The Bookshop Girl
This story is about a little girl named Property Jones, so-called because she was left in the lost property cupboard of a bookshop when she was five years old. Property loves living in the bookshop, but she has a whopper of a secret... she can't actually read! So Property doesn't see the newspaper article announcing the chance to win the Montgomery Book Emporium, the biggest and most magnificent bookshop in the world! When her family win the competition, Property finds herself moving to the Emporium, a magical place filled with floor upon floor of books and a very bad-tempered cat. But all is not at it seems at the Emporium and soon Property Jones finds herself in a whole heap of trouble.

The Bookshop Girl Details

TitleThe Bookshop Girl
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 2nd, 2017
PublisherScholastic
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fiction, Mystery, Writing, Books About Books

The Bookshop Girl Review

  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This middle grade read is an enjoyable one for many ages. This book harkened slightly to A Series of Unfortunate Events and The Mysterious Benedict Society for me. The mystery in this book is not a deep one but it was amusing nevertheless. I enjoyed the book's few illustrations and felt that they supplemented the text perfectly. My favorite part of the book was the author's use of the main character, Property Jones. When Property and her family run into trouble, she doesn't rely on her brother o This middle grade read is an enjoyable one for many ages. This book harkened slightly to A Series of Unfortunate Events and The Mysterious Benedict Society for me. The mystery in this book is not a deep one but it was amusing nevertheless. I enjoyed the book's few illustrations and felt that they supplemented the text perfectly. My favorite part of the book was the author's use of the main character, Property Jones. When Property and her family run into trouble, she doesn't rely on her brother or mom to solve the problem. She solves it herself (more than once). This message of girl power is extremely affirming and is just what young girls need to see more of in books geared toward their age group.I would recommend this book to anyone who likes to visit bookshops, new or used, to anyone who has ever smelled a book or closely examined one, to anyone who loves to write in the margins of a book, or gets lost in amazing illustrations. As a second grade teacher, this would definitely be above my students' reading level. Although I could use this book as a class read aloud, I think children would get more enjoyment out of this book by being able to read this book a year or two down the line from this grade level (hence the middle grade status).I received a free copy of this book from Edelweiss (it's not an ARC). You can go there to download a free copy as well!
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  • Laura Noakes
    January 1, 1970
    CHARM-FILLED & WONDERFUL. Read in one sitting!
  • Mehsi
    January 1, 1970
    I have been looking forward to this book for months, ever since I first saw it pop up on Twitter. I just had to have the book, a book about book stores? About a girl not being able to read while living in a book store? With mystery?I can hear you say: What? The MC lives in a book store but can't read? Nope, she can't read. As the first chapter tells us:"Property was eleven years old when our story begins. She had been living with the Joneses for six years. She loved them very much, and she was a I have been looking forward to this book for months, ever since I first saw it pop up on Twitter. I just had to have the book, a book about book stores? About a girl not being able to read while living in a book store? With mystery?I can hear you say: What? The MC lives in a book store but can't read? Nope, she can't read. As the first chapter tells us:"Property was eleven years old when our story begins. She had been living with the Joneses for six years. She loved them very much, and she was almost entirely happy there. But she was never completely happy, because she was keeping a secret from them, and it was a whopper:Property Jones couldn’t read."How did this girl not learn to read? Also, what is up with the name Property? Well you should read the book for that, I am not going to tell you everything! But this secret is really weighing on Property's shoulders, especially later when they win the price and get a huge book store as a price. She is worried her mom and her brother won't like her any more since she has fooled them for so many years. She worried they might also abandon her. I just felt so sorry for the girl. She has her reasons for not telling (read the book!). You can tell however that this girl wants nothing more than to read. Of course she is already quite satisfied with just looking, sniffing, smelling, feeling, opening the book, but she wants to learn those magical marks as well. I know I was rooting for her the entire book to tell people. To let