Click'd
Allie Navarro can't wait to show her best friends the app she built at CodeGirls summer camp. CLICK'D pairs users based on common interests and sends them on a fun (and occasionally rule-breaking) scavenger hunt to find each other. And it's a hit. By the second day of school, everyone is talking about CLICK'D.Watching her app go viral is amazing. Leaderboards are filling up! Everyone's making new friends. And with all the data Allie is collecting, she has an even better shot at beating her archenemy, Nathan, at the upcoming youth coding competition. But when Allie discovers a glitch that threatens to expose everyone's secrets, she has to figure out how to make things right, even if that means sharing the computer lab with Nathan. Can Allie fix her app, stop it from doing any more damage, and win back the friends it hurt-all before she steps on stage to present CLICK'D to the judges?New York Times best-selling author Tamara Ireland Stone combines friendship, coding, and lots of popcorn in her fun and empowering middle-grade debut.

Click'd Details

TitleClick'd
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 5th, 2017
PublisherDisney-Hyperion
ISBN-139781484784976
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Contemporary, Young Adult

Click'd Review

  • Lola Reviewer
    January 1, 1970
    What a disappointment from the author of Every Last Word.Allie loves computers. She spent her summers at an all-girl coding camp and now she’s eager to enter her newest invention—Click’d—in a competition.But she hasn’t figured out everything about Click’d. She needs to work hard on the glitches that seem to be causing so much problem. Maybe it’ll be ready on time… if she works with her nemesis.It’s all about the app. I guess I should have seen it coming, given the title, but I just did not expec What a disappointment from the author of Every Last Word.Allie loves computers. She spent her summers at an all-girl coding camp and now she’s eager to enter her newest invention—Click’d—in a competition.But she hasn’t figured out everything about Click’d. She needs to work hard on the glitches that seem to be causing so much problem. Maybe it’ll be ready on time… if she works with her nemesis.It’s all about the app. I guess I should have seen it coming, given the title, but I just did not expect EVERY SINGLE THING to be about the app. How it affects her friends. How it brings she and her nemesis together. I grew bored. First of all, Click’d is inspired by so many apps out there that it’s not creative at all. It’s just… an app. The idea of helping new students make friends is honourable, but it’s not working well. It causes more problems than it solves.Then there’s the fact that it’s so… young. I’ve read many middle grade novels, so I know that these can work for adults as well. This one, however, I would not recommend to readers older than eleven. It’s simply-written, lacks dimension and made me wish I’d never started it in the first place. Its redeemable qualities are its pacing and the relationship between Allie and her nemesis. It was super easy to read and pretty fast with all of its extra content—text messages and Click’d walls. I liked the idea of the competition at the end as well, but it, too, turned into a bummer. Such a shame. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Nenia *The Flagrant Liberal* Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestI was honestly surprised to receive an ARC of this because Disney-Hyperion never approves me for anything.But they did, so I was like, "Bleep yeah! Girl coders!" I took a coding class in high school. It was one of the most difficult classes I've ever taken, but it was also one of the most satisfying. Every time I figured out the code to make a program work, I felt so good. It was the ultimate mental rush, like forcing checkmate in a difficu Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || PinterestI was honestly surprised to receive an ARC of this because Disney-Hyperion never approves me for anything.But they did, so I was like, "Bleep yeah! Girl coders!" I took a coding class in high school. It was one of the most difficult classes I've ever taken, but it was also one of the most satisfying. Every time I figured out the code to make a program work, I felt so good. It was the ultimate mental rush, like forcing checkmate in a difficult game of chess; I'd often feel energized after leaving that class, ready to take on anything.I'm trying to read more books about STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) heroines, so combined with my (abbreviated) history in coding and technology, CLICK'D was an easy pick for me. It's about a twelve-year-old girl named Allie competing in an app competition called "Games for Good." Her game, "Click'd" is basically a combination of a Buzzfeed quiz and Myspace (circ. 2007): users answer questions and get matched up with other users, and based on the ways they answer questions, are ranked on a leaderboard within the app.Allie's game takes off at her school and pretty soon she has over 1,000 users. But there's a security risk embedded within the site, and she decides not to say or do anything about it because she's afraid it might compromise her place in the G4G competition. Pretty soon, though, it's clear that more than just her users' data is at risk, and when she tries to tinker with the code, things go horribly wrong.I really liked how programming and coding was at the forefront of this story. I also liked the G4G competition, although Allie's game wasn't exactly a humanitarian cause (now the girl who did the app about grooming girls in 3rd world countries to become teachers? can we get her story?). Allie in general kind of cheesed me off over the course of the story. She was incredibly selfish, and the way she treated Nathan towards the end of the book made me really angry. I get why she felt the way she did, and I probably would have jumped to the same conclusion as a preteen, but I was still like, "OH, YOU LITTLE SHEET."This book was a little young for me (I didn't realize it was middle grade when I applied for it), but it's a great story with a good moral and a subject that's becoming increasingly relevant in the information age. Would not recommend this to fans of older YA, but for younger girls who are interested in math and computers and teachers who want to supply books for them as a resource and/or inspiration? Yes.Thanks to Netgalley/the publisher for the review copy! 2.5 stars
