The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder
A must-read companion to the Little House books 2017 is the 150th anniversary of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s birthday. Her beloved Little House series tells a classic coming-of-age story based on Wilder’s own family life and is a reflection of the pioneer spirit of the time. They are also deeply rooted in the natural world. The plants, animals, and landscapes are so integral to the stories, they are practically their own characters. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder, by New York Times bestselling author Marta McDowell, explores Wilder’s deep relationship to the landscape. Follow the wagon trail of the series, starting in the Wisconsin setting of Little House in the Big Woods to the Dakotas and finally to Missouri. Throughout, you’ll learn details about Wilder’s life and inspirations, discover how to visit the real places today, and even learn to grow the plants and vegetables featured in the stories.  The artful package includes original illustrations by Helen Sewell and Garth Williams, along with historical and contemporary photographs. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder is a must-have treasure for the millions of readers enchanted by Laura’s wild and beautiful life.

The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder Details

TitleThe World of Laura Ingalls Wilder
Author
ReleaseSep 20th, 2017
PublisherTimber Press
ISBN-139781604697278
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Biography, Historical, Environment, Nature

The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder Review

  • Eve Recinella (Between The Bookends)
    January 1, 1970
    Great cover on this one. Obviously it is a fantstic representation of the subject matter. It has great composition and graphics use as well.This book was supremely cool! I am a HUGE fan of LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE. I grew up reading the books and watching the TV show. I am pretty sure I have seen the repeats so often I could give you the dialogue from whole episodes verbatim. *lol* So I knew the minute I saw this one available for review that it was meant to be mine.This book was stuffed full Great cover on this one. Obviously it is a fantstic representation of the subject matter. It has great composition and graphics use as well.This book was supremely cool! I am a HUGE fan of LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE. I grew up reading the books and watching the TV show. I am pretty sure I have seen the repeats so often I could give you the dialogue from whole episodes verbatim. *lol* So I knew the minute I saw this one available for review that it was meant to be mine.This book was stuffed full of cool information. Drawings, photos, newspaper clippings, and maps. Information about their life back in the day (food, clothing, weather, games, etc.). Personal photos of the Ingalls. Sometimes this type of book can make for dry reading, but the way it was written with the Little House tie-in kept it charming and fresh. It would make the perfect gift for any fan of the books or TV show.
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  • Evelina | AvalinahsBooks
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really cool book for those who are interested not only in the stories of the Little House in the Prairie, but also in the lifestyle of the day. There are tons of pictures, maps, even botanical drawings of the plants that grow in various places the Ingallses have lived in. You will also find pictures of the actual Ingalls sisters, Laura's husband Almanzo, as well as other members of the family. Aside from that though, it includes a lot of detail about life back then, in all its facets - This is a really cool book for those who are interested not only in the stories of the Little House in the Prairie, but also in the lifestyle of the day. There are tons of pictures, maps, even botanical drawings of the plants that grow in various places the Ingallses have lived in. You will also find pictures of the actual Ingalls sisters, Laura's husband Almanzo, as well as other members of the family. Aside from that though, it includes a lot of detail about life back then, in all its facets - foods, plants, weather and even pests, clothing, games and entertainment. It's even got a list of plants the Wilders grew so you could grow your own Wilders' garden! For any history, pioneer or just plain old Little House fan, this book has the right stuff.
