reactions of the characters are sort of weird. They didn't seem authentic. And the plot just kind of fizzles out into nothing much at all. I found myself slightly amused, but more confused...like what exactly was the point?I think the book is unique and will definitely find its audience. I just wasn't that audience for it.
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  • Trish Leggat
    January 1, 1970
    I got this eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is my FIRST Edelweiss book I've been approved for and I'm excited! I had read about this site and how difficult it can be to get approved for books so imagine my delight when I got an email through confirming I've been approved for one :DI initially applied for this because.... Yup, you guessed it! I liked the cover. The cover intrigued me and it stood out from the others on the page at the time. I was immediately draw I got this eARC from Edelweiss in exchange for a fair and honest review. This is my FIRST Edelweiss book I've been approved for and I'm excited! I had read about this site and how difficult it can be to get approved for books so imagine my delight when I got an email through confirming I've been approved for one :DI initially applied for this because.... Yup, you guessed it! I liked the cover. The cover intrigued me and it stood out from the others on the page at the time. I was immediately drawn to this because of the colours on it and also the name.This is set in the cold war era in Southern USA - Arkansas in 1984 to be exact. We follow 16-year-old Laura Ratliff who lives in the town of Griffin Flat. Griffin Flat is known solely for being a town surrounded by missile silos. In the middle of the cold war. MAD (Mutually Assured Destruction) is something that the town live with (and try to forget) every, single day. Then Hollywood comes knocking on the town's door. They have picked Griffin Flat as the location for a Nuclear Holocaust movie. When Laura wins a competition for a walk on part (with a plus one!) we get to see behind the scenes and if it all goes to plan. It will all go to plan? Right?!?!?!The Positives:- Footnotes!!!!!!!!!!!! As an avid Terry Pratchett fan, this was a delight to see. The way that the author used footnotes to give more context to the era and explain some of the day to say was really well done. A word of warning though - the current lay out in the eBook doesn't work as the page breaks aren't clear for the footnotes - sometimes you have to go forward or back 2-3 pages to find the footnote that it relates to.- The setting - I can't say I've ever read a book that was set in the cold war era, and if I have it certainly wasn't set in Arkansas! It was different and relatable, but completely out the box for me. It was different aspect to a part of history that I don't really know a whole lot about.- Some of the themes discussed - This touches on racism in the 80s a lot with a dysfunctional, multi race family. I feel like it deals with it well for what feels like a book on the younger end of the scale. It doesn't over power the storyline but reflects how it might have been then. There is also a lot of social anxiety and mental health issues touched on as well which i liked. Its all related to the nuclear bombs and the anxiety around that but its well done. We also have the ever challenging topic of divorce and how teens deal with it. Without going into spoiler territory it was nice to see a non 2.4 children approach to it.The Negatives:- The predictability of the plot line. I think we all saw what was coming. It was enjoyable but predictable, I had worked it out about 2/3 of the way into the book, if even thatThe Hollywood characters. Can you say stereotypical?!?! I didn't like them and I didn't particularly see the need to have them match the stereotypes that are out there. Why have the characters you see on screen match the personalities off. I think this would have been a lot more intriguing if they were switched up!- The depth of the themes discussed. Now, while i have the themes in my positives and I've praised how its been dealt with it did feel a little bit like there was one theme too many touched on. There was an element of the things being touched on (Laura's relationship with her Stepbrother Terrence for example) were only being scratched at and there was so much more to say. At the end of the day, however, this is an end of world drama novel, not a Judy Blume novel dealing with teenage live and growing up. That being said, I would LOVE to hear a Judy Blume style novel done in companion to this in Laura's voice- The pacing of the book. This one was a slow starter with some quick bursts of happening through out. It could be a little hard to follow at times when you hit one of the bursts of drama, typically around an anxiety attack or a fight.Overall I did enjoy this and I can imagine other people will really enjoy it. I would recommend it but I probably wouldn't pick it back up - 2.5* out of 5 for me. I'm rounding up to 3* because it was overall a decent book and a positive read :) Edelweiss scores out of 10 so I've going for 5/10 to match the 2.5/5 stars on here :)https://readinglife342128355.wordpres...
