Ink in Water (Or, How I Kicked Anorexia’s Ass and Embraced Body Positivity)
At once punk rock and poignant, Ink in Water is the visceral and groundbreaking graphic memoir of a young woman’s devastating struggle with negative body image and eating disorders, and how she rose above her own destructive behaviors and feelings of inadequacy to live a life of strength and empowerment.As a young artist living in Portland, Lacy Davis’ eating disorder began with the germ of an idea: a seed of a thought that told her she just wasn’t good enough. And like ink in water, that idea spread until it reached every corner of her being. This is the true story of Lacy’s journey into the self-destructive world of multiple eating disorders. It starts with a young and positive Lacy, trying to grapple with our culture’s body-image obsession and stay true to her riot grrrl roots. And while she initially succeeds in overcoming a nagging rumination about her body, a break up with a recovering addict starts her on a collision course with anorexia, health food obsession, and compulsive exercise addiction. At the request of her last real friend, she starts going to a twelve-step Overeaters Anonymous course, only to find that it conflicts with her punk feminist ideology.Blending bold humor, a healthy dose of self-deprecation, vulnerability, literary storytelling, and dynamic and provocative artwork by illustrator Jim Kettner, Ink in Water is an unflinching, brutally honest look into the author’s mind: how she learned to take control of her damaging thoughts, redirect her perfectionism from self-destructive behaviors into writing and art, and how she committed herself to a life of health, strength, and nourishment.

Ink in Water (Or, How I Kicked Anorexia’s Ass and Embraced Body Positivity) Details

TitleInk in Water (Or, How I Kicked Anorexia’s Ass and Embraced Body Positivity)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 1st, 2017
PublisherNew Harbinger Publications
ISBN-139781626258310
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Nonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir

Ink in Water (Or, How I Kicked Anorexia’s Ass and Embraced Body Positivity) Review

  • Romie
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel is a real gift.Knowing it’s a memoir makes everything even more relatable, you know what I mean?I’ve been fighting my binge & purge eating disorder for years now, 5 years to be precise, and I’ve never related with a graphic novel as much as I did with this one.In this gn, you learn a few things about eating disorders : anything can trigger them, you don’t always look like you’re fighting, the fight never ends, sometimes you feel amazing but it doesn’t mean you can’t have d This graphic novel is a real gift.Knowing it’s a memoir makes everything even more relatable, you know what I mean?I’ve been fighting my binge & purge eating disorder for years now, 5 years to be precise, and I’ve never related with a graphic novel as much as I did with this one.In this gn, you learn a few things about eating disorders : anything can trigger them, you don’t always look like you’re fighting, the fight never ends, sometimes you feel amazing but it doesn’t mean you can’t have dark days, you can spend years without having to deal with it and it’s back in a second, and it’s never your fault. Your disorder doesn’t define you as a person and doesn’t define your worth.You see that even if you know you have a disorder and actively fight against it, getting better is really the hardest part. It’s something people without a disorder tend to forget about : just because we acknowledge our disorder doesn’t mean it goes away like that, we have to work a lot just to get better, and it never really goes away, it’s something we’ll fight our entire life.I’m grateful this memoir exists, it’s important people start to see themselves in graphic novels, it’s important people who don’t have any disorder learn what it truly means.4.5Thank you Netgalley for providing me an e-arc in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Scarlet Cameo
    January 1, 1970
    An honest and hard story-RTC-A digital copy of this book was provided by NetGalley/i>
  • Schizanthus
    January 1, 1970
    Lacy J. Davis has nailed it in this graphic novel memoir of her battle with an eating disorder in Ink in Water. She bravely takes the reader on a journey with her from its inception with thoughts of not being good enough to the beginnings of food restriction and anorexia, to compulsively exercising and finally bulimia. We watch on as her world shrinks along with her body, as she shuts out friends while her obsession with her body takes hold. We're taken inside her mind as she battles the thought Lacy J. Davis has nailed it in this graphic novel memoir of her battle with an eating disorder in Ink in Water. She bravely takes the reader on a journey with her from its inception with thoughts of not being good enough to the beginnings of food restriction and anorexia, to compulsively exercising and finally bulimia. We watch on as her world shrinks along with her body, as she shuts out friends while her obsession with her body takes hold. We're taken inside her mind as she battles the thoughts telling her she's too fat and we silently cheer her on from the sidelines as we watch her courageously fight to become healthy again and triumph over her demons.While everyone fighting an eating disorder is on their own journey, Lacy takes us on an unflinching ride through hers. Not sugarcoating (yeah, I know, weird word to use in a review for a book about eating disorders) her struggles, yet ultimately giving us hope, this book will speak to everyone who has had, has or knows anyone with an eating disorder. People who can't understand why they just don't eat more or why they don't just stop exercising so much will gain much needed insight into what life with an eating disorder looks and feels like.There are as many stories behind why eating disorders begin as there are people struggling with them and what works for one person may not work for another as they work towards recovery. I applaud Lacy for showing us that recovery from eating disorders isn't a success only path but that ultimately there is hope.Jim Kettner's illustrations are gritty and take us deeper into Lacy's journey than we could have gone with words alone. We become a part of Lacy's struggles and her grief, we're inside her head listening to the voices telling her she's not enough and we feel the hope that shines through despite her struggle.I received an ARC from NetGalley (thank you so much to NetGalley and New Harbinger Publications, Inc. for the opportunity) in exchange for honest feedback. If you have an eating disorder I encourage you to keep fighting, don't stop searching until you find treatment that works for you and hold onto hope. Recovery is possible. Yes, even for you!
