An Offering
1504, Brunnendorf, GermanyEight year-old Therese longs for a home. Fatherless and living in one, small room with her mother, Therese is sent to visit her grandparents in the next town when men come to visit. She’s hoping this man will be the one who marries her mother and gives them a home.But on this day, while heading to her grandparents, she stops to pick up vegetables that have fallen off a passing wagon and is accused of being a beggar and attacked with stones. Rescued by a nun from the local convent, she brings Therese to the church, where she is cared for. In the loving arms of the nun, Therese wishes she could stay.Leaving the convent for her grandparent’s house, Therese is welcomed in for the first time. Again, she longs to make this her home along with her mother, but realizes that grace and forgiveness don’t come easy. What must be sacrificed to see her dream come true?

An Offering Details

TitleAn Offering
Author
ReleaseJul 17th, 2017
PublisherTyndale House Publishers, Inc.
Rating
GenreChristian Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Fiction

An Offering Review

  • Rachel McMillan
    January 1, 1970
    Like one long line of poetry, Therese's story is a stirring historical told in simplistically beautiful language. Evocative and stirring, this petite novella is the perfect amuse bouche while I eagerly await the release of Loving Luther.Pittman is one of my all-time favourite scribes and her ability to jam-pack this small canvas with heart-wrenching characters and breathtaking descriptions is truly a feat. Longtime readers (like myself) know how comfortable Pittman is at transporting us to the g Like one long line of poetry, Therese's story is a stirring historical told in simplistically beautiful language. Evocative and stirring, this petite novella is the perfect amuse bouche while I eagerly await the release of Loving Luther.Pittman is one of my all-time favourite scribes and her ability to jam-pack this small canvas with heart-wrenching characters and breathtaking descriptions is truly a feat. Longtime readers (like myself) know how comfortable Pittman is at transporting us to the greatest heights of Americana: baseball, the 1920s, even the dustbowl. Here, she proves that her prose is century- agnostic, crafting a riveting tale amidst the cloistered halls of convents and woods of 16th century Germany. Escape into a lovely rural portrait resplendent with imagery and full of heart.
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  • CM
    January 1, 1970
    Very Catholic.
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