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  • Brooke
    January 1, 1970
    The year is 1984, and much like the George Orwell book of the same name, sixteen-year-old Laura Ratliff is afraid that her life will soon resemble a dystopian novel. Fear of the atomic bomb is real, the Cold War is raging, and Laura is convinced that the “flash” will happen in her lifetime. She just doesn’t want to die young. It doesn’t help that Hollywood has planted themselves in the midst of her small Arkansas town to film the sequel to the box office smash hit, The Year That Never Was. The s The year is 1984, and much like the George Orwell book of the same name, sixteen-year-old Laura Ratliff is afraid that her life will soon resemble a dystopian novel. Fear of the atomic bomb is real, the Cold War is raging, and Laura is convinced that the “flash” will happen in her lifetime. She just doesn’t want to die young. It doesn’t help that Hollywood has planted themselves in the midst of her small Arkansas town to film the sequel to the box office smash hit, The Year That Never Was. The sequel, The Eve of Destruction, has taken over her hometown ... and her life. Especially since Laura has won a walk-on role in the film by correctly answering several incredibly difficult nuclear-related questions in a local radio station contest (Laura is part scientific genius, but the way.) Now there’s really no escaping the bomb. While Laura enjoys herself on the set of the film, and even finds some ways to allay her fears, things take a strange and destructive turn for the worse on the day the cast and crew are set to film the atomic bombing. There is a huge explosion, a brilliant flash of light, and a wave of unease as everyone tries to determine if they just got bombed for real. The Incredible True Story of the Making of the Eve of Destruction by Amy Brashear is set in the ‘80s, and does a fantastic of capturing the country’s fear that a USSR bomb could be in our future. This novel is full of cultural references to nuclear war preparations and drills, as well as to music and movies. Brashear shows readers that anticipating the bomb was a way of life, and through Laura, demonstrates what effect this doom and gloom had on our country’s youth. Despite an interesting premise and an atmospheric first half, much is left to be desired in this novel. Brashear packs the book with numerous random cultural references, and provides footnotes to explain them (as her target audience wouldn’t have even been born until nearly two decades after the events in this book.) While some of these footnotes are intriguing, many just give the basic facts, such as a movie’s premiere date and the starring actors. If young readers wanted to look up useless trivia about movies and music they’ve never send or heard, they now have the Internet for that. The footnotes quickly became a bore and were just something more to plod through in a novel that is in desperate need of plot and character development. Then there is the problem of the second half of the book, particularly when filming for The Eve of Destruction begins. Brashear introduces us to too many Hollywood caricatures, that 1) make the novel difficult to follow, and 2) remove any sort of connection that readers might have felt with the plot or characters. Even Laura’s personality seems to change, and the book turns into what seems to be a long stream of dialogue. Outrageous characters, unbelievable events ... it all amounts to “who cares?” When the maybe-maybe not nuclear explosion happens, things get even more over-the-top and I had a difficult time following what was going on. It’s not a good sign when you read a novel and feel like you’re missing something vital. In all, you may enjoy reading this book for the nuclear war references, but don’t expect an outstanding plot or characters. Thank you to NetGalley and Soho Teen for an ARC copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Niko
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced e-copy of this novel from NetGalley.I'm always looking for exciting new books to introduce to my students. As a literature teacher whose students don't speak English as their first language, it is hard to balance level-appropriate vocabulary and age-appropriate plot. For that reason, right off the bat I was SO thrilled to see the chapters of this book have footnotes. I thought it was a clever way for my readers who don't share the same cultural history to pick up the refer I received an advanced e-copy of this novel from NetGalley.I'm always looking for exciting new books to introduce to my students. As a literature teacher whose students don't speak English as their first language, it is hard to balance level-appropriate vocabulary and age-appropriate plot. For that reason, right off the bat I was SO thrilled to see the chapters of this book have footnotes. I thought it was a clever way for my readers who don't share the same cultural history to pick up the references without needing to ask or research. Ultimately, that was that I enjoyed most about the novel.The main character, Laura, has a very authentic teenage voice. She talks comics and music and friends like any other kid her age. She's dealing with some big family changes as well as living with the never-ending anxiety of an impending nuclear attack (this is