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  • Stacee
    January 1, 1970
    I don't normally read MG, but I love all things Tamara, so it was a sure thing. I loooooved Allie. She's so smart and so determined and has loads more ambition than I think I've ever had. I truly enjoyed her journey. Allie's friends are fun and add a great dynamic. I especially loved Ms. Slade and Allie's parents for being such positive and supportive adults. Plot wise, it was a lot of fun. I'm completely intrigued by the idea of coding and I was blown away at what Allie and Nathan were doing. T I don't normally read MG, but I love all things Tamara, so it was a sure thing. I loooooved Allie. She's so smart and so determined and has loads more ambition than I think I've ever had. I truly enjoyed her journey. Allie's friends are fun and add a great dynamic. I especially loved Ms. Slade and Allie's parents for being such positive and supportive adults. Plot wise, it was a lot of fun. I'm completely intrigued by the idea of coding and I was blown away at what Allie and Nathan were doing. There was a few bumps and conflicts, but it was quite refreshing to see a different type of drama than what I see in YA. Overall, it was a lot of fun with a story that I'm sure will be important to a lot of kids. I can't wait to get a finished copy. **Huge thanks to Hyperion for providing the arc free of charge**
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  • Gerardo Delgadillo
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC ebook from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.5 out of 5 shining stars.My experience in software made me curious about CLICK'D. Thing is, I've read a bunch of novels where the technical aspects and the programming fall into the magical-coding category. This is a tricky topic to write about--too much detail becomes tedious, while not enough detail is confusing or cheesy. I'm glad to say CLICK'D managed to be realistic without inundating us with geeky details. Very well h I received an ARC ebook from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.5 out of 5 shining stars.My experience in software made me curious about CLICK'D. Thing is, I've read a bunch of novels where the technical aspects and the programming fall into the magical-coding category. This is a tricky topic to write about--too much detail becomes tedious, while not enough detail is confusing or cheesy. I'm glad to say CLICK'D managed to be realistic without inundating us with geeky details. Very well handled.CLICK'D is a quick read that flows as smooth as olive oil on marble. It's fun, fun, fun--a must for middle grade novels. And it has heart, and a message for the young ones. In summary, a wonderful "geeky" story for non-geeks and geeks. ;)
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  • YA and Wine
    January 1, 1970
    CLICK'D is a delightful new middle grade novel about friendship, chasing your dreams, and following your heart. The story is so much fun to read. I love the concept of empowering kids to use their coding skills to create incredible apps that help improve the world. This book really celebrates the fact that our youth not only cares about the issues facing the world they live in, but they also take action to improve it. CLICK'D was a quick and refreshing read that I would recommend to readers of a CLICK'D is a delightful new middle grade novel about friendship, chasing your dreams, and following your heart. The story is so much fun to read. I love the concept of empowering kids to use their coding skills to create incredible apps that help improve the world. This book really celebrates the fact that our youth not only cares about the issues facing the world they live in, but they also take action to improve it. CLICK'D was a quick and refreshing read that I would recommend to readers of all ages.*I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    Fast-paced and timely middle school story with a great technology premise. Thanks to Disney Hyperion for the advance review copy of this title - all opinions are my own. CLICK'D tells the story of a middle school coding superstar who develops an app at a summer coding camp and is surprised to have it become a smash hit when she debuts it at her school. Allie is a very relatable middle school character and this is written perfectly for the upper middle school crowd who live with their phones. T Fast-paced and timely middle school story with a great technology premise. Thanks to Disney Hyperion for the advance review copy of this title - all opinions are my own. CLICK'D tells the story of a middle school coding superstar who develops an app at a summer coding camp and is surprised to have it become a smash hit when she debuts it at her school. Allie is a very relatable middle school character and this is written perfectly for the upper middle school crowd who live with their phones. There are lessons of integrity and friendship included in the story, but are in no way preachy, and the code-speak is appealing for techies but understandable for even only the end-users. I will definitely be buying this one for my middle school library and can't wait to get it into the hands of my students! If you are looking for a similar book for younger readers, try the GIRLS WHO CODE series, and if you want something for older readers, WHEN DIMPLE MET RISHI is perfect.
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  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    I liked Click'd! It's a straightforward MG story that tackles technology, coding, and friendship in a really readable, interesting way.
