Queens of the Conquest
The story of England’s medieval queens is vivid and stirring, packed with tragedy, high drama and even comedy. It is a chronicle of love, murder, war and betrayal, filled with passion, intrigue and sorrow, peopled by a cast of heroines, villains, stateswomen and lovers. In the first volume of this epic new series, Alison Weir strips away centuries of romantic mythology and prejudice to reveal the lives of England’s queens in the century after the Norman Conquest.Beginning with Matilda of Flanders, who supported William the Conqueror in his invasion of England in 1066, and culminating in the turbulent life of the Empress Maud, who claimed to be queen of England in her own right and fought a bitter war to that end, the five Norman queens emerge as hugely influential figures and fascinating characters.Much more than a series of individual biographies, Queens of the Conquest is a seamless tale of interconnected lives and a rich portrait of English history in a time of flux. In Alison Weir’s hands these five extraordinary women reclaim their rightful roles at the centre of English history.

Queens of the Conquest Details

TitleQueens of the Conquest
Author
ReleaseSep 26th, 2017
PublisherJonathan Cape
ISBN-139781910702079
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, Biography, Historical, Medieval, European Literature, British Literature

Queens of the Conquest Review

  • Amalia Gavea
    January 1, 1970
    Although I am an avid History reader, I always approach any Non-Fiction History books with caution, since we all know that no Historian (either professional or amateur) can be wholly objective, especially when it comes to biographies. Now, I can't claim to be much familiar with Alison Weir's work, but she comes highly recommended by trusted Goodreads friends and since the extraordinary queens in English History have always been a favourite subject of mine, I chose "Queens of the Conquest" eagerl Although I am an avid History reader, I always approach any Non-Fiction History books with caution, since we all know that no Historian (either professional or amateur) can be wholly objective, especially when it comes to biographies. Now, I can't claim to be much familiar with Alison Weir's work, but she comes highly recommended by trusted Goodreads friends and since the extraordinary queens in English History have always been a favourite subject of mine, I chose "Queens of the Conquest" eagerly. I wasn't disappointed. I found the book to be thoroughly researched and a satisfying read with only a few weak parts.The book narrates the lives of the queens of England after the Norman conquest in 1066 but doesn't include Emma of Normandy and Eleanor of Aquitaine (who is mentioned in the periphery, nonetheless) along with Isabella of France since Weir has written separate biographies of the two illustrious monarchs. So, our focus is on Matilda of Flanders of the Bayeux Tapestry fame, Matilda of Scotland, Adeliza of Louvain, Matilda of Boulogne, and my personal favourite, the Empress Maud. Weir stresses the fact that sources of information coming from monastic chronicles are difficult to be trusted. Think of the raiding Vikings and the horned helmets which was a fairy-tale way for the monks to refer to the Norsemen as the personification of the Devil. And it is to be expected that the views of the Church authorities about a woman in a position of full power were not favourable, to put it mildly. It is evident in her writing that Weir tries to create a balanced view of each queen by presenting the positive and the negative opinions of the time. She includes letters, chronicles and testimonials to paint a portrait of each woman that will be as rounded and objective as possible. In my opinion, she succeeds to the fullest and creates a vivid biography by providing background information about the era, the daily life, the castles, the clothes, the customs and beliefs. "And so it lasted till the land was all undone and darkened with such deeds; and men said openly that Christ and His Saints slept" The narration of the war between Maud and Stephen and the time of his reign which was called "The Anarchy" is the most fascinating moment of the book, in my opinion. Maud has always been one of my favourite queens along with Isabella of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine. I like the rebel queens who refused to be defined by their husbands and bend the knee. Maud is also one of the reason I love Follett's "The Pillars of the Earth" so much. Part 4 is a beauty. There we have the first years of Henry's reign in the shadow of his mother, Maud, and his wife, Eleanor.It is an era that most history buffs are very familiar with, an era that brought about so many changes not only in England but in the whole European continent. Another incident that attracted my attention was the complex, turbulent relationship between Matilda of Flanders and William the Conqueror. If the historical anecdotes are indeed accurate, then Matilda was an extremely courageous woman to put up with such a husband. Not that there were many means that women could use to defend themselves at the time, whether they were queens or peasants.The only weak part of the book, in my opinion, was the heavy inclusion of correspondence. Certainly, it helps us understand and realize that these historical figures that contributed in shaping Europe were people with fears, hopes, passions and incredible responsibilities on their shoulders. However, the Appendixes include the letters in their entirety. It became progressively tiresome to stop the narration in order to present quotes from the same letter again and again. Another thing that diminished my enjoyment was the plethora of syntactical and grammatical mistakes in my ARC. I hope and - believe that they will be corrected in the published book, because they are almost childish at parts and yes, I am a serious case of Grammar Nazi, I admit.Whether you are a connoisseur of the times of the Norman conquest and the monarchs that sealed England's future forever or whether you wish to become familiar with the lives of five of the most fascinating women to ever grace this continent in an era full of changes, fights and progress and all at the same time, this book will definitely satisfy your craving.Many thanks to Random House UK, Vintage Publishing and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange of an honest review.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsWhile meticulously researched, this book suffered from a lack of focus. Ostensibly it aimed to reveal the lives of the five Norman Queens, but the dearth of direct extant evidence means that it was more generalised history than truly revelatory biography. We see something of the women, but almost as much about the men in their periphery and about the wider society in which they lived. Perhaps my dissatisfaction here is simply a matter of preference, I wanted a sharper look at the specif 3.5 starsWhile meticulously researched, this book suffered from a lack of focus. Ostensibly it aimed to reveal the lives of the five Norman Queens, but the dearth of direct extant evidence means that it was more generalised history than truly revelatory biography. We see something of the women, but almost as much about the men in their periphery and about the wider society in which they lived. Perhaps my dissatisfaction here is simply a matter of preference, I wanted a sharper look at the specific female experience. As a result, I was less invested and as the writing style was often bitty, the overall experience of the book suffered. Interesting, but not as good as I hoped.ARC via Netgalley
