Basic Witches
Capitalizing on the rising trend of hipster witchcraft, BASIC WITCHES is a lighthearted and empowering book of spells and lifestyle tips for feisty millennial women.In Basic Witches, readers will discover how to tap into their inner sorceress and channel the dark arts for everything from cluttered apartments to dating disasters. Want to enhance your attractiveness? Pick the right power color of eyeshadow and project otherworldly glamour. Need to exorcise a toxic friendship? Say the right symbolic curse and banish it from your life. Need to boost your self-confidence? Whip up a tasty herbal “potion” to strengthen your inner resolve. Plus historical and pop culture sidebars that situate the new witchcraft trend within a broader context. With humor, heart, and a hip modern sensibility, journalists Jaya Saxena and Jess Zimmerman dispense witchy wisdom for the curious, the cynical, and anyone who could use a magical boost to get through the day. This ain’t your grandma’s grimoire!

Basic Witches Details

TitleBasic Witches
Author
ReleaseSep 12th, 2017
PublisherQuirk Books
ISBN-139781594749773
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Self Help, Religion, Wicca

Basic Witches Review

  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    This book is clearly not for me; it's geared towards: A) women B) people interested in witchcraft. But it's about as charming as you can get in a book. The two authors have written out spells, life tips and just ideas for how to be a witch. I absolutely loved the section on makeup and beauty tips and thought it was both cute and interesting. Overall, this is a very fun, light and interesting read sprinkled with interesting anecdotes and facts about the history of witchcraft.
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  • Flavia
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so much fun! I’m not usually one to consult self-help books, or one who reads nonfiction in general! I know that some of you may also associate the word “nonfiction” with dry and boring information. But even as a lover of fiction (and fantasy fiction, at that), I am telling you that not all nonfiction has to be dry. In fact, quite a bit of nonfiction is actually quite fun while also being educational!The first thing that caught my attention about this book was the title (I know! Us This book was so much fun! I’m not usually one to consult self-help books, or one who reads nonfiction in general! I know that some of you may also associate the word “nonfiction” with dry and boring information. But even as a lover of fiction (and fantasy fiction, at that), I am telling you that not all nonfiction has to be dry. In fact, quite a bit of nonfiction is actually quite fun while also being educational!The first thing that caught my attention about this book was the title (I know! Usually it’s the cover, haha, but don’t worry…that was the second thing that caught my attention). Most of us will know that this title is a play on words based on a phrase which as become quite common I the past 5 years or so (this is an assumption, rather than an answer with any research behind it. Sorry!) Anyway, I found the title to be witty, and the cover to be fun and quite different from a lot of covers that I’ve seen over the years. The interior of Basic Witches is just as much fun as the exterior, and the same kind of illustrations can be found throughout. The authors and illustrator (whether the illustrator is one of the authors, I do not know) all have a very healthy sense of humour!They manage to cover a lot of bases, while being serious when it’s required, and quite funny when it’s called for! If my boyfriend or any of my family members were watching me while I read this book, they would have seen me alternate between some serious nodding, with a concentrated look on my face, and laughing uncontrollably. The formatting on the inside was also straightforward, keeping each type of information separate from the other types, in the way that an effective textbook would. I also really enjoyed the Harry Potter, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, and Charmed, (and possibly American Horror Story? I don’t quite remember) since those are some of my favourite things ever!I like that this book does not have to be read in a chronological order. Rather, with the use of the index at the start of the book, you can flip to whichever section you need at a given time! I actually did read this book out of order, flipping from parts at the end to parts at the beginning, etc. etc. To avoid any confusion, this book is not necessarily for witches (although Wiccans are more than welcome to read it, obviously). The magic which is discussed in this book is actually more of a realistic magic. And what I mean by that is that Saxena and Zimmerman discuss the magic of effective goal-setting, positive thinking, good vibes, as well as how to “exorcise” demons such as fake friends, and toxic relationships. I also liked how both mental, and physical, health remedies were included (with the mental health ones in the form of “spells,” including steps and everything)!Overall a really good self-help book, and fun at that! I will definitely be returning to this one, time and again. I will most certainly be keeping an eye on Saxena and Zimmerman, to see what they come up with next, and I have to say…I would not be opposed to a version of this book, or a book of the same nature (by these authors) formatted like and old school spellbook! Hint hint! Cough cough!
