The Way to Bea
With a charming voice, winning characters, and a perfectly-woven plot, Kat Yeh delivers a powerful story of friendship and finding a path towards embracing yourself.Everything in Bea's world has changed. She's starting seventh grade newly friendless and facing big changes at home, where she is about to go from only child to big sister. Feeling alone and adrift, and like her words don't deserve to be seen, Bea takes solace in writing haiku in invisible ink and hiding them in a secret spot.But then something incredible happens--someone writes back. And Bea begins to connect with new friends, including a classmate obsessed with a nearby labyrinth and determined to get inside. As she decides where her next path will lead, she just might discover that her words--and herself--have found a new way to belong.

The Way to Bea Details

TitleThe Way to Bea
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 19th, 2017
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780316236676
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Contemporary

The Way to Bea Review

  • Lola Reviewer
    January 1, 1970
    I knew I would love this book before I even turned the first page. The Truth About Twinkie Pie was wonderful—of the emotional sort—and so surprisingly creative. I had a feeling I would love this one too. And although this is only the second book I read from Kat Yeh, she’s one middle grade author I have on auto-buy. The beauty of this novel is that it can be enjoyed by adults also. I’m reading another middle grade novel right now, and contrary to this one, there’s a youngish vibe and I can’t see I knew I would love this book before I even turned the first page. The Truth About Twinkie Pie was wonderful—of the emotional sort—and so surprisingly creative. I had a feeling I would love this one too. And although this is only the second book I read from Kat Yeh, she’s one middle grade author I have on auto-buy. The beauty of this novel is that it can be enjoyed by adults also. I’m reading another middle grade novel right now, and contrary to this one, there’s a youngish vibe and I can’t see myself recommending it to older readers. But The Way to Bea explores universal themes and is masterfully written. Like, what do you do when you’ve become estranged from your best friend? Who do you turn to? How do you react? Beatrix Lee is very much into Haiku poems so she pours all of her thoughts and emotions into them. She even starts to converse anonymously with a classmate in invisible ink, sometimes sharing her poetry. This helps. But so do the new friends she makes.I loved how the heroine found patterns in her life. How she found links between things, especially when talking about people—both kids and adults—finding it hard to approach other people. The friends she makes accept her as she is, whereas her former best friend has joined a new group that find her weird. I’m sure it has happened to all of us, especially in middle school, where we make ‘‘friends’’ just by talking to someone and lose them just by arguing for a second. If it has never happened to you, then you’re super lucky. This is also what I mean by universal themes. We’ve all been that age once. We can all connect. Bea makes it even easy to relate to her, the lovely girl that she is.Heart-warming. A winner. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Patty
    January 1, 1970
    I do not know the wayUntil that extra thump (six) on your heart tells you that you've made the wrong choice. Only this time, it's not just a haiku—it's real life. And there's no starting over.What an absolutely beautiful, emotional, and realistic read!! What you feel inside is what you put out in the universe. Because...how do you keep someone?I mean, how do you keep someone and make sure they don't leave? How do you figure out how to be and how to act, so they don't even want to begin to think I do not know the wayUntil that extra thump (six) on your heart tells you that you've made the wrong choice. Only this time, it's not just a haiku—it's real life. And there's no starting over.What an absolutely beautiful, emotional, and realistic read!! What you feel inside is what you put out in the universe. Because...how do you keep someone?I mean, how do you keep someone and make sure they don't leave? How do you figure out how to be and how to act, so they don't even want to begin to think about leaving? It's like you saved me from eternal invisibility. Briggs frowns. "But i think that's kind of messed up. I think people should talk about things. How is anyone suppose to understand anything or how are things suppose to get better if you don't talk about it?" Full review to come.
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  • Audrey Webster
    January 1, 1970
    Review can be found on my blog. Linked here:https://betweenthepagesbooks.wixsite....
  • Shenwei
    January 1, 1970
    A Bea-utiful book about finding new friends when your old ones have abandoned you and learning to be true to yourself. 😭💜note: the main character is Taiwanese American and one of the supporting characters is autistic.