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  • Maureen Timerman
    January 1, 1970
    This year Laura Ingalls Wilder would be celebrating her 150th birthday, and this book shows just what the world she lived in was like.We get a taste of just about everything here, from what the landscape looked like, what her gardens were like, and even a few cherished photos.Not only do we see what life was like and about what it looked like for a young Laura, we do the same for Amanzo in this farm up by the St Lawrence River in New York.Come and get lost in Laura’s world, I loved this look int This year Laura Ingalls Wilder would be celebrating her 150th birthday, and this book shows just what the world she lived in was like.We get a taste of just about everything here, from what the landscape looked like, what her gardens were like, and even a few cherished photos.Not only do we see what life was like and about what it looked like for a young Laura, we do the same for Amanzo in this farm up by the St Lawrence River in New York.Come and get lost in Laura’s world, I loved this look into what inspired the Little House Books, and all we have come to love about this wonderful author.I received this book through Library Thing, and was not required to give a positive review.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    I was a lucky giveaway winner of "The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Marta McDowell writes and interesting take on Laura Ingalls Wilder. She maps out all the place Laura lived and writes of what the land was like there. What kind of things they planted, what the weather could be like. She shared pictures of what farming tools etc they may have used. When possible, she even showed actual pictures of Laura, Almanzo, Rose and a couple of the rest of her family. There is even a gardening section cal I was a lucky giveaway winner of "The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Marta McDowell writes and interesting take on Laura Ingalls Wilder. She maps out all the place Laura lived and writes of what the land was like there. What kind of things they planted, what the weather could be like. She shared pictures of what farming tools etc they may have used. When possible, she even showed actual pictures of Laura, Almanzo, Rose and a couple of the rest of her family. There is even a gardening section called Growing a Wilder Garden. kind of a fun book if you read any of Laura Ingalls Wilder books. I found this to be a very informative book to learn more about the places Laura Ingalls Wilder lived.
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  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    ok this is kind of on me because I just saw "The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder" on the new books list and requested it because I loved those books and she's my problematic fave, but then when the book came in I was like "oh it's like.....literally the world?" Like literally Marta McDowell combed through all the books and found all the plants she mentioned and it's about those plants.It's...an impressive work....of plants...but I don't like....care that much about plants, so I kind of heavy-skimm ok this is kind of on me because I just saw "The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder" on the new books list and requested it because I loved those books and she's my problematic fave, but then when the book came in I was like "oh it's like.....literally the world?" Like literally Marta McDowell combed through all the books and found all the plants she mentioned and it's about those plants.It's...an impressive work....of plants...but I don't like....care that much about plants, so I kind of heavy-skimmed this. There are a lot of great photos and illustrations, and it was kind of interesting? Also the author seemed way hype about the ~sustainable lifestyle~ of the pioneers and made like, 1 throwaway mention of Native Americans, sooooo...not great. Last year's Annotated Pioneer Girl was much better about that I think.Pick it up IF YOU LOVE PLANTS. Or if you're doing some kind of school project about plants. Plants.
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  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    **I received an advanced reader’s copy through NetGalley of this book in exchange for an honest review**McDowell explores Laura Ingalls Wilder’s life through the flora and fauna found in the Little House books and at the homes and prairies of Wilder and her family. Along the way, McDowell offers historical notes about flora varietals and nineteenth and early twentieth century trends in agriculture. Vibrant illustrations and drawings appear throughout the text.Before reading this book, I never th **I received an advanced reader’s copy through NetGalley of this book in exchange for an honest review**McDowell explores Laura Ingalls Wilder’s life through the flora and fauna found in the Little House books and at the homes and prairies of Wilder and her family. Along the way, McDowell offers historical notes about flora varietals and nineteenth and early twentieth century trends in agriculture. Vibrant illustrations and drawings appear throughout the text.Before reading this book, I never thought about the landscapes and foliage Wilder writes about in the Little House books. It always seemed secondary to me, as a young reader who had more interest in a young Laura learning life lessons in a time period not my own. Now, I want to read the Little House books again, only to capture these pieces of information. I am not an outdoorsy person by any stretch of the imagination, but McDowell’s writing makes me want to stand in the prairie fields or in the Ozarks and just breathe in the scenery. I absolutely loved the photographic contributions to this book – it really made the writing come to life. This is perfect for fans of the Little House books, or those who enjoy reading about historic landscapes or historic agriculture, or even those who have a sense of adventure. McDowell concludes the book with a list of places to visit for Wilder fans, as well as a list of all the foliage and vegetation mentioned in the books or that could be found at a Wilder landmark.