  • Dianne
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Tamara Ireland Stone for creating an age-perfect read for middle grade kids that:1) Includes a topic they can completely relate to, as opposed to “read this instead of playing that”2) Shows them that it is possible to take a dream and make it a reality3) Is written for and geared to younger readers with no “possibly inappropriate” scenesCLICK’D is a tale of accomplishment, responsibility, insecurity and coming of age that is wrapped up in a charming tale filled with imagination and th Thank you, Tamara Ireland Stone for creating an age-perfect read for middle grade kids that:1) Includes a topic they can completely relate to, as opposed to “read this instead of playing that”2) Shows them that it is possible to take a dream and make it a reality3) Is written for and geared to younger readers with no “possibly inappropriate” scenesCLICK’D is a tale of accomplishment, responsibility, insecurity and coming of age that is wrapped up in a charming tale filled with imagination and that feeling of actually being in the world of a twelve –year-old girl and her friends.Allie spent her summer at a camp designed to encourage computer coding. She took her own personal fears at not knowing anyone and created an app that helped strangers become friends, connecting their commonalities. What a wonderful way to take some of the fear of meeting others, particularly for this age group! Of course, sometimes even the best ideas need tweaking and Allie soon learned that there were downsides to her “game.” Allie had a deadline to fix her app, and a huge competition coming up she so desperately wanted to win. She also had her arch nemesis, Nathan to finally beat.What Allie learned in that week prior to the competition would be far more valuable than the first place prize.Tamara Ireland Stone has a powerful, yet fun read that offers more than entertainment, it offers proof that no matter what, nothing is better than being yourself, being honorable and being a good friend, not to mention, taking a risk in life is always worth it.I received an ARC edition from Disney-Hyperion in exchange for my honest review.Publisher: Disney Hyperion (September 5, 2017)Publication Date: September 5, 2017Genre: Middle Grade FictionPrint Length: 304 pagesAvailable from: Amazon | Barnes & NobleFor Reviews & More: http://tometender.blogspot.com
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  • Marianna
    January 1, 1970
    For more reviews and bookish stuff check out my blog! https://mariannascorner.wordpress.com/3.5 stars “I received this e-ARC via NetGalley. A huge thank you to the publisher for accepting my request. All thoughts are my own.”Click’d is a gripping middle grade book, focusing on friendship, success, hard work, responsibility and family ties. From the very beginning the reader is introduced to this whole other world: the world of coding. For me personally that was a totally foreign concept and gett For more reviews and bookish stuff check out my blog! https://mariannascorner.wordpress.com/3.5 stars “I received this e-ARC via NetGalley. A huge thank you to the publisher for accepting my request. All thoughts are my own.”Click’d is a gripping middle grade book, focusing on friendship, success, hard work, responsibility and family ties. From the very beginning the reader is introduced to this whole other world: the world of coding. For me personally that was a totally foreign concept and getting to see the “behind the scenes” of an app was a very fascinating experience.Allie was an amazing protagonist. She is strong willed, hard working and determined. She is more or less a genius since she built this amazing app all on her own at the age of 12(!). Just like every 12 year old, she’s strumbling to find her place in this world and as so, she makes mistakes and tries -in the best way she can- to fix them.An aspect I really enjoyed was the friendship. Allie has a solid friend group consisted of three girls: Emma, Zoe and Madie. They work together, play together, go to school together and do what friends are supposed to do. Unfortunately good frienships are lacking in books, so I’m thirsty for them whenever I get them. Also she has her CodeGirl friends whom she did not forget the moment she stepped off camp, which I also appreciated.Finally, I liked the messages Click’d conveyed. It is a tradition for MG books to have a message right?The first was a message of not confusing competition with animosity. Just because you are competing with someone for a job, a competion, a test, it doesn’t mean that you have to hate them. Sometimes we have more things in common with our competitors that we know. And most of the times, competition is what makes us move forward; the need to do more, to succeess, to be the best. We should not, however, let that need consume us and makes us jealous and hating.The second was a message of responsibility. In life we screw up and make mistakes all the time. The key is to take responsibility for said mistakes and not blame others for the things you failed to do. In order to learn from our mistakes and become better we have to realise we actually made a mistake in the first place, and that this mistake was a result of our own actions.Overall, Click’d was a nice MG book with cute characters and nice messages!Click’d comes out September 5th! Don’t forget to grab a copy!
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  • Laurie –A Court of Books–
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 starsI actually didn't realise it was middle grade until rather late in the book (the MC is 12). But I guess that once you see it you can't un-see it.
  • Brenda Ayala
    January 1, 1970
    Click'd is a ridiculously sweet story. It follows a preteen girl who created her own app to help people find friends in close physical proximity. When a glitch in her system causes some hurt feelings and she tries to make it better, things only snowball. I loved the friendships Allie had. They felt true to life in a way that many other novels don't--often they feel too pretty or too dramatic. Either there is no conflict at all between friends or the conflict is seemingly insurmountable. When All Click'd is a ridiculously sweet story. It follows a preteen girl who created her own app to help people find friends in close physical proximity. When a glitch in her system causes some hurt feelings and she tries to make it better, things only snowball. I loved the friendships Allie had. They felt true to life in a way that many other novels don't--often they feel too pretty or too dramatic. Either there is no conflict at all between friends or the conflict is seemingly insurmountable. When Allie had issues with friends, that's all they were--issues. They stayed friends but worked through their problems. It was refreshing.Her interactions with Nathan were a little more silly, but I liked how it ended. For a girl who seemed fairly aware of emotions with her friends she was a total dunderhead where Nathan was concerned. A note, too: I LOVED that there were apps created to help people. I'm going to search the App Store and see if this is a real thing.