  • Alisha Marie
    January 1, 1970
    I'm weird with Middle Grade books. There are a few that I have really liked and there are some that I found underwhelming. This one falls right in the middle of these two categories. While I did like The Way to Bea, I wasn't in love with it.The Good: The best thing about The Way to Bea is the way that Yeh captures the loneliness that Bea felt so wonderfully. I felt like I could feel her pain. I also loved the resolution between Bea and S. I thought that it was so realistic.The Eh: Plot-wise, I f I'm weird with Middle Grade books. There are a few that I have really liked and there are some that I found underwhelming. This one falls right in the middle of these two categories. While I did like The Way to Bea, I wasn't in love with it.The Good: The best thing about The Way to Bea is the way that Yeh captures the loneliness that Bea felt so wonderfully. I felt like I could feel her pain. I also loved the resolution between Bea and S. I thought that it was so realistic.The Eh: Plot-wise, I found The Way to Bea to be a little thin. It seems to be more about Bea discovering herself. The labyrinth/maze aspect of it wasn't in the book all that much and most of it was towards the end. I did find the middle to be a bit of a slog (however, I'm an adult reading a middle grade novel so take that with a grain of salt) and it did feel a bit long.In the end, I liked The Way to Bea. This book shined the brightest when it was getting into Bea's loneliness and her angsty inner most thoughts. If you're looking for something with adventure, though, I'd skip this one.
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  • Aeicha
    January 1, 1970
    Twelve year old Bea Lee and her BFF had big plans for seventh grade, but now Bea’s friends are ignoring her, Bea’s super busy artist mother and graphic novelist father are focused on the arrival of Bea’s little sister, and Bea feels utterly lost and invisible. She takes comfort in the poems she feels in her heart and writes in invisible ink, then hides in a special place...and one day someone writes back! Who is the mystery writer and friend? Could it be Bea’s former BFF, one of the interesting Twelve year old Bea Lee and her BFF had big plans for seventh grade, but now Bea’s friends are ignoring her, Bea’s super busy artist mother and graphic novelist father are focused on the arrival of Bea’s little sister, and Bea feels utterly lost and invisible. She takes comfort in the poems she feels in her heart and writes in invisible ink, then hides in a special place...and one day someone writes back! Who is the mystery writer and friend? Could it be Bea’s former BFF, one of the interesting boys Bea meets working on the school newspaper, or someone else? Navigating seventh grade turns out to be as complex as the world of labyrinths Bea finds herself immersed in...and just maybe along the way, Bea simply finds herself.Kat Yeh’s The Way To Bea is a heartfelt delight! With an absolute pitch-perfect voice, endearing characters, and beautiful depth, The Way To Bea will sweetly and smartly charm middle-grade (and grown-up) readers.Kat Yeh perfectly captures that angsty, confusing, often heartbreaking, and too big, too muchness time in adolescence (the middle-school years), and does so with clever humor, profound honesty, soul-deep heart, and fantastic poetry. I think every reader, but especially middle-grade readers, will be able to relate to Bea’s story in some way and, more importantly, will find meaning in her journey. Young readers will appreciate Bea’s genuine and authentic POV and voice, and the way Yeh doesn’t underestimate her readers’ ability to ponder life’s big questions and process even bigger emotions. The Way To Bea is bursting with a rainbow of wonderfully engaging characters! From Bea to her parents, peers, and teachers, there is such an awesome array of eclectic, quirky, thoughtful, funny, unique characters for readers to love and relate to. With Bea’s new labyrinth obsessed friend, Will, Kat Yeh carefully and deftly gives a voice to young readers on the Autism spectrum, as Will has Asperger Syndrome (this is never stated in the book, but alluded to). And I must mention the character of Briggs, the editor in chief of the middle-school newspaper, because the boy charmed me completely! I’d love to see a 17/18 year old Briggs in a young adult novel someday because that boy is gonna grow up to be a sweetly swoon-worthy fella. (One of my favorite Briggs lines is halfway down on page 338!).I just loved everything about this book: it’s captivating storytelling, irresistible voice, wonderful characters, and moving and profound message. The Way To Bea is a thoughtful and timely middle-grade novel that has that magical, marvelous ability to leave readers feeling like they just met a new friend!
