Not Now, Not Ever
The sequel to The Only Thing Worse than Me Is You, inspired by The Importance of Being Earnest.Elliot Gabaroche is very clear on what she isn't going to do this summer. 1. She isn't going to stay home in Sacramento, where she'd have to sit through her stepmother's sixth community theater production of The Importance of Being Earnest.2. She isn't going to mock trial camp at UCLA.3. And she certainly isn't going to the Air Force summer program on her mother's base in Colorado Springs. As cool as it would be to live-action-role-play Ender's Game, Ellie's seen three generations of her family go through USAF boot camp up close, and she knows that it's much less Luke/Yoda/"feel the force," and much more one hundred push-ups on three days of no sleep. And that just isn't appealing, no matter how many Xenomorphs from Alien she'd be able to defeat afterwards.What she is going to do is pack up her attitude, her favorite Octavia Butler novels, and her Jordans, and go to summer camp. Specifically, a cutthroat academic-decathlon-like competition for a full scholarship to Rayevich College, the only college with a Science Fiction Literature program. And she's going to start over as Ever Lawrence, on her own terms, without the shadow of all her family’s expectations. Because why do what’s expected of you when you can fight other genius nerds to the death for a shot at the dream you’re sure your family will consider a complete waste of time?This summer's going to be great.

Not Now, Not Ever Details

TitleNot Now, Not Ever
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 21st, 2017
PublisherWednesday Books
ISBN-139781250142108
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary

Not Now, Not Ever Review

  • Sherwood Smith
    January 1, 1970
    This YA novel with a romantic thread is every bit as wonderful as the author's previous. This one features protagonists mostly seventeen, the summer before senior year of high school. Elliott has sneakily signed up for a summer camp for smart nerds, given at a college that has a famous science fiction section. Her mother expects her to stay with family tradition and go into the military; her step-mother and lawyer father are horrified at the idea and want her to stay close. So she runs away . . This YA novel with a romantic thread is every bit as wonderful as the author's previous. This one features protagonists mostly seventeen, the summer before senior year of high school. Elliott has sneakily signed up for a summer camp for smart nerds, given at a college that has a famous science fiction section. Her mother expects her to stay with family tradition and go into the military; her step-mother and lawyer father are horrified at the idea and want her to stay close. So she runs away . . . to summer camp for smart kids, and changes her name to Ever Lawrence. But she discovers to her horror that her incredibly annoying cousin Isaiah, who is not even sixteen, also got in. The two of them pretend to be twins, so that Isaiah won't get booted out, their decision more of a truce, or mutual blackmail, than friendship.The camp is run by college-age counselors, and it's mostly based on mountains of trivia in a lot of subjects, but surprisingly enough, not math. There's a reason for that, and a mystery, and a beautifully developed romance, and some very sharply realized emotional growing up, which often times smart kids don't have to do, because they intimidate (or fog) everyone around them.It's funny, full of great characters; Anderson understands smart kids and their warts as well as their great qualities. The mystery gets solved, and Elliott has to make some hard decisions. Terrific voice, great pace, heartfelt moments as well as the fun. So far this author is batting two for two (books I read on NetGalley that I buy for my shelves.)Copy provided courtesy of NetGalkey
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  • Stacee
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t even read the synopsis for this book. Between that cover and Lily’s name attached to it, I was sold. I love love loved Elliot. Her inner monologue is snarky and fantastic. She’s smart and strong and truly delightful. I don’t even know what to say about the adorable-ness that is fluent in French Brandon and I’m absolutely ready for a story with Leigh as the MC. Ohh and I was borderline maniacal with glee when I saw Ben and Trixie again. Plot wise, it was fun. There were a lot of pop cult I didn’t even read the synopsis for this book. Between that cover and Lily’s name attached to it, I was sold. I love love loved Elliot. Her inner monologue is snarky and fantastic. She’s smart and strong and truly delightful. I don’t even know what to say about the adorable-ness that is fluent in French Brandon and I’m absolutely ready for a story with Leigh as the MC. Ohh and I was borderline maniacal with glee when I saw Ben and Trixie again. Plot wise, it was fun. There were a lot of pop culture references and more snark than you could shake a stick at. And never did I feel like I wasn’t smart enough to read a book about geniuses. If anything, I want to start it all over again. Overall, there is absolutely no worry of a sophomore slump with this book and I can’t even wait to see what Lily gives us next. **Huge thanks to Wednesday books for providing the arc free of charge**
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  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    So fun and cute. I love that Anderson has totally made "Nerdy Rom Coms Based on Classics" her skillful niche. Really liked the military angle to Ever's background, too, as well as the family and racial dynamics. Also, calling it now that Ever will realize she's bi in college.
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  • Liv (Olivia Chanel's Galaxy of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm SO IN LOVE WITH THIS BOOK. You all need it in your life. Rating to come but it's between 4 or 5 stars.
  • Silvana [The Book Voyagers]
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and St. Martin's Press for the egalley. All opinions are my own.Lily Anderson wrote a nerdy contemporary YA and it was the best thing in the world. Now I know I have to read the one before this one because the ship (and various characters) appear in this book but OLDER. So they're in the age of NA and that makes me want to scream so I want to read it because I just know I'll love it a lot. I also loved this one a lot obviously *stares at rating* I'm a sucker for nerdy roma Thank you to Netgalley and St. Martin's Press for the egalley. All opinions are my own.Lily Anderson wrote a nerdy contemporary YA and it was the best thing in the world. Now I know I have to read the one before this one because the ship (and various characters) appear in this book but OLDER. So they're in the age of NA and that makes me want to scream so I want to read it because I just know I'll love it a lot. I also loved this one a lot obviously *stares at rating* I'm a sucker for nerdy romances. Or nerdy theme in books. It's one of my favorite tropes/theme/kinks around. So what happens is that Ever, our protagonist, runs away to summer camp instead of going to air force camp and she changes her name (a nickname) and her last name (her other last name). But she goes to summer camp OF GENIUSES. Lit all of the people in this camp are geniuses. They know so much and are A+ amazing woah like for real. Ever meets so many great people including her new roomate Leigh who is freaking amazing, and Brandon, a boy who has long bangs, thick eyebrows, has a typewriter instead of a laptop and loveeees math. Everything about this book is so adorable and FUN. It never got tiresome or boring or like I needed to stop. I binge read this mf book you all. It's so GOOOOOOD. It's the perfect summer book that for sure will make you smile and cry.