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  • Sunnie
    January 1, 1970
    I grew up on Laura Ingalls Wilder. I was a Minnesota gal! My favorite teacher shared two wonderful book series with us. The Box Car Children and all things Laura Ingalls Wilder!I fell in love with the pioneering spirit of these wonderful books. The trials, the joy, sadness and heartache that all was apart of their lives. As an adult, I returned to Minnesota and we visited Burr Oak, in Iowa which was not far from my Minnesota border town home. Now I've shared my love of these books with my daught I grew up on Laura Ingalls Wilder. I was a Minnesota gal! My favorite teacher shared two wonderful book series with us. The Box Car Children and all things Laura Ingalls Wilder!I fell in love with the pioneering spirit of these wonderful books. The trials, the joy, sadness and heartache that all was apart of their lives. As an adult, I returned to Minnesota and we visited Burr Oak, in Iowa which was not far from my Minnesota border town home. Now I've shared my love of these books with my daughter and also my granddaughter.These books are so special to me and I was so thrilled to see this commemorative book on behalf of Laura's 150th birthday.The book is beautiful and does a real loving memory to this wonderful author and pioneering woman. Her illustrations and art work are just amazing and the text brought a few tears to my eyes as I remembered the stories and the details of the lives of these people who became a part of my growing up years. Such a beautiful book, the kind you want to leave on your coffee table for all to browse through.And as a genealogist, I loved looking at the plat maps, seeing where they lived throughout their lives. I never really realized how often they started over, although I knew that there were several homes.This book is truly a reminder of the many happy childhood memories this author shared with me and many others who have loved and treasured her books. So happy to have had a chance to see this wonderful tribute to Laura Ingalls Wilder.I received an e-book version of this book from NetGalley for my honest review, which I have given. All thoughts are my own.
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  • Janilyn Kocher
    January 1, 1970
    2017 is the 150th Birthday of Laura Ingalls Wilder and there are a profusion of blogs, posts, and books out or forthcoming. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder is part of the trend. It's a nice book full of descriptions of the flora, fauna, and terrain of the regions Wilder resided. One of the aspects I liked the best was the author's interspersed vignettes of her own family's garden, flowers, and produce harvests. I found the charts listing all the plants grown at Rocky Ridge derived from Rose Wi 2017 is the 150th Birthday of Laura Ingalls Wilder and there are a profusion of blogs, posts, and books out or forthcoming. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder is part of the trend. It's a nice book full of descriptions of the flora, fauna, and terrain of the regions Wilder resided. One of the aspects I liked the best was the author's interspersed vignettes of her own family's garden, flowers, and produce harvests. I found the charts listing all the plants grown at Rocky Ridge derived from Rose Wilder Lane's journals, diaries, family letters, and other sources one of the most original aspects. However, as far as any new revelations, the author shares the same information found in the bibliography of Wilder's life and works. The ARC I read from NetGalley had a page for photo credits, but it was blank. The author used many photos that need to be credited, so I hope the published version includes that.
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  • Rosanna
    January 1, 1970
    Like many women in America, I grew up reading all of Wilder's "Little House" books. For my 10th birthday my mother made me a prairie dress and bonnet so I could pretend that I was Laura Ingalls, living on the prairie and struggling through the many hardships that she experienced with her family. Growing up in Southern California, I wasn't familiar with the places where the Ingalls family lived, but learned a bit about geography and plants through her books.This book serves as an adult fix for me Like many women in America, I grew up reading all of Wilder's "Little House" books. For my 10th birthday my mother made me a prairie dress and bonnet so I could pretend that I was Laura Ingalls, living on the prairie and struggling through the many hardships that she experienced with her family. Growing up in Southern California, I wasn't familiar with the places where the Ingalls family lived, but learned a bit about geography and plants through her books.This book serves as an adult fix for me to learn more about Laura, where she lived, and her local resources. I am amazed at all of the hardships she had to go through, including long blizzards, drought, locust plagues, and more. This book puts a lot of these events in a historical and geographical context.After reading this book, I am ready to jump into my car and visit each of the locations where the family lived. It has renewed my fascination with this incredible woman!Thanks to NetGalley for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Beth Cato
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program.This book is a fascinating work of scholarship that focuses on a unique angle of Laura Ingalls Wilder's life: that of the flora and fauna described in her books and other personal writing. She had a wonderful knack for describing settings, making them come to life through her words, and this book takes that further by adding historical context and fantastically detailed descriptions and photographs. McDowell goes through each I received this book through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program.This book is a fascinating work of scholarship that focuses on a unique angle of Laura Ingalls Wilder's life: that of the flora and fauna described in her books and other personal writing. She had a wonderful knack for describing settings, making them come to life through her words, and this book takes that further by adding historical context and fantastically detailed descriptions and photographs. McDowell goes through each Little House book and expands on Laura's descriptions, and fills in some blanks as well, such as going to places like Burr Oak, Iowa, which was not included in the fictionalized accounts. The book-by-book breakdown is thoroughly enjoyable, but the back of the book contains another treasure trove of information: a sort of tour guide of what you will find when you visit each of Laura's home sites today, and a detailed table of all plants mentioned across Laura's writing with full citations. Seriously, that alone is a jaw-dropping piece of work. The book will even tell you where to order vintage seeds so you can grow many of the plants yourself.If you love the Little House books and want a different insight into that period of history in the upper Midwest, this book should be on your shelf. I also highly recommend this to any writers working in that area and period. I certainly will be keeping this on my shelf for future reference.