them know, so they could help her out, because I was sure of one thing, these people won't just drop her because of her illiteracy. Oh no, both Michael and Netty are really sweet people. At least that is my impression from the book. Property was a terrific character though. Even if she can't read, she helped out in her way with the Emporium (yeah for pictures), and later with the villain and all the badness that happens she is the one who can help her family and friend out. They can't see the difference between certain objects, but she can. By smell, by colour, by other factors, and I just adored this. She didn't let the illiteracy stand in the way. She might not be able to read the words, but she knew a (view spoiler)[ forgery (hide spoiler)] when she saw one, and that truly is a really awesome skill. I so loved the Montgomery Book Emporium, it was absolutely fabulous and brilliant. There are floors upon floors of books, with magical contraptions, rooms full of books place in the most magnificent ways (like the dictionary room which is full of dictionaries and everything else is labelled and explained, or the sunken treasure room, with books in chests), I just wanted to go there and stay there for all day. Just enjoying every bit of it. Soaking it all up.I was just a bit stunned that we only got to enjoy it for so short in the book. I was truly looking forward to pages upon pages of it.Then again the format of the book was a bit unconventional. Not bad, oh no, not at all, I was just a bit startled (if that is the right word). Normally the villain would cause small heaps of trouble left and right and then the grand plan is revealed, and at times even executed if he isn't foiled by the MC and friends, but in this one it was just in a big BANG (with some smaller hints towards it, though I certainly didn't expect it to go this fast), and then it was up to Property and her family to figure out things and get revenge/get back what is theirs (which was absolutely fun).Montogomery, eh, I quite liked him (he reminded me a bit of Willy Wonka, not only with the whole giving away an emporium, but also the way he acted (eccentric), and some other things). My feelings for him at the beginning were a bit bleh, I was wondering what he was hiding, and also why he was acting like this, but then later on he turned out to be really reliable and a sweet and great character. I also have to mention The Gunther, also know as the cat that never leaves Property and loves sitting on her head or shoulders (yes, like a parrot, only then a bit more deadlier). The Gunther was adorable, and I loved how protective and helpful he was. He instantly took a liking to Property, and Property to him. He was a bit of demon, but still I loved him so much. He was a great character, and I am glad the author added him in the mix. The ending, and all that happens there? Exciting, terrific, and hilarious. I loved the plan Property created and how they executed it. Brilliant! Especially what they said to the villain later on, haha. He did not expect this.Oh, and I also kept reading the villain's name wrong. I thought it was with two LL's as that is how I see the name being spelled generally, but instead it was just with one L. I even had to flip back at times to make sure it was always with one L.The book is also stuffed to the brim with delightful illustrations, and I love how many of them there were and how well they captured all the characters. Everyone was exactly as how I would imagine them. Plus it was great fun to see the Emporium in pictures (though I could easily imagine it in my mind). So Sylvia Bishop and Ashley King did it again. Their first book: Erica's Elephant was wonderful, and they got another hit with this book. I can't wait to see what this duo will create next, I know for sure I will be pre-ordering, and reading it! I would highly recommend this book to everyone. You like books? Proper villains? A demon kitty? Mystery? A great plan? Secrets? You love illustrations to accompany the story? Then be sure to read this one!Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/
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  • Kristina
    January 1, 1970
    I was just looking for a book about books! 💞I enjoyed Property's adventures so much and fell in love with her little family and the amazing bookshop!I am a huge fan of bookish books and if you are too, then I definitely recommend! You'll most certainly like it ☺Kristina Z I was just looking for a book about books! 💞I enjoyed Property's adventures so much and fell in love with her little family and the amazing bookshop!I am a huge fan of bookish books and if you are too, then I definitely recommend! You'll most certainly like it ☺️Kristina Z
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  • Steph
    January 1, 1970
    A brilliant tale filled with mystery, magic and delight. I devoured this book quickly and I love the name Property. From the first but of the book to the very end, you have a story that will delight kids. I loved this so much!