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  • Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)
    January 1, 1970
    First, let me say that this is definitely not the type of book I would normally read. It's actually probably the type that I wouldn't even think of picking up. But anything witches always intrigues me. I also remember being a kid and thinking I could put a spell on anyone. I tried. They never worked! Ha! This book gives a little history on witches and then is riddled with rituals and spells to cast the negative out of your life and work on the positive. Which is basically taking out anything tox First, let me say that this is definitely not the type of book I would normally read. It's actually probably the type that I wouldn't even think of picking up. But anything witches always intrigues me. I also remember being a kid and thinking I could put a spell on anyone. I tried. They never worked! Ha! This book gives a little history on witches and then is riddled with rituals and spells to cast the negative out of your life and work on the positive. Which is basically taking out anything toxic and building your self esteem.. basically your typical self help type of book, but done with humor and in a way that keeps you turning the page. There's sections on how to read tea leaves that made me laugh. For instance, seeing a flower means you'll receive praise but seeing Leonardo's Last Supper means your cup is too big. I also loved the Calisthenics part - they call planking "Light as a feather, stiff as a board." I found these little things to just be adorable. All the spells and rituals are things that can be done... and maybe they don't actually work but I think the basic core of just doing SOMETHING helps ease the mind at times.I'm never going to be that person who will find my inner light or believe in mercury retrograde or the universe making things happen... but will I open this book every once in a while and do a little ritual because it might make me feel better for the moment? Well, it certainly is healthier than other options so yes, absolutely.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This was a cool, aesthetically pleasing self help book disguised in quirky humour and a witchy nu-goth aesthetic. 3.5/5
  • Luna
    January 1, 1970
    review to come
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I don't normally read books classified as "self-help", but when I saw this cover and read the description, I had to take a peek! BASIC WITCHES is a hilarious approach to a self-help book. There is a little bit of the history behind witches, which is always interesting to me to read about. It's full of great illustrations and "spells" or rituals to remove negativity from your life. There were a lot of great references and funny sections on reading tea leaves.This is definitely one of those books I don't normally read books classified as "self-help", but when I saw this cover and read the description, I had to take a peek! BASIC WITCHES is a hilarious approach to a self-help book. There is a little bit of the history behind witches, which is always interesting to me to read about. It's full of great illustrations and "spells" or rituals to remove negativity from your life. There were a lot of great references and funny sections on reading tea leaves.This is definitely one of those books I can see people enjoying. Even if it's just for a laugh or two whenever you're feeling down. So if you're looking for a fun read with some witchy references, then you'll have to give this one a read - even if it's just for the illustrations (I mean, the cover alone will pull anyone in!) There isn't much more I can say without giving away most of the fun of this read. So enjoy the spells and rituals - who knows, maybe if you try hard enough they could work! ;)I give this one 4/5 stars!
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  • Tiffany Rose
    January 1, 1970
    A self-help book with actual spells? Yes, please!I feel like the start of the book was a bit stereotypical try new clothes, try new colors, but once the basics were done the book tackled some very important things like losing people, toxic friendships, and personal demons. It was also great to see the book mention non-binary people and pushed an actually fair view on sex positivity. If you are a witch, would like to be a witch, or think the aesthetic will personally help you, check this book out A self-help book with actual spells? Yes, please!I feel like the start of the book was a bit stereotypical try new clothes, try new colors, but once the basics were done the book tackled some very important things like losing people, toxic friendships, and personal demons. It was also great to see the book mention non-binary people and pushed an actually fair view on sex positivity. If you are a witch, would like to be a witch, or think the aesthetic will personally help you, check this book out!
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  • Maja Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    A cute little flip-book of advise about how to be a "witch" or, perhaps more aptly, a modern, feminist-leaning woman. There is a lot of light-hearted quotes and "spells" (affirmations) and plenty of beautiful illustrations. I mean, look at the cover. It's gorgeous.I recommend flipping through this book and reading what catches your eye instead of sitting down and reading front to back. There is a lot to see and plenty of fun to have!Thanks to Jaya Sexena and Quirk Books for an ARC.
