The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder
A must-read companion to the Little House books 2017 is the 150th anniversary of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s birthday. Her beloved Little House series tells a classic coming-of-age story based on Wilder’s own family life and is a reflection of the pioneer spirit of the time. They are also deeply rooted in the natural world. The plants, animals, and landscapes are so integral to the stories, they are practically their own characters. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder, by New York Times bestselling author Marta McDowell, explores Wilder’s deep relationship to the landscape. Follow the wagon trail of the series, starting in the Wisconsin setting of Little House in the Big Woods to the Dakotas and finally to Missouri. Throughout, you’ll learn details about Wilder’s life and inspirations, discover how to visit the real places today, and even learn to grow the plants and vegetables featured in the stories.  The artful package includes original illustrations by Helen Sewell and Garth Williams, along with historical and contemporary photographs. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder is a must-have treasure for the millions of readers enchanted by Laura’s wild and beautiful life.

The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder Details

TitleThe World of Laura Ingalls Wilder
Author
ReleaseSep 20th, 2017
PublisherTimber Press
ISBN-139781604697278
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, Biography, Historical, Environment, Nature

The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder Review

  • Eve Recinella (Between The Bookends)
    January 1, 1970
    Great cover on this one. Obviously it is a fantstic representation of the subject matter. It has great composition and graphics use as well.This book was supremely cool! I am a HUGE fan of LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE. I grew up reading the books and watching the TV show. I am pretty sure I have seen the repeats so often I could give you the dialogue from whole episodes verbatim. *lol* So I knew the minute I saw this one available for review that it was meant to be mine.This book was stuffed full Great cover on this one. Obviously it is a fantstic representation of the subject matter. It has great composition and graphics use as well.This book was supremely cool! I am a HUGE fan of LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE. I grew up reading the books and watching the TV show. I am pretty sure I have seen the repeats so often I could give you the dialogue from whole episodes verbatim. *lol* So I knew the minute I saw this one available for review that it was meant to be mine.This book was stuffed full of cool information. Drawings, photos, newspaper clippings, and maps. Information about their life back in the day (food, clothing, weather, games, etc.). Personal photos of the Ingalls. Sometimes this type of book can make for dry reading, but the way it was written with the Little House tie-in kept it charming and fresh. It would make the perfect gift for any fan of the books or TV show.
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  • Evelina | AvalinahsBooks
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really cool book for those who are interested not only in the stories of the Little House in the Prairie, but also in the lifestyle of the day. There are tons of pictures, maps, even botanical drawings of the plants that grow in various places the Ingallses have lived in. You will also find pictures of the actual Ingalls sisters, Laura's husband Almanzo, as well as other members of the family. Aside from that though, it includes a lot of detail about life back then, in all its facets - This is a really cool book for those who are interested not only in the stories of the Little House in the Prairie, but also in the lifestyle of the day. There are tons of pictures, maps, even botanical drawings of the plants that grow in various places the Ingallses have lived in. You will also find pictures of the actual Ingalls sisters, Laura's husband Almanzo, as well as other members of the family. Aside from that though, it includes a lot of detail about life back then, in all its facets - foods, plants, weather and even pests, clothing, games and entertainment. It's even got a list of plants the Wilders grew so you could grow your own Wilders' garden! For any history, pioneer or just plain old Little House fan, this book has the right stuff.
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  • Maureen Timerman
    January 1, 1970
    This year Laura Ingalls Wilder would be celebrating her 150th birthday, and this book shows just what the world she lived in was like.We get a taste of just about everything here, from what the landscape looked like, what her gardens were like, and even a few cherished photos.Not only do we see what life was like and about what it looked like for a young Laura, we do the same for Amanzo in this farm up by the St Lawrence River in New York.Come and get lost in Laura’s world, I loved this look int This year Laura Ingalls Wilder would be celebrating her 150th birthday, and this book shows just what the world she lived in was like.We get a taste of just about everything here, from what the landscape looked like, what her gardens were like, and even a few cherished photos.Not only do we see what life was like and about what it looked like for a young Laura, we do the same for Amanzo in this farm up by the St Lawrence River in New York.Come and get lost in Laura’s world, I loved this look into what inspired the Little House Books, and all we have come to love about this wonderful author.I received this book through Library Thing, and was not required to give a positive review.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    I was a lucky giveaway winner of "The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Marta McDowell writes and interesting take on Laura Ingalls Wilder. She maps out all the place Laura lived and writes of what the land was like there. What kind of things they planted, what the weather could be like. She shared pictures of what farming tools etc they may have used. When possible, she even showed actual pictures of Laura, Almanzo, Rose and a couple of the rest of her family. There is even a gardening section cal I was a lucky giveaway winner of "The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Marta McDowell writes and interesting take on Laura Ingalls Wilder. She maps out all the place Laura lived and writes of what the land was like there. What kind of things they planted, what the weather could be like. She shared pictures of what farming tools etc they may have used. When possible, she even showed actual pictures of Laura, Almanzo, Rose and a couple of the rest of her family. There is even a gardening section called Growing a Wilder Garden. kind of a fun book if you read any of Laura Ingalls Wilder books. I found this to be a very informative book to learn more about the places Laura Ingalls Wilder lived.