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the publisherProperty Jones (so named because she was abandoned in a bookstore and put into the lost property cupboard by Michael Jones, whose mother Netty ends up adopting the girl) loves living and working in the White Hart bookstore with her family, but times are hard. When there is a contest to win the best bookshop in the UK, The Great Montgomery Book Emporium, Netty enters and is greatly relieved to win, since the White Hart was in danger of going under. The Emporium is a m ARC provided by the publisherProperty Jones (so named because she was abandoned in a bookstore and put into the lost property cupboard by Michael Jones, whose mother Netty ends up adopting the girl) loves living and working in the White Hart bookstore with her family, but times are hard. When there is a contest to win the best bookshop in the UK, The Great Montgomery Book Emporium, Netty enters and is greatly relieved to win, since the White Hart was in danger of going under. The Emporium is a mechanical bookshop, with fascinating rooms, and Michael and Property are thrilled to be there. However, not long after they arrive, Mr. Eliot Pink comes to inform them that Mr. Montgomery bought a draft of one of Shakespeare's books from him but never paid for it, so the Joneses must pay him 43 million pounds or forfeit the shop to him! Of course, they don't have that much money, but Property thinks she has seen the book. The family finds it, but it has been badly damaged. Something seems not quite right about both Mr. Pink and the book, and it's up to the children to find out why so they can save their fabulous new home. Property must struggle with another issue she is keeping a secret, and this complicates matters. Strengths: This was delightful, and any young reader who would love to like in a bookstore will adore this. There's a light mystery, cats, and lots and lots of tea. There are even a few illustrations, and the ARC came with the most adorable buttons! There is an undeniably British feel to this, so readers who enjoy Roald Dahl or Kate Saunders will want to read this. It's sort of a UK version of Mr. Lemoncello's Library, without quite as many cool rooms. Weaknesses: I had a lot of trouble believing that Property could keep her secret from Netty, but if I've learned nothing from UK middle grade lit, it's that most UK parents are apparently rather rubbish. (Ahem.)What I really think: I would definitely purchase this for an elementary library. I'm debating for middle school, because I spend so much on these easier readers last year.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Sweet, charming, and full of heart, with a wonderfully cozy and classic feel to the writing. And seriously, it's a book about a girl who gets to live in a bookstore (first a normal one and then a nigh-on magical one, although it's described merely as "mechanical") - so what were the chances that I wouldn't enjoy it? ;)As a kid, this would have been an all-five-stars book for me. As an adult, I still truly enjoyed it, but I also kept on getting tripped up by a few significant logic issues behind Sweet, charming, and full of heart, with a wonderfully cozy and classic feel to the writing. And seriously, it's a book about a girl who gets to live in a bookstore (first a normal one and then a nigh-on magical one, although it's described merely as "mechanical") - so what were the chances that I wouldn't enjoy it? ;)As a kid, this would have been an all-five-stars book for me. As an adult, I still truly enjoyed it, but I also kept on getting tripped up by a few significant logic issues behind the whimsy. First of all, I don't understand why the author set this story in modern London and yet there's never any possibility of either child in the family attending school OR being homeschooled. It would have been so easy to set it in an earlier historical era, before the time of compulsory education and social workers, when that would have been genuinely plausible - and nothing else about the story (including the dialogue) would have had to change - but since it is clearly set in modern times, I kept getting hung up on worrying about that part, as a boring adult (and as a parent)!Similarly, in the mechanical bookstore full of amazing rooms, I kept worrying about who exactly fed the various animals who lived in the various rooms. This is what comes of being a nearly-40-year-old mum who can't stop thinking about how all the boring details of household life are actually managed! But I am certain that no kids (the actual target audience) will get as distracted as I was by those aspects - and I know that my own kids certainly won't when I read them this book...which I will, because it really is delightful! I read it all within a day, and it was so much fun despite my boring adult nitpicks. I only wish I'd been able to read it aged 9! It would have been PERFECT. :)
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  • Lisa B.