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  • Gurveen Kaur
    January 1, 1970
    You know when you find a story that reflects purity, honesty and a good heart, and imprints all these emotions and thoughts in you and yet you're left speechless? Ink in Water by Lacy J. Davis and Jim Kettner does just that! My very first graphic novel, this one's going to stay with me for a very long time. Lacy shares her struggles with Life and her health that she's had to deal with since her early 20s. A normal girl, with a happy childhood, good people around and a healthy dating life - is su You know when you find a story that reflects purity, honesty and a good heart, and imprints all these emotions and thoughts in you and yet you're left speechless? Ink in Water by Lacy J. Davis and Jim Kettner does just that! My very first graphic novel, this one's going to stay with me for a very long time. Lacy shares her struggles with Life and her health that she's had to deal with since her early 20s. A normal girl, with a happy childhood, good people around and a healthy dating life - is suddenly pushed into this darkness that engulfs every fibre of her being. She deals with eating disorders, and I respect the fact that it's been talked about so truthfully in her story. Her mind had kept this blob of an idea hidden there somewhere, waiting for one thing to go wrong, and spread like ink spreads on a paper and fills it with darkness. Ink in Water is her story of survival and victory, and how she defeats all the troubles that come her way. It's a story about love, dedication and commitment. The artwork is just amazing! It explains each emotion and moment so truthfully and vividly, that you almost start seeing yourself in the protagonist's situation. It is immensely expressive and explains the gravity of situations, being talked about, perfectly. I could sense the mixed emotions and frustration Lacy's dark thoughts brought along. It might not be an easy read for some, but it's definitely important and totally worth it. I respect Lacy for her strength and for being true to herself even when she didn't think she knew how to be. And I respect Kett for being such a wonderful and generous human being and to always be with her through all her highs and specially her lows. Also, I want to thank Lacy for staying with herself despite all that went wrong and for choosing to do whatever it takes to keep their relationship going. I can't explain the entire story in words but more so through tears and emotions. I love how the story starts with her shoulders slumped but ends with her walking upright and glowing. I found myself clapping and cheering her on! It's an amazingly empowering story and I'm really glad that it'll soon be shared with the world! e-Book courtesy: Net Galley
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  • Manon
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Ink in Water is an illustrated memoir that tells the story of Lacy. It tells her journey, mostly focusing on her eating disorder and anxiety.I really liked this book, the story was captivating and I couldn’t put it down…I loved Lacy, she was so relatable.I teared up a couple time, it made me feel so much.The only reason this doesn’t get 5 stars is that even though I liked the art I didn’t LOVE it…IDK…Still, a great read that I I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Ink in Water is an illustrated memoir that tells the story of Lacy. It tells her journey, mostly focusing on her eating disorder and anxiety.I really liked this book, the story was captivating and I couldn’t put it down…I loved Lacy, she was so relatable.I teared up a couple time, it made me feel so much.The only reason this doesn’t get 5 stars is that even though I liked the art I didn’t LOVE it…IDK…Still, a great read that I would strongly recommend.
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  • Tea & Crackers
    January 1, 1970
    Having a eatingdisorder, there's alot in this that you can relate too. Very nice and also infomative for related people that wants to know more from ones perspective.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and New Harbinger Publications, Inc for an uncorrected proof of this graphic novel in exchange for an honest review. An extremely candid graphic novel, Lacy J. Davis exposes the demons that abound in the world of eating disorders. I am so grateful that she wrote it! Through black and white photos, Davis speaks with such raw emotion of living each day with an ED. So very relateable!
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  • Clair Sharpe
    January 1, 1970
    I received this in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. Thank you to the author, Lacy Davis, and the publisher, New Harbinger for this opportunity.Ink in Water is a memoir of Lacy Davis’ upsetting struggle with negative body image and eating disorders. and how she rose above her own damaging behaviours and feelings of inadequacy to live a life of strength and empowerment.Told in the form of a graphic novel, it covers her friendships and how they break down, the beginning of her recovery I received this in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. Thank you to the author, Lacy Davis, and the publisher, New Harbinger for this opportunity.Ink in Water is a memoir of Lacy Davis’ upsetting struggle with negative body image and eating disorders. and how she rose above her own damaging behaviours and feelings of inadequacy to live a life of strength and empowerment.Told in the form of a graphic novel, it covers her friendships and how they break down, the beginning of her recovery on an overeaters anonymous course and the relationships she forms. Over the course of the book she suffers from both anorexia and bulimia and also partakes in extreme exercise.It is heart-breaking in places and I found I was able to totally emphasise with Lacy. I liked her and was cheering on her recovery. The illustrations are amazing and I can’t rate this highly enough. I don’t generally read graphic novels but after having some family experience with eating disorders I wanted to know more about it and the feelings people have.