the 80s after all). While I find Laura a believable character, as an educator there were a few things that made me take pause, most notably her continual judgement of the high school sport's players as being stupid and leeching off of her intelligence. I'd hesitate to group read this novel in my classes that have academically struggling students or sports players. Laura's paranoia/anxiety growing throughout the novel made me anxious as well, which is the mark of good story-telling but also a signal for warning for my own students whose anxieties might be affected.The novel touches on a lot of important social issues such as racism, survival in the threat of war, and family divorce and integrating with step-family. We do see Laura's relationship with her step-brother Terrence grow through the fall-out, but I felt a lot of these topics were touched on and not deeply dug into. Realizing this is an End of the World novel and that should be the primary focus, I feel like issues that could make up entire novels were used as small plot-points or afterthoughts and I was left wanting to discover more about them.This novel doesn't play lightly. Laura's panic about the end of the world is very real, her observations and judgments are very up-front, even the events and consequences of The Event are apologetically detailed. I appreciate that rawness in story-telling. There were times when I would blink in shock over a description of what was happening (especially the teeth during Laura's heated conversation with another character), but respect it as an accurate depiction of what would happen and the author for not sugar-coating the gravity of the situation.Making of the Eve of Destruction is a novel that invites a lot of questions and discussion. How does one prepare for and survive a nuclear attack? As the filming for Eve of Destruction proceeds, what is manufactured and what is real? Even Laura's parting foot-note begs the question of whether or not the novel was told in a reliable narrative. Teaching in South Korea, I believed my students could have related well to this novel, being that North Korea is just above our heads. I think this is a creatively told and entertaining story. I would suggest it for anyone who's into apocalyptic stories or likes period novels set in the 80s. After reading this novel I don't know that it would be appropriate to add to my curriculum, but it would definitely be a decent choice for any of my bold readers to take off of my bookshelf.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I got a free ARC for this book trough Edelweiss, in exchange for an honest review. I initially requested this book because the cover looked really cool (yes, I judge books by their cover. Quite often actually), the plot sounded interesting and on top of that the main characters name was also Laura (I mentioned this as a reason to request the book and I like to think it played a part :) ).Trigger warnings for this book are racism, nuclear related anxiety and nuclear threat/nuclear bomb.I had neve I got a free ARC for this book trough Edelweiss, in exchange for an honest review. I initially requested this book because the cover looked really cool (yes, I judge books by their cover. Quite often actually), the plot sounded interesting and on top of that the main characters name was also Laura (I mentioned this as a reason to request the book and I like to think it played a part :) ).Trigger warnings for this book are racism, nuclear related anxiety and nuclear threat/nuclear bomb.I had never read about the nuclear threat during the cold war. I just learned about the cold war during history lessons but they were mainly focused on Europe and how we were sandwiched between two big countries with nuclear bombs and we couldn't really do anything. This means I never realized the impact it had on people living in America so close to nuclear bombs, so the theme of the book was really new to me.Let me start of to say that I really enjoyed the book. I loved reading about that time period and how people were trying to deal with the nuclear presence. It was very well written and I couldn't wait to finish it.(view spoiler)[This book relies on footnotes to explain quite a lot, usually things like information on songs or athletes and explaining acronyms. I'm not sure whether I liked that, it interrupted my reading flow because I had to read the footnote and try to find the passage I had just read and that sometimes up to three or four times a page. This book, on the other hand, is supposed to be written by the main character, Laura Ratliff, so the footnotes can also be read as explanations later added to her story. In short, it helped the story but I think it was done a little too often.I liked the build up to the actual chapters of the shooting of the movie. You really got to know Laura and her family dynamics and her way of thinking. This part didn't feel rushed nor stretched out. The author did a really good job ofThe ending threw me off, I totally hadn't expected a real bomb. It sounds really unlikely that a bomb would go off at the exact same time as their fake bomb, and there's one remark about it I didn't really understand, but the buildup is so good that it is actually believable. Them having to find out for themselves what had happened and not wanting to believe it was