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  • Lori Lamothe
    January 1, 1970
    In "Queens of the Conquest," Alison Weir chronicles the tumultuous lives of five medieval queens historians have mostly ignored. Her meticulously researched book begins in 1066 with Matilda of Flanders, the wife of William the Conqueror, and ends in 1154 with Empress Maud, an “intrepid spirit” who fought to rule England. Despite a relative scarcity of information, Weir reconstructs a tale of murder, love, ambition, rivalry, treason, adultery and betrayal. Each queen’s story is filled with detail In "Queens of the Conquest," Alison Weir chronicles the tumultuous lives of five medieval queens historians have mostly ignored. Her meticulously researched book begins in 1066 with Matilda of Flanders, the wife of William the Conqueror, and ends in 1154 with Empress Maud, an “intrepid spirit” who fought to rule England. Despite a relative scarcity of information, Weir reconstructs a tale of murder, love, ambition, rivalry, treason, adultery and betrayal. Each queen’s story is filled with details that give readers a vivid sense of the women and the times they lived in. Weir’s talent as a novelist is evident, but her rigor as a historian is also impressive. Queens of the Conquest is filled with child brides, shipwrecks, castles and court intrigue, but it also contains more than a hundred pages of supplementary material, including sources, maps and letters. Perhaps most notable is Weir’s ability to portray the queens as strong, intelligent women without romanticizing them or subjecting them to present-day standards. Matilda of Flanders initially refused William the Conqueror’s proposal because he was a “bastard son,” only to relent after he beat her so severely she took to her bed to recover. It would be easy to dismiss her change of heart as an example of women’s subjugation or to assign it to a weakness in character. Weir does neither. While she does make the inferior position of women clear, she never lapses into polemics. Citing a primary source, she records that Matilda told her astonished father she would marry no one but William, “for he must be a man of great courage and high daring who could venture to come and beat me in my own father’s palace.” Matilda soon became William’s most trusted confidant and would rule as regent in his absence on many occasions. When she secretly supported their rebellious son, William railed against the betrayal of the woman “whom I love as my very soul” but did not punish her. I’ve already spent too much time on Matilda of Flanders, in part because her section was my favorite, but also because it is easy to get caught up in each woman’s tale. At a time when queens were valued primarily as breeders of future kings, these women proved they were far more than that. Maltilda of Scotland, whisked from a nunnery to marry Henry I, garnered criticism for surrounding herself with too many musicians, poets and scholars. Queen Adeliza was known for her beauty and her patronage of the arts. Empress Maud, who was married off and sent overseas at eight years old, went on to lead a rebellion against King Stephen in hopes of gaining the throne. Stephen’s queen, Matilda of Boulogne, in turn led her own rebellion to restore her husband to power while he was imprisoned in chains. The women’s stories, however, aren’t the only ones I’ll remember. Weir’s depiction of the plight of their English subjects is also moving. The five queens witnessed (and, in some instances, caused) famine, torture and war. Subjects were hung upside down, castrated, flayed and had their eyes put out. Villages were burned and lands plundered, often at the behest of the ruling class. While I can’t say I enjoyed these passages, I’m grateful to Weir for documenting them. "Queens of the Conquest" is the first of a four-book series about the medieval queens, one which will undoubtedly appeal to fans of British history. My only caveat is that the book may not win over readers looking purely for historical drama (if you’re looking for that, read one of Weir’s excellent novels). It’s a dense book, rich with facts, so at times it can be a bit slow going. I admit to skimming all the supplementary material and to occasionally confusing the four (four!) Matildas. On the flip side, gaps in the historical record may bother other readers. There are few pictorial representations of the women, no diaries, and fewer primary sources than exist for later rulers. That said, Weir has done a remarkable job of bringing these women to life. I thoroughly enjoyed "Queens of the Conquest" and plan on reading the next installment.
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  • BAM The Bibliomaniac
    January 1, 1970
    A great thank you to Ms. Alison Weir, Ballantine Books, and Netgalley for the free copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.I'm ecstatic about Weir's new Queen series with the first two novels released: Katharine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn. So when I heard of a new nonfiction release book one in a series I jumped at the chance to review it. Weir is s touchstone of British history, with in depth research and a fluid narrative style. All of her books I have read, both fiction and nonfic A great thank you to Ms. Alison Weir, Ballantine Books, and Netgalley for the free copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.I'm ecstatic about Weir's new Queen series with the first two novels released: Katharine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn. So when I heard of a new nonfiction release book one in a series I jumped at the chance to review it. Weir is s touchstone of British history, with in depth research and a fluid narrative style. All of her books I have read, both fiction and nonfiction, have been written with meticulous care of the facts as well as a high entertainment value.RTC
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Alison Weir's book about Eleanor of Aquitane was fascinating, so I can't wait to read this story of five medieval queens. On a personal note, I had just finished reading Weir's book about Eleanor of Aquitane before a job interview many years ago. The interviewer asked who I would invite to dinner if I could invite three people living or dead to share a meal. One of the three I listed was Eleanor of Aquitane. I got the job! I can't wait to get this book and read it.