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  • Katie Kempski
    January 1, 1970
    If there's a right way to write a book about ED, this is it. I used to have an eating disorder, one that was actually extremely similar to what Lacy describes. Most books I've read during and since have been triggering, usually glamorizing eating disorders or lessening how harsh and terrible they really can be. But this book doesn't do that. Thank God.Ink and Water is difficult to read at times, but only because Lacy doesn't hold back on how much she struggled and how much her ED affected her an If there's a right way to write a book about ED, this is it. I used to have an eating disorder, one that was actually extremely similar to what Lacy describes. Most books I've read during and since have been triggering, usually glamorizing eating disorders or lessening how harsh and terrible they really can be. But this book doesn't do that. Thank God.Ink and Water is difficult to read at times, but only because Lacy doesn't hold back on how much she struggled and how much her ED affected her and everyone around her. The book itself is extremely well written with a natural flow and truths laid out in easy-to-follow internal and external dialogue. The illustrations fit in perfectly. Though all black and white, the lines and shading perfectly reflect the mood as it develops, white and vibrant in the good times, gray and black in the tough, and extremely well done throughout.I am duly impressed with Lacy's ability to get her message across in such a powerful way. I couldn't help but fall in love with her, feeling her pain while she grew sick and worked to get well again yet understanding her hesitancy in acknowledging her problems and sharing them with her loved ones. I'm glad Lacy shared her story, showed that eating disorders are incredibly difficult to deal with, not at all as glamorous as the media portrays, and, above all, ABLE TO BE OVERCOME. Her overarching message of body-positivity and self-love is obvious and something that all women (and men) can benefit from, whether or not they have struggled or are currently struggling with an ED. I admire Lacy's bravery in sharing her story, and I'm impressed by her ability to convey it in a visually compelling graphic novel. Can't wait to read more from this author.
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  • Deepika Ramesh
    January 1, 1970
    "It doesn't matter how big you feel; the sky is bigger than you," says Lacy J Davis in her epilogue. 'Ink in Water' records Lacy's struggle with eating disorder. She was always feeling big. Every food seemed unhealthy. She was losing friends, jobs, and finally herself to the disorder that was spreading like ink in water. The illustrations are haunting and moving, for in the panels which show her battle with bulimia, Lacy looks like an X-Ray projection of herself. As she is aided by her boyfriend "It doesn't matter how big you feel; the sky is bigger than you," says Lacy J Davis in her epilogue. 'Ink in Water' records Lacy's struggle with eating disorder. She was always feeling big. Every food seemed unhealthy. She was losing friends, jobs, and finally herself to the disorder that was spreading like ink in water. The illustrations are haunting and moving, for in the panels which show her battle with bulimia, Lacy looks like an X-Ray projection of herself. As she is aided by her boyfriend to climb out of the abyss, to embrace the dark blotches in her head, Lacy discovers her way to body positivity. This feminist memoir is an honest account on how so many of us are trapped in our bodies, how we succumb to the dark voices in our head, and how we miss the good part of our lives, lest we become someone who doesn't meet the beauty standards established by the society. I enjoyed 'Ink in Water', for it celebrates life. Eat cupcakes. Lift weights. Take enough rest. Be obsessed with creativity. Pay the kindness forward. Above all, live well."Those dark thoughts still occasionally crackle deep in my gray matter. Sometimes they spread. But one thing I've learned is that hope spreads too. Creating a positive dialogue for myself... Being a friend to myself... is like water in ink. It dilutes the bullshit and washes it away."
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book simply because the concept is so different. I read a lot of biographies and memoirs, but this is the first I've seen in a comic book format, and it really works. It's much easier to read, with the information and accounts much more succinct, offering only the bare bones. The monochrome colour scheme really works well to complement the topics covered; eating disorders and recovery, dating and relationships, amongst others. The only thing I didn't like was the odd swear I really enjoyed this book simply because the concept is so different. I read a lot of biographies and memoirs, but this is the first I've seen in a comic book format, and it really works. It's much easier to read, with the information and accounts much more succinct, offering only the bare bones. The monochrome colour scheme really works well to complement the topics covered; eating disorders and recovery, dating and relationships, amongst others. The only thing I didn't like was the odd swear word which didn't seem necessary in the context. The book ends with talking about recover and, living with an eating disorder, as well as a short page of advice on living with an eating disorder. On the whole an enjoyable read with a really novel concept.
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  • Isaiah
    January 1, 1970
    I got an ARC in return for an honest review on NetGalley.I have to say that I requested this mainly because of the cover. I loved the art style. The subject hit close to home and I really appreciated the existence of the comic. I was just hoping that I would love reading it so I could brag to everyone that I read it and that they should too.Thankfully, I loved this book. I loved how open and honest the author was. This had to be some painful art to make. I felt both like a voyeur and a confidant I got an ARC in return for an honest review on NetGalley.I have to say that I requested this mainly because of the cover. I loved the art style. The subject hit close to home and I really appreciated the existence of the comic. I was just hoping that I would love reading it so I could brag to everyone that I read it and that they should too.Thankfully, I loved this book. I loved how open and honest the author was. This had to be some painful art to make. I felt both like a voyeur and a confidant. There was a subtle switch when I felt the author had let me in. It was an amazing feeling and I can't tell if it was intentional or not. No matter the intentions, it was an incredible read and one I will recommend again and again (and again).  The voice was so raw and natural. It felt like a real conversation and it felt authentic. There are very few things I hate worse in books than a fake sounding memoir or stand point theory. They grate me. This is your story, it should should like you really experienced it. This book delivered pain, hope, despair, and so much. I loved how the artist drew her head when the thoughts started to take over. It was so visual and powerful.I can't say enough amazing things about this book. I can't do this book justice with anything I say. Read it. For more reviews check out mibookreviews.wordpress.com
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  • Jocelyn Schenk-Laewetz
    January 1, 1970
    A captivating memoir! One of struggle, relapse, raw emotions and empowerment. This memoir will have you hooked from the very start! It is organized well and captures the readers interests. Lacy J. Davis does a fantastic job illustrating her journey with her Eating Disorder (ED) and provides the reader with the opportunity to peak inside the world of an ED. The memoir is graphic at times and does contain explicit language so keep that in mind if considering incorporating into any sort of curricul A captivating memoir! One of struggle, relapse, raw emotions and empowerment. This memoir will have you hooked from the very start! It is organized well and captures the readers interests. Lacy J. Davis does a fantastic job illustrating her journey with her Eating Disorder (ED) and provides the reader with the opportunity to peak inside the world of an ED. The memoir is graphic at times and does contain explicit language so keep that in mind if considering incorporating into any sort of curriculum for youth. Overall the memoir is brilliantly executed and the illustrations provide a complimentary backdrop to tell the story.I was pleased to receive this memoir through NetGalley in return for an honest review. Thank you to not only NetGalley but as well the publishers and author/illustrator of this book.