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  • Alissa
    January 1, 1970
    Ok...so I was halfway through my undergrad when the first Harry Potter book was published in the U.S. That doesn't mean I wasn't let down by not having received my Hogwarts (or perhaps that would have been Ilvermorny for me). Because I am TOTALLY the witchy/magical type and have been since before I knew how define it.So this book was fun. Did I mention I'm totally into fun books lately? I'm also totally into books about witches. And magical types.Basic witches reminded me of The Bad Girl's Guide Ok...so I was halfway through my undergrad when the first Harry Potter book was published in the U.S. That doesn't mean I wasn't let down by not having received my Hogwarts (or perhaps that would have been Ilvermorny for me). Because I am TOTALLY the witchy/magical type and have been since before I knew how define it.So this book was fun. Did I mention I'm totally into fun books lately? I'm also totally into books about witches. And magical types.Basic witches reminded me of The Bad Girl's Guide to Getting What You Want....but without the awkward/weird obsession with finding alternative uses for panty liners. Because, come on, that's just gross and NO ONE does that unless they're more than a little mentally unbalanced. Although not a real spellbook, this this book does have tips on beauty, health, relationships, and on overall positive womanhood. Or, as we'd say in the 90s, "Grrrl Power" (Spicy!). I can't use all the tips presented, because some of them are written more for the early 20s single girl types and I'm past that stage in my life, but there's still some good advice in other areas. And mixed in are fun anecdotes about modern day and historical witches and witchery. I only really have ONE beef with this book...and it's kind of a big one.I gotta say it: I'm a bit bummed my favorite witches, the Sanderson Sisters, weren't included in the list of Famous Pop Culture Witches. I know, I know...these ladies fit the negative stereotype of "bad witches", but hear me out: Not only are they some of the best-known pop culture witches from those who grew up in my generation (WAY bigger than Sabrina the Teenage Witch - sorry Sabrina), but they actually have some valuable lessons to teach us. For one, Tenacity: Hanging committee got ya down? No worries, ladies. Just keep coming back until you get the better of 'em (or at least try). And when you DO return, curse the crap out of them. In song!For second, The Importance of Books/Literature:Speaking as a librarian and bibliophile, I say this to you: If you take my books without permission, or mess with them in any way, I will hunt you down like a boss...and your little talking cat too. And no Burning Rain of Death will stop me.aaaaand I just dated myself. Ah, well... (I could also make a good argument for the Wicked Witch of the West who, after all, was only trying to avenge her sister's murder. She wasn't the most slick member of the coven, but family loyalty. I totally get that. Don't eff with the family. And not only that, but b*tch took her shoes as well... Off with her head, I say! But spare the dog. He may be an annoying, barky thing, but it's not his fault his owner is an arsehole masquerading as a Mary Sue [which is the worst kind of Mary Sue].)Ok, I've said my piece.However, props to the authors for listing Hermione Granger first and foremost. That girl is one bad-ass witch, and an excellent role model for witchy types everywhere. Not only does she use her brain to save the day (Harry would be nothing without her), but she knows how to throw a punch too. Boo-Ya!Overall: Fun to browse, but not to buy. Rather, rent ot from your local library or borrow it from a friend.Note the shameless Library plug. Yeah, that was intentional.
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  • Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a bit older than the target audience for this book (actually, quite a bit older) (all right, a lot older), but the note in the description about exorcising a toxic friendship was made the decision to request it. I was curious. I've always had an interest in how people integrate spirituality of whatever flavor into their lives – and I ended up being deeply impressed by this book. It's not a deep and in-depth guide to how to practice wicca, not a hardcore spellbook or grimoire or whathaveyou, I'm a bit older than the target audience for this book (actually, quite a bit older) (all right, a lot older), but the note in the description about exorcising a toxic friendship was made the decision to request it. I was curious. I've always had an interest in how people integrate spirituality of whatever flavor into their lives – and I ended up being deeply impressed by this book. It's not a deep and in-depth guide to how to practice wicca, not a hardcore spellbook or grimoire or whathaveyou, as such; the prevailing opinion I've always encountered is that it's flat-out dangerous to mess around with something like that on your own, especially when very young and inexperienced. (I mean, it's the sort of thing which, even if you don't believe in any of it, still – a bit of common sense never hurts. Never go jogging wearing earphones that render you deaf to your surroundings (especially if you're a woman alone), be aware of your surroundings, never ever play with a Ouija board, and never mess around with spells when you don't know what you're doing. The demon you prevent from entering this dimension may be your own.What this actually is is a positive, warm, funny guide to how to handle situations that are bound to come up in everyone's life. For example, that note that got my attention about toxic friends? I've got two, people I work with who used to be friends who knifed me when I wasn't looking, and whom I can't avoid. Will the section on what to do about it make it all better? Nope. But it serves as proof that I'm not alone – I'm not the only one who is going through something like this. And it does serve as a pretty good guideline of how to manage the way I think about it.I'm not entirely thrilled with the light tone with which demons are discussed, but maybe I've been listening to too many funky podcasts lately. And nothing in here seems at all dangerous - quite the opposite.In a lot of ways this is more therapy or counsel than Magick. Well, maybe it comes to the same thing, in the end. The usual disclaimer: I received this book via Netgalley for review.
