Motro Volume One
A reclusive young boy with superhuman strength tries to live up to the expectations of his dead father in an fantastic world of mechs and monsters. What will it take to fulfill his destiny? From illustrator and intricate world-builder Ulises Farinas (IDW's Judge Dredd), comes the first chronicle of the life and legend of a fantasy hero for the ages.

Motro Volume One Details

TitleMotro Volume One
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 11th, 2017
PublisherOni Press
ISBN1620104083
ISBN-139781620104088
Number of pages112 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Fantasy

Motro Volume One Review

  • Nek0 Neha (BiblioNyan)
    March 30, 2017
    Okay, I honestly have no idea where to even begin with the hot-mess that was Motro Volume One by Ulises Farinas and Erick Frietas. Mind you, I've read some pretty awful titles in my life, but it has been a very long time since I've come across something of this calibre. This comic is not something that I could or would recommend to anyone...ever. The story is supposed to revolve around a young boy who has superhuman strength, and he tries to live up to the expectations of his dead father. It's Okay, I honestly have no idea where to even begin with the hot-mess that was Motro Volume One by Ulises Farinas and Erick Frietas. Mind you, I've read some pretty awful titles in my life, but it has been a very long time since I've come across something of this calibre. This comic is not something that I could or would recommend to anyone...ever. The story is supposed to revolve around a young boy who has superhuman strength, and he tries to live up to the expectations of his dead father. It's very clichéd, I know. If that doesn't pique your interest, then how about tossing in mechs and monsters in a fantastic world? See, those were the elements that originally attracted my attention. But... man... the execution was a colossal fail, and probably a bit too ambitious.There are several time jumps that pop out randomly, and the empty space in-between the jumps are never filled in. This creates a frustratingly jarring experience, not to mention that it's just very confusing. The writing and "fantasy" aspects felt like it was penned by a child. With the writing, since it's told from the perspective of a youngin I can understand too an extent, but with elements outside of his perspective? It just makes the story sound dumb. For example, the machine creatures in the serial fart explosions when they eat something spicy. Between the artwork and this unfitting immature imagery, I honestly felt like I was reading something created by Beavis and Butthead... in the Beavis and Butthead universe...This brings me to the illustrations. Because of the Beavis and Butthead...atmosphere, there was a strong vibe that the comic was supposed to be reminiscent of 90s MTV animations (or inspired by, maybe), yet it doesn't even come close to what made the art for those [MTV] animations work for that particular time period. If by some super feat of patience and comprehension you are capable of deciphering the overall plot, you might be able to see a message of how family doesn't always consist of those with whom you share blood and biology. However, it's buried beneath layers and layers of terrible writing and illustrations that you probably won't be able to stomach the comic long enough to figure it all out. If someone had a really bad trip on drugs, or alcohol, and were to create a comic... this is it, this is what would more than likely be a result of said bad trip.1 machine outta 5.
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  • Michael Mills
    February 16, 2017
    First off, full disclosure: I got a free ARC of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review.I admit this one lost me a bit, but given the rather meta themes of memory, destiny and guiding authors from above, that's probably quite intentional. It'd probably reward a reread or ten.What I did like was what I could follow on a page-by-page basis. Motro is a consciously mythic piece, evoking everything from Norse sagas to Kamandi, the Last Boy on Earth; though there are times where it com First off, full disclosure: I got a free ARC of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review.I admit this one lost me a bit, but given the rather meta themes of memory, destiny and guiding authors from above, that's probably quite intentional. It'd probably reward a reread or ten.What I did like was what I could follow on a page-by-page basis. Motro is a consciously mythic piece, evoking everything from Norse sagas to Kamandi, the Last Boy on Earth; though there are times where it comes across as Mad Max as made by Studio Ghibli (and if that's not a quote worthy of a blurb I don't know what is).But Farinas's artwork is what drew my attention to Motro and it is simply gorgeous. The pastel colours and Moebius-esque simplicity building into complexity give me a warm glow. He's also very clever in his composition; the use of pictograms in place of words is a great use of the form (I heart Wheeliebeast) and should be an inspiration to other creators.Motro lost me, but it was a gorgeous walk.