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    Click'd was an interesting middle grade novel about coding and friendship. Allie makes several bad decisions, but redeems herself in the end. Her interactions with her classmates felt sincere, and I was glad that the author allowed her to learn from her mistakes without reward. I have read other books by Tamara Ireland Stone that I liked better, but it was a fun quick read. (3.5 stars)
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  • Kirsti Call
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. What I liked: Tamara Ireland Stone writes beautifully. Her book, EVERY LAST WORD is one of my favorites of all time. So I was thrilled to receive a copy of her middle grade debut. The book is fast paced, engaging and heart-warming. Tamara manages to combine the angst and insecurities of middle school with hope. The characters in this book are engaging and relatable. The premise of a girl whose ap goes viral is in I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. What I liked: Tamara Ireland Stone writes beautifully. Her book, EVERY LAST WORD is one of my favorites of all time. So I was thrilled to receive a copy of her middle grade debut. The book is fast paced, engaging and heart-warming. Tamara manages to combine the angst and insecurities of middle school with hope. The characters in this book are engaging and relatable. The premise of a girl whose ap goes viral is incredibly fun. Allie's 7th grade year starts out with a bang when everyone loves the ap she programmed. When a glitch threatens to ruin her friendships and her ability to compete in the upcoming Games for Good competition, the stakes are high. And Allie may have to find help from her nemesis in order to compete and fix the problem with her code. Allie's interactions with her parents are spot-on; she doesn't want to tell them when things go wrong. Her interactions with her teacher are realistic and the peer relationships feel authentic. I especially love how Allie changes in the end, matures and realizes what's really important. LOVE this book!
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  • Sam Kozbial
    January 1, 1970
    This was a cute tale, which combined fun, friendship, and those mistakes that one is bound to make when growing up. Allie was so proud of the app she created during her summer with the CodeGirls, and was excited to share it with her three best friends in the week leading up to the Games for Good competition. She sort of got caught up in the zeal surrounding her app, that when some issues arose with the code, she decides to NOT seek the advice of her mentor and to take care of it herself, and soo This was a cute tale, which combined fun, friendship, and those mistakes that one is bound to make when growing up. Allie was so proud of the app she created during her summer with the CodeGirls, and was excited to share it with her three best friends in the week leading up to the Games for Good competition. She sort of got caught up in the zeal surrounding her app, that when some issues arose with the code, she decides to NOT seek the advice of her mentor and to take care of it herself, and soon she was in a little over her head. I really liked all the characters Stone created. They seemed very genuine and age appropriate. The way Allie approached her issues did not surprise me, because, well, she was 12. I sort of loved that Stone gave Allie those moral dilemmas to struggle with. It's all a normal part of growing up. She also took responsibility for her poor choices, and I like that Stone gave her that maturity. I have to say, the concept for the app was fun, and I loved being in the midst of the Click'd frenzy. There were a lot of really sweet moments of friendship, and we also had an appropriate amount of parental involvement considering the age of the protagonists. The technical side of the story brought me back to my days as a programmer. It was fun to see the kids excitement for it, and I thought that Stone used just enough jargon that it sounded sort of credible without alienated those who are not programmers. Overall: A delightful and heartwarming tale, which I hope will inspire many to use technology to do good.
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  • Eli
    January 1, 1970
    Based off the premise alone, this book was very close to home for me, so from day one, I knew I had to read it and that I would be pretty critical of it, especially in terms of accuracy. Despite that, Click'd ended up both surprising and impressing me. I didn't know that Stone had it in her, but I respected her other novels and now I respect this one.Click'd is about a promising young female coder who has to go through the growing pains of the development cycle, from the crushing lows of not kno Based off the premise alone, this book was very close to home for me, so from day one, I knew I had to read it and that I would be pretty critical of it, especially in terms of accuracy. Despite that, Click'd ended up both surprising and impressing me. I didn't know that Stone had it in her, but I respected her other novels and now I respect this one.Click'd is about a promising young female coder who has to go through the growing pains of the development cycle, from the crushing lows of not knowing where a problem is to the soaring highs of figuring it out. I felt Allie's enthusiasm for code, and I loved her support network. I empathized with her fears and rooted for her all the way. Really, what this novel is about more than anything else is the magic that is computer science. The portrayal of the struggles and the joys made the book for me, and what sealed the deal was how Stone managed to leave a good taste in my mouth with the ending but still stayed true to her story.It's fun, it's a bit fluffy, and it'd be a fantastic story to get middle school girls into coding. The growing relationship between Allie and Nathan was fun to follow, and it was great to see them work together despite continuing to be rivals. Click'd places a big emphasis on the good that technology can do, and I was inspired thinking about all the good that this generation can and will do for the world.And while I enjoyed Allie's character and thought she was a great narrator, it was actually Nathan who turned out to be my favorite. I couldn't imagine being friends with Allie, but I could imagine Nathan, and he really endeared himself to me with his drive and skills as well as his weaknesses. Every character had just the right amount of depth for this story. On a similar note, I loved that Stone focused on strong, intelligent kids (who are still very much kids), the kind of kids who truly do exist, and didn't downplay their smarts or abilities. The challenges they faced were spot-on, and the plot was woven together excellently.In terms of the writing, I ended up liking Stone's