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  • marlin1
    January 1, 1970
    My first graphic novel and I thought the subject matter sounded interesting. The overall feel of the story is dark and I think this is enhanced by the black and white pictures but ultimately it is very uplifting and empowering. Exploring a multitude of topics: self doubt, relationships, friendships, obsessive disorders including eating and excerising and learning to love yourself again.A very interesting format, no waffling, just feelings which are straight to the point which makes it very easy My first graphic novel and I thought the subject matter sounded interesting. The overall feel of the story is dark and I think this is enhanced by the black and white pictures but ultimately it is very uplifting and empowering. Exploring a multitude of topics: self doubt, relationships, friendships, obsessive disorders including eating and excerising and learning to love yourself again.A very interesting format, no waffling, just feelings which are straight to the point which makes it very easy to read.Thank you to Netgalley and the Publisher for a copy to read and review
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  • Rianna (RiannaBlok)
    January 1, 1970
    48/45 books read in 2017Provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.An extremely powerful account of the start of an eating disorder and the continuous struggle of living a life during recovery from said ED. Although I have never officially had an ED, I do know the struggle of living with and despite your demons (for me, my demons are more perfectionism/anxiety based). This story gripped me and I felt like I was right there with Lacy. I definitely recommend this to anyone, whether you 48/45 books read in 2017Provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.An extremely powerful account of the start of an eating disorder and the continuous struggle of living a life during recovery from said ED. Although I have never officially had an ED, I do know the struggle of living with and despite your demons (for me, my demons are more perfectionism/anxiety based). This story gripped me and I felt like I was right there with Lacy. I definitely recommend this to anyone, whether you are recovering or just curious to know more.
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  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    Harrowing memoir about a woman's struggle with the eating disorder that took over her life affecting her work, friendships, and love life.
  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest reviewI don't read a lot of non-fiction but I really enjoyed this book. I think that whether you have had a full-blown eating disorder or not, it's hard to be a woman in today's society without having some kind of weird or complicated relationship with food at least at some point in your life, so this book has a lot of very relatable moments even if you haven't been exactly where the author is. I really liked the in dep I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest reviewI don't read a lot of non-fiction but I really enjoyed this book. I think that whether you have had a full-blown eating disorder or not, it's hard to be a woman in today's society without having some kind of weird or complicated relationship with food at least at some point in your life, so this book has a lot of very relatable moments even if you haven't been exactly where the author is. I really liked the in depth look at how she felt about the 12 step program and also her relationship with exercise and how she turned that around to be something that would make her stronger and not just thinner. This is a really positive and uplifting book and I would definitely recommend it.
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  • Jason Brown (Toastx2)
    January 1, 1970
    Facts: I am a fat bearded man. I have been fat for a long time. I carry myself with pride and have come to an understanding with myself that I am good how I am. I can be more healthy and strive towards that, but socially, I am aware of myself and not bothered... For the most part.While the bearded part didn't come until much later, I was always the "Husky" kid (I hate that term). I remember the first time I stressed about my size. Seventh grade was particularly hard for all the kids my age, new Facts: I am a fat bearded man. I have been fat for a long time. I carry myself with pride and have come to an understanding with myself that I am good how I am. I can be more healthy and strive towards that, but socially, I am aware of myself and not bothered... For the most part.While the bearded part didn't come until much later, I was always the "Husky" kid (I hate that term). I remember the first time I stressed about my size. Seventh grade was particularly hard for all the kids my age, new classes in a new school had all kids pushing boundaries and testing the power structures. One particular young lady made a few comments about my t-shirt being pushed out by my belly which embarrassed me greatly. I spent the next year holding my body certain directions so that my belly never touched the front of my shirt visibly, or holding the hem of my shirt. I wasn't fat, just a little early teen chubby. The idea stuck though and my brain was rewired to be conscious of my size and shape. It is a snowball: One person caused a reaction by me which added to the growing body shame I carried for many years. I owned that shame, kept it under cover and chose not to ever mention it. I remember reading books where characters found unusual diets, tips, and tricks, or even mild disorders as ways to make themselves "better". I admit, I tried a great deal of them. I sometimes wonder how many books folks like myself turned into instruction manuals when the original premise was to inform/scare/warn against. Good thing for me to fail at I suppose. I sucked at sports and dietary self-harm.It took a long time to get to the "fuck your opinion" stage of my life, but I am glad I made it here even though I have to talk myself into it sometimes. Now all I have to worry about is the people who cross the street when they see a big bearded dude walking down the sidewalk. I am a teddy beard goddamn it, but one cannot help other folk's