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  • Hannah Brown
    January 1, 1970
    I've recently become really interested in witchcraft, so this book has come at the perfect time for me! It's a really simple, and plain gorgeous, little guide to the modern witch. Throughout the book, Jaya and Jess have invented spells to help you for a whole range of things, and some of them I think would actually be ones I'd perform! They write about rituals, and stones and runes, and throughout keep up with a really good sense of humour that actually had me laughing out loud. Not only was the I've recently become really interested in witchcraft, so this book has come at the perfect time for me! It's a really simple, and plain gorgeous, little guide to the modern witch. Throughout the book, Jaya and Jess have invented spells to help you for a whole range of things, and some of them I think would actually be ones I'd perform! They write about rituals, and stones and runes, and throughout keep up with a really good sense of humour that actually had me laughing out loud. Not only was there some really good information in this book (the girls are very well informed, and write about a lot of history of witchcraft, which I found so interesting!) but it was also just a pleasure to read. I would love them to collaborate and write a fictional book together, I think it would be hilarious! I will say that if you are truly looking for a book on "modern witchcraft", this is not it. This is a book for people who feel like they want a bit more empowerment in their lives, and are happy to perform spells and rituals to do it. (Reading this book has made me feel a lot more feminist, and, incidentally, I loved how inclusive Jaya and Jess were!) For example, there is a "Personal Exorcism Spell" which could actually be legit alongside pages making up tea cup readings and demons.The fundamentals of witchcraft are included in this book: that intent is the most important thing, all you need to be a witch is you and a sense of yourself, and, as I've said, they're both very well researched. I think that this book will become really popular, because it is a really entertaining read. I will say that I think the look of it suggests that some booksellers will put it into the children's section, but this is not a children's book! Jaya and Jess happily talk openly about sex and sexuality, having sex, and how orgasms can be used to charge spells and crystals, but therefore it's not a children's book! I would suggest this for old MG and any YA! For context, I am 19 and I really enjoyed this book! Overall, I highly rate this book! I don't think it'd get a budding witch onto a firm journey into witchcraft, but they might find it enjoyable to have this book on their shelf. It's a fun one if you want to have a slumber party and perform some spells with your self-made coven, and Jess and Jaya don't shy away from the shit that life throws at you. Their anecdotes weren't drawn out, their writing was light, and I give this book a strong 4/5. Thanks so much to Quirk Books for providing me with a copy of this book! All opinions are my own. This book will be released on September 12th in the UK and August 29th in the US. 
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  • Cherise
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a great resource for people just starting out in witchcraft. Unlike most of these 101 guides, this book focuses on a modern take of witchcraft and how it is connected to feminism. Though it focuses more on female readers and in turn spells, it's great for all genders and even has a section for male-presenting witches. It explains history of witches that aren't as well known, gives you great examples of fictional witches to look up to, spells that anyone can sit down and do, and even This book is a great resource for people just starting out in witchcraft. Unlike most of these 101 guides, this book focuses on a modern take of witchcraft and how it is connected to feminism. Though it focuses more on female readers and in turn spells, it's great for all genders and even has a section for male-presenting witches. It explains history of witches that aren't as well known, gives you great examples of fictional witches to look up to, spells that anyone can sit down and do, and even throws jokes in there when you're caught up on the reading just to throw you and make you laugh.(Full Review On Blog)
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Sassy and sweet, irreverent and also serious, this book is a fun slice of insight into the modern-day uptick in interest in witchy aesthetic, behaviour, and actions. While some of the "spells" can seem silly, there are rich seams of wisdom sewn in. Of particular interest to me were the historical interludes - I would have even loved more of them. A fun read, a beautiful cover - and the illustrations really make the whole thing a great package.