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  • Janilyn Kocher
    January 1, 1970
    2017 is the 150th Birthday of Laura Ingalls Wilder and there are a profusion of blogs, posts, and books out or forthcoming. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder is part of the trend. It's a nice book full of descriptions of the flora, fauna, and terrain of the regions Wilder resided. One of the aspects I liked the best was the author's interspersed vignettes of her own family's garden, flowers, and produce harvests. I found the charts listing all the plants grown at Rocky Ridge derived from Rose Wi 2017 is the 150th Birthday of Laura Ingalls Wilder and there are a profusion of blogs, posts, and books out or forthcoming. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder is part of the trend. It's a nice book full of descriptions of the flora, fauna, and terrain of the regions Wilder resided. One of the aspects I liked the best was the author's interspersed vignettes of her own family's garden, flowers, and produce harvests. I found the charts listing all the plants grown at Rocky Ridge derived from Rose Wilder Lane's journals, diaries, family letters, and other sources one of the most original aspects. However, as far as any new revelations, the author shares the same information found in the bibliography of Wilder's life and works. The ARC I read from NetGalley had a page for photo credits, but it was blank. The author used many photos that need to be credited, so I hope the published version includes that.
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  • Sonja
    January 1, 1970
    I grew up on Laura Ingalls Wilder. I was a Minnesota gal! My favorite teacher shared two wonderful book series with us. The Box Car Children and all things Laura Ingalls Wilder!I fell in love with the pioneering spirit of these wonderful books. The trials, the joy, sadness and heartache that all was apart of their lives. As an adult, I returned to Minnesota and we visited Burr Oak, in Iowa which was not far from my Minnesota border town home. Now I've shared my love of these books with my daught I grew up on Laura Ingalls Wilder. I was a Minnesota gal! My favorite teacher shared two wonderful book series with us. The Box Car Children and all things Laura Ingalls Wilder!I fell in love with the pioneering spirit of these wonderful books. The trials, the joy, sadness and heartache that all was apart of their lives. As an adult, I returned to Minnesota and we visited Burr Oak, in Iowa which was not far from my Minnesota border town home. Now I've shared my love of these books with my daughter and also my granddaughter.These books are so special to me and I was so thrilled to see this commemorative book on behalf of Laura's 150th birthday.The book is beautiful and does a real loving memory to this wonderful author and pioneering woman. Her illustrations and art work are just amazing and the text brought a few tears to my eyes as I remembered the stories and the details of the lives of these people who became a part of my growing up years. Such a beautiful book, the kind you want to leave on your coffee table for all to browse through.And as a genealogist, I loved looking at the plat maps, seeing where they lived throughout their lives. I never really realized how often they started over, although I knew that there were several homes.This book is truly a reminder of the many happy childhood memories this author shared with me and many others who have loved and treasured her books. So happy to have had a chance to see this wonderful tribute to Laura Ingalls Wilder.I received an e-book version of this book from NetGalley for my honest review, which I have given. All thoughts are my own.
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  • Rosanna
    January 1, 1970
    Like many women in America, I grew up reading all of Wilder's "Little House" books. For my 10th birthday my mother made me a prairie dress and bonnet so I could pretend that I was Laura Ingalls, living on the prairie and struggling through the many hardships that she experienced with her family. Growing up in Southern California, I wasn't familiar with the places where the Ingalls family lived, but learned a bit about geography and plants through her books.This book serves as an adult fix for me Like many women in America, I grew up reading all of Wilder's "Little House" books. For my 10th birthday my mother made me a prairie dress and bonnet so I could pretend that I was Laura Ingalls, living on the prairie and struggling through the many hardships that she experienced with her family. Growing up in Southern California, I wasn't familiar with the places where the Ingalls family lived, but learned a bit about geography and plants through her books.This book serves as an adult fix for me to learn more about Laura, where she lived, and her local resources. I am amazed at all of the hardships she had to go through, including long blizzards, drought, locust plagues, and more. This book puts a lot of these events in a historical and geographical context.After reading this book, I am ready to jump into my car and visit each of the locations where the family lived. It has renewed my fascination with this incredible woman!Thanks to NetGalley for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Beth Cato
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program.This book is a fascinating work of scholarship that focuses on a unique angle of Laura Ingalls Wilder's life: that of the flora and fauna described in her books and other personal writing. She had a wonderful knack for describing settings, making them come to life through her words, and this book takes that further by adding historical context and fantastically detailed descriptions and photographs. McDowell goes through each I received this book through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program.This book is a fascinating work of scholarship that focuses on a unique angle of Laura Ingalls Wilder's life: that of the flora and fauna described in her books and other personal writing. She had a wonderful knack for describing settings, making them come to life through her words, and this book takes that further by adding historical context and fantastically detailed descriptions and photographs. McDowell goes through each Little House book and expands on Laura's descriptions, and fills in some blanks as well, such as going to places like Burr Oak, Iowa, which was not included in the fictionalized accounts. The book-by-book breakdown is thoroughly enjoyable, but the back of the book contains another treasure trove of information: a sort of tour guide of what you will find when you visit each of Laura's home sites today, and a detailed table of all plants mentioned across Laura's writing with full citations. Seriously, that alone is a jaw-dropping piece of work. The book will even tell you where to order vintage seeds so you can grow many of the plants yourself.If you love the Little House books and want a different insight into that period of history in the upper Midwest, this book should be on your shelf. I also highly recommend this to any writers working in that area and period. I certainly will be keeping this on my shelf for future reference.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    This book gives an in-depth look into the background of the Little House stories and the lives of the Ingalls/ Wilder families, with a focus on the agricultural details touched on in the books. I found this a fascinating read, as it meticulously follows the timeline of Laura and Almanzo Wilder's lives, including maps of their travels, townships and homesteads over the years. The author has done a lot of research, weaving together parts of the fiction series and Laura's biography, Pioneer Girl, w This book gives an in-depth look into the background of the Little House stories and the lives of the Ingalls/ Wilder families, with a focus on the agricultural details touched on in the books. I found this a fascinating read, as it meticulously follows the timeline of Laura and Almanzo Wilder's lives, including maps of their travels, townships and homesteads over the years. The author has done a lot of research, weaving together parts of the fiction series and Laura's biography, Pioneer Girl, with anecdotes of her own that add color to the story. Beautiful botanical drawings, photographs and other vintage prints throughout make this a quality book to leave out on the coffee table. It would be a nice addition to any library, especially if someone has an interest in history and rural living. Recommend! (An e-book was provided by NetGalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.)