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  • Savanah Lowder
    January 1, 1970
    Y'all! This book is so. Effing. Fun.I won the ARC in a Goodreads Giveaway and I could not have been more thrilled! It's so unbelievably nerdy, every chapter having nerd references that make it that much more fun, if you're into that (which I most definitely am).I somehow missed that this is a sequel! So I have not read the first book, but I have now purchased it and can't wait. And I don't think anything was ruined for me. I enjoyed this book very much as a standalone.The writing here is so fun! Y'all! This book is so. Effing. Fun.I won the ARC in a Goodreads Giveaway and I could not have been more thrilled! It's so unbelievably nerdy, every chapter having nerd references that make it that much more fun, if you're into that (which I most definitely am).I somehow missed that this is a sequel! So I have not read the first book, but I have now purchased it and can't wait. And I don't think anything was ruined for me. I enjoyed this book very much as a standalone.The writing here is so fun! Very quick-paced, easy to get through. Had I had the time, this is exactly the kind of book I love to read in an afternoon!The pacing is spot on. No parts of the book lag at all.This is one of my favorite kinds of stories. I adore books that are easygoing, fun, and not too serious. This is exactly what I was in the mood for. I LOVE books about summer, with cute little romances and there's just something about going away to camp that I die for. So this, where Ever goes to what is basically a nerdy summer camp (though at a college) was right up my alley.If you like books like When Dimple Met Rishi or Summer Unscripted, this is exactly the kind of book for you.The characters here are what really make this so worth it! We have a pretty decent-sized ensemble cast, most of whom are distinct characters and easy to keep straight. Some we don't get to know as well, and that's how it should be, given the camp situation. But the counselors are fun, and the other kids competing with Ever are really great.Ever, our narrator, is awesome. She's such an amazing main character for a lot of reasons. She's brilliant, funny, a bona fide genius. She's not extremely girly, opting for running clothes, but she's also not the typical archetypal character we see. Whenever I read a story about a girl like Ever, there's a distinct "I'm not like other girls" quality. (For instance, my only problem with WDMR is that Dimple puts down on traditionally girly girls.) We don't get that with Ever. There's no jealousy issues, there's no "I'm not girly so I must not be pretty." She's a confident, kickass chick and I love her.Brandon, our romantic interest for Ever, is awesome. He's nerdy af, like, so nerdy. He uses a typewriter, for crying out loud. But I think this is super healthy, because here we have another nerdy, nice, decent guy, who is also sexy and whom you're excited about. I too often see the "bad boy" thing in YA, and I love leading men who break that role.I also want to say I believe the romance between Ever and Brandon is incredibly realistic and very healthy for teens. It's not love at first sight; it's given healthy and real time to develop and that's so important to me.In terms of representation, we get a couple of really great things, here!Ever is black, so we get a brilliant, genius black girl as our main character, which is phenomenal. No stereotyping. She's also quick to call out racism/talk about it in a way that's not alienating and I think it's really healthy for any young people reading.Ever wears her hair natural, she has a full afro, which I love to see! Great shot of this on the cover, too.We also get an interracial relationship, between her and Brandon, which is awesome (especially because neither make this a big deal, as it shouldn't be).And a greatly diverse cast among the side characters, also!My final thought is that this is a fun, easy read that will most definitely tug at your heartstrings!Thanks to the publisher for early access to this book in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    *I was provided an e-ARC of this book from the publisher - thanks so much for sending me over a copy!!*I absolutely loved Anderson's prior novel, The Only Thing Worse Than Me is You, which was a contemporary, geeky retelling of Much Ado About Nothing, one of my favorite classics ever. It featured a geeky Beatrice and Benedict in a genius school. It was so much fun and for a while, it hung out on my favorites shelf...until I kind of forgot everything about it? Well, good thing, I went and bought *I was provided an e-ARC of this book from the publisher - thanks so much for sending me over a copy!!*I absolutely loved Anderson's prior novel, The Only Thing Worse Than Me is You, which was a contemporary, geeky retelling of Much Ado About Nothing, one of my favorite classics ever. It featured a geeky Beatrice and Benedict in a genius school. It was so much fun and for a while, it hung out on my favorites shelf...until I kind of forgot everything about it? Well, good thing, I went and bought it after finishing this one because now I can refresh and perhaps get more excited with all the wonderful cameos from the other characters from the first. What has not changed from the first book to the second is Anderson's ability to write. She has showcased herself to be a retelling and contemporary genius with these two books, and I can't wait to see what she does next (um, her new book slated for 2018 sounds amazing and is already chilling on my give it to me nowwwwwwwwww shelf). She's witty, easy to read, and adds her retelling elements in so nicely and brilliantly. Obviously, what I loved about this the most was the Importance of Being Earnest inclusion. Anderson did a wonderful job with including a lot of the elements infused in the novel with and without the reader knowing it. The Bunburying of Ever and her "new brother" was brilliant, and the first few chapters had me cracking up with all the little remarks about it. I was fangirling hardddddd.I also loveddddd Ellie. She was so much fun, she was funny, and she was the perfect heroine for this story. The rest of the characters were a lot of fun, but Ellie was the brightest star of the bunch.I did have two gripes in this book that did take away a bit of the enjoyment. The first was there was kind of two many characters? I kept getting lost with the characters and I'm like, ah, I have no clue who is supposed to be who. I kept getting lost, which is a pitfall of the camp setting.The other issue was the pacing, which I thought went a bit too slow. And because it was going so slow, I kept getting confused. I felt this book was a bit too smart for me at times? I would just sit there going, but wait, I'm confused? And I'm not even sure why. I'm not even sure how to explain it. But the pacing really threw me off. Overall, though, there were a lot of fun contemporary goodness in this book. Anderson does such a good job with the retelling, and she is a fantastic writer. However, there were just a few issues I had with this book to make it from being great. And if you're going to read this one, I definitely recommend reading the first book because the cameos would make far more sense and I mean, it's really good. ;) And thank you, thank you, thank you for creating an Importance retelling, and I so hope that more of these will show up in YA in the future. Three crowns for this book, and a Belle rating! 