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  • Luke Reynolds
    January 1, 1970
    ARC Review (6/20/17, received from a local bookstore)Actual rating: 4.5 out of 5 starsWhen I first heard about this novel, I was absolutely ecstatic. Kat Yeh's middle grade novel debut, The Truth About Twinkie Pie, was one of my favorite novels last year. She did an impeccable job crafting a relatable protagonist with a phenomenal voice and capturing all the emotions of what's it like to be a kid like she's truly been in those same places. However, what I loved about that book was its sincerity. ARC Review (6/20/17, received from a local bookstore)Actual rating: 4.5 out of 5 starsWhen I first heard about this novel, I was absolutely ecstatic. Kat Yeh's middle grade novel debut, The Truth About Twinkie Pie, was one of my favorite novels last year. She did an impeccable job crafting a relatable protagonist with a phenomenal voice and capturing all the emotions of what's it like to be a kid like she's truly been in those same places. However, what I loved about that book was its sincerity. Yeh's writing is earnest and heartrending in all the right ways. Her casts of characters feel real and are always entertaining, and following their journeys is fun. Nothing feels forced. Everything feels 100% authentic. So when I saw it at a local bookstore on their kids ARC pile, I snatched it as fast as I could.Needless to say, I was pleased to see Yeh's strengths carry over in The Way to Bea. Bea, the protagonist here, is another lovable protagonist that feels real, and her journey with trying to find her best self was fun. Additionally, the characters represent all walks of life once more, and everyone will be able to see pieces of themselves in them. However, the wandering plot and some lack of development for other characters aside from the leads still remain. I did notice these more with the follow-up, but it doesn't detract from yet another fantastic story with a big heart.Beatrix "Bea" Lee is the titular character here (or, I realized, the former acronym of Book Expo), and once again, Yeh's crafting shines here. Bea's journey itself was wonderful, but her emotions are tapped into incredibly well. The loneliness without a best friend she can only refer to by the first letter of her name (which was an excellent touch to me, especially since this changes later so we learn her name (view spoiler)[(Sammie) (hide spoiler)] and those of the friend group), the anxiety that swelled up when she had to confront her past, the realization of how fun making haiku was and of making new friends so she could let them in, and even her sass as she's opening up felt genuine and achingly human. To see her grapple with these things made me realize just how much Yeh has experienced pain and joy, and Bea was that sponge soaking up those prior moments on her way to find her best self, planning a labyrinth (we also got the official definition of mazes and labyrinths, thank goodness; now I know the difference) conquering adventure with a new friend, and realizing she's best when she's creative.(view spoiler)[Also, I feel like Bea was maybe asexual. Romance played absolutely no part with her, no matter when she was exasperated at how mushy her parents could get or when she discovered Briggs had a crush on her (she just really, really liked him instead of liking him). She held no interest when Sammie became involved with boys as she got older as well, so it has me wondering. I could be wrong with that, though, seeing as there's no label. (hide spoiler)]But that's not all. All the characters in The Way to Bea were diverse and interesting to read. Seeing the differences in how they interacted with Bea made me invested in the world of this book. Whether it was Will, a striped-shirt wearing boy interested in labyrinths who eventually became Bea's friend (and who was also a very respectful handling of Aspergers), Ms. Rodriguez, the librarian who always knew which book to recommend to a student who needed it, Briggs, the fedora-clad eighth grader with his heart on his sleeve, the few interactions we saw with S(view spoiler)[ammie (hide spoiler)] in the past, and Jaime, the girl with the Afro who drew a comic about a turtle looking for a band in the school newspaper who wanted to be Bea's friend, they all captured my attention equally. Most of them treated each other with respect and approached things in their own way, and I was really rooting for them to succeed in whatever they were working on. I do wish that there had been more development with some of the kids on the Broadside (school newspaper) team, but sometimes, you get what you get, and they definitely felt like individuals, which is a plus.I also enjoyed the heck out of the love for art in this book. Both of Bea's parents (aside from still being absolutely head over heels with each other with another baby coming on the way that Bea gets to middle name) are artists: the father is a comic book artist with a Taiwanese superhero (since Bea'a family is from there), while the mother works on blue paintings. This got passed down to Bea's haiku