triggers."Ink in Water: An Illustrated Memoir (or how I kicked anorexia's ass and embraced body positivity)"Ink in Water: An Illustrated Memoir (Davis - Kettner)272 pagesNew Harbinger PublicationsISBN-10: 1626258317ISBN-13: 978-1626258310Okay. That is a mouthful of a title, but mouthful, in this case, is a good thing as it is highly descriptive and shines a spotlight on the topic rather than obscuring it. Written by Lacy J Davis and Illustrated by Jim Kettner, this Graphic Novel memoir covers approximately a 10-year span of time as Lacy moves from confident and rebellious punk to Crossfit lover and guru. The majority of the book follows the dark years in between which are the entire point of this story. After some commentary from a boyfriend about body size and shape of someone he knows, Lacy interprets the comments as directed towards her, even tangentially. The result is a depressed obsession with dieting, health food, and exercise that could have killed her. She eats very little or very specific foods, then over exercises to burn even more calories. Cardio Catharsis is her favorite medicine. She ends up a walking skeleton and thought everything was fine.After hearing health concerns from people she trusts and being put on temporary leave from work, Lacy joins Over Eaters Anonymous, and 12 steps through her troubles with others who have a myriad of eating disorders. She deludes herself about her progress, she allows life to deter her from forward motion, she backpedals then moves forward before backpedaling again.Moving through life like a confused toddler is part of our graceless human condition.Textually, this book is easily consumed, but the subject matter makes it a little unapproachable. Starting with the cover, the deep details in the subtitle, while serving one descriptive purpose, might also fight against itself with out the help of vocal fans. Advising this is a book about "kicking anorexia's ass" might deter a significant number of people from reading it. DON'T be that deterred person. Read this then be vocal. The story here is amazing and inspiring. It is presented in a manner which flows well and ensures it is not a chore. Lacy's story is a roller coaster of emotions, and even the parts which might be funny are hard to laugh at. I did cheer once or twice and every time I saw Powell's Books I got a bit happy.The artwork in this book is phenomenal. Just the right amount of detail where needed, and lacking where it would only distract or be wasted. Some of the most impressive panels were areas where Lacy's brain is on fire, and the smoke and electrical wires are bursting forth into the universe. Interestingly, Kettner plays a key role in the story. As a Graphic Artist, drawing web comics and media, he and Lacy hit it off and he spends a large amount of meta time in the comic along side her in a role of support, understanding, and unconditional love. This Graphic Novel is highly recommended, end of story. --Disclosure:This Graphic Novel was supplied for review purposes by the publisher or author. If the topic of this novel resonates with you, then who gives a rats ass who provided it.
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  • Carlee
    January 1, 1970
    It has been a very long time since I've read a graphic novel. Honestly, I don't even remember what the last one was that I read, but I'm SO glad I came across Ink in Water on NetGalley.Lacy is brutally honest about her battle with anorexia. She is open about the good and the bad decisions she's made throughout her life and how she is constantly recovering. Those evil thoughts about not being good enough are constantly circling through her mind, but in the end, she has learned how not to be trapp It has been a very long time since I've read a graphic novel. Honestly, I don't even remember what the last one was that I read, but I'm SO glad I came across Ink in Water on NetGalley.Lacy is brutally honest about her battle with anorexia. She is open about the good and the bad decisions she's made throughout her life and how she is constantly recovering. Those evil thoughts about not being good enough are constantly circling through her mind, but in the end, she has learned how not to be trapped by them. It truly was a beautifully written account of a terrible obsession with food.There were many parts that were difficult to read, but that unflinching honest story needs to be told. I've never personally had an eating disorder, but I've come close. I've obsessed about calorie counts, carbs, ingredients, and time at the gym. I've dedicated journals and notebooks to tracking my body's intake and output as if it were my job. I've taken countless diet pills and tried my fair share of fad diets, none of which worked. I've felt the emptiness in my stomach and thought that was a good sign.I no longer do that, but my relationship with food isn't always good, because that is what it is... a relationship. I still eat emotionally and those same thoughts that Lacy describes of being too big still pop into my head. And I would have never written any of that, if it weren't for reading Lacy's novel.I think we all at some point or another in our lives have those voices in our head. The voices that tell us that we aren't good enough. Lacy is no different from any of us in that aspect. She was just brave enough to share her story with the world.The illustrations by Kettner are amazing, particularly those showing the chaotic jumble of negative thoughts in Lacy's head. i love that the images are all in black and white and I hope that doesn't change when the novel goes to print. I don't know about you, but my thoughts aren't very colorful when they are negatively focused on my body image. The feelings provoked by the illustrations match those of Lacy's story. And if I'm being honest (which I am), it was the cover illustration that grabbed my attention. It screamed, "Pick me!"Lacy's story is one that need to be told and I'm glad I've had the pleasure to read it. This novel is for those struggling with an eating disorder, recovering from one, or wanting to better understand the toll an eating disorder takes on everyone involved. It is also for anyone that has ever let those thoughts take control of their lives even for the briefest of moments.Thank you Lacy for writing your story down.
