Rosa Parks
In the Little People, Big Dreams series, discover the lives of outstanding people, from designers and artists, to scientists. All of them achieved incredible things, yet each began life as a child with a dream.Rosa Parks grew up during segregation in Alabama, but she was taught to respect herself and stand up for her rights. In 1955, Rosa refused to give up her seat to a white man on a segregated bus, sparking the Montgomery Bus Boycott.Her decision had a huge impact on civil rights, eventually leading to the end of segregation on public transport. Rosa was described as “the mother of the freedom movement”. This inspiring story of Rosa’s life is moving, and approachable for young readers.

Rosa Parks Details

TitleRosa Parks
Author
ReleaseSep 7th, 2017
PublisherLincoln Children's Books
ISBN-139781786030184
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Nonfiction, Biography, History

Rosa Parks Review

  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a lovely book that I would love to give to my future children. It's part of a series about powerful women who have achieved wonderful things and there's such a broad selection from Rosa Parks to Amelia Earhart to Maya Angelou to Coco Chanel to Audrey Hepburn to Agatha Christie to a few more. I think it's nice to give kids books about real women who achieved incredible things and it's a fabulous idea. I thought the book itself was good. The art was so beautiful and I think that kids This was such a lovely book that I would love to give to my future children. It's part of a series about powerful women who have achieved wonderful things and there's such a broad selection from Rosa Parks to Amelia Earhart to Maya Angelou to Coco Chanel to Audrey Hepburn to Agatha Christie to a few more. I think it's nice to give kids books about real women who achieved incredible things and it's a fabulous idea. I thought the book itself was good. The art was so beautiful and I think that kids will love it. I personally would have liked a bit more information on Rosa but I also think that maybe it would have been the perfect amount of information for kids. The one thing that felt off to me was the writing and I think that could be because it's translated to English from a different language but I doubt kids will notice that to be honest. I would 100% recommend this for kids. It's a good starting point to learn about Rosa Parks. *I received a copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • [Shai] The Bibliophage
    January 1, 1970
    The life story of Rosa Parks is a very good way of teaching kids to treat everyone with equality. This children's book should be promoted so that a lot of young readers will be informed of the absurdity of racism. We may not be aware of it, but racism still does exist even at present. It always up to the parents, teachers, or guardians of children to teach them that whatever color or from wherever you came from, we are all coequal. Lastly, Rosa Parks' bravery and standing up for what is right al The life story of Rosa Parks is a very good way of teaching kids to treat everyone with equality. This children's book should be promoted so that a lot of young readers will be informed of the absurdity of racism. We may not be aware of it, but racism still does exist even at present. It always up to the parents, teachers, or guardians of children to teach them that whatever color or from wherever you came from, we are all coequal. Lastly, Rosa Parks' bravery and standing up for what is right also set as an example and inspiration not only to children but to adults as well.
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  • Hilary
    January 1, 1970
    This is a good series of books titled Little People BIG DREAMS. Simple books with a few lines of text on each page, bright, engaging illustrations and inspiring stories of people from humble beginnings who did something great with their lives (and they all seem to be women)This book is about Rosa Parks. Although the slavery that Rose's ancestors suffered is a thing of the past, racism is rife and when Rosa is asked to give up her seat for a white person on the bus she does the right thing, she c This is a good series of books titled Little People BIG DREAMS. Simple books with a few lines of text on each page, bright, engaging illustrations and inspiring stories of people from humble beginnings who did something great with their lives (and they all seem to be women)This book is about Rosa Parks. Although the slavery that Rose's ancestors suffered is a thing of the past, racism is rife and when Rosa is asked to give up her seat for a white person on the bus she does the right thing, she courageously refuses. Rosa is arrested and suffers for what she stood for although eventually her act symbolised the civil rights movement and helped stop the discrimination of segregating people because of the colour of their skin.There are two pages at the back with facts and photos. I would have liked these to have been more detailed, but a good introduction.
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  • Jessi ♥️ H. Vojsk
    January 1, 1970
    The series „Little people, big dreams“ is an awesome way to show children that there were and will always be strong, courageous women, who want to change the world and change it. The illustrations were also really beautiful. Definitely a great book to share with your kids!