and poetry writing, and I loved how the novel spent time showing Bea's creative process and how it guided her to make the decisions she wanted to make. It took time as well to explore the relationship between Bea and her parents, one with more independence than most kids her age.There were also plenty of music and literary references, which I loved to guess and figure out where they were going (all the songs mentioned in the book are in a playlist at the end, which I will definitely be listening to).While I do think this book's plot had a lot going for it (Bea dealing with her anxiety, haiku, the newspaper crew, finding a labyrinth, giving a middle name to a baby sister, best friend drama), The Way to Bea is still an enjoyable book. With realistic characters, engaging writing, fun adventures, and enough sincerity to replicate even the warmest of apple pies, Kat Yeh proves to be one of the sweetest middle grade authors around.One last thing: Peyton Elizabeth Lee from Disney Channel's Andi Mack (which is the best show the company has worked on in years thanks to Terri Minsky, please check it out) would make an awesome Bea in an adaptation of this. Not only would she capture the spunk of the lead incredibly well, but the show actually reminds me a lot of Yeh's writing (and not just the plot twist of the debut). It's engaging, authentic, heartwarming, and subverts pretty much all the typical things you see in shows like this. Lee's also too darn cute.After Reading:I need a moment to process my thoughts because I'm in an emotional and allergy-suffering state where my eyes sting. All I know is the ending was excellent, Kat Yeh is one of the most sincere writers I've ever read, and I just need more beautiful stories like this one from her.Before Reading:More Kat Yeh? Sounds great to me!
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  • Wendi Lee
    January 1, 1970
    This is a tender, wonderfully written book about losing your friends, and finding the courage to stand strong and be yourself. Bea has high hopes for seventh grade, but when she comes back from a summer vacation in Taiwan, nothing is as it was before. Her best friends have turned their backs on her, and while a kind-hearted teacher immediately tries to engage Bea into different groups of kids, Bea isn't sure she wants to have anything to do with anyone. To make matters more complicated, her arti This is a tender, wonderfully written book about losing your friends, and finding the courage to stand strong and be yourself. Bea has high hopes for seventh grade, but when she comes back from a summer vacation in Taiwan, nothing is as it was before. Her best friends have turned their backs on her, and while a kind-hearted teacher immediately tries to engage Bea into different groups of kids, Bea isn't sure she wants to have anything to do with anyone. To make matters more complicated, her artist parents are busy with different projects and don't notice how things have changed for Bea. She finds a kindred spirit in Will, a member of the school literary magazine. Will is different in ways that Bea is not, but he's unafraid to be himself. There's also Briggs, a year older than Bea, who embraces individuality and creativity, and is a big fan of Bea's poetry. It's hard to be different, especially in middle school. There is a LOT of pressure to conform to what everyone else is doing, and tamp down the quirks and talents that make you special. I love how this book embraces who Bea is - from her artistic, heart-feeling parents, to lovely Mrs. Rodriguez, and all the school literary magazine kids. It's a fantastic message with a robust, organically diverse cast of characters. I can't recommend this book enough. *I was a Goodreads Giveaway winner for this book!*
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  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    When I was in seventh grade I loved haiku's much the same as Bea, the main character, in this book does. Baa's a girl who has come back from a trip to Taiwan with her family to find she find she and her best friend 'S' are no longer the inseparable duo they once were. There's a lot about Bea that's relatable, but I found myself relating as much if not more to the quirky kid Will who studies mazes and eats lunch by himself in the newspaper office. The book has relatable characters, and though th When I was in seventh grade I loved haiku's much the same as Bea, the main character, in this book does. Baa's a girl who has come back from a trip to Taiwan with her family to find she find she and her best friend 'S' are no longer the inseparable duo they once were. There's a lot about Bea that's relatable, but I found myself relating as much if not more to the quirky kid Will who studies mazes and eats lunch by himself in the newspaper office. The book has relatable characters, and though there are no straight forward villains there are definitely those who would change Bea. And she doesn't need changing.
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  • Nafiza
    January 1, 1970
    This was so good! Review on The Book Wars soon.