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  • Ashlie Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Pros and cons abound with this little handbook. Before anything gets started, the authors make it clear that this book is not about witches in a historical or religious sense. They've basically used the word "witch" as a stand in for "modern woman," and while I am totally okay with that, I wonder if people who practice Wicca or claim the term "witch" in a solemn way would feel as open to it. Some of the spells seem very silly, especially after the authors have made it clear that this is not nece Pros and cons abound with this little handbook. Before anything gets started, the authors make it clear that this book is not about witches in a historical or religious sense. They've basically used the word "witch" as a stand in for "modern woman," and while I am totally okay with that, I wonder if people who practice Wicca or claim the term "witch" in a solemn way would feel as open to it. Some of the spells seem very silly, especially after the authors have made it clear that this is not necessarily a book that deals with actual mysticism. After reading several, I kind of accepted that everything in this book is something you can take or leave depending on how it strikes you, and I feel like the authors meant it that way.For me, the historical anecdotes were BY FAR the most interesting part of the book. Page-long stories about famous women who were known as witches and the bullshit they had to deal with with are peppered through the book, and I was always disappointed when they were over.In all, I enjoyed this book MUCH MORE after I stopped trying to read it through and let myself flip around, stopping where it caught my eye. Little charts explaining the properties of gemstones and essential oils made me smile, and the illustrations are freaking perfect (I could stare at the cover all day). My largest reservation remains use of language and labels surrounding witchcraft, but I am not an expert, and I'm not sure if the authors had sensitivity readers (actual witches) checking for appropriation.
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  • Vesta Kerns
    January 1, 1970
    Basic Witches is my exact brand of witchcraft. I'm not into religion or mysticism whatsoever, but I love witches, magic, and generally tricking yourself into being a better person. It seems like that's what this book is all about. In the first chapter one of the authors describes how she does not believe in magic(k) but uses spells and amulets to help her through life and challenges. I'm here for that. I'm usually not a marker or highlighter when I read books but I found myself underlining lines Basic Witches is my exact brand of witchcraft. I'm not into religion or mysticism whatsoever, but I love witches, magic, and generally tricking yourself into being a better person. It seems like that's what this book is all about. In the first chapter one of the authors describes how she does not believe in magic(k) but uses spells and amulets to help her through life and challenges. I'm here for that. I'm usually not a marker or highlighter when I read books but I found myself underlining lines that I found to be particularly moving. Because I have an Advanced Reading Copy, I can't add quotes, but there are so many lines and paragraphs that stood out to me as powerful and meaningful. This book is laid out like a cook book. You can open this book up and find the spell for dealing with rejection and perform it. Do you feel a little better now? Yeah, sure. MAGIC! It's not the type of book you read front to back. I enjoyed the pages at the beginning of the book and at the beginning of every chapter. I mostly flipped through and read whatever caught my eye. My favorite little portions were the historical bits. Overall, if you are a boss ass bitch (read: witch) who needs a little feminist boost now and again, check this book out. I will be buying this for a few friends. It's a great little book.