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  • leynes
    January 1, 1970
    The installment on Rosa Parks was definitely my favorite of all the Little People, Big Dreams-biographies I've read so far. The illustrations were sooo cute and Rosa's story is just so damn inspiring and important that I was really happy to see how well it translated to a children's book. Due to the fact that the series originated in Spain, it provides an amazing opportunity to discover some amazing Spanish artists with whom I wasn't familiar with before. Whether Isabel Sánchez, Leire Salaberria The installment on Rosa Parks was definitely my favorite of all the Little People, Big Dreams-biographies I've read so far. The illustrations were sooo cute and Rosa's story is just so damn inspiring and important that I was really happy to see how well it translated to a children's book. Due to the fact that the series originated in Spain, it provides an amazing opportunity to discover some amazing Spanish artists with whom I wasn't familiar with before. Whether Isabel Sánchez, Leire Salaberria, Ana Albero or now Marta Antelo, all of them had their unique style and I loved being introduced to their work in this endearing manner.Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't buy these books for myself (since I think they're quite pricy for how few pages they have, and I literally have no use for them) but I love dipping in and out of them at my local bookshop. Next time, I'm definitely going to pick up the installment on Ella Fitzgerald.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    The story and life of Rosa Parks, the civil rights activist, is an inspiring and incredible one which everyone should hear about. This book addresses her life and the way in which she stood up for herself and her civil rights in such a simple but effective way. There is just enough information so as not to overload young readers, whilst still putting across the pertinent points. The 'Little People, Big Dreams' series covers lots of inspiring figures from over the years, and I'll be looking out t The story and life of Rosa Parks, the civil rights activist, is an inspiring and incredible one which everyone should hear about. This book addresses her life and the way in which she stood up for herself and her civil rights in such a simple but effective way. There is just enough information so as not to overload young readers, whilst still putting across the pertinent points. The 'Little People, Big Dreams' series covers lots of inspiring figures from over the years, and I'll be looking out to read more of these. A collection of books that would be very useful in a young person's library.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Loved the illustrations.
  • Andreia
    January 1, 1970
    This book is part of a brilliant collection of illustrated short books for children that are all about brave women who managed to do great things in their often short-lived lives. I chose to read Rosa Parks first because she was definitely one of the bravest women that ever walked upon this Earth. She is still inspiring many women around the world - regardless of their race - to fight for what they believe in and to do what they think is right. I am glad that her story hasn't been forgotten and This book is part of a brilliant collection of illustrated short books for children that are all about brave women who managed to do great things in their often short-lived lives. I chose to read Rosa Parks first because she was definitely one of the bravest women that ever walked upon this Earth. She is still inspiring many women around the world - regardless of their race - to fight for what they believe in and to do what they think is right. I am glad that her story hasn't been forgotten and that she was chosen to be part of this collection, which celebrates the 100th anniversary of the women's right to vote movement. I wish this book was longer but then again, it is a children's book and it can be really hard to make children interested in historical figures so this is a brilliant way to spark their curiosity. If you have a little girl, hand this book to her and hopefully she will become as brave and as resilient as Rosa Parks.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    A great introduction to Rosa Parks. The text is well suited to the intended audience and explains difficult topics in an age appropriate way so that young readers can understand the historical and political climate Parks grew up and participated in. The back matter recommends age appropriate further reading as well as the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI where readers can visit the bus on which Parks refused to give up her seat. Hands down, this is my favorite Rosa Parks book for children to da A great introduction to Rosa Parks. The text is well suited to the intended audience and explains difficult topics in an age appropriate way so that young readers can understand the historical and political climate Parks grew up and participated in. The back matter recommends age appropriate further reading as well as the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI where readers can visit the bus on which Parks refused to give up her seat. Hands down, this is my favorite Rosa Parks book for children to date! The artwork is appealing and the text is simple enough to be read aloud, yet doesn't shy away from any of the important issues. Highly recommended for K-3.
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  • JoAnne
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series of books! Read this with my 5 year old and these books are a perfect way to introduce topics such as the Civil Rights movement and who Rosa Parks was. It even taught me a few things - I never knew that Rosa Parks had to move away from Alabama after becoming so well known - (though of course it makes sense..) and it was super interesting learning more about her life than just the bus story - what everyone knows her for.
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  • Zahrah Al-Merei
    January 1, 1970
    A great introduction to the story of Rosa Parks and her fight for equality. The book manages to sucessfully tell a very difficult part of history in a child friendly way, and can be used to begin a dialogue with children on issues like racism. The illustrations are definitely a bonus!