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderfully evocative and informative account of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s life and work, and her travels across America. Beautifully illustrated, reading it was such a joy. A must-read for anyone who loved – or indeed loves - the Little House on the Prairie books, but also for anyone interested in the history of the times and places Wilder knew so well.
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  • Tamsen
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely! I really loved this botany tour through the Ingalls books. I was glad to see pokeweed featured (I was educated in pokeweed by my neighbor as I have some growing wild in my front yard) and was so charmed by ground cherry, I immediately ordered some seeds from Seed Saver, and later McDowell even mentions Seed Saver and I thought damn, if you could "win" at this book, Tamsen, you did it.
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  • Angelique Simonsen
    January 1, 1970
    a cute book that depicts Laura's life with gorgeous pics of the wildflowers and parts of the prairie life did get bored at the end though
  • Dorine
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't able to finish this as my review copy expired while traveling. It wasn't available on my Kindle, so I read it on Adobe Digital Editions. I have difficulty with that software. It just doesn't flow as well as using my Kindle. My laptop has too many distractions and it doesn't go camping with me. Hopefully, I'll get this book out at the library and I can finish it then. I enjoyed the illustrations that I think would be better viewed in print. So, in fairness, I'm not rating the book until I wasn't able to finish this as my review copy expired while traveling. It wasn't available on my Kindle, so I read it on Adobe Digital Editions. I have difficulty with that software. It just doesn't flow as well as using my Kindle. My laptop has too many distractions and it doesn't go camping with me. Hopefully, I'll get this book out at the library and I can finish it then. I enjoyed the illustrations that I think would be better viewed in print. So, in fairness, I'm not rating the book until I'm able to read it in full.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    This book gives an in-depth look into the background of the Little House stories and the lives of the Ingalls/ Wilder families, with a focus on the agricultural details touched on in the books. I found this a fascinating read, as it meticulously follows the timeline of Laura and Almanzo Wilder's lives, including maps of their travels, townships and homesteads over the years. The author has done a lot of research, weaving together parts of the fiction series and Laura's biography, Pioneer Girl, w This book gives an in-depth look into the background of the Little House stories and the lives of the Ingalls/ Wilder families, with a focus on the agricultural details touched on in the books. I found this a fascinating read, as it meticulously follows the timeline of Laura and Almanzo Wilder's lives, including maps of their travels, townships and homesteads over the years. The author has done a lot of research, weaving together parts of the fiction series and Laura's biography, Pioneer Girl, with anecdotes of her own that add color to the story. Beautiful botanical drawings, photographs and other vintage prints throughout make this a quality book to leave out on the coffee table. It would be a nice addition to any library, especially if someone has an interest in history and rural living. Recommend! (An e-book was provided by NetGalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.)