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  • Caidyn (BW Book Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews.I received this book from Netgalley for an honest review.Buckle in children. This is going to be a long review. I'm half tempted to get my APA ass out and do sections since my outline for this is just about three pages long, and that's not including quotes (although since this is an ARC, quotes are likely to change and I should check to make sure they're in the published version by my lazy ass will not) and me going into more detail.My revie This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews.I received this book from Netgalley for an honest review.Buckle in children. This is going to be a long review. I'm half tempted to get my APA ass out and do sections since my outline for this is just about three pages long, and that's not including quotes (although since this is an ARC, quotes are likely to change and I should check to make sure they're in the published version by my lazy ass will not) and me going into more detail.My review structure is going to be pretty simple. Weir broke this into five sections and there are, technically, only four queens. I'm just going to sort of go with her sections. Also, head's up. 4/5 queens are named Matilda. I'm sorry. Please imagine me trying to read this behemoth and keep all the names straight. Weir actually changed one of the queens known to history as Matilda to Maud so she wouldn't confuse people as much."The Queen of England occupied a powerful and socially desirable position. Her status was reflected in every aspect of the ritual and ceremonial that surrounded her and governed her life; and she would have been aware of the weight of responsibility that brought with it. A queen had to be the embodiment of piety, beyond reproach morally, the guardian of the royal bloodline, a gentle and moderate mediator in the conflicts of men and a helpmeet to her husband. Her virtue was exemplified by her chastity and humility, her charity and her acts of mercy." Matilda of Flanders "Though often apart, [Matilda and William] clearly worked in unison for the general benefit of their realms, and trusted each other."Before this book, I sadly hadn't heard of the first Matilda. However, I know a lot about her husband, William the Conqueror. Really, Matilda was really the first modern queen. She made the model of how queens should act throughout time. She was a fantastic leader, helping her husband while also being a regent in Normandy with her son. The quarrels that William had with his eldest were straightened out by her. She was a religious leader and founded so many places, bringing her own children in as nuns. As I said, she was a good mother and took care of her children. She was a patron to so many different places, religious and otherwise. Really, Matilda is a woman to be admired since she succeeded in a very modern way in a male-dominated world. Personally, I loved her and definitely want to read more books about her.The only thing was her marriage to William. It was a bit fucked up. I mean, she didn't want to marry him so he came and beat her up, then she said she wanted to marry him for that reason. I thought it was great propaganda but really fucked up. Matilda of Scotland "Chronicles would call the new Queen 'the second Matilda'; like the first, she set an example of devout queenship that would be emulated by her successors."Another Matilda. Technically, her name was Edith and when she married Henry I her name got changed. I thought that she modeled herself after her mother-in-law and her own mother. She was extremely religious in nature, washing the sick's feet. It made me wonder whether that queenly tradition started with her.However, this part wasn't exactly about her. There was a big controversy before her marriage that took up her time. Then there was a huge part of the Investiture Controversey where she took the side against her husband, then had to try to warm him up. There was a bit of stage setting for the eventual civil war between Maud (who will come later) and Stephen.Weir also made some claims that she didn't follow up on. Such as, her being oppressive in taxation. It was mentioned quite a few times, yet never followed up. Weir focused more on her religiosity. She was friends with Anselm of Canterbury, who's pretty famous for his proof for God. As I said earlier, she mixed in on the controversy over who has the right to invest bishops with their titles. When she died, she almost became a saint. Pretty impressive, right? Adeliza of Louvain "Adeliza would be remembered as 'the May withouten vice.' She was young and untried, and was to play virtually no public role in politics."If there was ever an antithesis to the first two queens, this was it. When Matilda of Scotland died, Henry I remarried to Adeliza. Her whole point was to produce more legitimate children. With Matilda of Scotland, he had two children. He had tons of illegitimate children as well. Adeliza did not have any children with Henry I and, even worse, Henry lost his only son and had to settle his heir on a woman, Maud, who had been married to the Holy Roman Emperor and stayed in the Germanic territories until he died and left her a widow.This section wasn't about Adeliza, quite honestly. This section was setting the stage by explaining who Stephen was or about Maud. She never did anything religious as a queen and she wasn't involved in government. The later section actually talked more about her. With her second husband, she had children. Anne Boleyn and Katherine Howard actually claim her as a descendant through those children. In her second marriage, she also created religious houses and issued charters. Matilda of Boulogne and Empress Maud "The energetic Queen Matilda proved a formidable political opponent to the Empress. The two women had much in common: both were strong characters, heiresses with royal Saxon blood and nieces of King David of Scots. Both were married to forceful, acquisitive men, and ambitious for their sons."This last real section combined both the queens involved in the civil war. After Henry I died, Maud was supposed to inherit the throne. However, she was with her husband (more on him later) and Stephen jumped at the chance and took the throne. From there, it turned into a civil war.Henry really undermined Maud's cause, honestly. I think she would have made a great queen and the toils of war were what caused her to act as she did. First, he married her off to a man eleven years younger than her without getting support from anyone in England. Second, he never involved her in politics. Third, she had to spend time with her husband rather than be in England to make a presence. So, she got fucked over. When she was in the war, the English largely viewed her as haughty and that she was pretending to be a man since she came to England as a woman alone. Her husband never supported her, but tried to win Normandy. She was literally alone and trying to navigate a poltical field that she had never been brought into. So, to me, Weir's comment in the last chapter about Maud acting this way because of menopause was absolutely absurd. She was stressed out. Of course you do stupid things when you're stressed out. Furthermore, why can't you take a feminist reading. This is the time period when men's domination over women was being formalized and it's certainly down to the Bible and tradition that she was seen as unfit.So, to me, Weir's comment in the last chapter about Maud acting this way because of menopause was absolutely absurd. She was stressed out. Of course you do stupid things when you're stressed out. Furthermore, why can't you take a feminist reading. This is the time period when men's domination over women was being formalized and it's certainly down to the Bible and tradition that she was seen as unfit.It was obvious that Matilda favored Maud, even though she treated both women evenly. Matilda was in about the same state as Maud, but she was backed up by her husband. She ruled while he fought. While Maud was seen as usurping her femaleness, Matilda was viewed as a queen ought to be. I think this quote sums it up better:"In the eyes of male contemporaries, [Maud] had behaved in an imperious, unwomanly fashion, while at the same time manifesting the weaknesses of her sex. Queen Matilda, on the other hand, had shown herself as tough and thrusting as Maud, and men had praised her 'manly courage,' yet she had retained support because she acted in Stephen's name, and won sympathy because she had to act alone while he was imprisoned."Maud made the same mistakes Stephen made, yet they were interpreted differently through history. Her mistakes were because she was a woman unused to doing this. Stephen made these mistakes because they were an accident. Maud just didn't have anyone to help her out like Matilda did.My concluding thoughts are that this book is good, but focused a lot on men or people other than some of the queens. Perhaps this book would have been better as separate biographies on the women, not like they were. The ending totally pissed me off and left me with a bad taste in my mouth since I definitely think it's appropriate to read history through a feminist lens.