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    The story follows Laura Ingalls Wilder’s stays in Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, and Missouri. The book is not a retelling of Wilder’s life, but a botanical journey of the areas she lived. Maps, pictures of the landscape, and numerous garden plant illustrations accompany text describing living conditions, cultural and social relevance for Wilder and family. An extensive list of the plants that Laura grew and knew includes the common name, botanical name, work the plant is refe The story follows Laura Ingalls Wilder’s stays in Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, and Missouri. The book is not a retelling of Wilder’s life, but a botanical journey of the areas she lived. Maps, pictures of the landscape, and numerous garden plant illustrations accompany text describing living conditions, cultural and social relevance for Wilder and family. An extensive list of the plants that Laura grew and knew includes the common name, botanical name, work the plant is reference in and whether the plant is grown at the Rocky Ridge Farm. There is also a list of recommended readings along with sources and citations. The book is an excellent addition to libraries for fans of Wilder and biologists.I received this book through Net Galley. Although encouraged as a courtesy to provide feedback to the publisher, I was under no obligation to write a review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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  • Penmouse
    January 1, 1970
    The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder: The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by Marta McDowell is a charming book filled with old-fashioned images that include wood cut prints and botanical drawings. Interspersed in her book our the stories of the Ingall's family's travels from the east to the west and the states they lived in. The Ingall's story often mirrored my husband's family's story as his family moved from the east to Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota and later the Dakota Terr The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder: The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by Marta McDowell is a charming book filled with old-fashioned images that include wood cut prints and botanical drawings. Interspersed in her book our the stories of the Ingall's family's travels from the east to the west and the states they lived in. The Ingall's story often mirrored my husband's family's story as his family moved from the east to Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota and later the Dakota Territory much like the Ingall's family. Reading this book truly does tell about the history of the American pioneers who moved westward in search of a better life.McDowell has included a treasure trove of plant and gardening information throughout her book. She teaches about some of the old-fashioned plants not often found in modern times. She also tells about plants still enjoyed today by many Midwesterners. The chokecherry is a good example of a plant used by modern cooks today to make chokecherry jam or syrup. Recommend.Review written after downloading a galley from Net Galley.
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  • Karen Parisot
    January 1, 1970
    I remember reading and adoring the whole “Little House” series of books as a child. If you enjoyed those books, too, or are a lover of nature and gardening then you are sure to delight in this new book by Marta McDowell. In it she takes the reader on a tour of the midwest and great plains starting with the birth of Laura Ingalls in a little log cabin in the woods of Wisconsin and ending at Rocky Ridge Farm in Missouri where Laura Ingalls Wilder passed away in early 1957. Along the way she paints I remember reading and adoring the whole “Little House” series of books as a child. If you enjoyed those books, too, or are a lover of nature and gardening then you are sure to delight in this new book by Marta McDowell. In it she takes the reader on a tour of the midwest and great plains starting with the birth of Laura Ingalls in a little log cabin in the woods of Wisconsin and ending at Rocky Ridge Farm in Missouri where Laura Ingalls Wilder passed away in early 1957. Along the way she paints an enchanting picture of all the flora that Laura and her family found surrounding their many homesteads. It tells the story of the Ingalls and Wilder families and of Rose, the only child of Laura and Almanzo, It also tells the story of the westward settlement of America and what it looked like before it developed into what we know today. Extremely well researched and immensely readable, the book contains many photographs, maps, illustrations and advertisements that add so much to the story. I also enjoyed the author’s personal anecdotes. Should the reader decide to travel the Laura Ingalls Wilder trail, the author also gives lots of ideas for interesting things and places to see along the way. There is a large appendix at the back of the book that among other things details the plants that Laura grew and recommendations for further reading.