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  • Jana
    January 1, 1970
    I was a big fan of Laura Ingalls Wilder's LITTLE HOUSE books as a kid, and I'm rediscovering them as an adult, so Marta McDowell's The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder seemed like a great book to read alongside the LITTLE HOUSE books. If at all possible, I highly recommend reading Wilder's books as close to concurrently as can be managed with McDowell's text, because there are lots of references and details in McDowell's work that you might not have an immediate recollection for if the last time yo I was a big fan of Laura Ingalls Wilder's LITTLE HOUSE books as a kid, and I'm rediscovering them as an adult, so Marta McDowell's The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder seemed like a great book to read alongside the LITTLE HOUSE books. If at all possible, I highly recommend reading Wilder's books as close to concurrently as can be managed with McDowell's text, because there are lots of references and details in McDowell's work that you might not have an immediate recollection for if the last time you read Wilder's books was, say, a couple of decades ago.The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder is thoroughly researched, including a wealth of horticultural information about the different geographical areas Wilder wrote about, ranging from New York state to Wisconsin, South Dakota, Missouri, and even touching on Wilder's late-in-life trip to San Francisco. McDowell leaves no stone unturned, and readers who are only familiar with Wilder's novels are sure to be surprised at the knowledge that the LITTLE HOUSE books aren't comprehensive or strictly autobiographical, and additionally at the realization that Wilder's novels transmit a tremendous amount of area-specific information about birds, plants, and other natural phenomena. McDowell also includes modern-day information about visitor's centers at, for example, Almanzo Wilder's family farm and the Rocky Ridge homestead in the Ozarks, so that readers who want to see some of these sites in person can start to make plans. (Or readers can simply enjoy reading about the various farming techniques from the comfort of a chair, which neither McDowell nor I will disparage.)Like many readers, McDowell has a connection with Wilder's books, and she shares certain moments in her research process -- whether it's a string of memories, or an illuminating experience in the South Dakota snow -- which elevate The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder from a simple list of "plants, animals, etc." to something more personal and intimate. And, most helpful of all, there are charts at the back of this book which detail the various plants mentioned and grown by Wilder, so that interested readers can try to create little prairie gardens or forest gardens of their own. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder would be a great resource for teachers, librarians, and budding horticulturists of all ages.Review cross-posted on Amazon.I received a free ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    The story follows Laura Ingalls Wilder’s stays in Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, and Missouri. The book is not a retelling of Wilder’s life, but a botanical journey of the areas she lived. Maps, pictures of the landscape, and numerous garden plant illustrations accompany text describing living conditions, cultural and social relevance for Wilder and family. An extensive list of the plants that Laura grew and knew includes the common name, botanical name, work the plant is refe The story follows Laura Ingalls Wilder’s stays in Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, and Missouri. The book is not a retelling of Wilder’s life, but a botanical journey of the areas she lived. Maps, pictures of the landscape, and numerous garden plant illustrations accompany text describing living conditions, cultural and social relevance for Wilder and family. An extensive list of the plants that Laura grew and knew includes the common name, botanical name, work the plant is reference in and whether the plant is grown at the Rocky Ridge Farm. There is also a list of recommended readings along with sources and citations. The book is an excellent addition to libraries for fans of Wilder and biologists.I received this book through Net Galley. Although encouraged as a courtesy to provide feedback to the publisher, I was under no obligation to write a review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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  • Alana
    January 1, 1970
    I have read the Little House books several times and always appreciated Wilder's descriptions of her surroundings (no doubt enhanced by being her sister's "eyes" for so many years), but had never really paid attention to the detail of her botanical knowledge and descriptions. The prairie and forest lands she describes are absolutely vivid in color and variety, and McDowell's book brings those plants and flowers to life not only with illustrations and photos but with descriptions of how each plan I have read the Little House books several times and always appreciated Wilder's descriptions of her surroundings (no doubt enhanced by being her sister's "eyes" for so many years), but had never really paid attention to the detail of her botanical knowledge and descriptions. The prairie and forest lands she describes are absolutely vivid in color and variety, and McDowell's book brings those plants and flowers to life not only with illustrations and photos but with descriptions of how each plant was incorporated into the ecosystem. I hadn't really thought about how the richness of plant-life mattered so much to those pioneer prairie days but I appreciate McDowell's research into not only the Wilder's history but how love of land and beauty brought so much meaning to their lives.As she described the area around Plum Creek, for example, I remembered visiting that location as a child during one of my family's many road trips. I don't remember what it looked like in detail (other than the slight disappointment when I learned that the dugout had long since collapsed and there is only a plaque there now to commemorate the location) but I do remember walking down to the creek bed and the grasses along its edge, and perhaps the bridge to walk across and the spring that flowed into it....although that might be my own imagination filling in from similar locations that I've visited over the years. I do remember the sense of realizing that these were real people (even if I only read of their fictional counterparts in the series) and this was real life "back in the day." It's sad to know that so much of these vast lands are gone, lost to industry and "progress," although it's nice that through books and historical sites that we can revisit those early days and history.If nothing else, descriptions of Laura's gardens, canning and daily kneading of bread show me just how many modern conveniences I take for granted every day! God bless my water heater, flushing toilet, and washing machine!