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  • Ceri Fowler
    January 1, 1970
    Being a massive Tudors geek, I’ve read and enjoyed lots of Alison Weir’s work before so I was really happy when I was offered this book to review. I love to read a good history and I was especially interested in this for its focus on the women rather than the men of the conquest (we have enough books about 1066!).Alison Weir is the biggest-selling female historian in the UK and this book tells us once again why that is so. It’s the first of a planned quartet about the Medieval Queens of England; Being a massive Tudors geek, I’ve read and enjoyed lots of Alison Weir’s work before so I was really happy when I was offered this book to review. I love to read a good history and I was especially interested in this for its focus on the women rather than the men of the conquest (we have enough books about 1066!).Alison Weir is the biggest-selling female historian in the UK and this book tells us once again why that is so. It’s the first of a planned quartet about the Medieval Queens of England; this volume begins with Matilda of Flanders in 1066 and takes us through to the life of the Empress Maud. Weir describes the lives of the Queens as having “all the elements of the historical soap opera” and, after reading, this perfectly encapsulates both the positives and negatives of the book as I found it. The lives of the Queens are dramatic and full of intrigue and the source material from which the narrative is built is undoubtedly exciting. However, the source material is also scant in places and, in order to build a narrative account rather than a dry academic essay, Weir is forced to make assumptions or educated guesses about the queens – some sections are frustratingly full of phrases such as “it is likely that” rather than offering the reader any certainty. This is my only criticism as I thoroughly enjoyed the book.The style is, as ever with Weir’s work, lively and engaging and despite the distance of time and struggle with sources I felt that she successfully pulled back the veil of history and gave a true insight into the lives of these Queens: the “beautiful and noble” Matilda of Flanders, who was repeatedly the regent of Normandy for her husband, William the Conqueror; Matilda of Scotland, the first Queen of Henry I, who loved literature, founded hospitals and was “renowned for her goodness”; Adeliza “the fair maid” of Louvain, the second Queen of Henry I, who remarried after Henry’s death and was a distant ancestor of one of my favourite Queens of England, the infamous Anne Boleyn; Matilda of Boulogne, wife of Stephen, who proved a key player and worthy opponent for none other than the Empress Maud, sole daughter of Henry I, who was the heir to the English throne in her own right.The last pairing was the most interesting part of the narrative. A story so dominated by two women in a period of war is unusual in British History and I was completely drawn in. Weir’s talent for description meant I could imagine, for example, the Empress Maud fleeing from the siege of Oxford through the deep snow, dressed in white to camouflage herself in the blizzard. The clever use of sources to describe this incident and others, while maintaining a coherent narrative, is the best feature of the book and I was left wanting to know more about the period and the time, which is a high recommendation. I will eagerly await the remaining three books in the series and would thoroughly recommend it to all fans of history.
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  • lacy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ebook in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley. Many thanks to Netgalley and Random House Publishing for giving me the opportunity to read and review this book. Let it be know that the opinions expressed down below are my own and were not influenced by being given this book. Alison Weir is a gifted biographer. She is easily one of my insta-buy authors. I don't even have to read what the book is about to know that I will buy whatever she writes. She brings monarchs that ar I received this ebook in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley. Many thanks to Netgalley and Random House Publishing for giving me the opportunity to read and review this book. Let it be know that the opinions expressed down below are my own and were not influenced by being given this book. Alison Weir is a gifted biographer. She is easily one of my insta-buy authors. I don't even have to read what the book is about to know that I will buy whatever she writes. She brings monarchs that are known and monarchs that aren't known to life. She manages to write in such a way that she gets all the information across but it's not boring. This was a biography of five different queens and I felt like I got to know each one personally, which is really tough to do. This book has made me want to go research more about this dynamic queens and I learned a lot. I will admit that I thought this book was going to be more of a novel based, kind of like Weir's Katharine of Aragon. It wasn't but in a way, I was glad. I feel like if it had been read like that, we would have lost a lot of information. And there was a lot packed into this 400 page book. I also really liked that this series is going to be split into four parts. That gives more space for information and it doesn't become overburdened. The beginning Queens did so much and it would have been a shame for them to not be given their proper page time. Each and every Queen deserves to have their time to shine.Alison Weir really put in work to find out everything she could about the Queens. I feel that everything was very carefully researched and properly annotated. Even the information that hazy at best was given in such a way that I wasn't frustrated that it was guest work (which is a common thing for me), which was the case for the first couple of Queens. The use of letters was a nice touch as well. Overall, I couldn't be more happy with my first Netgalley ARC approval. Alison Weir is gifted in the historical nonfiction and biography field. I feel that she loves what she writes and that makes me love what she writes. I should give a slight warning by saying this is a dense book. This really should be read by those that are utterly fascinated with history, like I am. However, I also feel that if you are wanting to learn more about the earlier Queens, this could also be a good book for you to start at.
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  • Adrienne Dillard
    January 1, 1970
    Schemers and dreamers; sinners and saints - the five queens depicted in this new biography by prolific writer, Alison Weir, could lay claim to each of those descriptors and many more. In this ambitious work, Weir probes the lives of the women who helped lay the foundations of England as we know it. In doing so, she brings to life the intrigues that shaped their world.I've always preferred Weir's narrative non-fiction over her novels and Queens of the Conquest proved true to form. She makes heavy Schemers and dreamers; sinners and saints - the five queens depicted in this new biography by prolific writer, Alison Weir, could lay claim to each of those descriptors and many more. In this ambitious work, Weir probes the lives of the women who helped lay the foundations of England as we know it. In doing so, she brings to life the intrigues that shaped their world.I've always preferred Weir's narrative non-fiction over her novels and Queens of the Conquest proved true to form. She makes heavy subject matter interesting and engaging. True, it is difficult to keep the Matilda's straight (there are three queens, plus the several daughters named for them), but that's to be expected in the era covered and it detracts in no way from the story-line.In an effort to include all existing information on the queens, Weir often posits conflicting information regarding the details of their lives - number of children, personalities, events, etc. There is also quite a bit of conjecture - Queen so-and-so could have, possibly, perhaps. While I would normally reject so much unprovable content, it is to be expected in a work covering such early years. This time period was nearly a century ago, it's not surprising that so little can be said with absolute certainty. This is the time period I know least about, so I can't comment at all upon the accuracy, but this work seems to have much more comprehensive reference notes than I've seen from Weir in the past. Hopefully, this is a new trend. Queens of the Conquest is a worthy read and I look forward to future installments coming in this series.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an advance copy from Netgalley.There is much I enjoyed about this book, particularly Weir's scholarship and use of primary sources which I found impressive. She has clearly amassed a wealth of research material for this book and I felt she used it effectively.My main issue with this book was still the amount of emphasise there was on the men. I realise that sources in this period that discuss women either fairly or at all are scare. However, there were sections especially I received this book as an advance copy from Netgalley.There is much I enjoyed about this book, particularly Weir's scholarship and use of primary sources which I found impressive. She has clearly amassed a wealth of research material for this book and I felt she used it effectively.My main issue with this book was still the amount of emphasise there was on the men. I realise that sources in this period that discuss women either fairly or at all are scare. However, there were sections especially when discussing Matilda of Flanders where I felt the focus was too much on William I, the barons and clergy. I have already read copious books on that subject and I had hoped I would get something a little different from this. I feel in setting out to discuss England's Queens, Weir gave herself a difficult task. I think overall I would have preferred a shorter book which focused solely (well as much as possible,) on the women and less on the history of the whole period, which has been discussed so often by other historians. This may be my own high expectations here, it seems that other readers didn't experience this feeling. Overall I did enjoy the book and will still continue to support Alison Weir as I think she is a fantastic historian and writer.