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  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    Lily Anderson wrote a great story about "nerdy' teenagers who entered a contest of sorts at a select college, Rayevich, in Oregon.Elliot Gabaroche, a 17 year old girl is desperate to be on her own during the summer and not be pushed off to some military camp for the summer. Her mother is in the Air Force and has followed in the family's footsteps. Elliot does not want this for herself.She wins a chance to go this college in Oregon and takes a train there. Family thinks she is elsewhere. She give Lily Anderson wrote a great story about "nerdy' teenagers who entered a contest of sorts at a select college, Rayevich, in Oregon.Elliot Gabaroche, a 17 year old girl is desperate to be on her own during the summer and not be pushed off to some military camp for the summer. Her mother is in the Air Force and has followed in the family's footsteps. Elliot does not want this for herself.She wins a chance to go this college in Oregon and takes a train there. Family thinks she is elsewhere. She gives herself a new name, Ever Lawrence, and becomes a different person for the summer. She seems to blend in with all the others and no one suspects her. Here she will enter an academic decathalon competition to win a full scholarship to Rayevich. She gets a shot at trying to beat all the other genius nerds at a shot for her dream.She does meet and fall for Brandon, another geeky genius. Their romance blooms, but when Ever is found out by her mother where she is, that's it for her and Brandon, for now anyway.I think the end of the book was too quick. I think a little more could have been written about Elliott and Brandon and how they were going to stay together.I won this ARC copy of the book from Goodreads. I really enjoyed it and you will too.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley. Lily Anderson did it again - she blew me away with her book. Her adaptation of classics into modern times are very well written and funny and fluffy and just charming my pants off. This time, she adapts Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. I haven't read this play yet, though I've been meaning to for quite some time, and now, after reading this book, my desire to read it burns through me, renewed. I have missed the adorable and nerdy geniuse ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley. Lily Anderson did it again - she blew me away with her book. Her adaptation of classics into modern times are very well written and funny and fluffy and just charming my pants off. This time, she adapts Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. I haven't read this play yet, though I've been meaning to for quite some time, and now, after reading this book, my desire to read it burns through me, renewed. I have missed the adorable and nerdy geniuses from the last book, and the really fun part was realizing that they all make appearances in this one!! They are older now and it was so much fun to see what they have been up to. But our protagonist in this book, Elliot/Ever and her nerdy camp friends were awesome as well.As well as in the first book, there is a bit of mystery happening which spices things up even more.Happily, Lily Anderson did not disappoint and I couldn't be more excited for her next work to come.
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  • Christiana
    January 1, 1970
    This didn't feel as tight as Anderson's first, both in terms of the mystery (could anyone have figure this out on their own?) and things that were left without answers (without giving anything away, Brandon and Leigh's futures), but I have to hope that this is mostly because Anderson plans to continue with these characters in the future and I just have to be patient. Overall, the writing and story were good enough that I shirked most things to read instead and if that's not a win, I don't know w This didn't feel as tight as Anderson's first, both in terms of the mystery (could anyone have figure this out on their own?) and things that were left without answers (without giving anything away, Brandon and Leigh's futures), but I have to hope that this is mostly because Anderson plans to continue with these characters in the future and I just have to be patient. Overall, the writing and story were good enough that I shirked most things to read instead and if that's not a win, I don't know what is.
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  • Kelli Spear
    January 1, 1970
    Lily Anderson is a goddess. Or a genius. Or both.Last year's The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You was at the top of my list for best reads, and I didn't think she could pull off another fantastic nerd story.I am delighted to tell you that I was wrong. I have to be honest, there aren't enough good/great geeky girl stories. I mean, the trend is definitely picking up, but not all are brilliant. That's what makes Lily's books so special. From the beginning of both, I was hooked. She has a way with wo Lily Anderson is a goddess. Or a genius. Or both.Last year's The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You was at the top of my list for best reads, and I didn't think she could pull off another fantastic nerd story.I am delighted to tell you that I was wrong. I have to be honest, there aren't enough good/great geeky girl stories. I mean, the trend is definitely picking up, but not all are brilliant. That's what makes Lily's books so special. From the beginning of both, I was hooked. She has a way with words---and I can't help but get sucked into the world she's created.Teen geniuses. Nerds. Geeks. Interwoven are POC, diverse sexualities...it really can't get much better! Now, I was worried about this book. I loved the cast of TOTWTMIY so much. I didn't expect to like this crew as much. And to be honest, I didn't. But they're lovable in their own ways. Plus, hello cameos! That was actually one of the absolute best things about Not Now, Not Ever. Well, besides Elliot/Ever herself. Sort of a jock, but also a nerd, she's just a really kick ass chick. Her group of cam friends all have their own quirks and I found myself LOL constantly while reading. At the heart of this, though, is a basis of family. And not wanting to disappoint, but also wanting to live your life the way that would make you happy. The entire time Ever was at the camp, I found myself wondering how it would end. Would she win the scholarship? Would she stay with Brandon after it was all over? But, thanks to a "revenge" act (or maybe spite), things get turned upside-down quickly. As it all unravels, I just wanted to hug Ever/Elliot. And tell her it IS okay to disappoint others if it means being true to yourself.With a brilliantly written and brainy cast, Not Now, Not Ever is a wonderful follow-up to Anderson's debut. I hope she continues writing characters connected to this world, because I'd love the chance to see everyone (again!) a few years down the road.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Anderson's debut was one of my favorite YA novels of 2016, so I jumped at the chance to read NOT NOW NOT EVER early. My expectations were high, but they weren't disappointed. Elliot was so relatable, and it was a joy to read from her perspective. This book was just as nerdy, fun, and heartwarming as its predecessor. The perfect summer read. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing the eARC!