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  • Madge
    January 1, 1970
    Full review on my blog.If you're already a practicing witch, I might not recommend this. It's definitely not like the stuff I had to work with when I started out (like Silver, Scott, Edain, and all the others that many of us agree, now, should mostly be avoided or read critically because of the misinformation, appropriation, etc.), and that's not a bad thing. It just might not be very helpful for anyone actually practicing witchcraft for any length of time.But if you're curious, or really new, o Full review on my blog.If you're already a practicing witch, I might not recommend this. It's definitely not like the stuff I had to work with when I started out (like Silver, Scott, Edain, and all the others that many of us agree, now, should mostly be avoided or read critically because of the misinformation, appropriation, etc.), and that's not a bad thing. It just might not be very helpful for anyone actually practicing witchcraft for any length of time.But if you're curious, or really new, or even if you've been at it a long time and want something different from the other books on witchcraft, this might be for you.It's been mentioned that this book uses the word "witch" to, basically, mean an independent woman/feminist/etc., and I agree. That was slightly annoying for me, because the description is a little misleading, but I still enjoyed this book after I adjusted how I was reading it (less for the witchy stuff, more for the advice).The spells are very simple with very few items used, and everything that's "required" is easy to come by (paper, candles, your phone even). There are things in here to help you with anxiety for a doctor's appointment, to figure out what you want out of a romantic partner, to give yourself permission to practice self-care, to heal your heart, and a lot more.It's definitely more like a fun self-help book than a book on witchcraft, but that's pretty cool because witchcraft is constantly changing, and lots of us use it for the things covered in this book. Even the structure of the spells is similar to what many of us seem to be doing these days (obviously I can't speak for all witches, I'm just basing this on what I do and what I've seen others share online about how they do things). Regardless of how you feel about the witchy side of things in this book, I would still recommend it for the advice in it and the little historical bits about witchcraft and women. I really think just about anyone could find something helpful in this book.I received a free copy to review from Net Galley
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  • Miss Fay Myers
    January 1, 1970
    I was recommended this book at YALC by the lovely lady at the publisher's table, for use in the school library I work in. However I feel like it is aimed more at women in their twenties and thirties, and am not sure whether to shelf it in the library or not... perhaps the sixth form section (students age 16-18). This is due to various reasons, some being: references to pop culture that teens would not be familiar with (before their time), and some of the subject matter perhaps being better read I was recommended this book at YALC by the lovely lady at the publisher's table, for use in the school library I work in. However I feel like it is aimed more at women in their twenties and thirties, and am not sure whether to shelf it in the library or not... perhaps the sixth form section (students age 16-18). This is due to various reasons, some being: references to pop culture that teens would not be familiar with (before their time), and some of the subject matter perhaps being better read as an adult. I felt like it was aimed more at me, a female in her late twenties rather than at a school student. But hey we can see if it appeals to perhaps the sixth formers, as I mentioned.Viewing this book as a female adult, I can see the appeal. It is beautifully illustrated in the hard back copy I purchased at YALC, but this doesn't show through so well in the ebook Galley, that I received kindly from the publisher, so I'd advise going for the hardback if you can.There is a mix of real life advice, and 'magic' themed activities to help one through certain events in their life. But, it didn't really appeal to me hugely, despite being a fan of the concept of witchcraft, the film 'The Craft', and the Wizarding World of J.K.Rowling etc. But it might appeal to those who like the quick fire magazine article style self help book, with bit of a Buzzfeed humour thrown in.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes the ritual is a way to spark a belief or emotion that isn't yet present inside you. Other times it's simply a way to organize what you already feel. But no matter what your goal or method, some part of you should be comforted, delighted, or moved by the process. You should feel like you're making magic.At times cute, fun, and comforting, and at other times downright silly, Basic Witches is less about warts and potions and more about caring for yourself and others in a way that's both f Sometimes the ritual is a way to spark a belief or emotion that isn't yet present inside you. Other times it's simply a way to organize what you already feel. But no matter what your goal or method, some part of you should be comforted, delighted, or moved by the process. You should feel like you're making magic.At times cute, fun, and comforting, and at other times downright silly, Basic Witches is less about warts and potions and more about caring for yourself and others in a way that's both fun and empowering. The magic in this book makes me think of Terry Pratchett's Granny Weatherwax, a witch whose power comes mainly in the form of what she calls "headology." Our brains are always on, and always listening. It's a matter of telling ourselves the things we actually need to hear and envisioning positive outcomes rather than continuing down destructive paths and chanting negative mantras to ourselves. And if you can do that while burning pictures and smudging ash on yourself, why wouldn't you?