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  • Margaret Sankey
    January 1, 1970
    If you already know medieval history, or just read a lot of Jean Plaidy books, none of this is new information, although Weir conscientiously gives context and wades through a lot of anecdotes and scurrilous stories to report on which are probably biased or just biolerplate applied to all pre-modern queens.
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  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book very much. It was well researched and full of information I had not know prior to reading Weir's newest book. I could have done without the many instances of "probably" history, but it did not take away from the book's overall effectiveness most of the time. Thank you, NetGalley and Random House Publishing for the advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    5 starsThis book begins with the story of Duchess Mathilda, the wife of Duke William of Normandy. After an unusual courtship they finally wed and appear to live happy and most fruitful lives. There is much detail about life in the Eleventh Century; about living in castles, daily life, the fashions and court practices of the day. There are many direct quotes from writers of the time that lead authenticity to the story.In 1051, William was promised the throne by the then ruler of England Edward th 5 starsThis book begins with the story of Duchess Mathilda, the wife of Duke William of Normandy. After an unusual courtship they finally wed and appear to live happy and most fruitful lives. There is much detail about life in the Eleventh Century; about living in castles, daily life, the fashions and court practices of the day. There are many direct quotes from writers of the time that lead authenticity to the story.In 1051, William was promised the throne by the then ruler of England Edward the Confessor. There was an ongoing battle with the papacy about the legitimacy of Mathilda and William’s marriage. For some reason a succession of Popes, beginning with Pope Leo IX, who for no known reason refused to acknowledge the marriage and even called it a mortal sin. They were not related closely enough, nor were either promised to another person, to have caused such enmity. Finally Nicholas II who overthrew the papacy and installed himself as pope, granted the dispensation and legitimized the issue of the marriage.In 1066, the promised assurance of the English throne was withdrawn by Edward’s supposed heir. William immediately made plans to invade England and take the crown rightfully his by force. He became known as William the Conqueror after he took the crown. Surviving documents show that Mathlida was a good partner to William contrary to later anecdotes about the couple.Edith was a princess of Scotland who due to overthrow of the monarchy found herself penniless. However, due to her lineage, Henry now the King of England courted her and married her. Henry urged her to change her name to Mathilda, his mother’s name. Henry took the throne after many machinations and perhaps an assassination – no one really knows. After delivering two live children – a boy named William and a girl named Maud – the relationship between Henry I and his Queen Mathilda deteriorated. Henry spent much time in Normandy re-taking the throne from his brother Robert after having imprisoned him for many, many years. She died at the young age of thirty-seven.Wanting more legitimate children after siring a number of bastards Henry I married Adeliza of Louvain next. Her father Godfrey was a powerful ruler who was descended from Charlemagne. History does not record her birthdate, but she was very young while Henry was fifty-two. After a tragedy at sea, William, Henry’s only legitimate son, was killed at sea. Henry wanted his only legitimate child, Maud to rule after his death. His courtiers were against it, but finally swore to support her. She very reluctantly was married to Geoffrey, a very young man/boy. The king’s subjects were very displeased at the marriage. They swore to renege on their promise to support Maud after Henry’s death. Their marriage was an unhappy one and they despised each other. Geoffrey repudiated Maud and moved to Normandy. They later reconciled. Maud gives birth to a son. About a year later, she almost dies giving birth to a second son.On December 1, 1135, Henry I died. Stephen, a nephew of Henry’s sails to England and seizes the throne from Maud. His wife was Mathilda of Boulogne. Stephen was said to be “a mild man, soft and good, and did no justice.” Lawlessness reigned and the barons ran wild. Civil war broke out with King Stephen on one side and Maud and her supporters on the other. Stephen was taken prisoner following a battle in which his supporters deserted him. Maud then became Queen of England – albeit briefly. Stephen re-took the throne. King Stephen was to pass away of the bloody flux. Henry, Maud’s son, was to become King Henry II who was to found the Plantagenet line. As with all of Alison Weir’s biographies, this book is meticulously researched and very well written. The stories are told in a linear fashion and with much clarity. It is easy to read and understand for any reader with an interest in the subject. She brings these remarkable women to life in a way that no other author can. She brought to life the strength of these women and the fact that they shared in the life and reigns of their husbands. I truly appreciate her writing skills and am in awe of her research abilities. I want to thank NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group – Ballantine for forwarding to me a copy of this most remarkable book for me to read and enjoy.