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  • michelle (magicalreads)
    January 1, 1970
    **Thank you to Wednesday Books for the giveaway I won on Goodreads for this book. These are my honest opinions, and I was in no way compensated for this review.**4.5 starsI loved Not Now, Not Ever much more than I anticipated! I had actually heard of this one a couple of months ago and decided to read the first one because of the wait, and while I enjoyed that one, I think I liked this one a lot more. It also might be because I understood a lot more of the references in this book because I've ac **Thank you to Wednesday Books for the giveaway I won on Goodreads for this book. These are my honest opinions, and I was in no way compensated for this review.**4.5 starsI loved Not Now, Not Ever much more than I anticipated! I had actually heard of this one a couple of months ago and decided to read the first one because of the wait, and while I enjoyed that one, I think I liked this one a lot more. It also might be because I understood a lot more of the references in this book because I've actually read The Importance of Being Earnest in school.If you haven't read or heard of The Importance of Being Earnest before, the gist is this: double lives, secret identities, and trying really hard to hide these, but someone comes along and ruins it. Lily Anderson rooted this book in a lot of this, along with quoting the play a lot, which I thought was really cute and set the scene more. In true Wilde fashion, Elliot Gabaroche, or Ellie, runs away from her life in Sacramento to Oregon to participate in a camp where she could win a full four-year scholarship to her dream college. She's escaping the expectations of both her parents, and she just wants to have a fun summer. You know, while also taking a second identity, Ever Lawrence, and hiding that from everybody. In a "cutthroat academic-decathlon-like competition" where they basically have to memorize random facts and try to win random competitions every day. But fun, right? But someone comes along and almost ruins the whole thing . . .I loved Ever so much! As someone with a lot of parental expectations, I completely related with her character. Pursuing a dream that your parents disapprove of hits really close to home, and I loved how Ever handled it. I loved all of the other characters as well! They're all in a camp for geniuses, but they're all so different from each other, it was funny. I would recommend, though, to read The Only Thing Worse than Me Is You before reading this one because you'll have a lot more fun when you see the characters from the first book and how they interact from a third party observer. (Ever is so confused by them lol but you're in the know, so you understand all their little jokes and digs.) Also, there's so much diversity in this book! Ever is black and has her natural hair. A lot of the side characters are PoC, especially the background ones (which you may not consider representation, but I do! I love when authors throw in random names that are clearly PoC and not just John Doe or something equally white).I think I liked the romance in the first book more, just because I love a hate-to-romance relationship, but the ship in this book is so cute! There's also a side mlm ship that was cute, and if you read the first book, you may or may not see some of the ships from there ;).The only thing I didn't really like was that the "mystery" part was solved pretty quickly. I wish we got to see more of the steps that led up to the answer, but I still didn't see any of it coming.This book was such a fun read. I definitely needed this with all the stress I'm under from school; it'll make you laugh and smile and just feel good. I wholeheartedly recommend Not Now, Not Ever, and I really hope you'll pick it up on November 21! Until then, you may want to check out The Only Thing Worse than Me Is You, so you can see all the geekiness and witticisms that you'll also get in the second book, and you'll understand more of Not Now, Not Ever!
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  • Brittani
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect for fans of Becky Albertalli, Lily Anderson's Not Now, Not Ever was an absolute delight. Anderson's debut, The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You was in my Top Ten List of 2016, so I had high expectations for her sophomore book and I'm happy to say it didn't disappoint in the slightest. Quirky and fun, Not Now, Not Ever had me laughing out loud multiple times. It was really lovely to see characters from her previous book pop up in different ways and I also really loved the new characters we Perfect for fans of Becky Albertalli, Lily Anderson's Not Now, Not Ever was an absolute delight. Anderson's debut, The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You was in my Top Ten List of 2016, so I had high expectations for her sophomore book and I'm happy to say it didn't disappoint in the slightest. Quirky and fun, Not Now, Not Ever had me laughing out loud multiple times. It was really lovely to see characters from her previous book pop up in different ways and I also really loved the new characters we're introduced to (particularly Leigh); everyone was delightfully nerdy. I highly recommend you check this one out when it comes out in November (and while you wait for it you should DEFINITELY read The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You if you haven't yet).Lily Anderson is 100% an autobuy author for me now.I was provided a free copy of this book on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Another book about super smart teens at some super smart place that just misses by focusing more on the relationships and less on the super smart part. If only there'd been more about the SF nerdiness and less about the family, the budding romance, etc.. The blurb promises genius nerds and instead, it's normal teens. Sigh.ARC provided by publisher.