    January 1, 1970
    Property Jones lives in a bookstore with her adoptive family - Mom, Netty and brother, Michael. When the family wins the Great Montgomery Book Emporium the three of them give up their little bookstore and move into the book emporium. Property takes with her a long kept secret.Oh what fun this middle school book was to read. Property is one observant young lady and she uses her skills to save the family from a unpleasant dilemma. By the end of the story, Property gets to unburden herself of her s Property Jones lives in a bookstore with her adoptive family - Mom, Netty and brother, Michael. When the family wins the Great Montgomery Book Emporium the three of them give up their little bookstore and move into the book emporium. Property takes with her a long kept secret.Oh what fun this middle school book was to read. Property is one observant young lady and she uses her skills to save the family from a unpleasant dilemma. By the end of the story, Property gets to unburden herself of her secret and discovers that all is right in her world.I love reading middle school books with a positive message. This was a fun and fast read. I think this is just the book to give to a few lucky middle schoolers I happen to know. I'm pretty sure they are going to like Property just as much as I did.My thanks to Peachtree Publishers and Netgalley.
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  • Luna
    January 1, 1970
    While I’m relatively certain I have one of the best bookshops in the country on my doorstep I do wish Montgomery Book Emporium was real. A bookshop like that would be the ruin of me, but in the best possible way.The Bookshop Girl is magical. Anyone who adores books will love the description of the Montgomery Book Emporium. Added to that you have Property and her family, their original bookshop, an absurd (in the best way) adventure and a cat.It did not take me very long to read but I enjoyed The While I’m relatively certain I have one of the best bookshops in the country on my doorstep I do wish Montgomery Book Emporium was real. A bookshop like that would be the ruin of me, but in the best possible way.The Bookshop Girl is magical. Anyone who adores books will love the description of the Montgomery Book Emporium. Added to that you have Property and her family, their original bookshop, an absurd (in the best way) adventure and a cat.It did not take me very long to read but I enjoyed The Bookshop Girl from start to finish.
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  • Stacey (prettybooks)
    January 1, 1970
    The Bookshop Girl is a bonkers story. Property Jones is so-called because she was discovered as a five-year-old in the lost property section of a bookshop and adopted by the bookish Jones family. Property loves books. She really does. But she's hiding a secret: she cannot read.One day, the Jones family win a prize draw to run the famous Montgomery Book Emporium. With the help of an extremely grumpy and oddball cat, the Jones family must solve a dastardly mystery or lose everything – books an' al The Bookshop Girl is a bonkers story. Property Jones is so-called because she was discovered as a five-year-old in the lost property section of a bookshop and adopted by the bookish Jones family. Property loves books. She really does. But she's hiding a secret: she cannot read.One day, the Jones family win a prize draw to run the famous Montgomery Book Emporium. With the help of an extremely grumpy and oddball cat, the Jones family must solve a dastardly mystery or lose everything – books an' all. Continue reading this review over on Pretty Books.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Would you love to live in a bookstore? What if you didn't know how to read, would you still want to live there? This is the life of Property Jones. She was abandoned in a bookstore when she was very young and raised by the bookstore owner, Netty Jones and her son Michael. Property kept a secret for six years - she never learned how to read- but she pretended she did. The longer she went on pretending that she could read, the harder it was to tell the truth. However, that became the least of Prop Would you love to live in a bookstore? What if you didn't know how to read, would you still want to live there? This is the life of Property Jones. She was abandoned in a bookstore when she was very young and raised by the bookstore owner, Netty Jones and her son Michael. Property kept a secret for six years - she never learned how to read- but she pretended she did. The longer she went on pretending that she could read, the harder it was to tell the truth. However, that became the least of Property's problems when her family won the greatest bookstore in all of Britain. The Jones' couldn't believe their luck when they won Albert H. Montgomery's Book Emporium. Little did they know that the reason Mr. Montgomery was so eager to get out is that he bought a very rare and expensive piece of literature but he ruined it by spilling lemonade on it. He owed a very mean man a very large amount of money and he wanted the Joneses to take the fall for it. As Mr. Eliot Pink proceeds to take everything away from the Jones, Property discovers a secret that the evil Mr. Pink wants to stay hidden - the book he sold to Mr. Montgomery is a fake. Now Property has been locked into one of the many rooms in the Emporium and she can't tell her secret to anyone. Will Property be able to escape the room and alert her family of what is going on? Will Property's embarrassing secret that she cannot read ever be revealed? Will Property's family be kicked out of their home or can she expose what Mr. Pink is doing? Read this exciting story of family, friends, and determination, not to mention one of the most amazing bookstores ever!Follow me:Blog - Blazer Tales - https://blazertales.weebly.com/Facebook - Laurie’s Library Place - https://www.facebook.com/LauriesLibra...Instagram - laurieslibrary - https://www.instagram.com/laurieslibr...Twitter - @laurieevans27Goodreads - Laurie Purser - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1...Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/auburngirl2...YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCulD...