middle-grade writing style significantly. The social structure outside the main character relationships was a bit simplistic, too let's all-eat-cake-and-be-happy-because-the-world-is-full-of-sunshine-and-love, but otherwise, it was perfect. I would definitely be open to seeing more of this style from her.However, the book wasn't without its faults. I did like Allie and Nathan's friendship, but it didn't start out that way at all. Allie had this passionate dislike of Nathan, and Nathan was just as bad to her. Then a few minor things happened and suddenly they became best buddies. I thought the turnaround was great, but it needed more time and development.Another segment of the story that could've stood up to more editing was the beginning, which started out like a success story for Girls Who Code. Don't get me wrong--those are fun and inspiring, but they're irritating in novel form. When I read, I don't want to feel like the author is selling something. There's a time and place for that, but that time isn't now and that place isn't literature. Fortunately, that faded with time.On that note, I really hope that the end of the book includes a link other than Code.org. Code.org is brilliant at certain things and not-so-brilliant at others. The fact remains that there will inevitably be high school girls and adult women who read this book, and when they do, they should have a resource a bit more grown-up than painfully slow block coding to get started with code. It's a solid introduction, but it's not generally engaging to older audiences, especially those that pick it quickly. It's for this very reason that my Computer Science Club is redesigning the way we run the annual Computer Science Education Week activities for the high school level in our district. We previously used Code.org's Hour of Code at all levels and made this decision after numerous visits to local middle schools to bring students through different kinds of coding workshops. Other link I would think about including are codecademy.com, Scratch, Kodu Game Lab, and more specialized resources for girls like Girls Who Code, Engineer Girl, and NCWIT. The graphic below has some more great resources for learning more about code from she++'s #include initiative pdf. I'm also a fan of student-run sites like CoderGirls and STEMpower Girls and story-based sites like ReigningIt. Overall, I will be recommending Click'd. Maybe not to everyone because even though I liked the writing, it felt somewhat childish to me as a whole. I would be more hesitant to hand this to a high-schooler or adult (granted, that does depend on reader situation). But it is a phenomenal middle-grade novel, and I'm excited to see books moving in this direction and reflecting the changes in tech. 3.5 stars.
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  • Katy Noyes
    January 1, 1970
    Great for techies, an absorbing and App-centred story that isn't too long for even reluctant readersNot one that will easily draw from older age groups as some books for this age range do, Click'd will be a great choice to offer to those who like their computers, coding, technology, social media. Allie is a coder, and at summer camp has designed her own app that helps you find friends with common interest - Click'd. It works brilliantly when she tests it on her friends before entering it at a na Great for techies, an absorbing and App-centred story that isn't too long for even reluctant readersNot one that will easily draw from older age groups as some books for this age range do, Click'd will be a great choice to offer to those who like their computers, coding, technology, social media. Allie is a coder, and at summer camp has designed her own app that helps you find friends with common interest - Click'd. It works brilliantly when she tests it on her friends before entering it at a national competition, alongside a fellow student (and rival's) app. But when a problem becomes apparent, Allie is faced with tough decisions, and even finds that her app is straining her relationships with her friends.The themes are very much 'middle school' centred, which may seem too immature for older readers/teenagers. There is no romance, and Allie's home and family life is only briefly featured - it's all about her friendships, rivalry with Nathan, and mostly - her App. Which isn't a bad thing - it will interest many readers, and though I'm not a techie myself, I enjoyed the story. I could see myself, a Judy Blume fan at that age (10-13) being caught up in Allie's world and problems, and liked the choices Allie makes. Some good questions and discussions could come out of this. Though it features a female protagonist, boys will also find a lot here to capture their interest as well, including the character of Nathan. Could make a good class read for Year 6 or 7 classes.With thanks to Netgalley for the advance reading copy.
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  • Christina (Ensconced in Lit)
    January 1, 1970
    Like some other reviewers, I don't usually read MG, but when I heard Tamara Ireland Stone, one of my all time favorite authors, was writing one about girls that code, I knew that was for me! Thank you so much to Disney Hyperion for sending me this copy, and this fact does not change my rating or my review.Allie attended a CodeGirls camp over the summer and overcame her shyness by creating an app called Click'd that helps connect people with similar interests. She is an entrant in a competition f Like some other reviewers, I don't usually read MG, but when I heard Tamara Ireland Stone, one of my all time favorite authors, was writing one about girls that code, I knew that was for me! Thank you so much to Disney Hyperion for sending me this copy, and this fact does not change my rating or my review.Allie attended a CodeGirls camp over the summer and overcame her shyness by creating an app called Click'd that helps connect people with similar interests. She is an entrant in a competition for top app against her nemesis, Nathan, who seems to best her at everything. But when the rest of her classmates start getting access to Click'd, something happens that could derail everything. Can Allie figure out how to fix things before it's too late?I loved Allie as a protagonist. I thought she was super likeable and relatable and I would be proud if my daughter could grow up to be someone like her. Smart, driven, kind, and thoughtful. While competitive, she has a good heart. I loved the way the book focused on coding and the program and while she was trying to figure out her program, she similarly was going through a character arc that was both moving and inspiring. I thought the ending was perfectly done and exactly how it should be.Overall, I absolutely loved this book and it's a perfect middle grade book. I hope my daughter will read it one day and draw inspiration from it.