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  • Shira
    January 1, 1970
    "במשך השנים למדתי שאם את יודעת בדיוק מה צריך לעשות - הפחד נעלם." - רוזה פארקס
  • Ylenia
    January 1, 1970
    I just love this adorable series! I wished I had these books when I was a kid.
  • Rebecca Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been enjoying this series a great deal. Their simple language and adorable illustrations make them a fantastic introduction to fascinating people.
  • Taija
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent, and informing read catered to children. I love the art work! I now want to read the whole series!!!
  • Megan Schmelzer
    January 1, 1970
    Open Book Reviews by Megan Schmelzerwww.openbookreviews.orgWhile wandering around Barnes and Noble, I stumbled across this awesome new board book series for babies and toddlers. The vibrant, yet simple, covers displaying historical women that I have grown up learning caught my eye, and it instantly drew me to pick up a few of these books off the shelves. To be totally honest, I was so intrigued by these books that I ended up sitting right down in the aisle of the store to explore this new nonfic Open Book Reviews by Megan Schmelzerwww.openbookreviews.orgWhile wandering around Barnes and Noble, I stumbled across this awesome new board book series for babies and toddlers. The vibrant, yet simple, covers displaying historical women that I have grown up learning caught my eye, and it instantly drew me to pick up a few of these books off the shelves. To be totally honest, I was so intrigued by these books that I ended up sitting right down in the aisle of the store to explore this new nonfiction board book series. My husband and daughter must have been embarrassed to be near me while I was sprawled out on the floor of Barnes and Noble reading board books designed for little ones because they ditched me and left me alone to dig into this new series!  Through my reading and my post-reading research, I have learned that Little People, Big Dreams is a new series that focuses on introducing the youngest of readers to amazing, wonderful women that have influenced the world. Each book is purposely designed in order to highlight one woman who has made a difference in the world. It tells the story of that women's dream and how she was able to make her dream come true despite the biggest of obstacles. I loved the simplicity of the design of the series, Little People, Big Dreams. The authors and illustrators who have worked on this project clearly understand their audience, and they have made each of the books reflect exactly what they want their youngest of readers to be exposed to. Designed for babies and toddlers, Little People, Big Dreams uses simple text and engaging pictures to tell the story of each woman in a kid-friendly manner. Often times, my biggest complaint with board books is that they lack plots or messages. Even though board books are purposely designed for babies and toddlers, I absolutely believe they still need to be strong examples of books that contain both strong plots and messages. All age levels of children need to have access to great text.I loved how Little People, Big Dreams designed their biography series for baby and preschool readers. There are not many nonfiction book series out there. This series is absolutely helping to pave the way to push the norm for what we typically think of when we think of baby books. Little People, Big Dreams series is a positive example of how even our youngest of readers can read and learn from awesome books!
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  • Kitty Wenham
    January 1, 1970
    ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review."In the Little People, Big Dreams series, discover the lives of outstanding people, from designers and artists, to scientists. All of them achieved incredible things, yet each began life as a child with a dream." A couple of weeks ago, I took my eight-year-old sister to the cinema to watch the original 'Hairspray' movie together. She was a little distressed by some of the scenes about racism and police brutality, and afterward ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review."In the Little People, Big Dreams series, discover the lives of outstanding people, from designers and artists, to scientists. All of them achieved incredible things, yet each began life as a child with a dream." A couple of weeks ago, I took my eight-year-old sister to the cinema to watch the original 'Hairspray' movie together. She was a little distressed by some of the scenes about racism and police brutality, and afterwards I found myself using the example of Rosa Parks to explain what the American Civil Rights movement was, and why it happened. She had a lot of questions afterwards, and I was interested to see if a book like this would be able to answer them for her in a much simpler and educational way than I could. Of course, there's a limit to how much a book aimed at younger children can explore, but she's loved other books in the 'Little People, Big World' Series, so it seemed like a solid place to start. This book might be aimed at children a bit younger than eight, but not all kids have the same reading ability, or the patience to listen to a chaptered book before bed. I found the language and pacing in this perfect, and wouldn't discount it for any primary-school aged reader, The illustrations are wonderful, and it doesn't hide away from the bigger issues. I only have a basic understanding of Rosa Park's life and work as an activist, but it seems to be fairly accurate. I think it's wonderful that there are resources for children to learn about these people and events at a much younger age than I did, and I'm looking forward to reading this through with my little sister.