so well written I totally felt like I was with the main characters. I didn't want to believe it myself. I was in denial until they stepped out of the bunker and found army men who confirmed it. I have to say that Rodney's death didn't do me a lot. I'm not sure if it was supposed to or if it's just me but I was just like: Yeah alright, one more person to die in this book.I loved the twist at the end where you're suddenly doubting the realness of the situation and you're just left with all these conflicting feelings. (hide spoiler)] I wrote a few notes after finishing it to help me write this review and most of them were variations of: wow...what just happened.I totally recommend this book. It is well written, an interesting topic and well thought-out. Really, the only not entirely positive thing I have to say about the book, is about the footnotes and that is also partly personal preference.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    Actual Score- 2.5This book is about the making of a nuclear disaster movie that ends with Hollywood setting off a real bomb. The story is interesting, but it has some issues. The main character wins a contest to be in a walk on role in the movie. She decides to take her stepbrother with her and this freaks everyone out because he is black and there can't be too many black people in the movie.🙄 The main character is also terrified of nuclear war, so why she would ever volunteer to be a victim of Actual Score- 2.5This book is about the making of a nuclear disaster movie that ends with Hollywood setting off a real bomb. The story is interesting, but it has some issues. The main character wins a contest to be in a walk on role in the movie. She decides to take her stepbrother with her and this freaks everyone out because he is black and there can't be too many black people in the movie.🙄 The main character is also terrified of nuclear war, so why she would ever volunteer to be a victim of an atomic bomb is beyond me. Overall, I did like her, her stepbrother, and her best friend Max though. Every other character kinda sucked and were stereotypical. My biggest issue with this book was the ending. There was a lot of build up, but when the bomb goes off it is super anticlimactic. The main characters don't realize that it was the bomb, but when they do, they are super calm even though the main character was having multiple panic attacks throughout the novel at the thought of the bomb going off. Then everyone they knows dies and it is kind of glanced over. Finally, one of the survivors is killed by an army man because they thought their superior said "shoot" when he said, "shit." I can't make this stuff up. Then the epilogue is just like we all stayed close and moved to Colorado. We went through years of trauma (never see the trauma) and healing (never see the healing), but made a butt ton of money from our story even though no body believes it. The freaking footnotes. Those were super annoying and added nothing to the story. I get that this is set in the 80s, which was wonderful and overall done well, but the footnotes just explained 80s facts with no real purpose. I get that this was written for teens who have no true reference to the 80s, but still. They can freaking google the references if they are confused or move on because they don't really matter to understanding the story. I don't think a reader needs to know that this movie was made in this year and stared these actors. It isn't that important. Overall, the concept was interesting, but I wanted more about the fallout than just wrapping it up quickly.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I received an eARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. While the 1950s were known for their obsession and terror surrounding the atomic bomb, nothing has changed in Laura’s Alabama town during the 1980s. She is sure that if an atomic war began, her town would be one of the first to get hit. Laura is an expert on all things atomic holocaust and these skills help her win a walk-on role in the atomic apocalypse movie being filmed in her town. It is going to be tough to figure out wh I received an eARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. While the 1950s were known for their obsession and terror surrounding the atomic bomb, nothing has changed in Laura’s Alabama town during the 1980s. She is sure that if an atomic war began, her town would be one of the first to get hit. Laura is an expert on all things atomic holocaust and these skills help her win a walk-on role in the atomic apocalypse movie being filmed in her town. It is going to be tough to figure out who her plus one is going to be, considering of her two friends, one is annoying and the other is totally self-involved. Laura decides to take her stepbrother, Terrence, who is the best thing to come out of her mother’s infidelity. Things start becoming more and more real as the filming of the disaster movie continues. On the day that the town is supposed to be filmed as being bombed, things become more real than anyone ever thought was possible. Overall, I enjoyed this book, simply because I like end of the world books. It was a quick story, the footnotes didn’t really flow or work for me, but perhaps in the final product with the formatting developed it may make more sense and flow better.