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  • Helen
    January 1, 1970
    In Alison Weir's new non-fiction book, Queens of the Conquest, she explores the lives of the five queens of England who followed the Norman Conquest of 1066. These five, in the order they appear in the book, are Matilda of Flanders (wife of William the Conqueror), Matilda of Scotland and Adeliza of Louvain (the two wives of Henry I), Matilda of Boulogne (wife of King Stephen), and the Empress Maud, Henry I's daughter, who was never actually crowned but called herself Lady of the English. Lots of In Alison Weir's new non-fiction book, Queens of the Conquest, she explores the lives of the five queens of England who followed the Norman Conquest of 1066. These five, in the order they appear in the book, are Matilda of Flanders (wife of William the Conqueror), Matilda of Scotland and Adeliza of Louvain (the two wives of Henry I), Matilda of Boulogne (wife of King Stephen), and the Empress Maud, Henry I's daughter, who was never actually crowned but called herself Lady of the English. Lots of Matildas, then – Maud is also referred to in many sources as Matilda – but with each queen discussed chronologically (apart from where their stories overlap), things aren’t as confusing as you might imagine!Apart from Maud, whom I have read about several times in fiction, I knew very little about the other queens whose stories are covered in this book. Considering the general lack of information available to us today – we don't even have a clear idea of what these women looked like due to the absence of contemporary portraits – I think Weir still does a good job of providing as full and comprehensive an account of each queen's life as she possibly could. There is inevitably a lot of padding – facts about medieval life, descriptions of castles and long passages quoted from letters – but if you don't know a lot about the period, most of this should still be of interest.I can't really comment on the historical accuracy of this book as my own knowledge is very limited, but Weir does provide references to back up most of what she says. In fact, the additional material which includes the references, sources, maps etc takes up about a quarter of the book! There are still times, though, when she is forced to speculate and make assumptions about how one of the queens may have felt or behaved, and resorts to using words like 'probably' or 'possibly'. Usually I prefer more certainty when I'm reading non-fiction, but in this case, I do understand that with the primary sources being so sparse, some guesswork was necessary to round out the characters of the queens and to make this into an entertaining read rather than a dry textbook. The most enjoyable part of the book for me was the section describing the period of civil war known as the Anarchy during which Maud (who was named as her father Henry I's heir) and Matilda of Boulogne (whose husband, Stephen, was Henry I's nephew and another claimant to the throne) found themselves on opposite sides. As I've read several novels which have this period as a setting, it was good to read a factual account this time instead of a fictional one, while still recognising some of the most interesting episodes, such as Maud's escape in the snow from the besieged Oxford Castle.Maud certainly didn't seem to have made herself very popular, having a reputation for being proud, haughty and arrogant, but I have always assumed that this was probably due to the prejudice of the male chroniclers of the time against a female ruler who didn't behave the way they expected a woman to behave. Weir points out that Matilda of Boulogne often acted in a similar way but her actions were seen as acceptable because she was taking them on behalf of her husband, King Stephen, rather than for herself, but she also suggests that Maud's overbearing attitude and poor decision-making may have been due to mood swings caused by early menopause or a long-term illness she suffered following childbirth. This was the one place where I thought there may have been some bias creeping in, as Weir clearly seems to like Matilda of Boulogne much more than the Empress – and I couldn't help wondering what caused the aggression and lack of judgement of some of the kings mentioned in the book! I was also interested to read the various theories and legends behind Matilda of Flanders' marriage to William the Conqueror and the controversies surrounding Matilda of Scotland's marriage to Henry I (she had previously spent some time in a convent so it was debatable whether or not she was free to marry). I felt that I learned very little about Adeliza, though; while she is described as being particularly beautiful and helping to promote the arts, it seemed that she had less power and political significance than the other queens.Although I sometimes felt that too much time was devoted to the general history of the period when I would have preferred more analysis of the specific lives and characters of the five queens, I did find Queens of the Conquest a fascinating read. Apparently this is just the first of four volumes which will take us through the rest of the medieval queens to the end of the Wars of the Roses. I will be looking out for the next one.
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  • Prue
    January 1, 1970
    Alison Weir is one of my favourite authors of ‘popular’ history. Although not an officially accredited historian, Ms Weir demonstrates her tireless efforts in the research behind her biographies, and can be relied upon to provide the facts: both those that can be proven, and educated assumptions or inferences.Many of the Queens covered in this book are of the lesser known variety. Just about everyone recognises Eleanor of Aquitaine or Anne Boleyn; fewer are aware that the Empress Maud or Matilda Alison Weir is one of my favourite authors of ‘popular’ history. Although not an officially accredited historian, Ms Weir demonstrates her tireless efforts in the research behind her biographies, and can be relied upon to provide the facts: both those that can be proven, and educated assumptions or inferences.Many of the Queens covered in this book are of the lesser known variety. Just about everyone recognises Eleanor of Aquitaine or Anne Boleyn; fewer are aware that the Empress Maud or Matilda of Flanders even existed, never mind who they were in any great detail. This gives us two main problems:1. This is women’s history. As such direct evidence is harder to find, often lacking focus and open to interpretation both by modern scholars and by the many biographers and scholars who have touched this evidence since its inception.2. Writing about less familiar personages has both a positive and a negative aspect. On the plus side there is less ‘popular opinion’ or general knowledge about any individual so you are not battling as many misconceptions about what is ‘known’ about that person. In the negative you have to be able to describe the individual, the society surrounding the individual, and their place in that society to the general reader who may not be familiar with that period of history. In addition for popular history you also have to make it interesting so that the general reader will be encouraged to finish the work.Alison Weir is successful on both fronts. She has obviously waded through the hundreds or possibly thousands of sources of information on each individual, and this extensive research has been broken down so that even those completely unfamiliar with the person or history will be able to follow and enjoy the biography.These types of biography will always have weak spots. Educated inferences and assumptions must be made to be able to present a full picture. When the subject is a woman this is even more necessary as the material will always be less than that available for a man of a similar status. Alison Weir has successfully produced a book that is both knowledgeable and entertaining, and most importantly, can be relied upon to be truthful as far as any historian can ascertain from limited sources.I’d recommend this book to anyone with a general or academic interest.*Advanced Reading Copy provided by publisher in lieu of an honest review.