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  • Bridget
    January 1, 1970
    I picked this up because of the retro cute cover and the illustration style. It's a beautiful little book, but the text of the story didn't sit well with me. When the book ends: "But she knew who she was. A regular person, just as good as anyone else," it feels condescending. It made sense in the middle of the book, when she was little and the book is looking at how she was treated differently/poorly because she was black, to talk about how she's "just as good as anyone else." But, in 2017, it's I picked this up because of the retro cute cover and the illustration style. It's a beautiful little book, but the text of the story didn't sit well with me. When the book ends: "But she knew who she was. A regular person, just as good as anyone else," it feels condescending. It made sense in the middle of the book, when she was little and the book is looking at how she was treated differently/poorly because she was black, to talk about how she's "just as good as anyone else." But, in 2017, it's weird to emphasize that same narrative at the end of the story. It comes across as, hey, little African American readers, you're just as good as anyone else! Implying that maybe you weren't aware of that? Like empowering stories and representation are really important, but I feel like they should be coming from a place of power instead of a place of insecurity? I wanted an ending more like: Rosa knew who she was. Not just a regular person, a person who saw something wrong and worked really hard to address it. A person with a regular life and regular problems, who chose to fight against them. A determined and driven person, who became a hero.On the other hand, I really appreciated that this didn't take the inaccurate narrative that Rosa didn't move on the bus because she was tired. I feel like when I learned about her in school, the narrative was that she was tired of working and just couldn't move instead of she was tired of poor treatment and was choosing to take a stand. So I liked that this made it really clear that she was taking deliberate action.I don't know. I have a lot of complicated thoughts about this picture book.
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  • Storywraps
    January 1, 1970
    This wonderful book is the newest in the Little People, Dream Big series. This series unmasks wonderful individuals who although just ordinary people have made an extraordinary contribution to our world and our way of life. These stories are based on real-life people and are very interesting and educational for kids to read.Rosa Parks, 'The Mother of the Freedom Movement', is an inspiring true story of a civil rights activist. She grew up in Alabama during the segregation era but always felt dig This wonderful book is the newest in the Little People, Dream Big series. This series unmasks wonderful individuals who although just ordinary people have made an extraordinary contribution to our world and our way of life. These stories are based on real-life people and are very interesting and educational for kids to read.Rosa Parks, 'The Mother of the Freedom Movement', is an inspiring true story of a civil rights activist. She grew up in Alabama during the segregation era but always felt dignity and self-worth in such a condemning and ostracizing time. She was taught at home to stand up for her rights and respect herself. In 1955, Rosa was riding on a bus and the bus driver asked her to give up her seat to a white man and go sit in the back of the bus with the other "coloured' folks. She simply said "no". She refused to budge. That simple two letter word, "no", started the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Others heard about her bravery to take a stand and refuse her unfair treatment so emboldened by Rosa's defiant stand they joined in to further her just cause. All her life she fought for equal rights and fought back against adversity and injustice. The powerful lesson you learn? One little insignificant person can change the entire world. Every individual should be treated with fairness and respect no matter what race, colour or group they belong to. I highly recommend this book and this entire series.
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  • Rachel McKitterick
    January 1, 1970
    *thank you to Quarto Publishing Group - Frances Lincoln Childrens and Netgalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*4 stars.I had not known of Rosa Parks before reading this but Im very glad to have now been introducted to her. The whole time throughout this book I kept thinking, 'Go Rosa!' I am SO glad that she was apart of this world and I really admire her. She is strong, determined, and stood up for what she believed to be right (and she was 100% right!). I am proud of h *thank you to Quarto Publis­hing Group - Frances Lincoln Childrens and Netgalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*4 stars.I had not known of Rosa Parks before reading this but Im very glad to have now been introducted to her. The whole time throughout this book I kept thinking, 'Go Rosa!' I am SO glad that she was apart of this world and I really admire her. She is strong, determined, and stood up for what she believed to be right (and she was 100% right!). I am proud of her and all she did. This book is important for people to know what the world was like and that its changed for the positive now, thanks to people like Rosa Parks. She is a great inspiration and a hero to many. This little book does an amazing job of introducing her to people and the illustrations are really well done. If you or your child is interested in what the world was like for 'coloured' people, how people of different skin colour were treated differently, then this is a great book to do just that. I am Caucasian but I am still so thankful and glad to know what Rosa Parks has accomplished.Highly recommended.