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  • wafiyah
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so excited! I loved (and recently bought a hard copy of) Lily's debut novel (The Only Thing Worse Than Me is You) and I hope this experience will be just as fulfilling.
  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed reading Not Now, Not Ever. It’s a story inspired by The Importance of Being Earnest about a girl attending a summer camp that is essentially a nerd academic-decathlon who navigates discovering who she wants to be under the weight of family expectations as well as finding some romance. I found myself rooting for and admiring Ever all the way throughout the book.Things I liked: Ever is African-American. I didn’t know picking up the novel beforehand, so when it first came up I was I really enjoyed reading Not Now, Not Ever. It’s a story inspired by The Importance of Being Earnest about a girl attending a summer camp that is essentially a nerd academic-decathlon who navigates discovering who she wants to be under the weight of family expectations as well as finding some romance. I found myself rooting for and admiring Ever all the way throughout the book.Things I liked: Ever is African-American. I didn’t know picking up the novel beforehand, so when it first came up I was surprised and giddy. As someone biracial, it’s rare to read characters who look like me, and rarer still to find characters who look like me and I relate to. I adored seeing Ever as a POC who was brilliant and capable and could fall in love, but also was stubborn and angry and could make mistakes. She wasn’t a stereotype or a caricature, she was a 3-dimensional person and I wish that there’d been more characters like her when I was reading in my teens.Ever’s struggles with her family. As someone who has felt the heavy pressure of familial expectations myself, I loved the portrayal of Ever and her family. Ever came from a loving family, but a family that pressed expectations upon her of what she should do and who she should be. I was absolutely in love with Ever’s agency and how she bravely and boldly made her path and struck out on it. The balance of Ever’s struggles to be true to herself while negotiating expectations was well done.The academic competition. The competition itself was unique and interesting, and I’d find myself smiling as I read. I The interactions between the characters as they went through the competition were witty and interesting, while still managing to be realistic.The references to The Importance of Being Earnest. I have never read The Importance of Being Earnest, and didn’t feel like I lost anything (so worry not if you’ve never read the play before!). Enough about the play was explained that you could understand the parallels between the play and Ever’s life. And I liked Ever’s mental Wilde lines that would float through her brain throughout the novel.Things I didn’t like as much:While I liked and appreciated the ending, it was wrapped up really quickly. Suddenly in the space of a few pages three different plot points and loose ends all got tied up, and I just felt that it happened pretty quickly. It gave me a little bit of mental whiplash.Especially in the beginning of the book, I struggled to remember who was who. You met so many characters in such a short amount of time (which plot-wise makes sense, as Ever suddenly met everyone at the camp), but I still struggled a little bit remembering who was a camper or counselor and who had what name. It got better, but still made the beginning a little more difficult to get through.Overall:I really, really enjoyed this novel. A fun and well-done premise, that also tackled issues such as navigating who you want to be when those you love have different plans. I would definitely recommend this book, especially to people who might be hoping for a diverse cast where a POC is shown as a believable and relatable 3-dimensional person. I’m giving the book 4 stars, as it was good, I enjoyed reading it, and would recommend it to others, but is not a book that I’ll reread again (which is essentially my criteria for 5 stars). NB: I received an advanced reader’s copy of this book through a Goodreads-sponsored giveaway.
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  • Destiny
    January 1, 1970
    Anyway, this review is based on the ARC (Advance Reader Copy) so some things may have changed from the final version. Also, I have never seen/read Much Ado about Nothing so... :PSTORY:"I took in a breath so deep that it burned the back of my throat, killing a sob before it could start. I could taste the eucalyptus baked into my sweater" (pg 90).Perhaps, not the best quote to start a review with, but it embodies the wonderfully quirky vibe of this book well. Also, I really love the trivia/languag Anyway, this review is based on the ARC (Advance Reader Copy) so some things may have changed from the final version. Also, I have never seen/read Much Ado about Nothing so... :PSTORY:"I took in a breath so deep that it burned the back of my throat, killing a sob before it could start. I could taste the eucalyptus baked into my sweater" (pg 90).Perhaps, not the best quote to start a review with, but it embodies the wonderfully quirky vibe of this book well. Also, I really love the trivia/language/sci-fi bits that are constantly present.The premise of Not Now, Not Ever by Lily Anderson (320 pages) is about a teen going to a genius camp with elimination games as a way to win a scholarship to her dream college. This college is important for Elliot Garboche to take control of her destiny instead of being pigeonholed into to enlisting in the army like her mother or becoming a layer like her father and step-mother desire her to be. Of course, Ever can let her overbearing family members know her true intentions to break away from the mold, so she lies and goes to the camp under the guise of Ever Lawrence. Getting into the camp was easy, but staying is harder than ever for Ever!Concerning the romance, it is in the background and any progress between Ever and Brandon is slow. Depending on who you are, that might be a great quality this story exhibits. For me, I don't mind the slow start and the focus on the camp itself, but the romance isn't aww-worthy (i.e. no fangirling moments).Well... The first kiss scene was incredibly cheesy, but the line, "He smiled. 'I really like you, Elliot.'" warmed my little young adult heart.CHARACTER:This book has some nice diversity considering the genius camp has contestants from every race and background. For example, the main character Ever has significant Creole ancestry. Eh, my first impression of Elliot (better known as Ever) was a bit prickly. I thought she was a little combative against a counselor named Cornell in their first meeting. Throughout the story, lowkey Ever needed to mind her own business. What's it to you that someone didn't solve a Rubik's cube? Anyway, she was mad intrusive and a bit judgemental, though the latter is a very common realistic trait she wasn't a character that I actually liked. I think the reason that particular personality trait turned me off is because I try my hardest not to assume things about people (despite it being a knee-jerk human behavior).However, I like that Ever was very confident about herself especially being a tall girl who did martial arts and loved sci-fi books, especially Octavia Butler. The rest of the cast never really stood out to me. I'm sure others will connect with the quirky, competitive array of characters, but I was not personally invested in them.OVERALL:"Do you ever miss things before they're over?" (pg 174)It's certainly worth a read. Not Now, Not Ever is also a fun way to learn a bunch of cool trivia with a tiny bit of mystery and romance.The ending also had a good dash of realism because sometimes YA-fiction, in general, can end either downright angsty or too fairytale happily-ever-after-ish.