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  • Anni Welborne
    January 1, 1970
    What a gorgeous book! And what an interesting twist on biography! Obviously, the Little House books are set in the forests and prairies of the American frontier. We all have vague notions of lots of trees and lots of grass, but this book enables the reader to understand much more fully how those trees and grasses shaped the people of the Little House books that we know and love so much.I found the book utterly fascinating. I’m not an avid gardener myself, but I enjoy learning about nature. Under What a gorgeous book! And what an interesting twist on biography! Obviously, the Little House books are set in the forests and prairies of the American frontier. We all have vague notions of lots of trees and lots of grass, but this book enables the reader to understand much more fully how those trees and grasses shaped the people of the Little House books that we know and love so much.I found the book utterly fascinating. I’m not an avid gardener myself, but I enjoy learning about nature. Understanding how very different the prairie of 150 years ago is from the prairie now was eye-opening. I live fairly close to an Indiana state park that is seeking to restore the prairie as it was, and this book was very helpful in learning about the native plants of the Midwest and enabled me to picture more completely the scenes that Mrs. Wilder so vividly describes.The table that lists each and every flora and fauna covered in Mrs. Wilder’s books is impressive. I especially liked the resources for ordering heirloom seeds for the various species of plants. A wonderful immersive project for a classroom or homeschool family would be to grow a Wilder Garden. Nowadays, it’s overwhelming to think about growing all the food that one’s family might need, and yet back then, it was very common. This books gives insight into what it might have taken to accomplish such a task.I gratefully received this book as an eARC from the author, publisher, and NetGalley in exchange for my unbiased review.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    The World Of Laura Ingalls Wilder is a closer look at the landscape that Laura and her family experienced. We explore Laura's relationship with the landscape that helped formed the background for her books. As we are led from Wisconsin, Kansas, South Dakota and finally to Missouri, you will get a close up look at the landscape and plants that they used during and even a chance to learn how to grow the plants yourself. This was not the book I was expecting to read, I get so focused on Laura and h The World Of Laura Ingalls Wilder is a closer look at the landscape that Laura and her family experienced. We explore Laura's relationship with the landscape that helped formed the background for her books. As we are led from Wisconsin, Kansas, South Dakota and finally to Missouri, you will get a close up look at the landscape and plants that they used during and even a chance to learn how to grow the plants yourself. This was not the book I was expecting to read, I get so focused on Laura and her family that reading about the landscape is what truly made the books great! I'm not much for reading books that involve plants but this book kept me captivated from the first page until the very last word! Just reading this book has me wanting to go travel along the same path that Laura did just to experience everything that she did and to see the landscape that made the books that I deary love!Thank You to Marta McDowell for writing a book that made me want to go back to read Laura's books all over again just to get a new prospective on them!I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book from the Publisher!I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley!
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    I fell in love for Little House on the Prairie TV series since little. Yes I confess that her books arrived later...I think I fell in love for your country, I am italian, also because of it.When I discovered that there was the chance for reading and reviewing a book about Laura Ingalls Wilder, I tried all my best for capturing it in the real sense, more or less of the word.Let's start to saying that The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by I fell in love for Little House on the Prairie TV series since little. Yes I confess that her books arrived later...I think I fell in love for your country, I am italian, also because of it.When I discovered that there was the chance for reading and reviewing a book about Laura Ingalls Wilder, I tried all my best for capturing it in the real sense, more or less of the word.Let's start to saying that The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by Marta McDowell will be published by Timber Press this next September 20th.Add this date to your calendar because, trust me when I tell you that this book is stunningly beauty, serious, detailed.The book doesn't just describe the books, locations, States, world met by Laura, but it is a real great biography mixed with the environment, Laura Ingalls Wilder and her family met and this fusion of aspects precious and important for remembering a woman who marked so profoundly and in positive ways a lot of generations of Americans and people all around the world presenting enthusiasm and good sentiments to everyone.A biography of a great woman and writer, with many details about the family of the Ingalls Wilder and later her own family.The book includes a lot of maps, drawings, illustrations and much more.I thank NetGalley and Timber Press for this eBook.
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  • Laura N
    January 1, 1970
    I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I love Laura Ingalls Wilder. The first chapter book I read by myself was Little House in the Big Woods. Even before that (and after too) I lived in my prairie dress. One year for Christmas, my grandfather got me a washboard and a washtub so I could wash things just like Laura did. We share the same first name. She was my constant companion through childhood. Even as an adult, I go back to her books year after I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I love Laura Ingalls Wilder. The first chapter book I read by myself was Little House in the Big Woods. Even before that (and after too) I lived in my prairie dress. One year for Christmas, my grandfather got me a washboard and a washtub so I could wash things just like Laura did. We share the same first name. She was my constant companion through childhood. Even as an adult, I go back to her books year after year. I’m always cautious about reading a book about Laura (as opposed to one by Laura). What if this person doesn’t treat ‘my Laura’ the way I feel she deserves to be treated? So I approached The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder with caution. I needn’t have been worried. Marta McDowell treated Laura with the reverence and love that is befitting of a beloved childhood friend. The book follows Laura and her family through their travels as portrayed in the Little House series (including an excursion to the Wilder farm in New York). At each step, McDowell details the crops, trees, vegetables, and flowers the Ingalls (or the Wilders) encountered. I’m not sure I had noticed the plethora of plant life in Laura’s books before, but they are very much there. My next read-through of her books will have me paying closer attention! And now, thanks to The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder, I have a visual to go with the names. The pictures were lovely botanical prints, as well as articles and maps from Laura’s time period. Occasionally, I would come across a picture that seemed out of place. While talking about the family’s time in Kansas, there is a picture of a river or a creek, but which one isn’t specified. Is this the same river Mr. Edwards crossed to bring Mary and Laura their presents from Santa? I would love to know!Sprinkled throughout the book, in italics, are the author’s personal recollections. While interesting, they didn’t feel like they belonged to the book. They were spaced oddly throughout the chapters, and they were infrequent. The second part of the book was a travel guide of sorts to Laura Ingalls Wilder sites around the US. It made me want to immediately hop in my car and drive to Wisconsin! There is also a thorough, well organized list of plants mentioned in the Little House books. This list also notes which books the each plant appeared in. Next year, I am planting violets. My ARC was an eBook, but based on the illustrations, I expect the physical copy to be beautiful! I look forward to seeing it in print. McDowell did her research (as evidence in the extensive sources at the end) and her love of Laura blooms across each page. I come from a family of Little House lovers and have already recommended The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder to several aunts and cousins. I really enjoyed the book, finishing it in less than twenty-four hours!