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  • Liz Terek
    January 1, 1970
    I cannot say enough wonderful things about this book! The story of American History's Iconic Civil Rights heroine is fascinating. Students will now have the opportunity to read about her at an earlier level and in a way they can comprehend. Our author doesn't sugarcoat the struggles that Rosa endures. Instead, she adopts a writing style that gently explains the injustices of the world at that time.The illustrations are adorable. Rosa's depiction is so sweet. The author/illustrator duo were defin I cannot say enough wonderful things about this book! The story of American History's Iconic Civil Rights heroine is fascinating. Students will now have the opportunity to read about her at an earlier level and in a way they can comprehend. Our author doesn't sugarcoat the struggles that Rosa endures. Instead, she adopts a writing style that gently explains the injustices of the world at that time.The illustrations are adorable. Rosa's depiction is so sweet. The author/illustrator duo were definitely a perfect pairing. I also love the size of the book. Quality, hardback construction makes it durable so the book will last through multiple readings.This books, as well as the others in the series, are the perfect way to introduce early readers to the Autobiography genre. I give it a full 5 stars and have recommended it to local libraries. I encourage homeschoolers to add it to their reading corner, too.
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  • Francis Thibeault
    January 1, 1970
    Ce dernier arrivée dans la collection De petite à GRANDE invite le lecteur dans une tout autre sphère qui caractérise aussi les femmes pionnières: la lutte pour l'égalité. Un récit simple et authentique qui n'hésite pas à faire voir aux enfants la triste réalité des personnes de race noire à l'époque de Rosa Parks. Les illustrations, de plus, mettent bien en valeur la dynamique des rapports entre les Blancs et les Noirs, en plus de la détermination du personnage principal dans sa lutte constante Ce dernier arrivée dans la collection De petite à GRANDE invite le lecteur dans une tout autre sphère qui caractérise aussi les femmes pionnières: la lutte pour l'égalité. Un récit simple et authentique qui n'hésite pas à faire voir aux enfants la triste réalité des personnes de race noire à l'époque de Rosa Parks. Les illustrations, de plus, mettent bien en valeur la dynamique des rapports entre les Blancs et les Noirs, en plus de la détermination du personnage principal dans sa lutte constante contre l'inégalité raciale. Un bel album pour éveiller en douceur les enfants à ce sujet chaud, mais toujours actuel...
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  • Suzie
    January 1, 1970
    Category: Life storiesAwards: N/AGrade Level: K - 3Summary: Ross Parks is a story about the historical life of Rosa Parks. Having to grow up during segregation, Rosa learned to fight for her rights and stand up for herself. She sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, after refusing to give up her seat to a white man on the bus.Review: Segregation and racism is always a sore subject talked about in the classroom. Books like Rosa Parks give teachers tools to help explain and teach children at a young Category: Life storiesAwards: N/AGrade Level: K - 3Summary: Ross Parks is a story about the historical life of Rosa Parks. Having to grow up during segregation, Rosa learned to fight for her rights and stand up for herself. She sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, after refusing to give up her seat to a white man on the bus.Review: Segregation and racism is always a sore subject talked about in the classroom. Books like Rosa Parks give teachers tools to help explain and teach children at a young age the truth about American history and real lives and hardships people faced.Activities: 1. Have the children make a KWL chart2. Can also do another time line but with Rosa Parks
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  • Heather Little
    January 1, 1970
    My 8 yr old autistic daughter has no clue what racism is, or Jim Crow. But she definitely understood it's not fair that someone should have to give up their seat for someone else, or not be allowed to use the same schools or water fountains. And that it's not ok for peoples' worth to be based on what they look like, etc. What's "fair" is a big deal to her, and this book helped her to see that sometimes "the rules" arent good and shouldnt be followed. It also helped her to see that it's okay to s My 8 yr old autistic daughter has no clue what racism is, or Jim Crow. But she definitely understood it's not fair that someone should have to give up their seat for someone else, or not be allowed to use the same schools or water fountains. And that it's not ok for peoples' worth to be based on what they look like, etc. What's "fair" is a big deal to her, and this book helped her to see that sometimes "the rules" arent good and shouldnt be followed. It also helped her to see that it's okay to stand up for yourself, and then to also stand up for the rights of others. I really liked it and liked the illustrations....