  • Savannah Hendricks
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this heartfelt, heartwarming, charming, happy, labyrinth of a story. Please read my full review at my blog, if you wish. http://wp.me/p2eSOM-Fd
  • SundayAtDusk
    January 1, 1970
    When her family's summer vacation in Taiwan approaches the end, Bea realizes she and her best friend Sammie . . . who is irritatingly known as "S" throughout most of the story . . . have not kept in touch as much as they planned. That didn't really worry, Bea, however, because their friendship was indestructible. Or was it? Apparently not. Sammie moved on to new friends over the summer, and Bea not only finds herself friendless at the beginning of 7th grade, but also talked about and laughed at. When her family's summer vacation in Taiwan approaches the end, Bea realizes she and her best friend Sammie . . . who is irritatingly known as "S" throughout most of the story . . . have not kept in touch as much as they planned. That didn't really worry, Bea, however, because their friendship was indestructible. Or was it? Apparently not. Sammie moved on to new friends over the summer, and Bea not only finds herself friendless at the beginning of 7th grade, but also talked about and laughed at. Her parents don't seem to notice, either, because they are preoccupied with their arts and each other; plus a second child in on the way. Where does that leave Bea? Feeling very alone. But then, as the new poetry editor of the school paper, she meets new people and makes new friends. Not without complications, mind you.While I liked this story and most of the characters, I couldn't seem to totally warm-up to it. It felt too planned out, and some of the child characters seemed too emotionally mature for their ages. Moreover, besides using initials for some of the girls' names, I found the author's practice of including songs and books in the story, without including their titles, downright irritating. Ms. Yeh does list the songs in the back of the book, along with what scenes they belonged to, but I'm not sure why she left out names and titles so often to begin with. Is it possibly a major theme of the book that names and labels are not necessary or harmful? In her acknowledgements, the author mentions learning about autism; and obviously one of the children in the story is affected by that; but he is never labeled as "autistic". His less than normal ways are just accepted as part of who he is, not as part of a disorder.(Note: I received a free ARC of this book from Amazon Vine.)
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Bea is a Chinese-American from Taiwan. She spends the summer break in Taiwan with her family and comes back to begin 7th grade. She has trouble with her only friend and it appears that it is not resolved and will continue. Bea's parents are arty and the father is in the entertainment business. The mother runs an art gallery and paints. Bea considers herself a poet. She is like her family, spontaneous, unorganized and freewheeling which suits them just fine. In pursuit of a friend, Bea chooses a Bea is a Chinese-American from Taiwan. She spends the summer break in Taiwan with her family and comes back to begin 7th grade. She has trouble with her only friend and it appears that it is not resolved and will continue. Bea's parents are arty and the father is in the entertainment business. The mother runs an art gallery and paints. Bea considers herself a poet. She is like her family, spontaneous, unorganized and freewheeling which suits them just fine. In pursuit of a friend, Bea chooses a boy named Will to have a crush on. He also has no friends, but finds it difficult to respond to Bea's friendship overtures. He is in charge of a poetry contest so there is an excuse for her to be around him. She discovers that he is obsessed with labyrinths and fixated on sneaking into one in the area owned by a billionaire. To please him, Bea researches the labyrinth and discovers a broken wall and fence they can sneak into to enter the property. Not only is Will obsessed with labyrinths, but has a thing about eggs, coats, and labels on his clothes. He also makes lists and adults in the school help him stick to a routine. So the day comes when the kids plan to sneak into the labyrinth, and all bell breaks loose on that day. It's a nice story and sweet but it is written in that talky, stream of consciousness style that is so popular these days. Constant dialog brings down the readability scores, and makes the story less serious and distant from its characters. It's not a writing style I care for. Still I liked this book enough to score 4 stars.