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  • Penmouse
    January 1, 1970
    The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder: The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by Marta McDowell is a charming book filled with old-fashioned images that include wood cut prints and botanical drawings. Interspersed in her book our the stories of the Ingall's family's travels from the east to the west and the states they lived in. The Ingall's story often mirrored my husband's family's story as his family moved from the east to Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota and later the Dakota Terr The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder: The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by Marta McDowell is a charming book filled with old-fashioned images that include wood cut prints and botanical drawings. Interspersed in her book our the stories of the Ingall's family's travels from the east to the west and the states they lived in. The Ingall's story often mirrored my husband's family's story as his family moved from the east to Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota and later the Dakota Territory much like the Ingall's family. Reading this book truly does tell about the history of the American pioneers who moved westward in search of a better life.McDowell has included a treasure trove of plant and gardening information throughout her book. She teaches about some of the old-fashioned plants not often found in modern times. She also tells about plants still enjoyed today by many Midwesterners. The chokecherry is a good example of a plant used by modern cooks today to make chokecherry jam or syrup. Recommend.Review written after downloading a galley from Net Galley.
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  • Karen Parisot
    January 1, 1970
    I remember reading and adoring the whole “Little House” series of books as a child. If you enjoyed those books, too, or are a lover of nature and gardening then you are sure to delight in this new book by Marta McDowell. In it she takes the reader on a tour of the midwest and great plains starting with the birth of Laura Ingalls in a little log cabin in the woods of Wisconsin and ending at Rocky Ridge Farm in Missouri where Laura Ingalls Wilder passed away in early 1957. Along the way she paints I remember reading and adoring the whole “Little House” series of books as a child. If you enjoyed those books, too, or are a lover of nature and gardening then you are sure to delight in this new book by Marta McDowell. In it she takes the reader on a tour of the midwest and great plains starting with the birth of Laura Ingalls in a little log cabin in the woods of Wisconsin and ending at Rocky Ridge Farm in Missouri where Laura Ingalls Wilder passed away in early 1957. Along the way she paints an enchanting picture of all the flora that Laura and her family found surrounding their many homesteads. It tells the story of the Ingalls and Wilder families and of Rose, the only child of Laura and Almanzo, It also tells the story of the westward settlement of America and what it looked like before it developed into what we know today. Extremely well researched and immensely readable, the book contains many photographs, maps, illustrations and advertisements that add so much to the story. I also enjoyed the author’s personal anecdotes. Should the reader decide to travel the Laura Ingalls Wilder trail, the author also gives lots of ideas for interesting things and places to see along the way. There is a large appendix at the back of the book that among other things details the plants that Laura grew and recommendations for further reading.
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  • Helen Robare
    January 1, 1970
    This book would have been more interesting if I were more into botany. I did learn a few things I didn't know about some fruit we had on our old farm when I was a kid. The book was very well written and the pictures and texture of the pages were great! Not a whole lot about the Ingalls family though. The illustrations in this book were phenomenal and drawn in such a way that it was very easy to tell what each picture was of. Since my parents were raised near Malone, NY...it was interesting to re This book would have been more interesting if I were more into botany. I did learn a few things I didn't know about some fruit we had on our old farm when I was a kid. The book was very well written and the pictures and texture of the pages were great! Not a whole lot about the Ingalls family though. The illustrations in this book were phenomenal and drawn in such a way that it was very easy to tell what each picture was of. Since my parents were raised near Malone, NY...it was interesting to read about the produce is grown and how it was harvested at Almanzo Wilder's childhood home in Malone. It did make me want to take a trip to the Adirondacks to the museum that's up there (and I could visit family that still live there!). :) I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to know what type of fauna grew in the places where Laura and Almanzo put down roots. :)
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  • Daisey
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book, but it was definitely a slow read for me. I would pick it up and read one chapter about the next place that Laura moved with her family and then put it down for a while again. I really appreciated the combination of illustrations from the books, photos, and plant illustrations. It has a lot of interesting information about the animals and plants in each of the places where they lived, but the focus was definitely on the different plants in each place. It would be a perfect c I enjoyed this book, but it was definitely a slow read for me. I would pick it up and read one chapter about the next place that Laura moved with her family and then put it down for a while again. I really appreciated the combination of illustrations from the books, photos, and plant illustrations. It has a lot of interesting information about the animals and plants in each of the places where they lived, but the focus was definitely on the different plants in each place. It would be a perfect complement to pair with reading the series in order to get a better idea of what the plant life was like when Laura's family experienced each landscape. *I received an electronic copy of this book through NetGalley for an honest review.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    The Little House books are full of references to various plants - grains, fruits and vegetables for food; trees for shade; flowers for their beauty. The author is a botanist who "follows" the geography of the books and discusses the plants in the context of the late 1800s/ early 1900s. Not for everyone, but I enjoyed it.