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    In this novel set in the 1980's a young girl wins a contest to go on the set of a movie that is about a nuclear attack. I will admit that I did not finish this book but I wanted to explain why I didn't. First off, to start with the positive, I enjoyed the cultural references to the 80's with the footnotes. I do think they were just a touch overdone and it was almost as if the author tried to see just how many she could fit into the dialogue. I felt that the characters were not introduced properl In this novel set in the 1980's a young girl wins a contest to go on the set of a movie that is about a nuclear attack. I will admit that I did not finish this book but I wanted to explain why I didn't. First off, to start with the positive, I enjoyed the cultural references to the 80's with the footnotes. I do think they were just a touch overdone and it was almost as if the author tried to see just how many she could fit into the dialogue. I felt that the characters were not introduced properly. The book just throws names into the plot with little to no introduction which causes the reader to not care about them. I also felt that the dialogue in many parts was unnatural. I know a lot of older people and they don't call everyone "dear" or "sweetie." I appreciate the effort of this idea but the execution fell flat for me.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This one sounded so cool that I was excited to snag an ARC when a copy came into the library. But ultimately, I was disappointed by this one. I found the footnotes pointless and distracting, the plot slow and boring, and the climax, falling action, and resolution supremely unsatisfying. Definitely wished I had picked a different read for our staff book group.Reviewed from an advance reader's copy, received by my library from the publisher.
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    Nice story, though a little random. Lots of the plot points (Laura's pushy friend, the director's racism, Laura's family issues) just kind of vanished. And good lord, the anachronisms. This was 1984, not 1994, so the following terms should not have been in the book: jump the shark, def, got owned, SUV, tinfoil hat, Cindy Crawford, just to name a few. Teachers would still have been showing movies via film strip, not VHS. Sloppy research.
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  • Bickering Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    For a more in-depth review watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfUnh...2.5 Rating: There are aspects of this book that are enjoyable. The end of the world angle may appeal to fans of apocalypse stories. However, the books tone felt a little off and aspects of the story felt confused.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    For a more in-depth review watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfUnh...In 1984, small town, Griffin Flat Arkansas has become the location for the new movie "The Eve of Destruction". Sixteen-year-old Laura Ratliff is the lucky winner of a walk on role in the movie. She will get to have a walk on role of the adaptation of one of her favorite books but Laura is in more concern with the possibility of nuclear war. Laura's experiences on the set turn out to be her worse nightmare come true in more For a more in-depth review watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfUnh...In 1984, small town, Griffin Flat Arkansas has become the location for the new movie "The Eve of Destruction". Sixteen-year-old Laura Ratliff is the lucky winner of a walk on role in the movie. She will get to have a walk on role of the adaptation of one of her favorite books but Laura is in more concern with the possibility of nuclear war. Laura's experiences on the set turn out to be her worse nightmare come true in more ways then she could have predicted. I had a very mixed reaction to this book. The first half of the book felt like a teen version of "Doctor Strangelove" and had moments of humor. However, after the onset explosion the book just kind of moved into a strange story that felt unnecessary. I received an eARC of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Reving
    January 1, 1970
    https://revingsblog.blogspot.com/2018...
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    The only thing The Incredible True Story of the Making of the Eve of Destruction has going for it is the nostalgia factor it evokes with its setting and with the protagonist that carefully annotates all cultural references she makes in her journal. Anyone who grew up in the eighties and nineties will enjoy the clothes, the food, the attitudes towards everything. You will remember the duck and cover drills and may even think about your own fear about nuclear holocaust during the height of the Col The only thing The Incredible True Story of the Making of the Eve of Destruction has going for it is the nostalgia factor it evokes with its setting and with the protagonist that carefully annotates all cultural references she makes in her journal. Anyone who grew up in the eighties and nineties will enjoy the clothes, the food, the attitudes towards everything. You will remember the duck and cover drills and may even think about your own fear about nuclear holocaust during the height of the Cold War. I enjoyed those parts of the story, even as it brought back some long-forgotten concerns of World War III and mutually assured destruction. That is where my enjoyment ends, however. The remainder of the story is too flippant for pleasure, mocking the movie industry and the fallout of having a movie made in your hometown. It tends to lighten the genuine threat of atomic warfare that was that era through poorly concealed jokes and way too much gallows humor. It is not even well-written enough to allow you to forgive some of its faults. I muddled through to the end because I was mildly curious to find out how it ended, and I am glad that I was able to assuage my curiosity to that end. I don’t regret reading it, but I do wish it had been better than it was.
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