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  • Julian
    January 1, 1970
    “…because little girls are fucking golden. And guess what, you’re golden too.”As a father of a five-year old girl, I can only agree with you, Ms. Davis. Your final note was very touching.This is a graphic novel about Davis’s fight, always an ongoing struggle, with eating disorders. The story is relatively straightforward with many of the common themes surrounding addictions (doubts, powerlessness, lack of self-awareness, relapse, etc). But each story and life is unique and this one is too. Davis “…because little girls are fucking golden. And guess what, you’re golden too.”As a father of a five-year old girl, I can only agree with you, Ms. Davis. Your final note was very touching.This is a graphic novel about Davis’s fight, always an ongoing struggle, with eating disorders. The story is relatively straightforward with many of the common themes surrounding addictions (doubts, powerlessness, lack of self-awareness, relapse, etc). But each story and life is unique and this one is too. Davis appeared to be living a full life with no major issues…until she didn’t and quite quickly went into a dark path, slowly starving herself. She fought back, looked for help and was fortunate enough to have strong support from a solid friend, G, who was battling her own demons – more on that in the novel. Davis kept fighting, nonstop, she didn’t give up. Even during the worst times, I have the impression she always wanted to come back. The result is a tale of endurance, persistence, hope, and eventually triumph. While there are hard parts, I found the overall message to be very bright. I checked the author’s website and social media and she seems to be doing well. I wish her all the best.The art is black and white. I loved the way emotions and feelings are portrayed. They can be random patterns in a head, or spirals, seeds inside a brain, reflections, darker figures, rain, etc. They’re very nice. I just found that Davis looks much older than a woman in her 20s and sometimes her features seem to change from one page to the next one. Artistic choice? Maybe, but that doesn’t compute with the flow of the story.I would have liked to know more about Davis’s family. There’s no mention of them, except for her late grandmother. Where are they? I also felt that she could have expanded on the causes of her eating disorder. There’s a trigger, sure, but I assume there’s more to that and it is not explored in detail. I understand, though, that Davis might have preferred to focus on the journey to recovery, not on the descend.I liked seeing Powell’s Book, which I had the chance to see when I visited Portland a lifetime ago.Obtained through NetGalley. Thank you!
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    It seems to rain a lot in Portland. But the young artist here finds herself pressurizing herself into losing weight so much that she can almost skip between the drops. The subtitle's positivity tells you all you really need to know about the plot.This is a really good book, but it's the kind of book where it's hard to separate the feelings you have for it from the thoughts of the real-life story and the person behind it. So yes, it's empowering how the character shrugs off a lot of crap she gave It seems to rain a lot in Portland. But the young artist here finds herself pressurizing herself into losing weight so much that she can almost skip between the drops. The subtitle's positivity tells you all you really need to know about the plot.This is a really good book, but it's the kind of book where it's hard to separate the feelings you have for it from the thoughts of the real-life story and the person behind it. So yes, it's empowering how the character shrugs off a lot of crap she gave herself from bulimia, anorexia, manic exercising and so on. But it still crossed my mind that there were other issues - the fact she finally reinvents herself as a kind of amateur power-builder suggests to me her issues may have been with an obsessive mind, and not exclusively diet-related. What do I know, as I'm not an expert, but I exercise none, eat what I like and drink too much, and I find myself in the happy zone she finally found - and yet we're both of the opinion the other has got there through unhealthy means.Still, enough about me - this book really does speak to so many people, and I've got nothing but good will for it when it comes to slamming the diet industry and the scum who enforce their ideas of the 'perfect' body image on to others. I've known too many people to be too worried about their weight, size and looks - thank the leaf (in-joke, never mind) I don't have enough of the latter to make it a relevant issue for me. This book, then, with its powerful imagery and wonderful variety in design, is high up there in the stack of corrective volumes that might - just might - sway someone you love from stressing about their gut. It can feel a little repetitive at times, but like any exercise routine it breaks from that, there's a shower at the end, and then hopefully a glance at the mirror with no problems. Definitely recommended.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review.Ink In Water is a really unique book: an autobiography of an eating disorder, told via an atypical format (graphic novel), by someone you wouldn't normally suspect would deal with something like this (a confident, creative punk rock girl). Both, I think, really add to this. The visuals do such a great job of conveying the emotions and mental struggle that lies at the root of disordered e Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review.Ink In Water is a really unique book: an autobiography of an eating disorder, told via an atypical format (graphic novel), by someone you wouldn't normally suspect would deal with something like this (a confident, creative punk rock girl). Both, I think, really add to this. The visuals do such a great job of conveying the emotions and mental struggle that lies at the root of disordered eating and exercise, and as we see a "tough" girl fall into this disorder, it dawns on the reader that this type of thing can and does happen to anyone - no stereotypes, no judging.To me, the most important part of Lacy's journey is how what started out as behaviors our society deems "normal" - counting and restricting calories, exercising quite a lot - quickly became a BIG problem. This really highlights what a slippery slope this type of thinking can be, and makes you question whether or not we should be glorifying behavior that's actually not entirely healthy.I do wish Lacy had added a bit more about what, if any, realizations she's had about what triggered her disorder - it seemed to me that (view spoiler)[Henry left (hide spoiler)] because of (view spoiler)[her being drunk and how it made him feel as a recovering addict (hide spoiler)], not Lacy's "size," and that her obsession took hold as a way to grasp some bit of control when things in her life felt out of her control. Same with the purging that began after (view spoiler)[Gia died. (hide spoiler)] I hope that she's finding some way to face and deal with that need to control, and that when another event happens that bumps her axis, this awful disorder doesn't resurface.