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Have you read the books that Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote? I did. My mom turned them on for me. I probably wouldn't had read them otherwise. This book is wonderful in that it added more information about what her life was like for her as she grew up. The author goes through each book and gives you maps, facts, activities, crafts, and recipes. Included in the book are family photographs. I learned about the trees, plants and gardens that she grew. I hope to someday to see at least one of Laura Inga Have you read the books that Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote? I did. My mom turned them on for me. I probably wouldn't had read them otherwise. This book is wonderful in that it added more information about what her life was like for her as she grew up. The author goes through each book and gives you maps, facts, activities, crafts, and recipes. Included in the book are family photographs. I learned about the trees, plants and gardens that she grew. I hope to someday to see at least one of Laura Ingalls Wilder homes that have been turned into museums if not all. There is also a family tree.If you are a fan of Laura Ingalls Wilder books, this is a great addition to have. If you are curious about what the life, land and nature was, this is a good book to read. I am so glad I had the chance to read this!Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book free from the author/publisher from Netgalley. I was not obliged to write a favorable review, or even any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    This book is not what I was expecting, but I loved every page! From the cover I was expecting a coffee table book full of lush pictures, but the contents were so much better than I had imagined! The author takes you on a journey through the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder, stopping at all the major rejoins she lived in to discuss what her life was life and the native plants that grew in each area. The book is full of sweet anecdotes and excerpts for the Little House books. While most of the informa This book is not what I was expecting, but I loved every page! From the cover I was expecting a coffee table book full of lush pictures, but the contents were so much better than I had imagined! The author takes you on a journey through the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder, stopping at all the major rejoins she lived in to discuss what her life was life and the native plants that grew in each area. The book is full of sweet anecdotes and excerpts for the Little House books. While most of the information provided can be found in dry biographies of Wilder, this book inserts many beautiful pictures that give you a visual glimpse into life at the time and the native plants of each region. Like many, I wore out my copies of the Little House series when I was younger and still think about many of the books with great fondness. I found this book to be a great companion to the book series and such an enjoyable read! If you are or were a fan of the Little House books you will enjoy this book!The book was provided to me by Net Galley in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own, this really is a lovely book!
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  • Ms. Reader
    January 1, 1970
    I recevied this book from Goodreads First Reads in exchange for an honest review...As soon as I got this book, I became very exciting. I had grown up on the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, then spent many, many hours of my young teenage life binge-watching the TV show on DVD (fyi, I've always enjoyed the books far more then the show, by a long-shot). Being the first to dig deep into this book was beyond thrilling for me, and it did not fail to satisfy.It was overall a very interest and captivating b I recevied this book from Goodreads First Reads in exchange for an honest review...As soon as I got this book, I became very exciting. I had grown up on the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, then spent many, many hours of my young teenage life binge-watching the TV show on DVD (fyi, I've always enjoyed the books far more then the show, by a long-shot). Being the first to dig deep into this book was beyond thrilling for me, and it did not fail to satisfy.It was overall a very interest and captivating book to read. Lots of intriguing facts, pictures, details, and information that you can't get from neither the books or TV show. It is jammed-pack and highly enjoyable to read. Well-written, very well put together, and very faithful to the Ingalls and Wilder family, this book is a must-have and a collectible!!
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I won this in a Goodreads giveaway. Enjoyable and informative.