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  • Nate
    January 1, 1970
    Queens of the Conquest follows the Norman Queens of England ending on England's only queen regnant (depending on whom you ask) Empress Matilda (referred to in the book as Maud for clarity amongst the other Matildas). Weir, as per usual, creates an interesting narrative of queens that remains well-sourced throughout. I especially liked the reliance on primary accounts, as I find some historians deal too much in secondary analysis. Weir also writes in short, digestible chapters making the book see Queens of the Conquest follows the Norman Queens of England ending on England's only queen regnant (depending on whom you ask) Empress Matilda (referred to in the book as Maud for clarity amongst the other Matildas). Weir, as per usual, creates an interesting narrative of queens that remains well-sourced throughout. I especially liked the reliance on primary accounts, as I find some historians deal too much in secondary analysis. Weir also writes in short, digestible chapters making the book seem lighter and making dull topics seem interesting as they are briskly, but thoroughly carried out. I especially like her mentioning of many of the myths around these women as they need to be dispelled because leaving them unmentioned would have created the illusion of possible accuracy. Another thing that really appealed to me was the analysis of each primry source in a section at the end, explaining their time period and biases, which really cemented this book as historically accurate and usable for me. This book was overall very good; however, it wasn't perfect. The main problems I had with this book were its occasional use of archaic terms (not awful but occasionally jarring), the overquoting of a letter (whole letters at some points), and the odd chapter here and there about medieval life that doesn't necessarily apply to the queens. The one that really bothered me was the middle one, as the other two didn't happen often. The quoting of whole letters seemed a bit of a space-suck to me, in a book that was already quite long and the first in a multi-volume series. It struck me as unnecessary. That said, if you can ignore the occasional editorial oversight and read medieval letters, Queens of the Conquest provides an interesting place to start learning about these great figures, Matilda of Flanders, Matilda of Scotland, Adeliza of Louvain, and the redoubtable Empress Maud.A digital copy of this book was provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Celia
    January 1, 1970
    For those like reading detailed history of The Queens of the Conquest is an interesting read.My first and only other book I have read by Alison Weir is Elizabeth of York (Henry the Eighth's mother). She was a very passive queen. As a group the medieval queens were much involved in governing. While they would not have been seen as men's equals, they were influential. They were very literate in an age when many Kings could not read. They acted as regents when the kings were away at war. They built For those like reading detailed history of The Queens of the Conquest is an interesting read.My first and only other book I have read by Alison Weir is Elizabeth of York (Henry the Eighth's mother). She was a very passive queen. As a group the medieval queens were much involved in governing. While they would not have been seen as men's equals, they were influential. They were very literate in an age when many Kings could not read. They acted as regents when the kings were away at war. They built churches and founded charities. There is a long bloody civil war where one woman (Maud) wants to become the ruling queen of England and is fighting Stephen for the throne where Stephen’s wife plays a key role in keeping the war going. Thus in this civil war two women played leading roles on opposing sides.As an American, I feel a cultural barrier sometimes when reading about English history before Henry the Eighth written by British writers. My knowledge of this period is very scantly. (For example it was only in the past couple of years that I found out that the Normans were decedents of the Vikings; I did not realize that ethnically they were Scandinavian not Latin. I was taught that the English were invaded by the French). Many British writers, I think are writing on the assumption people have a greater knowledge of British history than what I was taught in the states. These writers sometimes assume a knowledge of British history that does not get caught in the states.The book is very detailed; some readers may find it slow. I was surprised at the amount of information that exists about some of these rulers. The book is for someone who is a determined reader. However for history buffs this book is a worthwhile read.I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley.
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  • Kendal Noonlightreader
    January 1, 1970
    Author: Alison WeirGenre: History/Non-FictionRating: 4/5 starsI received this book from the publishers, Johnathan Cape/Vintage, in exchange for an honest review. Thanks goes to the publisher for the chance. This in NO way effects my opinion on the book.Queens of the Conquest is book one of a four part series on England's Medieval Queens by historian Alison Weir. It covers the years 1066 through 1167, focusing on the Norman queens - all oddly named Mathilda or some variant. The way Weir writes ab Author: Alison WeirGenre: History/Non-FictionRating: 4/5 starsI received this book from the publishers, Johnathan Cape/Vintage, in exchange for an honest review. Thanks goes to the publisher for the chance. This in NO way effects my opinion on the book.Queens of the Conquest is book one of a four part series on England's Medieval Queens by historian Alison Weir. It covers the years 1066 through 1167, focusing on the Norman queens - all oddly named Mathilda or some variant. The way Weir writes about these women is phenomenal. She makes facts of history read like she's weaving a story and leads you into loving or hating each historical figure she discusses. It's a non-fiction and each part of the book is based on the reign of a different Queen, but despite being truth it isn't all tedious references and footnotes! This is one of the wonderful things I love about Alison Weir's books and I'm glad to see this new series will be the same. Weir expertly weaves each Queens life into each other so the book reads seamlessly and clearly. I found the part about 'Mathilda of Flanders' and 'The Empress Maud' especially interesting. There are several illustrations within the book that show figures, buildings and artefacts related to each queen and story within the book which is a useful and fascinating addition to the text. I knew very little to nothing about these five queens prior to reading this, so I certainly feel the book has taught me something and I look forward to the rest of the series.
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  • Laura Newsholme
    January 1, 1970
    The women discussed in this volume are absolutely fascinating, which makes it a real shame that the book itself is so dry. The book tells the story of the first four queens of England (3 of whom were called Matilda) and their respective husbands as they navigate the landscape of Medieval England and France. In the introduction, Weir states that she has created a narrative history rather than an academic text, but to me, the prose is still very scholarly, which can make it a little inaccessible. The women discussed in this volume are absolutely fascinating, which makes it a real shame that the book itself is so dry. The book tells the story of the first four queens of England (3 of whom were called Matilda) and their respective husbands as they navigate the landscape of Medieval England and France. In the introduction, Weir states that she has created a narrative history rather than an academic text, but to me, the prose is still very scholarly, which can make it a little inaccessible. As you would expect in a history book, there are a lot of quotes from Medieval texts but I found that these sometimes served to break up the narrative pace too much by introducing more archaic speech patterns. Similarly, the book is split into parts, each part named after the queen it deals with, but I found that the narrative was more fluid in nature and consequently, the parts were a little confused. With all that being said, there is a great deal of excellent research on display here and for those who are interested in the period in question, this does provide insight into the lives of women. For me though, it is a book that would be better to dip in and out of.I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Casey Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free Kindle copy of Queens of the ConquestQueens of the Conquest by Alison Weir courtesy of Net Galley and Random HouseRandom House the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review to Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my history book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as the description sounded very interesting.. It is the first book by the Alsion Weir that I have read.T I received a free Kindle copy of Queens of the ConquestQueens of the Conquest by Alison Weir courtesy of Net Galley and Random HouseRandom House the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review to Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my history book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as the description sounded very interesting.. It is the first book by the Alsion Weir that I have read.This book was informative and engaging. The author chronicles the lives of five of the earliest queens of England and is well researched. One of the things that I found interesting was that four of the five were named Matilda, although one of them was better know as Maud. The author paints a vivid picture of each one and their husbands and does not gloss over the expected norms of a relationship during those time periods.This is the first of a series of four books on the queens and based on this one I am looking forward to the others. This is a definite read if you are interested in English royalty or are a fan of Alison Weir.