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Property Jones lives in a bookstore – but she cannot read! Little does she know, her secret just may save her family’s future.I am a sucker for books about books or set in bookstores/libraries or where reading is central to the plot. *Check*Check*Check* This book had it all! Property is a brilliant young girl who was “found” in her adopted family’s lost-and-found cupboard within their small bookstore. She is quite happy in her life with them and with her unique first name. When the family wins a Property Jones lives in a bookstore – but she cannot read! Little does she know, her secret just may save her family’s future.I am a sucker for books about books or set in bookstores/libraries or where reading is central to the plot. *Check*Check*Check* This book had it all! Property is a brilliant young girl who was “found” in her adopted family’s lost-and-found cupboard within their small bookstore. She is quite happy in her life with them and with her unique first name. When the family wins a large book emporium in a drawing, their lives change as their book surroundings become mountainous!The idea of the rotating rooms (I pictured a large Ferris wheel placing rooms in front of doorways) with their spectacular themes spurs the imagination. And, if you need a little bit of help nudging those memory-pictures into place, the illustrations of Poly Bernatene are simply marvelous! So, yes, the setting is top-notch. But the mystery that is solved by the young girl with the secret of not being able to read just makes this story terrific. We all struggled, at some point, with putting those mysterious forms into letters and words. Some struggle with it longer than others. Property took her lack of reading-skill and wove into a power of observation. Her attentiveness solves her family’s dilemma.This was a wonderful tale that is sure to enchant young readers. Once they inhale this one, they should race to the wonderful world of Mr. Lemoncello and immerse themselves in Chris Grabenstein’s great stories!
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  • TheMadHatter
    January 1, 1970
    I have been reading this book with my daughter over the last week. At about 180 pages it is the perfect sized book for children transitioning to chapter books. There are still pictures, but quite a few double pages with no pictures which I knew would challenge her as she is very much into the visuals. We both survived it though!The book is about a young girl called Property (so named because she was found in a lost property cupboard) who, with her adopted family, wins a (magical) bookshop with H I have been reading this book with my daughter over the last week. At about 180 pages it is the perfect sized book for children transitioning to chapter books. There are still pictures, but quite a few double pages with no pictures which I knew would challenge her as she is very much into the visuals. We both survived it though!The book is about a young girl called Property (so named because she was found in a lost property cupboard) who, with her adopted family, wins a (magical) bookshop with Hogwarts style changing rooms. However, there are some not so nice book forgers on the scene.....My daughter ABSOLUTELY loved this book. She even said that she was going to keep it forever. Really, what more could any-one ask? A future book hoarder in the making!!! For her this was a five star book. It didn't quite have the same magic for me being MUCH older and much more cynical so for me it was an enjoyable three star read (For our combined average of four stars).The Gunther (the cat) was easily a fave character for us both. My daughter now wants a kitten called Gunther. Beware that this book has a secondary purpose of fostering "I want a cat called Gunther" propoganda that you will have to deal with for a while after your close that last page!!!!!A great book for children around 8-10 years of age.