  • Jana
    January 1, 1970
    I was a big fan of Laura Ingalls Wilder's LITTLE HOUSE books as a kid, and I'm rediscovering them as an adult, so Marta McDowell's The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder seemed like a great book to read alongside the LITTLE HOUSE books. If at all possible, I highly recommend reading Wilder's books as close to concurrently as can be managed with McDowell's text, because there are lots of references and details in McDowell's work that you might not have an immediate recollection for if the last time yo I was a big fan of Laura Ingalls Wilder's LITTLE HOUSE books as a kid, and I'm rediscovering them as an adult, so Marta McDowell's The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder seemed like a great book to read alongside the LITTLE HOUSE books. If at all possible, I highly recommend reading Wilder's books as close to concurrently as can be managed with McDowell's text, because there are lots of references and details in McDowell's work that you might not have an immediate recollection for if the last time you read Wilder's books was, say, a couple of decades ago.The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder is thoroughly researched, including a wealth of horticultural information about the different geographical areas Wilder wrote about, ranging from New York state to Wisconsin, South Dakota, Missouri, and even touching on Wilder's late-in-life trip to San Francisco. McDowell leaves no stone unturned, and readers who are only familiar with Wilder's novels are sure to be surprised at the knowledge that the LITTLE HOUSE books aren't comprehensive or strictly autobiographical, and additionally at the realization that Wilder's novels transmit a tremendous amount of area-specific information about birds, plants, and other natural phenomena. McDowell also includes modern-day information about visitor's centers at, for example, Almanzo Wilder's family farm and the Rocky Ridge homestead in the Ozarks, so that readers who want to see some of these sites in person can start to make plans. (Or readers can simply enjoy reading about the various farming techniques from the comfort of a chair, which neither McDowell nor I will disparage.)Like many readers, McDowell has a connection with Wilder's books, and she shares certain moments in her research process -- whether it's a string of memories, or an illuminating experience in the South Dakota snow -- which elevate The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder from a simple list of "plants, animals, etc." to something more personal and intimate. And, most helpful of all, there are charts at the back of this book which detail the various plants mentioned and grown by Wilder, so that interested readers can try to create little prairie gardens or forest gardens of their own. The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder would be a great resource for teachers, librarians, and budding horticulturists of all ages.Review cross-posted on Amazon.I received a free ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder: The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by Marta McDowell is facinating in that it follows Laura's moves from Wisconsin to Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, and Missouri. Not only do we get to travel along with the Ingalls' and Wilder's, but we learn about pioneering history, American agriculture, animals, native plants, and trees. Many of us that are familiar with Laura's books are aware she harbored a deep love for her country, and w The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder: The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books by Marta McDowell is facinating in that it follows Laura's moves from Wisconsin to Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota, and Missouri. Not only do we get to travel along with the Ingalls' and Wilder's, but we learn about pioneering history, American agriculture, animals, native plants, and trees. Many of us that are familiar with Laura's books are aware she harbored a deep love for her country, and was of strong character. She was active in the community, participating in local fairs. The Wilder's were able to make a substainable living off their land. What they didn't eat, and store, was often fed to their livestock. This is really the type of book I was waiting for. But, I don't want to give away to much of it. So, I'll just go over a few points that I felt were interesting. Laura was happy to tour 'Muir Woods' while visiting daughter Rose, in California. We know from history that Muir's family emigrated to American, his family settled in Wisconsin the same state Laura was born in. You also learn that Laura was also known to be drawn to "Tennyson's...Maude". And, if you are familiar with the poem, you might think they were standing together when Tenneyson wrote , "From the lake to the meadow and on to the wood." This, too, was Laura's scenery. And, if you've read any of her books, you'll know she writes about being near water. I thought it very fitting this book includes a photo of an older Laura...near water.Yes, there were many hardships for Ingalls' and Wilder's. And, I love how Marta McDowell depicts their struggles in a detailed but not depressing manner.Laura was forty four when her first article appeared in the 'Ruralist' and she lived to see all of her books be reprinted in mutiple languages. I love that this story was teamed with photos, illustrations, drawings and clippings from newspapers of Laura's lifetime. My opinion is this book is truly a gem.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    "The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder" is a companion book to the Little House books. We're told the locations and dates for each book in the series. Going book by book, the author explained things like the history of each location and what was typical for the area at that time. She also gave more detail on the plants and farm work mentioned in the books. There were many pictures and illustrations of the places, tools, and plants. She included maps showing the locations where Laura lived.Basically, "The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder" is a companion book to the Little House books. We're told the locations and dates for each book in the series. Going book by book, the author explained things like the history of each location and what was typical for the area at that time. She also gave more detail on the plants and farm work mentioned in the books. There were many pictures and illustrations of the places, tools, and plants. She included maps showing the locations where Laura lived.Basically, each chapter was a companion to a book or location in the series: Wisconsin Woods ("Little House in the Big Woods"), New York Farm ("Farmer Boy"), Prairie of Kansas ("Little House on the Prairie"), Creekside in Minnesota & Iowa ("On the Banks of Plum Creek"), The Dakota Prairie ("By the Shores of Silver Lake" and "The Long Winter"), Settled Farm & Settled Town ("Little Town on the Prairie" and "These Happy Golden Years"), and Great Plains to Ozark Ridge ("The First Four Years"). The author also covered Laura's life at Rocky Ridge Farm and Rock Home (based on letters, newspapers, and other writings).She ended by describing the places that a person might enjoy visiting if interested in seeing the places where Laura Wilder lived. She also included a list of plants mentioned in the books for those interested in planting those flowers, trees, etc. The book was a fun, quick read. Overall, I'd recommend this interesting book to fans of the Little House series.I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Diana
    January 1, 1970