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  • Kelsey Rodkey
    January 1, 1970
    The first thing you should—no, need—to know is that I loved Lily Anderson's The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You. Loved it with all my heart. I was so stoked for this book, especially when I heard it was a sequel. Another thing you need to know is that you may want to read The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You right before diving into Not Now, Not Ever because there are a lot of characters, new and old. Part of the fun is catching up with the characters you loved from the first book, now three year The first thing you should—no, need—to know is that I loved Lily Anderson's The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You. Loved it with all my heart. I was so stoked for this book, especially when I heard it was a sequel. Another thing you need to know is that you may want to read The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You right before diving into Not Now, Not Ever because there are a lot of characters, new and old. Part of the fun is catching up with the characters you loved from the first book, now three years later, and part of the struggle is trying to keep them all straight.Elliot/Ever is a sweet, driven, dorky character. My mistake was constantly comparing this book to the first one. Elliot is not Trixie by any means. And that's great, obviously, because Anderson wouldn't want to write the same character over and over. I really liked Elliot, and Leigh and Brandon, but that's pretty much where it stopped. The old characters are given, but out of the vast array of new characters, I liked three. I admit, I know nothing about The Importance of Being Earnest so I can't compare that story to the one Anderson created, but it was a quiet, slow march to the finish line that I ultimately enjoyed. Although, within the last, like, 5% of the book, a major twist happens and I would have loved if the story had focused on that. It's revealed by a side character and it felt...cheap? I know it wasn't the focus of the story, but why include it then? I'm a bit salty because it was a good little twist, and very reminiscent of the first book's "mystery" kind of tone. Loose ends: I feel like I should give props to the cover because it's lovely and wonderful. There are a lot of wonderful, educational moments regarding race, hypocrisy, etc. and the cast is realistically diverse.*SPOILER POTENTIAL BELOW*The ending was a stretch for me. Elliot is at her camp almost three weeks and she's kicking ass left and right, but suddenly Other Character is so great that he/she could potentially win the scholarship Elliot was after? It just felt like it came out of nowhere, like the plot twist mentioned earlier, and then there's the matter of the love interest being interested in Elliot's thing, which I don't want to say even though I said there could be spoilers here. It just felt immature to me, but I guess teenagers...are...so....yeah. *SPOILER POTENTIAL ABOVE*Ultimately, I enjoyed this book and it was a quick read once I had time to sit down and read it. I look forward to more books from Anderson because she does have a good sense of humor and her nerd references—despite a lot going over my head—are so quirky and enjoyable. And I did like the main characters. She writes interesting, fun characters.
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  • Brianna
    January 1, 1970
    If you haven't had the pleasure of reading THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN ME IS YOU, read it immediately. Seriously. That book, like this one, is a breath of fresh air. Lily Anderson excels at telling the teenage "nerd" experience and telling it well. She uses the backdrop of a literary retelling--for THE ONLY THING, it was Shakespeare's MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING and for NOT NOW, NOT EVER, it's THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST. She deftly combines plots, references and actual quotes from both plays in th If you haven't had the pleasure of reading THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN ME IS YOU, read it immediately. Seriously. That book, like this one, is a breath of fresh air. Lily Anderson excels at telling the teenage "nerd" experience and telling it well. She uses the backdrop of a literary retelling--for THE ONLY THING, it was Shakespeare's MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING and for NOT NOW, NOT EVER, it's THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST. She deftly combines plots, references and actual quotes from both plays in the stories and does it with such energy and in an entertaining quality that you can't help but want to revisit the original material afterwards and with renewed interest. Lily Anderson has a way of making us care for characters so fully, as if we've had a series of books to get to know them instead of just one book. I was delighted when old friends from THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN ME IS YOU showed up in NOT NOW, NOT EVER. Though you don't need to read the book first, it definitely adds to the experience. NOT NOW, NOT EVER introduces readers to Elliot, a seventeen-year-old desperate to strike out on her own for the summer, away from her family and their hopes for her future. She's stuck between her father's wishes for her to be a lawyer and her mother's wishes for her to join the Airforce Academy. All Elliot wants to do is go to the selective private college, Rayevich and if that means running away from home to go to genius camp in order to win an exclusive scholarship, she'll do it. She changes her name and forgoes all memories of home in order to create a new identity for the summer. She doesn't realize that some parts of herself are harder to keep hidden. I loved this book. Adored this book. Devoured it and savored it just like it's I did for the THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN ME IS YOU. It was wonderful. I adored the references to geek/science fiction and literary culture. I adored the secondary characters who deserve books of their own. I adored everything about the book EXCEPT for the ending. I felt that it was a bit rushed, to be honest. I could have had a hundred more pages at the end to wrap up Elliot's story and hope that we get a chance to revisit it again. Thank you to Lily Anderson for such a wonderful novel and for continuing to tell amazing nerdy and true teenage stories.