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  • Jennifer Bradshaw
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book since it combines a few of my passions: Laura Ingalls Wilder, Midwest history, nature, and gardening. It is well written and very illustrated. I read an ARC, and I will be looking for a finished copy!
  • Erin Goettsch
    January 1, 1970
    This is FASCINATING (and much more accessible than Pioneer Girl) - a context/history of pioneering and politics and agriculture, based around each of the places Laura lived, when she lived there. Complete with government ads and family photos and fun tidbits. I adored this.
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  • Anni Welborne
    January 1, 1970
    What a gorgeous book! And what an interesting twist on biography! Obviously, the Little House books are set in the forests and prairies of the American frontier. We all have vague notions of lots of trees and lots of grass, but this book enables the reader to understand much more fully how those trees and grasses shaped the people of the Little House books that we know and love so much.I found the book utterly fascinating. I’m not an avid gardener myself, but I enjoy learning about nature. Under What a gorgeous book! And what an interesting twist on biography! Obviously, the Little House books are set in the forests and prairies of the American frontier. We all have vague notions of lots of trees and lots of grass, but this book enables the reader to understand much more fully how those trees and grasses shaped the people of the Little House books that we know and love so much.I found the book utterly fascinating. I’m not an avid gardener myself, but I enjoy learning about nature. Understanding how very different the prairie of 150 years ago is from the prairie now was eye-opening. I live fairly close to an Indiana state park that is seeking to restore the prairie as it was, and this book was very helpful in learning about the native plants of the Midwest and enabled me to picture more completely the scenes that Mrs. Wilder so vividly describes.The table that lists each and every flora and fauna covered in Mrs. Wilder’s books is impressive. I especially liked the resources for ordering heirloom seeds for the various species of plants. A wonderful immersive project for a classroom or homeschool family would be to grow a Wilder Garden. Nowadays, it’s overwhelming to think about growing all the food that one’s family might need, and yet back then, it was very common. This books gives insight into what it might have taken to accomplish such a task.I gratefully received this book as an eARC from the author, publisher, and NetGalley in exchange for my unbiased review.
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    what a great book! i couldn't stop reading and finished in 1 evening. i loved the photos. the chapters follow all the little house books. This is perfect for a little house fan, like I am.
  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    The World Of Laura Ingalls Wilder is a closer look at the landscape that Laura and her family experienced. We explore Laura's relationship with the landscape that helped formed the background for her books. As we are led from Wisconsin, Kansas, South Dakota and finally to Missouri, you will get a close up look at the landscape and plants that they used during and even a chance to learn how to grow the plants yourself. This was not the book I was expecting to read, I get so focused on Laura and h The World Of Laura Ingalls Wilder is a closer look at the landscape that Laura and her family experienced. We explore Laura's relationship with the landscape that helped formed the background for her books. As we are led from Wisconsin, Kansas, South Dakota and finally to Missouri, you will get a close up look at the landscape and plants that they used during and even a chance to learn how to grow the plants yourself. This was not the book I was expecting to read, I get so focused on Laura and her family that reading about the landscape is what truly made the books great! I'm not much for reading books that involve plants but this book kept me captivated from the first page until the very last word! Just reading this book has me wanting to go travel along the same path that Laura did just to experience everything that she did and to see the landscape that made the books that I deary love!Thank You to Marta McDowell for writing a book that made me want to go back to read Laura's books all over again just to get a new prospective on them!I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book from the Publisher!I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley!