    Book received from NetGalley.I think I woke my husband up with my squealing like a fangirl when I saw that I was approved for this book. I have loved Laura Ingalls Wilder's books for years and am always thrilled when something new comes out about her, though much of it is about things I have already learned about her. I grew up reading the "Little House" books, especially with my family coming from one of Missouri's neighbors. Laura was definitely one of their better-known daughters though her l Book received from NetGalley.I think I woke my husband up with my squealing like a fangirl when I saw that I was approved for this book. I have loved Laura Ingalls Wilder's books for years and am always thrilled when something new comes out about her, though much of it is about things I have already learned about her. I grew up reading the "Little House" books, especially with my family coming from one of Missouri's neighbors. Laura was definitely one of their better-known daughters though her life took her through many states and territories in the US. Since this year is the 150th anniversary of her birth and with the success of "Pioneer Girl", I was hoping for some new non-fiction books to be released. I believe that this one is a great addition to the library. It focuses on the botany, biology, geography, and geology of the areas the Ingalls and Wilder families lived, focusing mainly on Laura. This would be a great book for the older children who want to know more about what the prairies that Laura lived on were like, and the adults that still wonder what a chokecherry is or why in the world Ma thought that watermelons gave you malaria. I loved the illustrations and photos in the book, especially the illustrations of the prairie plants that Laura described in her books. It's going to be a long wait until this comes out in September so I can add it to my shelves.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    As a lover of all things Laura Ingalls Wilder and a gardener, this is a perfect book to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Laura Ingalls birth. I thought that after reading the wonderful Pioneer Girl: the annotated autobiography two years ago that most of what we know about Laura Ingalls Wilder was documented. However Marta McDowell manages to not only bring a wonderful gardening slant to the information we have from the Little House novels as well as LIW's nonfiction and papers but she also giv As a lover of all things Laura Ingalls Wilder and a gardener, this is a perfect book to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Laura Ingalls birth. I thought that after reading the wonderful Pioneer Girl: the annotated autobiography two years ago that most of what we know about Laura Ingalls Wilder was documented. However Marta McDowell manages to not only bring a wonderful gardening slant to the information we have from the Little House novels as well as LIW's nonfiction and papers but she also gives us new tidbits: Ma & Pa lived near Ma's parents when they were first married and grew hops which were needed by many local breweries. (The one question I wish was answered however was what, if any, effect did the Civil War have on Ma & Pa?). Most of the book follows the path of the novels, detailing the type of land and therefore the type of farming that the Ingalls as well as the Wilders did on their various farms. Ms. McDowell also intersperses her own family stories when they seem to intersect the experiences of LIW -- apparently husking black walnuts is not an easy thing to do! The author knows her plants and does an excellent job of passing on that knowledge. The last part of the book gives you detailed notes on visiting Wilder gardens as well as lists of plants that are in the novels and/or LIW's papers. This is a book that should go with you if you decide to visit the sites of Laura Ingalls Wilder.
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  • Psusan
    January 1, 1970
    The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder (The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books) by Marta McDowell is the book for anyone who has ever fallen in love with the Little House books. I found it to be a comprehensive look of the land, crops and plants that Laura Ingalls Wilder would have known. Many people may well be aware of these maps, produce, flora and terrain of the regions where she lived, but for someone like me who knew and enjoyed only her books as a child, I found this book The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder (The Frontier Landscapes that Inspired the Little House Books) by Marta McDowell is the book for anyone who has ever fallen in love with the Little House books. I found it to be a comprehensive look of the land, crops and plants that Laura Ingalls Wilder would have known. Many people may well be aware of these maps, produce, flora and terrain of the regions where she lived, but for someone like me who knew and enjoyed only her books as a child, I found this book to be interesting and enlightening as I traveled back in time to journey with Laura. Some features of The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder I liked the most were the quotes from the books, of course that’s a given, but also, I enjoyed the author’s personal notes from her own heritage. The varied type of illustrations; drawings and actual photographs from the time period as well as the flora, maps, the Currier & Ives prints and the illustrations that were in the first edition books. I especially loved the Growing the Wilder Garden section near the end of the book. When finished with this book, I had the urge to - first, go find my childhood copies of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s books to reread and second, to go plant something that would win Laura’s approval. The publisher through Net Galley provided a copy.
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  • ☘Tara Sheehan☘
    January 1, 1970
    Any fan, anyone who grew up with Laura Ingalls Wilder shaping their lives through her books and/or the TV Show based on her life will want an opportunity to read and explore this book. It’s a heartfelt and beautiful rendering of that strong, pioneer woman; a true dedication to her memory and the impact she’s had on multiple generations.Marta McDowell included some great illustrations to accompany her carefully research text that will have you journeying down memory lane as if these stories were Any fan, anyone who grew up with Laura Ingalls Wilder shaping their lives through her books and/or the TV Show based on her life will want an opportunity to read and explore this book. It’s a heartfelt and beautiful rendering of that strong, pioneer woman; a true dedication to her memory and the impact she’s had on multiple generations.Marta McDowell included some great illustrations to accompany her carefully research text that will have you journeying down memory lane as if these stories were your own. It’s the kind of thing you keep out for guests to notice and peruse so they too can enjoy the emotional impact of a cherished treasure.I knew she had moved a bit but until I saw this book I had no idea she moved this many times and across so much of the country.I think it’s one of those books that will appeal to people who are into historical and or genealogical kind of studies as there is a great deal of info on plants, terrain, farming, architecture of the time, and so forth. If someone was going to pick this up thinking it’s just like the previous fictional books released by her and others they may be disappointed. I didn’t notice any new information so much as just a lot of info that had previously been spread across multiple works which focused on specific subjects of the time, people and obviously Laura’s family so this book is more of a one stop place to research.