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  • Leslie aka StoreyBook Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this book on many levels. I loved that the author is a computer geek and brings that out in her main character, Allie. Allie is only 12 but has already created an app that could take off by leaps and bounds and help those awkward new students at school find friends. Allie has been coding programs for several years by this point and I think that message to all young women out there is a strong one = that math and sciences are just as easy for females to conquer as their male counterparts. I LOVED this book on many levels. I loved that the author is a computer geek and brings that out in her main character, Allie. Allie is only 12 but has already created an app that could take off by leaps and bounds and help those awkward new students at school find friends. Allie has been coding programs for several years by this point and I think that message to all young women out there is a strong one = that math and sciences are just as easy for females to conquer as their male counterparts.But beyond that message, there is also a message about friendship. That no app can truly decide who your best friends will be or who you will "click" with via this app, but it is a start especially in an unfamiliar situation. It is also about perseverance and working hard to get where you are in life, even at the age of 12.I would recommend this book to any young woman 10 and up (possibly a bit younger) and even to adults like myself so that we can continue to encourage young women in STEM.
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  • Misti
    January 1, 1970
    At CodeGirls summer camp, Allie built Click'd, a game app that helps people make real-life connections based on shared interests. Her teacher has entered her in a competition, and Allie's excited to show the app to her friends and maybe get a few more users in the week before the competition. When Click'd spreads virally through her school, Allie is thrilled. . . until a glitch manifests, and the fallout endangers one of her oldest and closest friendships. Can Allie fix everything before the com At CodeGirls summer camp, Allie built Click'd, a game app that helps people make real-life connections based on shared interests. Her teacher has entered her in a competition, and Allie's excited to show the app to her friends and maybe get a few more users in the week before the competition. When Click'd spreads virally through her school, Allie is thrilled. . . until a glitch manifests, and the fallout endangers one of her oldest and closest friendships. Can Allie fix everything before the competition?This was a fun, quick read. The pacing is good, the topic is hot right now, and I kind of want Click'd to be a real thing. If you have an interest in middle-grade books featuring real-world technology, keep an eye out for this one -- it comes out in September.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't realize when I started reading this that it was Middle Grade. If I'd known, I'd likely have been leery of picking it up. In the end, it both read too young for me and also like the characters were much older than they were at the same time; it felt like overly mature people behaving very immaturely? I'm quitting about 1/4 in.
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  • Paige Bradish
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come closer to review date
  • Ms. B
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating story about what happens when the app that middle schooler Allie develops goes out of control. Can she debug her program before the big competition?
  • Crys
    January 1, 1970
    See why I enjoyed this book so much by clicking here
  • Kathie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for an advanced reader copy of this book - all opinions are my own.This is the first book I've read with coding as a main theme, and I was so impressed for several reasons. First, this book felt so fresh, as coding is timely topic, but there hasn't been a lot written about it in middle grade fiction with female protagonists. Second, the characters in this book are real, using language and acting the way young teen girls do, and it felt very much at its audience's level. Th Thank you to NetGalley for an advanced reader copy of this book - all opinions are my own.This is the first book I've read with coding as a main theme, and I was so impressed for several reasons. First, this book felt so fresh, as coding is timely topic, but there hasn't been a lot written about it in middle grade fiction with female protagonists. Second, the characters in this book are real, using language and acting the way young teen girls do, and it felt very much at its audience's level. Third, I could not stop reading...I was totally invested in the story and loved that this book did not take me where I feared it might in the beginning.In CLICK'D, Allie has spent the summer at a coding camp for girls, where she's created a new friendship app that turns meeting people into a game. When her teacher recommends her for a coding contest, the stakes are raised when Allie learns her arch nemesis is also competing. Allie decides to let the app into the world to get some live data, and its a HUGE hit. As followers surpass all of her expectations, she thinks she's a shoo-in to win the contest...until a glitch causes everything to crash around her. As Allie races to fix the issues before the contest, she learns that friendship apps can be just as complicated as friendships in the real world.I'll definitely be ordering a copy of this book for our library and promoting it!5/5 stars
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  • Joanne
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book as an early reader through a copy from Net Gallery. I really enjoyed it. The plot was original and the characters were fun. I really appreciated th nerd factor in it. I didn't realize until after I'd finished that it was the same author who wrote Every Last Word! In my opinion, you've got another winner!