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  • Amy Formanski Duffy
    January 1, 1970
    Haiku, labyrinths and friend drama. Bea starts seventh grade without any friends. Her former best friends stopped talking to her over the summer after an embarrassing incident at a pool party. They think she's weird because she walks around with headphones on and writes poems in the air with her hands. Luckily she finds other allies: her artist mom and comic book author dad, a school librarian who always recommends the perfect book, the school newspaper editor who loves her poems, and a boy on t Haiku, labyrinths and friend drama. Bea starts seventh grade without any friends. Her former best friends stopped talking to her over the summer after an embarrassing incident at a pool party. They think she's weird because she walks around with headphones on and writes poems in the air with her hands. Luckily she finds other allies: her artist mom and comic book author dad, a school librarian who always recommends the perfect book, the school newspaper editor who loves her poems, and a boy on the autism spectrum who's obsessed with labyrinths. This accurately illustrates how kids feel when they don't fit and are trying to figure out their identities during the awkward middle school years. I would say the character development is the strongest aspect of the book. It's not so much about the plot, although it's fun to see Bea and her new friend Will break into a mysterious millionaire's estate to explore a labyrinth. We also get a satisfying resolution between Bea and her former best friend Sammie. Bea learns to see things from Sammie's perspective and they work out their differences. Maybe they won't be best friends anymore, but they'll be friendly and accept one another for who they are. Heartwarming and unique.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Do you know the difference between a maze and a labyrinth? You'll find out in this book. Also, I coincidentally watched Labyrinth while I was in the middle of this book, and I found out the movie should actually be named Maze.Anyway, there are only minor similarities between the David Bowie movie and this book. The book is more family appropriate, and really captures that awkward stage in life called seventh grade. It addresses the struggle of staying true to yourself versus conforming to the no Do you know the difference between a maze and a labyrinth? You'll find out in this book. Also, I coincidentally watched Labyrinth while I was in the middle of this book, and I found out the movie should actually be named Maze.Anyway, there are only minor similarities between the David Bowie movie and this book. The book is more family appropriate, and really captures that awkward stage in life called seventh grade. It addresses the struggle of staying true to yourself versus conforming to the norm.Through the novel, Bea deals with the loss of a friendship and the gain of new ones.Bea is a poetHaiku is her go-to formOf poetry, obv.The supporting characters (both kid and adult) weren't one-dimensional, and provided Bea with thoughtful and difficult interactions. From my previous experiences of being a shy, artistic kid, this was highly relatable.Consider me charmed.
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  • Tj Shay
    January 1, 1970
    Where to begin....Kat Yeh is a talented author and this book shows that. She has a special talent for using words that make you feel what the character feels and that is no easy task. Part of the story involves changing friend groups, which I am no stranger of, even as an adult. The way Kat describes it...in subtle and perfect words, is exactly right and true. You FEEL when you read this book. Then there was this quote..... It doesn't give any of the plot away to share it....THIS stopped me from Where to begin....Kat Yeh is a talented author and this book shows that. She has a special talent for using words that make you feel what the character feels and that is no easy task. Part of the story involves changing friend groups, which I am no stranger of, even as an adult. The way Kat describes it...in subtle and perfect words, is exactly right and true. You FEEL when you read this book. Then there was this quote..... It doesn't give any of the plot away to share it....THIS stopped me from going on and I reread it a bunch of times. Then I went on....and went back and reread it. 15 words that encompass so much reality and heart.if I actthe wayI wish I weream I still acting--or becoming?I loved it....I truly truly loved it.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    A gentle coming of age story that features a tween poet and the school newspaper editor who pines for her, a neglected labyrinth, an autistic boy who turns into an unexpected friend, a pair of artistic but distracted parents and a sneaker-collecting librarian. There's also friendship drama and Taiwanese culture woven in. A little less painful than Shannon Hale's Real Friends, but just as authentic.
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  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    Bea is in middle school and it's obvious something bad has happened with her best friends, who she refuses to even mention by name throughout most of the book. I love this in-depth look at how girls treat each other in middle school, sometimes just by accident. Friendship is hard, even when you think you know what you want. Bea is a little bit hard to connect to for the first half of the book but you'll love her and the diverse set of characters by the end of the book.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    I got an arc of this at bookcon. This book was really cute, it doesn't fall into the trap that many YAs fall into, which is being condescending to the reader. I can see this book really having a positive effect on a young reader.
  • Michele Knott
    January 1, 1970
    When it says it's written by Kat Yeh, that just means go ahead and preorder. Kat gives us another amazing middle grade read that is sure to captivate all readers.
  • Karina
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written! I found the characters so true and honest. Bravo, Kat!
  • Krysta
    January 1, 1970
    ARC
  • Stacy268
    January 1, 1970
    I laughed. I cried. Kat Yeh was flawless. This is a big league book. Poetry, family, friendships, art, heartbreak. *swoon*
  • Emily Scheinman
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorites of 2017!
  • Krista K.
    January 1, 1970
    A heartwarming book about being true to yourself and finding new friends when your old friends have turned away from you.
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