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Think Willy Wonka but you win a bookshop instead of a chocolate factory mixed with the mystery of A Series of Unfortunate Events, and you get The Bookshop Girl. Property Jones and her family own a small cute bookshop and on a whim enter a contest to win the Montgomery Book Emporium. They know books so who better to run the best bookshop in London.What I liked about it: magic, Property herself, the bookstore cat, lots and lots of vivid book descriptions and the happy ending. There wasn't anything Think Willy Wonka but you win a bookshop instead of a chocolate factory mixed with the mystery of A Series of Unfortunate Events, and you get The Bookshop Girl. Property Jones and her family own a small cute bookshop and on a whim enter a contest to win the Montgomery Book Emporium. They know books so who better to run the best bookshop in London.What I liked about it: magic, Property herself, the bookstore cat, lots and lots of vivid book descriptions and the happy ending. There wasn't anything I didn't like except that I wished it was way longer.I see some reviews from 2017, so maybe this was picked up by a new publisher or something, but the book I read will be in stores October 1, 2018Please note that I received a free advance E ARC of this book from Edelweiss+ without a review requirement or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that, I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.The Bookshop Girl by Sylvia Bishop
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  • Shelley Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    The Bookshop Girl by Sylvia Bishop is the story of Property Jones, a girl who was abandoned at a used bookshop when she was 5 years old. The Jones family takes her in and she helps run the bookshop. They win a raffle and receive ownership of The Great Montgomery Book Emporium. It's a marvelous world of books in a truly unique building, but there is a mystery to be solved. A feisty cat named Gunther helps Property and her family try to save the bookshop. It's a fun, action-packed, humorous myster The Bookshop Girl by Sylvia Bishop is the story of Property Jones, a girl who was abandoned at a used bookshop when she was 5 years old. The Jones family takes her in and she helps run the bookshop. They win a raffle and receive ownership of The Great Montgomery Book Emporium. It's a marvelous world of books in a truly unique building, but there is a mystery to be solved. A feisty cat named Gunther helps Property and her family try to save the bookshop. It's a fun, action-packed, humorous mystery full of secrets, forgeries, adventure, and family bonding. Property learns to have confidence in herself and trust the love of family. All details are nicely tied up at the end. Also included is a Q&A with the author about the story and her writing process.
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  • Charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    A fun story of a bookselling family who win a giveaway of a magnificent book emporium, only to find that their new bookstore comes with a mystery that could take everything away from them....a good one for the 3rd or 4th grade young bibliophile who enjoys fiction that stretch the bounds of realism without become fantasy. Bonus kitten of great intelligence and fierceness.
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  • Melodie Pearse
    January 1, 1970
    “The Bookshop Girl” is a whimisical story about an illiterate young character, Property, who lives in a bookshop. This story has a similar feel to “A Wrinkle in Time” and pulls on the reader’s imagination to create the described world. My fifth grade self would have enjoyed reading about Property’s experiences and I will certainly recommend to this book to my students. I received an advanced reading copy from the publisher via NetGalley.
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  • Samantha Novak
    January 1, 1970
    The Bookshop Girl was an OUTSTANDING book for and kid who loves: adventure, mischief, and a good mystery to solve. I loved all the big words and long but, interesting sentences that the author used. Never did I get bored or tired but, glued and stuck to the pages of this book. So to every kid who loves a good mystery, this is the book for you!
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  • Korie
    January 1, 1970
    Such a cute story with mystery and intrigue. It was so easy to read also the illustrations were adorable!
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I love the way this book was written. The plot is nice, but it's the way Bishop writes that I can't get over.