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  • Tom Donaghey
    January 1, 1970
    NOT NOW, NOT EVER by Lily Anderson was a very surprising story that had me constantly wanting to read a little bit more at any given time. Ms. Anderson has managed to make smart kids cool (not that they aren't already) and to populate this book with self-described nerds only to make them into romantic leads. There is comedy, a mystery, young love, odd people floating about, the possibility of a ghost, theft, and all manner of other things that happen to mix together into a smooth blend of enjoy NOT NOW, NOT EVER by Lily Anderson was a very surprising story that had me constantly wanting to read a little bit more at any given time. Ms. Anderson has managed to make smart kids cool (not that they aren't already) and to populate this book with self-described nerds only to make them into romantic leads. There is comedy, a mystery, young love, odd people floating about, the possibility of a ghost, theft, and all manner of other things that happen to mix together into a smooth blend of enjoyment. Ever Laurence has run away from home, only that isn't her real name. And she took off not to get in trouble but to be in a contest whose prize is a scholarship to a college for the gifted. She has to compete within a group of four dozen high school students, all genius level, and try to outthink everyone outside of her group. Her dad thinks she went off to a camp for future lawyers while mom is under the impression she is attending an Air Force summer camp for future cadets. Instead she is off to the wilds of Oregon and an intense three weeks of research, thinking, forming a team and competing in daily tests as well as prepare for the final team competition. All of this is set within a framework that often references Oscar Wilde's THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ERNEST. I've managed to make this fast paced, edgy comic romance sound rather dull, but it is anything but dull or boring. Think genius level fun, quick witted and sharp as the best cheddar cheese and you might have an inclination as to how NOT NOW, NOT EVER really is. I won this book through Goodreads.
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  • Elise
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Lily Anderson's first novel, The Only Thing Worse Than Me is You, and was very excited to find out she was writing a sequel. The characters from the first novel aren't the focus of the second, but it's nice to catch up with them and see how everyone is. It was also funny seeing Trixie from an outsider's POV since we were in her head for the first novel. (Perfect Nerd Girl! Ever gave awesome nicknames.) I loved the nerdy references and was pleased that I actually got many of them.Elliot/E I loved Lily Anderson's first novel, The Only Thing Worse Than Me is You, and was very excited to find out she was writing a sequel. The characters from the first novel aren't the focus of the second, but it's nice to catch up with them and see how everyone is. It was also funny seeing Trixie from an outsider's POV since we were in her head for the first novel. (Perfect Nerd Girl! Ever gave awesome nicknames.) I loved the nerdy references and was pleased that I actually got many of them.Elliot/Ever has an awesome character arc. I loved her romance with Brandon. It felt like a real high school romance. I loved the side cast of characters, especially Leigh. However, (view spoiler)[Leigh's secret that she not only attends the college already but LIVES IN A TREEHOUSE, felt super random and unnecessary. Also, pretty unbelievable (hide spoiler)].The mystery of the missing binders was fun, although the solving of it felt like an afterthought. I did not like Ever's "brother" Isaiah. At all. (view spoiler)[Honestly, he deserved the kick to the stomach. It's not like Ever kicked him to win the competition. She kicked him because he was being an asshole and slut shaming her. (hide spoiler)] Isaiah is only a year younger than Ever, but he comes off much younger and very immature. He drove me crazy. Ever does him a huge favor, one that I didn't think he deserved.I'll definitely read whatever Lily Anderson writes next. These books are so much fun! (Also, I'd love to find out what happens to Ever & Brandon while reading about new characters.)
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  • Gata Leitora / Cat reader
    January 1, 1970
    A very well written book telling the story of Elliot. A girl who is tired of being pressured by her parents and stepmother to accept each other's expectations for her own future and to escape from them, she invents a trip and turns aside to enjoy a nerd camp that promises the winner of the challenges a scholarship in a prestigious college Mixing challenges, revenge and personal competitions .There Eliiot meets young people of all kinds and meets her nemesis, her cousin who blackmails her at ever A very well written book telling the story of Elliot. A girl who is tired of being pressured by her parents and stepmother to accept each other's expectations for her own future and to escape from them, she invents a trip and turns aside to enjoy a nerd camp that promises the winner of the challenges a scholarship in a prestigious college Mixing challenges, revenge and personal competitions .There Eliiot meets young people of all kinds and meets her nemesis, her cousin who blackmails her at every moment. As the story progresses, Elliot begins to fear that her parents discover her plot and make her give up everything.I really enjoyed the final message about Elliot's professional choice. I just do not like some parts because there is also a message that young people only get what they want and that it meets the wishes of parents and other adults if they lie or cheat. I found this detail very negative, but this did not take away the brilliance of writing and history itself.
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  • Heather Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Lily Anderson's books are FANtastic(pun intended) and this one will be super popular with all the kids at my school!Elliott Garaboche may have been born to be in the military, but that doesn't mean she wants to go to military camp. Nor does she want to stay home and listen to her stepmom read her lines for The Importance of Being Earnest for the sixth time. So instead she runs away to nerd scholarship camp and becomes Ever Lawrence, future Sci Fi writer. Unfortunately, her cousin Isaiah had the Lily Anderson's books are FANtastic(pun intended) and this one will be super popular with all the kids at my school!Elliott Garaboche may have been born to be in the military, but that doesn't mean she wants to go to military camp. Nor does she want to stay home and listen to her stepmom read her lines for The Importance of Being Earnest for the sixth time. So instead she runs away to nerd scholarship camp and becomes Ever Lawrence, future Sci Fi writer. Unfortunately, her cousin Isaiah had the same idea, only his involves being a year older and Ever's twin brother. Will Ever or Zay get their own personal happy ever afters or will it all fall apart?It is awesome to see diverse role models in teen books, especially when they don't follow the foul trope of "potential gang member/drug dealer/rapper discovers a real future" that is completely irrelevant to many POC.