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I'm very excited to pick up a hard copy of this! Even if I'm not really one for witchcraft, this book will have a welcome spot on my shelf. As well as providing easy to read history about witches, it also brings witchcraft into the modern day, but still preserves the old values of womanhood, supporting each other and spirituality. I found that the affirmations were a delight to read, and I enjoyed browsing the spells that the authors have written - even if I wouldn't perform them myself. Many re I'm very excited to pick up a hard copy of this! Even if I'm not really one for witchcraft, this book will have a welcome spot on my shelf. As well as providing easy to read history about witches, it also brings witchcraft into the modern day, but still preserves the old values of womanhood, supporting each other and spirituality. I found that the affirmations were a delight to read, and I enjoyed browsing the spells that the authors have written - even if I wouldn't perform them myself. Many reviewers have said that they would come and go to this book, and pick little segments to read as they became relevant to them and any experiences they are having, and although I did read this book in one sitting, I think treating this fun little book as a handbook for life like these other people are doing is probably the best way! This handy companion will be staying with me for a while.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    If you are looking for a book to introduce you to the world of witchcraft and witches this is a great start. It’s all about using the stereotypes surrounding witches through out history and modern day technology and ideals to become more confident. Basic Witches talks about fashion, make up, dealing with nervousness, familiars, exercise, Netflix, emoji, finding love and friendship, the power of saying no, divination, and getting rid of toxic relationships. It is definitely about finding what mak If you are looking for a book to introduce you to the world of witchcraft and witches this is a great start. It’s all about using the stereotypes surrounding witches through out history and modern day technology and ideals to become more confident. Basic Witches talks about fashion, make up, dealing with nervousness, familiars, exercise, Netflix, emoji, finding love and friendship, the power of saying no, divination, and getting rid of toxic relationships. It is definitely about finding what makes you happy and confidant, while keeping witchcraft in mind. It’s a fun and easy read, full of interesting ideas and witch history facts. And it has really cute illustrations. It’s made me want to stock up on candles and sage and get a cat familiar. I really enjoyed this book and I read it in less then 24 hours. I’m going to try a few of the spells soon too. Most of the spells or rituals are more like positive thinking. So if you are looking for a book to help you become a witch or wicca, this isn’t for you. It’s more of a casual witch book, for those who don’t want to or aren’t ready to dive deeper into magic.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of Basic Witches: How to Summon Success, Banish Drama, and Raise Hell with Your Coven from Quirk Books for review on Rogues Portal . You can read an excerpt of that review below, or click this link to read it in full.***Co-authors Jaya Saxena (Elle.com) and Jess Zimmerman (Establishment) approach witchcraft the way many modern witches do: as a reclamation of a history and term that brings to mind unruly women with serious attitude. Basic Witches acknowledges that it isn’t just I received an ARC of Basic Witches: How to Summon Success, Banish Drama, and Raise Hell with Your Coven from Quirk Books for review on Rogues Portal . You can read an excerpt of that review below, or click this link to read it in full.***Co-authors Jaya Saxena (Elle.com) and Jess Zimmerman (Establishment) approach witchcraft the way many modern witches do: as a reclamation of a history and term that brings to mind unruly women with serious attitude. Basic Witches acknowledges that it isn’t just women who identify as witches, and offers ideas for adapting spells for people who are elsewhere on the gender spectrum. But it focuses mostly on women and women-centric language, which may be off-putting to men or non-binary people....At its heart, Basic Witches seeks to assure readers that anyone is capable of doing magic. Intention-setting and belief play a huge factor in every spell. There is no point where Saxena or Zimmerman argue that someone isn’t or can’t be a witch. They explore magic practically as well as possibly. Plus, they give you all kinds of tools to hex the patriarchy by elevating yourself, and that’s awesome.
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  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    Just in time for the fall! If you've tried reading inspirational nonfiction before-- dry psychological tomes or perky how-to manuals--you should give this wonderfully strange guide a try. This book is all about embracing your weird quirks, embracing emotional upheaval, and focusing on positivity. This book offers positive affirmations, exercise regimes, self-care rituals, advice for banishing toxic people from your life, and fun historical tidbits on the history of witchcraft.Rather than anythin Just in time for the fall! If you've tried reading inspirational nonfiction before-- dry psychological tomes or perky how-to manuals--you should give this wonderfully strange guide a try. This book is all about embracing your weird quirks, embracing emotional upheaval, and focusing on positivity. This book offers positive affirmations, exercise regimes, self-care rituals, advice for banishing toxic people from your life, and fun historical tidbits on the history of witchcraft.Rather than anything occult-related, this is more of a themed self-help book. It is, in turns, humorous and inspiring. I highly recommend this!
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  • Helois
    January 1, 1970
    This is not a book about the spiritual aspect of being a witch, what we have here is a little self-help book, complete with spells, though they read more like affirmations. Sometimes though having a little ritual with it, makes all the difference. I found it best to flip through it, reading what appeals to you most first, rather then reading it cover to cover. The best parts for me, where the historical anecdotes about famous women accused of witchcraft, or the history of some of the witchy myth This is not a book about the spiritual aspect of being a witch, what we have here is a little self-help book, complete with spells, though they read more like affirmations. Sometimes though having a little ritual with it, makes all the difference. I found it best to flip through it, reading what appeals to you most first, rather then reading it cover to cover. The best parts for me, where the historical anecdotes about famous women accused of witchcraft, or the history of some of the witchy myths. Full of positive messages about feminism and self love and self care, it is a rather quick and delightful read.I won a copy through goodreads.