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  • Jeanine Wold
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished Lacy J. Davis’s graphic novel, Ink in Water, and I am already anticipating her next book. My enjoyment was on the same level as when I read Lucy Knisley’s Relish, or Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home. I flew through this one—it is rare that I pick up a graphic and am instantly hooked by the story as well as the artwork. Davis does an amazing job of recounting her experience with an eating disorder without sensationalizing it. I appreciate that while we did see the physical manifestations I just finished Lacy J. Davis’s graphic novel, Ink in Water, and I am already anticipating her next book. My enjoyment was on the same level as when I read Lucy Knisley’s Relish, or Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home. I flew through this one—it is rare that I pick up a graphic and am instantly hooked by the story as well as the artwork. Davis does an amazing job of recounting her experience with an eating disorder without sensationalizing it. I appreciate that while we did see the physical manifestations of the disorder, we are also privy to the internal struggle of how she got there and how she found a way through it. I can see this story resonating with people who are fighting an eating disorder; not only does it flow well, she is just a super relatable person.At the beginning I wasn't sure about the black and white illustrations, but I can say now that they were absolutely necessary. Jim Kettner did a crazy great job with using shading to convey the mood in various scenes. For example, Lacy’s thoughts over a personal tragedy play out in mostly black illustrations, with her body being almost blurred out by grief. I’m not sure that this story would have been as effective if it had been done in color; the illustrations were appropriate for the grim subject matter.Whether you have an eating disorder, know someone who has fought with one, or are just a human in this insane world, I recommend that you give this a try. It’s a dark story in some ways, but there is so much hope woven throughout. 5 stars from me!Thanks to NetGalley, Lucy Davis, Jim Kettner, and New Harbinger Publishing for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    I received an uncorrected proof of this work for honest review. I was particularly interested in this as graphic memoir is a growing medium with a lot of potential. Connecting with the beginning was a bit hard for me, the whole tone tried too much to be upbeat and a bit jokey, which I thought fell flat both in the art and writing. However, as things spiral downward for Lacy we get a split in the style used, where the writing starts to really ring true and the art changes to become much more styl I received an uncorrected proof of this work for honest review. I was particularly interested in this as graphic memoir is a growing medium with a lot of potential. Connecting with the beginning was a bit hard for me, the whole tone tried too much to be upbeat and a bit jokey, which I thought fell flat both in the art and writing. However, as things spiral downward for Lacy we get a split in the style used, where the writing starts to really ring true and the art changes to become much more stylized - interspersed with smudged, splashy sequences and beautiful full panels. Near the end of chapter three they began to hit on something really compelling in a few panes, finally by the 2nd half they're cohesive in depicting something very raw, I wish it had been more laid out that way straight from the beginning.Davis did an amazing job with the main plot arc, genuinely conveying the downward slide of disordered eating, particularly the desperate misplaced need for control. Through everything she's clawing to re-gain control in her life after a failed relationship, she focuses that toward other aspects of her life over & over again in obsessive and damaging ways. It takes a difficult wake up call and a lot of loving support to drive her to turn that intensity toward goals that make life better and stronger.
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  • DubaiReader
    January 1, 1970
    An honest memoir about eating disorders.Graphic illustrations are a rather underused technique when it comes to mainstream literature, but they work particularly well with highly emotional issues like eating disorders. Lacy Davis has come clean with her problems with Anorexia and Bulimia (although she shies away from these terms), through a memoir that is honest and down-to-earth, and will hopefully provide motivation and encouragement for other sufferers.The art work is done by her partner, Jim An honest memoir about eating disorders.Graphic illustrations are a rather underused technique when it comes to mainstream literature, but they work particularly well with highly emotional issues like eating disorders. Lacy Davis has come clean with her problems with Anorexia and Bulimia (although she shies away from these terms), through a memoir that is honest and down-to-earth, and will hopefully provide motivation and encouragement for other sufferers.The art work is done by her partner, Jim Kettner, who we meet in the memoir. I have to admit to being particularly impressed that someone else understands her well enough to do these illustrations, throughout the book I had assumed they were done by Lacy, herself.Society puts huge pressures on youngsters these days, particularly the women, but men too. It is little surprise that many people crack under these pressures. In my opinion, any advice shared by those who have lived through their issues, is of tremendous value to those still battling their demons. This readily accessible format makes these shared experiences even more widely available.Good luck to Lacy and Kett, I shall be interested to see what they come up with next.
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  • Wayne McCoy
    January 1, 1970
    'Ink in Water: An Illustrated Memoir (Or, How I Kicked Anorexia's Ass and Embraced Body Positivity' by Lacy J. Davis with art by Jim Kettner is the true story of Lacy's eating disorder. At the beginning of the story, Lacy lives in Portland. She has a relationship with a guy there. When it goes away, Lacy is left feeling like she was inadequate. This leads her to question her body size. She begins questioning all her food and exercising maniacally. Through the help of a friend, she ends up going 'Ink in Water: An Illustrated Memoir (Or, How I Kicked Anorexia's Ass and Embraced Body Positivity' by Lacy J. Davis with art by Jim Kettner is the true story of Lacy's eating disorder. At the beginning of the story, Lacy lives in Portland. She has a relationship with a guy there. When it goes away, Lacy is left feeling like she was inadequate. This leads her to question her body size. She begins questioning all her food and exercising maniacally. Through the help of a friend, she ends up going to an Overeater's Anonymous group. What follows is her journey through the 12 steps and beyond. It's funny and sad and told in the exact kind of honest way that could be really helpful to other people. Lacy doesn't brag about overcoming. She doesn't hide the shame and guilt. There is real tragedy in the story and real hope. Jim (Kett-Nerd) Kettner's art is a good mix for the story. I really, really liked this one.I received a review copy of this graphic novel from New Harbinger Publications, Inc. and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this wonderful graphic novel.