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Rating:  2.5 StarsI picked Click'd up because I read Tamara Ireland Stone's book Every Last Word last year and loved it. I think it was even a 5 star read for me. When I saw a new book from her that was about young game developers, I thought it would be an interesting read. I want to start off this review by saying that while I rated it 2.5 stars, I can see that it was a case of the book not being for me. I can see how a lot of other people might enjoy the book, but I spent more than a few minut Rating:  2.5 StarsI picked Click'd up because I read Tamara Ireland Stone's book Every Last Word last year and loved it. I think it was even a 5 star read for me. When I saw a new book from her that was about young game developers, I thought it would be an interesting read. I want to start off this review by saying that while I rated it 2.5 stars, I can see that it was a case of the book not being for me. I can see how a lot of other people might enjoy the book, but I spent more than a few minutes while reading it being frustrated with how things were going, being presented, and ending up.Allie, the main character, starts out the book having finished a summer activity at a CodeGirls Camp, designed for young women to spend the summer developing app ideas and working on their skills. At the summit presentation that Allie gave, she presents a bare bones version of how Click'd would work. Reading about it, the app itself as presented then didn't sound special. The premise sounds nice, but basing the connections it makes off a small, generic quiz, something you might see on BuzzFeed, didn't make it special enough to warrant the attention it's creator Allie was getting from her computing teacher or the camp personnel. That a young person could code well enough to make an app is impressive because that sort of work seems hard to me, but the end product was average at best.Things did sound marginally more interesting when Allie showed the app to her school friends a couple of days later, but it was still ordinary. I felt like calling it a game was a bit of a stretch. The scavenger hunt aspect might count, but Nathan, Allie's classmate/arch-nemesis, had an actual game that sounded more interesting and overall "good" than Allie's. In fact, I felt a bit let down when we found out the range of other games that were presented at Games for Good, the competition happening a week into the school year that Allie's computing teacher Ms. Slade nominates her for. When looking at the other developers and their work, Click'd was never something that would've won. As the main character, I would've thought that she'd have something more in line with Nathan's game which facilitates raising funds for Habitat for Humanity, or another student whose game brings fresh drinking water to those in need.The timing aspect in the book felt strange as well. It was odd that the time Allie had with her mentor before the competition Games for Good was so short. Is a week really enough time to refine an app, test it, etc.? Why did Allie need a mentor for five days when she'd spent all summer working on it with supervision? A recommendation and that should've been it for Ms. Slade, who didn't end up actually doing a whole lot in her mentor capacity.Click'd also doesn't take into account the sheer weirdness of Instagram. It takes a photo from your timeline as a clue for the scavenger hunt aspect, but how will that help if you take pictures of your pets, of books?I will say that the friendships portrayed throughout the book seemed very real. I pretty much blocked out everything that happened to me between 7th and 12th grade, but what I do remember from right before that in elementary school was that friends were like this. You got mad, but it generally got better a lot quicker than it does when you're older, when you can hold a grudge. I didn't quite get the relationship, if it can be called that, between Allie and Nathan though. It felt like that was one partnership that never got resolved, other than their were "enemies" at the beginning and then things were better b the time the Games for Good competition rolled around. There didn't seem to be real resolution to the problems they had communicating, just...hey, we helped each other's game problems, we're all good. O.o I know I said relationships at that age I remember as resolving quickly, but these two didn't have a friendship that would facilitate that kind of recovery.All in all I thought Click'd was an okay book for me, though I probably wouldn't' read it again. I like middle grade books for the most part, but I think this was one of those times were it would be better enjoyed by the actual target age group rather than adults that enjoy the genre.I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I read this book in a day, that should tell you something. I really loved the messages this book conveyed about empowering young girls to code and participate in technology disciplines. As someone who studied engineering and who was one of 13 girls out of 80 in my Electrical Engineering major in college that really spoke to me. My only real issue with the book was that a middle school teen had ac I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I read this book in a day, that should tell you something. I really loved the messages this book conveyed about empowering young girls to code and participate in technology disciplines. As someone who studied engineering and who was one of 13 girls out of 80 in my Electrical Engineering major in college that really spoke to me. My only real issue with the book was that a middle school teen had access to all of this personal identifiable information, which is a cyber security risk that she could do anything with or some cyber criminal could do something with but her mentor and teacher never said anything about it. I think the author did an OK job addressing that issue, but I think I because of my experience in the area I'm being a little over critical.Overall I really enjoyed the story. I couldn't put it down. I really loved Ally. I connected with her as a girl who liked "nerdy" stuff and who played soccer. I saw so much of myself in her. The story is about Ally and the "game" she created at CodeGirls, a coding camp for girls over the summer. The purpose of her game Click'd is to find new friends based on a series of questions in a quiz you answer, much like an online dating profile. She even goes so far as to say that she studies those types of apps to create her own to make sure her data was matching people based on their likes and dislikes. She wanted people to make new friends or atleast talk to people that they otherwise would have never found before. She soon comes to find out that one of her best friends in real life is upset because her in real life friends are no longer on the top if her leaderboard and that isn't fun for her. Ally also finds a major bug in her app and tries to fix it on her own without help from her computer teacher and mentor for the Games for Good competition she's hoping to win. She finds an unlikely ally in her long time nemesis Nathan, who like Ally is also entered in the competition. Ally just wants people to find and click with people they otherwise wouldn't have ever talked to before, bringing smiles to peoples faces as they spark new friendships. Her app causes alot of turmoil and Ally isn't sure she can fix it. I think this story has a lot of great messages about friendship and loyalty, being driven to succeed, learning from your mistakes, and how technology especially mobile technology has really changed how we interact as a society. I really liked how in the end Ally's game brought people together the way she'd hoped and that she learned a lot of valuable lessons along the way. I would highly recommend this for the middle grade crowd, especially girls interested in the technology fields.