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  • Char Dauterman
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book as part of a Goodreads First Reads giveaway.A cute, empowering self help type book geared towards millennial women. I probably should pay more attention when entering giveaways because if I had, I would have realized that I'm not really the target audience for this. Definitely a good one, but geared more towards women much younger than myself. Still there were some interesting chapters that focused on things that everyone can relate to and some good advice for getting rid of nega I won this book as part of a Goodreads First Reads giveaway.A cute, empowering self help type book geared towards millennial women. I probably should pay more attention when entering giveaways because if I had, I would have realized that I'm not really the target audience for this. Definitely a good one, but geared more towards women much younger than myself. Still there were some interesting chapters that focused on things that everyone can relate to and some good advice for getting rid of negativity in our everyday lives.
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  • Linda Epach
    January 1, 1970
    "Basic Witches: How to Summon Success, Banish Drama, and Raise Hell with Your Coven" is a cute book with lighthearted advice and lots of positive speak to empower women to be the best that they can be. There is nothing mystical about the book, it is clearly a self help book to help you create your best self image. Its a simple way of making you take stock in your life and move forward and concentrate on yourself. For young women going thru a challenging time or who need a little positive energy "Basic Witches: How to Summon Success, Banish Drama, and Raise Hell with Your Coven" is a cute book with lighthearted advice and lots of positive speak to empower women to be the best that they can be. There is nothing mystical about the book, it is clearly a self help book to help you create your best self image. Its a simple way of making you take stock in your life and move forward and concentrate on yourself. For young women going thru a challenging time or who need a little positive energy and self confidence.
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  • Lizy
    January 1, 1970
    I was really excited about this ARC until pages 49-52, where the authors deadass suggest that if you're not a man (or just not feminine at all) but want to be witchy you should dress in your power colors (verbatim. Power colors), find a nicely scented cologne to wear, and do an anti-femininity spell where you literally keep a tube of lipstick under your pillow for 3 days.I'm sorry.I can't. That's bullshit if I ever heard it and I couldn't keep reading after that. It's like they didn't even try t I was really excited about this ARC until pages 49-52, where the authors deadass suggest that if you're not a man (or just not feminine at all) but want to be witchy you should dress in your power colors (verbatim. Power colors), find a nicely scented cologne to wear, and do an anti-femininity spell where you literally keep a tube of lipstick under your pillow for 3 days.I'm sorry.I can't. That's bullshit if I ever heard it and I couldn't keep reading after that. It's like they didn't even try to think of gender neutral or masculine things to do. I'm... I can't, yall.
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  • Danielle Brusco
    January 1, 1970
    It's a mix of positive affirmations, feminism, and very loose ties to witchcraft and rituals. The authors make it clear in the first couple chapters that they're not spiritually wiccan, nor are they pagans practicing witchcraft. Maybe it is because I'm studying paganism and witchcraft as spiritual path that I just felt overall disappointed that this was not one of those books. In the end, it's a fun (sometimes juvenile) book meant to empower anyone to be their best self.
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  • Hannah Emory
    January 1, 1970
    Basic Witches is all about female empowerment through the lens of witchcraft and magical practice. Saxena and Zimmerman write with witty, feisty candor about self-actualization and connecting with the world around us through everyday actions; their writing packs a wallop with a fantastic array of personal stories, rituals, historical information, recipes, and solid advice about life. This book is encouraging and will have readers excited to get some practical magic done in their own lives!
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked the concept of this book. It's not about *real* witchcraft, but about how to become more confident, more powerful, the real you. My only problem with it, is that it was a little too "smash the patriarchy" for me. (Not all men are douchebags.) Other than that, it was a pretty interesting and fun read. Also, it was very aesthetically pleasing!
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  • Tasya Dita
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest reviewThis is another case of "it's not me, it's you." While I was excited to read it at first (witches as modern woman? why not!) it quickly becomes boring and the topic is just not what I'm interested in. The only interesting thing for me is the history of witches and pop culture references written in this book.
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