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  • Amber Webb
    January 1, 1970
    Lisbeth Kaiser astound again with her Little People, Big Dreams series and Rosa Parks. Marta Antelo does a beautiful job filling Kaiser's words with illustrations so appropriate and kid-friendly. The explanation of Rosa's childhood and how that impacted who she became was excellent. The timeline at the end made the book even more real than it already was. This book showcases the power Rosa had even as a child. My hope is that this book inspires young children to stand their ground, stand up for Lisbeth Kaiser astound again with her Little People, Big Dreams series and Rosa Parks. Marta Antelo does a beautiful job filling Kaiser's words with illustrations so appropriate and kid-friendly. The explanation of Rosa's childhood and how that impacted who she became was excellent. The timeline at the end made the book even more real than it already was. This book showcases the power Rosa had even as a child. My hope is that this book inspires young children to stand their ground, stand up for others and be the change they want to see.
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  • Sharde Liggins
    January 1, 1970
    Little People, Big Dreams series explores the lives of people who have done something so exceptional they've become historical. This particular picture book focuses on civil rights activist Rosa Parks. The books intended audience kindergarten through third grade simplifies the role Rosa Parks played in the civil rights movement as well as the Montgomery bus boycott. The illustrations are beautiful done including a timeline of Rosa Parks achievements the story line however seemed to be a book of Little People, Big Dreams series explores the lives of people who have done something so exceptional they've become historical. This particular picture book focuses on civil rights activist Rosa Parks. The books intended audience kindergarten through third grade simplifies the role Rosa Parks played in the civil rights movement as well as the Montgomery bus boycott. The illustrations are beautiful done including a timeline of Rosa Parks achievements the story line however seemed to be a book of run on sentences to long to keep the attention of a kindergartner. Overall it was a decent book.
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  • Libbie Huhn
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed reading this book and I think it would be a good educational book about slavery and rights to read to students. I liked that it gave background to Rosa's life and helped me understand that she felt like things needed to change even from a young age. The illustrations in this book were beautiful and really added to the enjoyment of the story. However, I feel the author could have elaborated more on the things that Rosa did and changed during her life. I felt that part of the book was a I enjoyed reading this book and I think it would be a good educational book about slavery and rights to read to students. I liked that it gave background to Rosa's life and helped me understand that she felt like things needed to change even from a young age. The illustrations in this book were beautiful and really added to the enjoyment of the story. However, I feel the author could have elaborated more on the things that Rosa did and changed during her life. I felt that part of the book was a little dull.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Biography of American hero Rosa Parks, illustrated by Marta Antelo. I wasn't fond of the chubby-cheeked style Antelo uses for her characters. The series as a whole offers creative, simple, and inspiring examples of women in their professions. While the writers and illustrators vary from one title to the next, there is also a common tone and visual style. Each volume wraps up with a two-page biographical sketch with photos. And the inside front and back covers are stylishly designed with a differ Biography of American hero Rosa Parks, illustrated by Marta Antelo. I wasn't fond of the chubby-cheeked style Antelo uses for her characters. The series as a whole offers creative, simple, and inspiring examples of women in their professions. While the writers and illustrators vary from one title to the next, there is also a common tone and visual style. Each volume wraps up with a two-page biographical sketch with photos. And the inside front and back covers are stylishly designed with a different repeating pattern, this one with thin black lines, vertical on a white background.
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    This is a new series that looks like it springs from Little Golden Books, called Little People Big Dreams. This edition looks at Rosa Parks and the lessons she learned from childhood. It was those lessons that helped her no give up her seat on the bus, and it was those lessons that partly maker her the icon she is today. This book has a great way of telling the story, but if I were honest I like the I am… series better.
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  • Marthese Formosa
    January 1, 1970
    Got this children's book from Netgalley.This is part of a series on historical females and I loved it for it. The art was nice and it talked about injustice in terms that children would understand. The narrative was a bit too childish though, I feel that other words should have been used. The sentences were not so flowing.I am not sure if it's been corrected, but there was one mistake in the book. I'm curious about the other books in the series.
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