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    “It is the simple things of life that make living worthwhile, the sweet fundamental things such as love and duty, work and rest, and living close to nature.” — Laura Ingalls WilderYou want to make someone smile? Start talking about Laura Ingalls Wilder.“Once upon a time.” Like many children’s stories, Laura Ingalls Wilder opened Little House in the Big Woods with this quiet invitation to readers to turn their thoughts back in time. Hers was a long story, rooted in her father’s and her husband’s, “It is the simple things of life that make living worthwhile, the sweet fundamental things such as love and duty, work and rest, and living close to nature.” — Laura Ingalls WilderYou want to make someone smile? Start talking about Laura Ingalls Wilder.“Once upon a time.” Like many children’s stories, Laura Ingalls Wilder opened Little House in the Big Woods with this quiet invitation to readers to turn their thoughts back in time. Hers was a long story, rooted in her father’s and her husband’s, tales of family and farms and nature – a nature that was sometimes inviting and sometimes ferocious. It began in Wisconsin. (World of Laura Ingalls Wilder, pg 17)Marta McDowell, a New York Times bestseller in her own right, commemorates Laura’s 150th birthday with this enchanting book filled with flowers, photographs and delightful illustrations of the places, people, flora, fauna and homes that filled Laura and Almanzo’s lives.Don’t be fooled into thinking this is a childish work. The author has crawled beneath the covers of the Little House books and brought the physical world depicted in Laura’s books alive. No fairy tale here; just hard working pioneers accepting the challenge of working in harmony with nature.Stand alongside Laura, first as a child, and later as a mother herself, as she gathers berries and nuts from the forest and fields; meticulously documenting what she has found for future reference. Sweat with her as she boils the berries for preserves in a room already sweltering from the summer heat. Hand her the canning jars and the melted paraffin to seal in the fruit and keep out the spoilers. Stand back as she continues with her daily chores – on to fixing a hearty meal for her exhausted husband.Head out to the forest with Alamanzo and his axe as he clears land for a new home, fields for the crops and domestic animals. As the years progress, observe his willingness to experiment with crop rotations and research new agricultural equipment to expand and improve their livelihood.Experience the heartbreak of leaving loved ones and good friends behind after calamity has destroyed your hard work. Step up and take a seat in the wagon as they head out; stoically starting over…again and again. Somewhere else. Sit in the buggy and bounce and jostle along wandering through towering prairie grass toward an unknown future.With all the hard work necessary just to survive, it will surprise you to see how valuable education and literature was to both the Charles (Pa) Ingalls family and later with Laura and Almanzo. Where did they find the time in each day? Charles nurtured his children with stories about faraway places. Laura has provided generations of children with pioneer pride, responsibility, unity of purpose, community spirit and a love for nature and the world. Her books are as popular as ever today.Meet Laura’s daughter, Rose, named for the sweet-smelling prairie flower that infused the air during the Wilder’s courtship. Learn how Rose, a bestselling author, helped her mother hone her own writing talents.As each chapter was a diorama of a particular home site, I took my time reading the book. My favorite times were sitting on my screen porch overlooking my garden and I found that I shared Laura’s interest in the cycle of life progressing all around me. Laura and I watched birds hatch, flowers emerge from winter sleep, and note the arrival of summer’s sounds.This dynamic work doesn’t end at Rocky Ridge Farm on the Wilder’s front porch where Almanzo and Laura enjoyed their waning years. It continues with several chapters that include a tour guide to the Ingalls and Wilder homesites today and a handy table listing all the flowers Laura mentioned in her books along with citations to each referenced. Bonus. Sources of heirloom seeds is provided for the inspired gardener.I want to thank Netgalley and Timber Press for advance copy in exchange for my honest review.Highly recommended reading. Here is the perfect gift for a nature loving friend or relative.
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  • Darcysmom
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. I really, really enjoyed this book. Marta McDowell's exploration of the wild world Laura lived in was excellent. The book focuses a chapter on each of the places Laura called home. As we travel through Laura's life, we get to experience the wide variety of flora and fauna with her. Ms. McDowell quotes liberally from the works of Laura Ingalls Wilder, includes lush pictures, and solidly researched information I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. I really, really enjoyed this book. Marta McDowell's exploration of the wild world Laura lived in was excellent. The book focuses a chapter on each of the places Laura called home. As we travel through Laura's life, we get to experience the wide variety of flora and fauna with her. Ms. McDowell quotes liberally from the works of Laura Ingalls Wilder, includes lush pictures, and solidly researched information about the plants and wildlife then and now.The final two chapters are rooted firmly in the present. Visiting Wilder Gardens is chock full of helpful hints to make the most out of a road trip following the Laura Ingalls Wilder trail. Growing a Wilder Garden has a thorough lost of all the plants mentioned in Laura's writings and notations about cultivation at Rocky Ridge Farm. Additionally there are resources provided for heirloom seeds and gardening implements - basically everything you need to grow an authentic pioneer garden.The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder is a must read for every fan of the Little House books.
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    To wind up today, im going to hit you with a third, big, beautiful coffee-table book. It's 2017, and this year marks the 150th birthday of this most beloved of authors. The Little House On The Prairie series needs no introduction, nor explanation, being at the heart of American literature itself. In this volume, we explore the trails themselves, the landscape, the history of the world young Laura inhabited. With charming botanical drawings and vivid language. McDowell sets the stage for us in a To wind up today, im going to hit you with a third, big, beautiful coffee-table book. It's 2017, and this year marks the 150th birthday of this most beloved of authors. The Little House On The Prairie series needs no introduction, nor explanation, being at the heart of American literature itself. In this volume, we explore the trails themselves, the landscape, the history of the world young Laura inhabited. With charming botanical drawings and vivid language. McDowell sets the stage for us in a way Dame Wilder would have never considered necessary... it being unimaginable that her audience would be ignorant of basic farm tools and processes. Scene by scene and farm by farm, "The World of Laura" draws out the reminders that while fictionalized, Wilder sets her tales in a very real place, a place that has since been painted over by modernity, but still exists in the cracks and corners. Grab this for the Prairie lovers in your life, and all to the better if there's interest in gardening, farming, or botanicals.
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