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  • Terry
    January 1, 1970
    First, Thank you to Wednesday Books for the Advance Uncorrected Proof which was not rife with typos and grammar glitches but had a few remaining to be corrected.I had to ask myself, as I kept on reading about Elliot/Ever and her family and her campmates, if the time is precisely ripe for a novel of the elite ["You know, the elite. They’re elite?" — Donald Trump, quoted in James Fallows, “The Republican Party Is Enabling an Increasingly Dangerous Demagogue: With every passing day, the stain and r First, Thank you to Wednesday Books for the Advance Uncorrected Proof which was not rife with typos and grammar glitches but had a few remaining to be corrected.I had to ask myself, as I kept on reading about Elliot/Ever and her family and her campmates, if the time is precisely ripe for a novel of the elite ["You know, the elite. They’re elite?" — Donald Trump, quoted in James Fallows, “The Republican Party Is Enabling an Increasingly Dangerous Demagogue: With every passing day, the stain and responsibility for Trump’s actions stick more lastingly to the Republican establishment,” The Atlantic, August 23, 2017].Ripe or not, here it is. A bunch of geniuses at genius summer camp competing for scholarships to genius college. It's not pretty. But it is a good read.
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  • Gayle
    January 1, 1970
    Ever whose name is really Elliot decides she wants to take control of her future instead of her parents and step-mother who have opposing ideas of what she should do. She applies to a genius camp where the winner can get a scholarship to the school that she wants to attend. The only problem is she lied to her family as to where she was really going because they would be upset with her choice. She attends under an assumed name and jumps right in to win the scholarship. There are many secrets that Ever whose name is really Elliot decides she wants to take control of her future instead of her parents and step-mother who have opposing ideas of what she should do. She applies to a genius camp where the winner can get a scholarship to the school that she wants to attend. The only problem is she lied to her family as to where she was really going because they would be upset with her choice. She attends under an assumed name and jumps right in to win the scholarship. There are many secrets that you find out about close to the end. I did not read the first book but found this one entertaining and wondering what was coming next.I got this for free in a Goodreads Giveaway.
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  • Sami
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN ME IS YOU, and I was not disappointed in this refreshing and exciting sequel. Not Now, Not Ever is loosely based on The Importance of Being Earnest, with mistaken identities, scandalous competition and a shocking amount of Bunburying. Anderson's fast-talking super-genius teens leap off the page as a fully fleshed out characters, especially main character Elliot. Fans of her first book will love the reappearances of those characters, seen through Ell I thoroughly enjoyed THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN ME IS YOU, and I was not disappointed in this refreshing and exciting sequel. Not Now, Not Ever is loosely based on The Importance of Being Earnest, with mistaken identities, scandalous competition and a shocking amount of Bunburying. Anderson's fast-talking super-genius teens leap off the page as a fully fleshed out characters, especially main character Elliot. Fans of her first book will love the reappearances of those characters, seen through Elliot's sarcastic point of view.
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  • Katelyn
    January 1, 1970
    Elliot wants to remake herself. She's tired of living in the shadow of her parents' expectations (mom: Airforce, Dad: Lawyer). She runs away to the summer of her dreams: genius camp. Genius camp is a scholarship competition to get into her dream college, a top tier liberal arts college with the best Sci-Fi literature collection in the US.I loved the diversity of characters in Anderson's book and found the summer camp premise really fun. The romance and camp drama in the last third wore thin for Elliot wants to remake herself. She's tired of living in the shadow of her parents' expectations (mom: Airforce, Dad: Lawyer). She runs away to the summer of her dreams: genius camp. Genius camp is a scholarship competition to get into her dream college, a top tier liberal arts college with the best Sci-Fi literature collection in the US.I loved the diversity of characters in Anderson's book and found the summer camp premise really fun. The romance and camp drama in the last third wore thin for me. I would have liked more focus on the scholarship challenge at the end of the book.
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  • Bridgett Brown
    January 1, 1970
    I won this in a Goodreads Giveaway.Not Now, Not Ever is loosely based on The Importance of Being Earnest. Elliot Gabaroche runs away from her life in Sacramento to Oregon to participate in a camp where she could win a full four-year scholarship to her dream college. She's escaping the expectations of both her parents, and she just wants to have a fun summer. While also taking a second identity, Ever Lawrence. There Eliiot meets young people of all kinds and meets her nemesis, her cousin who blac I won this in a Goodreads Giveaway.Not Now, Not Ever is loosely based on The Importance of Being Earnest. Elliot Gabaroche runs away from her life in Sacramento to Oregon to participate in a camp where she could win a full four-year scholarship to her dream college. She's escaping the expectations of both her parents, and she just wants to have a fun summer. While also taking a second identity, Ever Lawrence. There Eliiot meets young people of all kinds and meets her nemesis, her cousin who blackmails her at every moment.
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  • Kirsten Seidel
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from a webinar and am providing a short review - I loved this book!!! A girl avoids military camp by running away to a genius summer camp in order to compete for a full ride scholarship to a school that provides a program for science fiction majors?!Exactly my cup of tea! :) A wonderful read that was inspired by The Importance of Being Earnest, this book is for those dorky kids who love sci-fi references, competitions, and geek love.I believe this book comes out in I received an ARC of this book from a webinar and am providing a short review - I loved this book!!! A girl avoids military camp by running away to a genius summer camp in order to compete for a full ride scholarship to a school that provides a program for science fiction majors?!Exactly my cup of tea! :) A wonderful read that was inspired by The Importance of Being Earnest, this book is for those dorky kids who love sci-fi references, competitions, and geek love.I believe this book comes out in November, and it'll be in the YA department of our library shortly after!
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