  • Michelle Kidwell
    January 1, 1970
    The Bookshop Girlby Sylvia Bishop Illus by Poly BernateneMyrick Marketing & Media, LLCPeachtree PublishersMiddle GradePub Date 01 Oct 2018I am reviewing a copy of The BookShop Girl through Peach Tree Publishing and Netgalley:This book is the perfect book for middle graders, full of a young hero who is trying to save her families Book Emporium from the grasp of a nasty villain.Property Jones family owns the Book Emporium, they won it in a contest but Property has a secret, she can't read.The 
The Bookshop Girl
by Sylvia Bishop Illus by Poly Bernatene
Myrick Marketing & Media, LLC
Peachtree Publishers
Middle Grade
Pub Date 01 Oct 2018
I am reviewing a copy of The BookShop Girl through Peach Tree Publishing and Netgalley:
This book is the perfect book for middle graders, full of a young hero who is trying to save her families Book Emporium from the grasp of a nasty villain.Property Jones family owns the Book Emporium, they won it in a contest but Property has a secret, she can't read.The quirky characters in this fun story allow for a fun, humorous read.I give The Bookshop Girl five out of five stars!Happy Reading!
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  • Deborah
    January 1, 1970
    Fun, magical, books!, mystery, very short, cute illustrations.
  • Sarah Nelson
    January 1, 1970
    A cute little middle grade story with a little bit of a mystery. I think fans of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory would love this.
  • Bev
    January 1, 1970
    It's strange how sometimes you can go weeks reading books that you quite like but don't really make you go wow then suddenly two come along at the same time like buses - loved both A Storm of Strawberries and this delightful story. Property Jones lives in a bookshop having been found abandoned there at the age of 5 and she is very happy but hides a secret from her mum and brother, she can't read. The family's adventures start when they win a huge book emporium and are chased out of it in a very It's strange how sometimes you can go weeks reading books that you quite like but don't really make you go wow then suddenly two come along at the same time like buses - loved both A Storm of Strawberries and this delightful story. Property Jones lives in a bookshop having been found abandoned there at the age of 5 and she is very happy but hides a secret from her mum and brother, she can't read. The family's adventures start when they win a huge book emporium and are chased out of it in a very short space of time. Full of lovely quotes about books - 'She wanted to explain that while she couldn't read the letters, there were stories in the cracks of the spine and the smell of the pages and the way the jacket feels under your fingers' - the book reminded me a little of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and believe me I can give it no greater compliment. Magical, heartwarming and just perfect for kids and book loving adults.
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  • Katy Noyes
    January 1, 1970
    Lost and Found - family, adventure and a love of booksA baby is abandoned in a bookshop and taken in by the owners, brought up as their own. They call her 'Property', and the bookshop is her home... despite never being taught to read. Years later, the rather down-at-heel Jones family win a competition to own a huge and magnificent bookshop... but of course all is not as it seems.This would make a great TV mini-series on CBBC. Property and her adopted family are upbeat, hard-working and very symp Lost and Found - family, adventure and a love of booksA baby is abandoned in a bookshop and taken in by the owners, brought up as their own. They call her 'Property', and the bookshop is her home... despite never being taught to read. Years later, the rather down-at-heel Jones family win a competition to own a huge and magnificent bookshop... but of course all is not as it seems.This would make a great TV mini-series on CBBC. Property and her adopted family are upbeat, hard-working and very sympathetic. And of course, book lovers! The 11-year-old heroine shows her resourcefulness as her family are placed in danger, and their adventure in the magical bookshop are destined to play well on a screen, rather Harry Potter-like. It's a short read, a great one for bedtimes in chapters, either for young listeners or fairly confident readers. The illustrations are warm and attractive, and the plot moves quickly, though the villains are a little pantomime-esque.I loved the book context, the shops, the paper books, the love of both the characters radiate. Property is an appealing heroine, and her family minor but important characters that exude love for their adopted daughter.Suitable for KS1 or KS2, it's a simple but very enjoyable story and with great messages about reading, learning and family.
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  • Alycia
    January 1, 1970
    Imaginative, clever, and funny!
  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this! It read like a combination of The Storied Life of AJ Fikry and Mr Penumbras 24hr bookstore, but for children. Will definitely be rereading once I can get a finished copy with illustrations and will definitely be recommending!