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  • Amanda
    February 20, 2017
    Received from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.There are some illustrators who are great writers, and there are some writers who can draw very well. This is not the case here. Motro is visually very cool, with a sketchy-punky-pastel aesthetic. Motro himself is a recognizable MC. There are some great concepts thrown in the mix. There are living tanks and motorcycles that grow from babies. The world seems to be the dystopia future of a swords-and-sorcery world. The author appears to have Received from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.There are some illustrators who are great writers, and there are some writers who can draw very well. This is not the case here. Motro is visually very cool, with a sketchy-punky-pastel aesthetic. Motro himself is a recognizable MC. There are some great concepts thrown in the mix. There are living tanks and motorcycles that grow from babies. The world seems to be the dystopia future of a swords-and-sorcery world. The author appears to have written himself into the story as "the master of fate". But the story is incoherent - an assemblage of "Cool ideas" without a frame to hang it on. Goodness knows not every story has to be linear, or straightforward (a surreal setting or confusing timeline can work really well, as in Fight Club 2). But none of the characters (motro included) are ever really developed beyond the most lazy characterization. The dialogue is... Lumpen. Ideas surface and are discarded. This all feels like random paragraphs from a lazy book report for a much longer, more detailed epic fantasy-dystopia novel.Both stars are for concept and artwork.
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  • Lör K.
    April 1, 2017
    Free copy provided by Netgalley in return for an honest reviewRating: 1 / 5Publication Date: 28th June 2017Review Date: 01st April 2017I decided to pick this up from Netgalley because the cover looked good, and the author is someone who has written for Judge Dredd before, which is one of my favourite franchises, and I demised that this must be pretty good for him to have written it.Oh boy. Don’t judge a comic by it’s cover.This was a mess. There was no discernible story line nor plot, the charac Free copy provided by Netgalley in return for an honest reviewRating: 1 / 5Publication Date: 28th June 2017Review Date: 01st April 2017I decided to pick this up from Netgalley because the cover looked good, and the author is someone who has written for Judge Dredd before, which is one of my favourite franchises, and I demised that this must be pretty good for him to have written it.Oh boy. Don’t judge a comic by it’s cover.This was a mess. There was no discernible story line nor plot, the characters were weak, things happened without explanation, and half of it wasn’t even in colour. I am sitting here, trying to understand this but I just can’t. The weak art work didn’t help at all in trying to decipher what was meant to be happening. I don’t understand, I can’t figure it out, and I’ve even tried rereading sections of it, but it just doesn’t make sense.I was seriously let down by this and I regret picking it up from Netgalley. I wouldn’t buy this when it comes out. I don’t think I’ll even be looking at the Motro franchise in any form again.
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  • Chad
    May 18, 2017
    I was enthralled by the art. It's this weird mishmash of Moebius, Geof Darrow and Studio Ghilbi. Set in a wild, apocalyptic future filled with frog-wizards and vehicles that communicate via emoji's . It's visually stunning. However the story was mostly incoherent. In broad strokes, the book is about Motro, a boy with the strength of 10 men. Just when you think the book is settling into the story, it'll jump forward several years into a completely unrelated scenario. It's jarring and leaves the r I was enthralled by the art. It's this weird mishmash of Moebius, Geof Darrow and Studio Ghilbi. Set in a wild, apocalyptic future filled with frog-wizards and vehicles that communicate via emoji's . It's visually stunning. However the story was mostly incoherent. In broad strokes, the book is about Motro, a boy with the strength of 10 men. Just when you think the book is settling into the story, it'll jump forward several years into a completely unrelated scenario. It's jarring and leaves the reader wondering WTF is going on. Unfortunately, the unique world and art can't save terrible writing.Received an advance copy from Oni Press and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jana
    March 25, 2017
    I received a free copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I didn't much care for this graphic novel. I found the story confusing and wasn't quite able to figure out what exactly it was supposed to be about. I also didn't love the art and found it hard to follow at times. It was just not for me.