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  • Chrissie Morrison
    January 1, 1970
    Allie Navarro went away to a CodeGirls summer camp where she learned how to create her very own app, and she was super excited to share it with her friends when she came back home.  Even more exciting?  She would have the opportunity to enter her app into the upcoming G4G (Games for Good) competition!  Her app was eligible because it helped people to find other people near them with whom they "clicked" even if they didn't know each other yet.  Basically, it was a friend finder and it worked to m Allie Navarro went away to a CodeGirls summer camp where she learned how to create her very own app, and she was super excited to share it with her friends when she came back home.  Even more exciting?  She would have the opportunity to enter her app into the upcoming G4G (Games for Good) competition!  Her app was eligible because it helped people to find other people near them with whom they "clicked" even if they didn't know each other yet.  Basically, it was a friend finder and it worked to make the world a less lonely place.Through a series of questions, much like online dating websites, Click'd was able to match people by their interests.  This way, the kids in her middle school (and anywhere else her app spread) would be able to get to know people outside of their usual friend groups.  When you finished the questionnaire, you would get access to a leaderboard of the top 10 users with whom you Click'd -- and then the app would send you on a scavenger hunt to find them!  The app utilized the phones' geolocation functions to tell people when they were near a match with a series of "bloops" and flashing lights -- and then it gave users a photo clue pulled from the user's public Instagram feed.  Or, at least, that was what was supposed to happen.  Somehow, though, there was a glitch that accidentally utilized private photos from the users' phones some of the time.  Would she be able to fix it in time to present at G4G?  Would she just present it without admitting to the coding error?  Definitely a good conversation starter about honesty and integrity.I like the fact that this story raised issues about privacy and phone/internet safety concerns without resorting to R-rated problems.  There were embarrassing photos and screenshots of conversations that were supposed to be secret, but no sex acts or nudity involved.  I am not sure whether that was done intentionally so that parents, teachers, and librarians would feel more comfortable sharing this book with younger tweens, but it certainly doesn't hurt.  I appreciated that there were no quick fixes, lots of hard work, and plenty of growing pains as the story worked up to the G4G competition.  I also loved the fact that it concluded with a happy yet realistic ending.   I thought that since my own middle-schooler is away at a computer programming summer camp this week, reading (and reviewing) this book was definitely apropos!  And, though the book will not officially be released until early September, I think I might just offer to let him read my ARC when he returns.  :-)Happy Reading!
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  • Jana
    January 1, 1970
    I had the opportunity to read a digital ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for this review. I really enjoyed this middle grade fiction story that has likable characters, a STEM plot that taps into kids’ obsession with social media apps, and good messages about friendship and making good decisions.Seventh grader Allie Navarro has just spent the summer at CodeGirls Camp developing a really cool friendship social media app/game called Click’d. Designed to help strangers find new friends th I had the opportunity to read a digital ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for this review. I really enjoyed this middle grade fiction story that has likable characters, a STEM plot that taps into kids’ obsession with social media apps, and good messages about friendship and making good decisions.Seventh grader Allie Navarro has just spent the summer at CodeGirls Camp developing a really cool friendship social media app/game called Click’d. Designed to help strangers find new friends that have compatible interests, the app has users complete profile quizzes, and uses sound effects and pictures from Instagram accounts to help friends find each other in a type of scavenger hunt. During the first week of school, her app is a huge hit at her middle school and hundreds of new users download the app right away. Her app is so awesome that her computer science teacher is mentoring her in a big contest that upcoming weekend. But when Allie discovers a glitch in the program that allows users’ private pictures from their phones to become very public, she realizes she's going to have to fix the code in order to salvage her app before the competition.I think this would be a terrific book to share with middle grade students. The main character, Allie, is a relatable girl who embraces the “computer geek” inside her, but also has a group of close friends and participates on a soccer team. She deals with the normal middle school stressors of homework and friend drama, along with her technology talents.Middle grade students of the iGen generation cling to their phones and spend a colossal amount of time texting and relating to each other through social media. I think this book definitely taps into that in a positive way. I think this will be a very popular book with kids in grades 5 - 8!
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  • Phoebe Salomon
    January 1, 1970
    Click’d, by Tamara Ireland Stone, is about a girl named Allie, who creates an app called Click’d. Click’d is an app that helps you find who you could be friends with best, according to a multiple choice test you take at the beginning. The app doesn’t immediately tell you who you match up with the most, it waits until you are in a hundred-yard area, and it lets out a “bloop” noise. Your phone screen will change color depending on how close you are to them. When you reach that person, your phone Click’d, by Tamara Ireland Stone, is about a girl named Allie, who creates an app called Click’d. Click’d is an app that helps you find who you could be friends with best, according to a multiple choice test you take at the beginning. The app doesn’t immediately tell you who you match up with the most, it waits until you are in a hundred-yard area, and it lets out a “bloop” noise. Your phone screen will change color depending on how close you are to them. When you reach that person, your phone screen will pop up with a picture of them, you will then tap your phones together, and then you are prompted to take a selfie together. Allie created the app at a CodeGirls camp, and she would be presenting it at the Games For Good competition. The thing that I loved about this book, was that it would be so cool if this app was really a thing! It would make it so much easier for people to find people in a new place where they don’t know anyone, and find out that they would be really great friends with some of them. The big climax of the story was that her app starts pulling pictures from people’s personal photos, it’s only supposed to pull from Instagram. This starts sharing people’s personal information and creating fights between groups of friends. When this starts happening, she needs to fix it before Saturday, which is when the Games for Good competition is. I expected that the story would end with her fixing her app, presenting it at the competition, and winning the competition. But, the complete opposite happened! She wasn’t able to fix it, and she had to have her name pulled from the competition. I felt that this really showed that it isn’t about winning, she ended up making more of an impact. I would recommend this book to all of friends, it was such a great book!
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