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  • Sheziss
    January 1, 1970
    It's ironic I picked this book shortly after reading Lighter Than My Shadow (which is an amazing comic, BTW). Both are autobiographical graphic novels, but each one of them has a very different style: the art, the perspective, the way to 'copy with' eating disorders.I can't lie. The drawing made me uncomfortable from the very beginning. I can't point out exactly why, but reading this was not relaxing in any way. The dark thick strokes, the caricature-like faces, the constant odd movements and th It's ironic I picked this book shortly after reading Lighter Than My Shadow (which is an amazing comic, BTW). Both are autobiographical graphic novels, but each one of them has a very different style: the art, the perspective, the way to 'copy with' eating disorders.I can't lie. The drawing made me uncomfortable from the very beginning. I can't point out exactly why, but reading this was not relaxing in any way. The dark thick strokes, the caricature-like faces, the constant odd movements and the not-so-right viewpoints. I was fast to call it 'ugly' but I prefer to say it's peculiar. At least it's a style easily recognizable and difficult to forget. Even though it doesn't allow your eyes to rest. Maybe precisely because of that.The story is a whole of apparently disjointed events (there are blank spots in-between, sometimes longer, sometimes shorter) and it focus on very personal matters in a sort of tragic-comic way. I think the drawing really works depicting that tragic-comedy feeling. It was a change of scenery. Not because eating disorders are uncommon. It's just we are so used to the stereotype of the teenager who wants to be skinny at school. That's the 'typical' age, but that doesn't mean that the rest of the people who suffer these disorders don't exist.I once met a 5-year-old girl who had anorexia nervosa. It was a very extreme (but unfortunately true) case.Lacy is over 20. The problem doesn't start there, but that's when the shits the fan. Badly.I specially liked that part where she explains how these issues are so related with self-steem and where we choose (or learn) where to trust your self-steem. And how the culture and the rest of the world influence us, and how difficult it can be to resist and be true to yourself.********Copy provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.***
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  • Thea (All About Books)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this uncorrected proof from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Into the Water is a graphic memoir of Lacy Davis' struggle through negative body image and an eating disorder in her early 20s.Wow. This was so inspiring for Lacy to talk about her ED in the graphic format. It was real and relatable. You could see and feel her bravery when she takes us through her journey from thoughts of not being good enough to food restriction and anorexia, to exercising compulsively and then b I received this uncorrected proof from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Into the Water is a graphic memoir of Lacy Davis' struggle through negative body image and an eating disorder in her early 20s.Wow. This was so inspiring for Lacy to talk about her ED in the graphic format. It was real and relatable. You could see and feel her bravery when she takes us through her journey from thoughts of not being good enough to food restriction and anorexia, to exercising compulsively and then bulimia. The illustrations are done by Lacy's partner Jim Kettner and they are dark and intense, but expressive and show Lacy's pain and struggle in such a real way.This was a quick, but powerful read. If you know someone going through an eating disorder or have yourself I recommend picking this up when it is released in Oct.
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  • Jessica Macaulay
    January 1, 1970
    Every now and then you come across a book that is so needed, so poignant, and yet so incredibly difficult to respond to in words rather than tears. For me, that was this book. Ink In Water is not for the faint of heart, but it’s most definitely a book that ought to be read.The artwork was so insanely expressive and it did an incredible job of conveying the inner turmoil of Lacy’s dark thoughts. The choice to print in greyscale was particularly metaphoric as recovery from eating disorders is rare Every now and then you come across a book that is so needed, so poignant, and yet so incredibly difficult to respond to in words rather than tears. For me, that was this book. Ink In Water is not for the faint of heart, but it’s most definitely a book that ought to be read.The artwork was so insanely expressive and it did an incredible job of conveying the inner turmoil of Lacy’s dark thoughts. The choice to print in greyscale was particularly metaphoric as recovery from eating disorders is rarely black and white. A lot of the imagery was uncomfortable to look at, but this was never meant to be an easy read. But with that being said, those parts depicting happiness, love, and genuine recovery were beautifully rendered and uplifting. However, the element that I found most striking was the artistic usage of almost complete darkness the convey the gravity of certain situations. The panels are busy, the gutters mentally engaging, ultimately there’s very little ‘action’, and it all works beautifully to covey a candid and ultimately empowering story.
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  • Hollowspine
    January 1, 1970
    In her graphic novel memoir, artist, writer, feminist and super strong woman, Lacy Davis, tells the history of her eating disorder and how it affected her life, from the first nagging thought that she might be 'too big.' She never flinches away from the details no matter how harrowing. It's brutally honest and because of that is so hopeful and strong. I also really enjoyed the composition of the book, the different styles she incorporated into the art which really flowed well with the story and In her graphic novel memoir, artist, writer, feminist and super strong woman, Lacy Davis, tells the history of her eating disorder and how it affected her life, from the first nagging thought that she might be 'too big.' She never flinches away from the details no matter how harrowing. It's brutally honest and because of that is so hopeful and strong. I also really enjoyed the composition of the book, the different styles she incorporated into the art which really flowed well with the story and brought out the emotional impact of the words.I would recommend this graphic novel to those who enjoyed Fun Home, Calling Doctor Laura and Lighter Than My Shadow.
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