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  • Thea Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Queens Of The Conquest is Alison Weir at her historical non-fiction best.Looking back at four of England's early medieval queens it is a big book and a complicated book to read as well, especially as all four queens were Matilda's which gave the potential for a great deal of confusion but luckily and thankfully Weir did her upmost to differentiate clearly between them all while ensuring that she has all of the stories flowing seamlessly together where they overlap.I, personally, have a great lov Queens Of The Conquest is Alison Weir at her historical non-fiction best.Looking back at four of England's early medieval queens it is a big book and a complicated book to read as well, especially as all four queens were Matilda's which gave the potential for a great deal of confusion but luckily and thankfully Weir did her upmost to differentiate clearly between them all while ensuring that she has all of the stories flowing seamlessly together where they overlap.I, personally, have a great love for England's kings and queens but must admit that I have never ventured this far back (apart from the odd Elizabeth Chadwick novel) so my knowledge of the times following The Battle Of Hastings was limited to pretty much names only but this huge and in depth book has taught me a great deal about how these queens ruled and lived and it truly was a fascinating story, full of love and war, treachery and deepest hatred in places. From William The Conqueror reign through to Empress Maud and beyond this is a seriously enchanting and engrossing work that I thoroughly enjoyed.Despite being a non-fiction piece of work, it still reads with easy language and with a lovely ease and flow. This meant that the book volume wasn't a slog in the slightest. If the history of England's many kings and queens is your thing then don't miss out on this one, it needs to be read!
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    In Queens of the Conquest, we are introduced to five lesser-known medieval queens. Alison Weir has given us a meticulously researched and exceptionally readable book. The amount of primary sources she has pulled together is quite astounding as women in medieval times are so often "also rans" as opposed to main characters. She used a great deal of correspondence from the time which I love. I also love that the focus is on strong, unique women. Historically speaking, women's stories are quite diff In Queens of the Conquest, we are introduced to five lesser-known medieval queens. Alison Weir has given us a meticulously researched and exceptionally readable book. The amount of primary sources she has pulled together is quite astounding as women in medieval times are so often "also rans" as opposed to main characters. She used a great deal of correspondence from the time which I love. I also love that the focus is on strong, unique women. Historically speaking, women's stories are quite difficult to disentangle from the men who surrounded them and she has done that admirably. If you are a fan of her Tudor Queens series and also enjoy historical non-fiction I think you will really enjoy this. An Alison Weir book is a must-read for me and this one only continues that trend. I received a copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Irene
    January 1, 1970
    Most of us have read historian Alison Weir's series--Six Tudor Queens. Her newest book chronicles England's medieval queens (and princesses)--royal prizes in the marriage market and pawns in a very real "game of thrones" (sometimes ending in love, other time in tragedy). Although I'm an avid reader of both Alison Weir and Philippa Gregory, many of the nobles chronicled in the book had escaped my notice. It was a pleasure to have them fleshed out, their courts detailed and their spheres of influe Most of us have read historian Alison Weir's series--Six Tudor Queens. Her newest book chronicles England's medieval queens (and princesses)--royal prizes in the marriage market and pawns in a very real "game of thrones" (sometimes ending in love, other time in tragedy). Although I'm an avid reader of both Alison Weir and Philippa Gregory, many of the nobles chronicled in the book had escaped my notice. It was a pleasure to have them fleshed out, their courts detailed and their spheres of influence described.
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  • Laura Paton
    January 1, 1970
    It has felt like a long time since I have read one of Ms Weir's history books which she primarily writes. It was an absolute pleasure to read about these five queens who have more or less been overlooked or left on the guidelines of history. Beautifully written with consummate references to sources this was a pleasure to read.
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  • Tracy
    January 1, 1970
    As always, a fascinating glimpse of history. It's amazing that material survives so long about so many people, as well as things they created. I could do with some people named Kynesha or Beyonce sometimes, though ;)
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    Loved! Can't wait for the next 3.
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Queens of the Conquest: England's Medieval Queens is quite an amazing read. I enjoyed learning about ancestors. Highly recommended. 5 plus stars.
  • Kaja
    January 1, 1970
    I got the copy on Netgalley.Queens of the Coqueens of the Conquest is the first book in Alison Weir’s series about the lives of medieval queens. It focuses on mostly Matildas – Matilda of Flanders in Part 1, Matilda of Scotland in Part 2, Matilda of Boulogne in Part 4, Empress Maud in Part 5. The exception is Adeliza of Louvain in Part 3. As its title says, the book focuses on women that were standing (and most of the time influencing) behind the powerful men that are known to everyone.I do not I got the copy on Netgalley.Queens of the Coqueens of the Conquest is the first book in Alison Weir’s series about the lives of medieval queens. It focuses on mostly Matildas – Matilda of Flanders in Part 1, Matilda of Scotland in Part 2, Matilda of Boulogne in Part 4, Empress Maud in Part 5. The exception is Adeliza of Louvain in Part 3. As its title says, the book focuses on women that were standing (and most of the time influencing) behind the powerful men that are known to everyone.I do not often read nonfiction and to be honest, this was the first book by Alison Weir that I have picked up and read. I did not know much about these women and Weir shows them in an interesting light. Pretty much every one of them had some influence on their respective husbands and Weir shows that in very interesting way.Sometimes non-fiction is a chore to read since there’s a huge danger of it becoming too dry and just packed with information. This does not happen in Queens of the Conquest. Sometimes it reads almost like a fictional story and not a non-fiction book. Each of the women is described thoroughly but not boringly. While the book does mention their husbands (of course it has to), they do not feature much. The main focus is on the described women’s personality and the deeds. There’s a lot of evidence and it is obvious that the theme has been very well researched. What proves that even further is that, according to my Kindle, 25% of the book is the Appendix in which there are many further information.I enjoyed the book very much and am certainly looking forward to reading more both of this series and of Weir’s books in general.Originally posted on https://katiejudgesbooks.wordpress.co...
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