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  • Paul Franco
    March 17, 2017
    A tiny motorcycle—I was hoping it was the main character—is in telepathic communication with a boy who has the power of ten men and even survives a direct blast from a tank. He has to save them all, according to his nightmare. He doesn’t want to fight, but has to, and eventually becomes the ruler’s new son. (Don’t ask what happened to the old one.)Fifteen years later he’s basically in charge and wants to go on a quest, no matter how many of his soldiers die. Thirty-four years later, the world ha A tiny motorcycle—I was hoping it was the main character—is in telepathic communication with a boy who has the power of ten men and even survives a direct blast from a tank. He has to save them all, according to his nightmare. He doesn’t want to fight, but has to, and eventually becomes the ruler’s new son. (Don’t ask what happened to the old one.)Fifteen years later he’s basically in charge and wants to go on a quest, no matter how many of his soldiers die. Thirty-four years later, the world has turned to black and white, where reptiles are kidnapping babies. Yep, it gets that weird.There are some fun touches. The bad guys’ tanks also communicate telepathically, but only in pictures, so they must be dumber than the motorcycle. This time it’s the frog that licks you to make magic, not the other way around.But I found both the plot and the character development lacking. He says he doesn’t want to fight, but when he has to, he kills—no middle ground. Leads his men to icy death, but that’s okay, because he gets what he wants.Strange ending. If there was a point to all this, I didn’t get it.2.5 pushed up to 3/5
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  • Bookthreat
    July 15, 2017
    Read our review at https://bookthreat.com/2017/04/13/1308/
  • Theediscerning
    March 21, 2017
    Just too bonkers for its own good – a sci-fantasy world, where vehicles speak in pictograms, and things get weirder and weirder – and more and more inconsequential as we go. It might be down to this being a 112 page book and I only got 85 pp on my netgalley file, but I don't think it would ever make any sense.
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  • Kristine
    February 14, 2017
    Motro, Volume One by Ulises Farinas et. al. is a free NetGalley e-comicbook that I read in mid-February.Somehow, Motro is nerdy, philosophical, RPG, cute, Mad Max dystopic, and Saturday morning cartoon fun all at once. I immediately gravitated towards its gravelly pastel color schemes, character sensibilities, and anamorphic vehicles that talk in Sims-like emoji bubbles. I will definitely be seeking out more issues of this in the future!
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  • Magda
    February 5, 2017
    Granted, I read an ARC, so stuff will change before it's officially released in July, but I found it to be quite the enjoyable read. The pacing is a little off from time to time, between him as a boy, then him as a man. Also, halfway through, the color stops and it's just black and white, but I figure it's because it's a galley. Overall it was a good story about a boy in search of a family and the challenges he encounters along the way. Can't wait to see the final product!
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  • Nicole
    February 8, 2017
    An immersive enough world that I wanted to keep reading but it was weaved together quite clumsily and the plot almost felt clunky.
  • Jessica Mcbee
    March 28, 2017
    I really enjoyed the visuals of this book. The reading was hard to follow, which diminished the story. There are many cool concepts in here that I would love to explore further if the writing was easier to digest. Thanks to NetGalley for providing a copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Thomas Jancis
    March 27, 2017
    (Received an ARC from Net Galley)I found this to be a very interesting idea with some strong ideas about fate, destiny and the price of leadership.Sadly some of the scenes were cluttered and hard to read.The third story was also in a sketchy black and white form. While the story was still interesting, I also feel with the way it ended abruptly that I may not have got the conclusion to the tale.Still, I think it is worth a read.
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  • Jacinta Carter
    April 11, 2017
    This graphic novel starts off with a reclusive boy who is terrified of the superhuman strength he possesses. From there, it branches off into several more plot lines, none of which follow through completely before shifting to the next one. This leaves the story feeling disjointed and incomplete. The artwork is incredibly detailed, but that can't make up for the lack of depth in the story.
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