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    I fell in love for Little House on the Prairie TV series since little. Yes I confess that her books arrived later...I think I fell in love for your country, I am italian, also because of it.When I discovered that there was the chance for reading and reviewing a book about Laura Ingalls Wilder, I tried all my best for capturing it in the real sense, more or less of the word.Let's start to saying that The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by I fell in love for Little House on the Prairie TV series since little. Yes I confess that her books arrived later...I think I fell in love for your country, I am italian, also because of it.When I discovered that there was the chance for reading and reviewing a book about Laura Ingalls Wilder, I tried all my best for capturing it in the real sense, more or less of the word.Let's start to saying that The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by Marta McDowell will be published by Timber Press this next September 20th.Add this date to your calendar because, trust me when I tell you that this book is stunningly beauty, serious, detailed.The book doesn't just describe the books, locations, States, world met by Laura, but it is a real great biography mixed with the environment, Laura Ingalls Wilder and her family met and this fusion of aspects precious and important for remembering a woman who marked so profoundly and in positive ways a lot of generations of Americans and people all around the world presenting enthusiasm and good sentiments to everyone.A biography of a great woman and writer, with many details about the family of the Ingalls Wilder and later her own family.The book includes a lot of maps, drawings, illustrations and much more.I thank NetGalley and Timber Press for this eBook.
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  • Laura N
    January 1, 1970
    I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I love Laura Ingalls Wilder. The first chapter book I read by myself was Little House in the Big Woods. Even before that (and after too) I lived in my prairie dress. One year for Christmas, my grandfather got me a washboard and a washtub so I could wash things just like Laura did. We share the same first name. She was my constant companion through childhood. Even as an adult, I go back to her books year after I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I love Laura Ingalls Wilder. The first chapter book I read by myself was Little House in the Big Woods. Even before that (and after too) I lived in my prairie dress. One year for Christmas, my grandfather got me a washboard and a washtub so I could wash things just like Laura did. We share the same first name. She was my constant companion through childhood. Even as an adult, I go back to her books year after year. I’m always cautious about reading a book about Laura (as opposed to one by Laura). What if this person doesn’t treat ‘my Laura’ the way I feel she deserves to be treated? So I approached The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder with caution. I needn’t have been worried. Marta McDowell treated Laura with the reverence and love that is befitting of a beloved childhood friend. The book follows Laura and her family through their travels as portrayed in the Little House series (including an excursion to the Wilder farm in New York). At each step, McDowell details the crops, trees, vegetables, and flowers the Ingalls (or the Wilders) encountered. I’m not sure I had noticed the plethora of plant life in Laura’s books before, but they are very much there. My next read-through of her books will have me paying closer attention! And now, thanks to The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder, I have a visual to go with the names. The pictures were lovely botanical prints, as well as articles and maps from Laura’s time period. Occasionally, I would come across a picture that seemed out of place. While talking about the family’s time in Kansas, there is a picture of a river or a creek, but which one isn’t specified. Is this the same river Mr. Edwards crossed to bring Mary and Laura their presents from Santa? I would love to know!Sprinkled throughout the book, in italics, are the author’s personal recollections. While interesting, they didn’t feel like they belonged to the book. They were spaced oddly throughout the chapters, and they were infrequent. The second part of the book was a travel guide of sorts to Laura Ingalls Wilder sites around the US. It made me want to immediately hop in my car and drive to Wisconsin! There is also a thorough, well organized list of plants mentioned in the Little House books. This list also notes which books the each plant appeared in. Next year, I am planting violets. My ARC was an eBook, but based on the illustrations, I expect the physical copy to be beautiful! I look forward to seeing it in print. McDowell did her research (as evidence in the extensive sources at the end) and her love of Laura blooms across each page. I come from a family of Little House lovers and have already recommended The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder to several aunts and cousins. I really enjoyed the book, finishing it in less than twenty-four hours!
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