  • Mrs G
    January 1, 1970
    A cute story that will appeal to the bookworms in my class. Funny, with a well-paced plot and some good characters. The illustrations are fab and complement the story beautifully. One for my class library rather than a class novel I think. Would suit LKS2+.
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  • Stacie
    January 1, 1970
    The Bookshop Girl, by Sylvia Bishop, is a humorous and sweet chapter book for young readers. It follows the story of orphan Property, left behind in a bookshop when she was five years old. Property lives with the owner of the bookshop Netty Jones and her son Michael - who’ve become her family. But their bookshop is small, old - and they are strapped for cash. With hopes high, they enter a raffle to win the large, prosperous and wondrous Book Emporium. And in a stroke of luck and wonder - they wi The Bookshop Girl, by Sylvia Bishop, is a humorous and sweet chapter book for young readers. It follows the story of orphan Property, left behind in a bookshop when she was five years old. Property lives with the owner of the bookshop Netty Jones and her son Michael - who’ve become her family. But their bookshop is small, old - and they are strapped for cash. With hopes high, they enter a raffle to win the large, prosperous and wondrous Book Emporium. And in a stroke of luck and wonder - they win. The Jones’ lives are changed immediately when they find themselves admidst an amazing amount of endless bookshelves. And these aren’t just any normal bookshelves. They are shelves that change with the pull of a lever, whole rooms full of books of every theme, shape and size that lie behind ever-evolving doors. A story that is a family-feel good tale and an old-school, madcap mystery with steampunk elements - The Bookshop Girl is bound to entertain readers young and old. Property is a loveably quirky character who, though very smart - keeps an unexpected secret. Her brother, mother, and the other minor characters and antagonists are also distinct and immediately likeable or unlikeable as well. The illustrations sprinkled throughout are delightful, and add to the overall charm of the story. An easy, quick read that would make a fun read-aloud or introduction to chapter books for a young reader, The Bookshop Girl is a story that feels both homespun and adventurous. It’s a book that celebrates books, a love of reading, being yourself - and what it means to be a family and be home. Last, it also gives readers a chance to see how others might be given second chances - and how every day is an opportunity to find an Object of Wonder.Thank you to NetGalley and Peachtree Publishers for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Matt Davies
    January 1, 1970
    Property Jones can’t read. When she was 5, she was found abandoned in a bookshop owned by the Jones family who later adopted her. Every day she pretends to her book-loving family that she can in fact read. By the time she is 11, the lie is so deeply rooted that she can’t tell her family.As a reader, it is always a pleasure to find a book about books. Despite Property not being able to read, she loves books. She loves the feel of them, the smell of them, the sound they make when you close them. S Property Jones can’t read. When she was 5, she was found abandoned in a bookshop owned by the Jones family who later adopted her. Every day she pretends to her book-loving family that she can in fact read. By the time she is 11, the lie is so deeply rooted that she can’t tell her family.As a reader, it is always a pleasure to find a book about books. Despite Property not being able to read, she loves books. She loves the feel of them, the smell of them, the sound they make when you close them. She believes that the tactile nature of books lets each book tell its own story regardless of the words on the page. Wow! It’s this sort of message that I am constantly telling children about and the reason I’ve never taken to my Kindle.Of course, the words in this book tell a tremendous story as well. Property’s family unexpectedly win ownership of the country’s biggest and best bookshop. It isn’t any old bookshop though, it’s a mechanical bookshop with moving rooms themed around books. How I wish it were real!The plot suddenly takes a turn for the worse as the family are conned out of their new bookshop. Cue Property and her brother Michael taking control of the situation. The plot, as with the book emporium, is magical if not realistic, but who cares? I was pulled along by Property, taking every step with her. There’s something about her which grabbed me.I couldn’t put this book down. It’s a straight-forward easy read, which moves along quickly and never has a dull moment. At it’s heart, it is an adventure story filled with innocence and books. It is a book for book-lovers, for children and a book to inspire less confident readers. Thank you Sylvia Bishop for a great read!www.mrdaviesreads.co.uk
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