Missions
Every local church should be engaged with global missions, even if most individuals in the church aren't called to go overseas. But what does this engagement actually look like? How can local churches train, send, and support missionaries well? Unpacking principles from the Bible and applying them in the context of real life in a local church, this new book in the 9Marks: Building Healthy Churches series is filled with practical steps and advice for supporting missionaries, forming international partnerships, sending short-term teams, and engaging with the nations here at home. This book casts a vision for the local church as the engine of world missions--for the joy of all people and the glory of God.

Missions Details

TitleMissions
Author
ReleaseAug 31st, 2017
PublisherCrossway Books
ISBN-139781433555701
Rating
GenreReligion, Church, Theology, Faith, Christianity, Evangelism

Missions Review

  • Michael Abraham
    January 1, 1970
    This book should be in the hands of every pastor. I hope and pray God uses it to awaken the church for His glory among all nations.
  • Lee Snow
    January 1, 1970
    The church where I serve took on a missionary in 2016 and just happened to use some of the principles and advice in this book but it was purely accidental. After having been in the work for over a year now I can honestly say that the points Andy makes are CRUCIAL to a vibrant and healthy relationship with an overseas missionary. Everyone should have to read this book in seminary or during their ministry training so churches will be ready when missionaries call on them for financial, emotional an The church where I serve took on a missionary in 2016 and just happened to use some of the principles and advice in this book but it was purely accidental. After having been in the work for over a year now I can honestly say that the points Andy makes are CRUCIAL to a vibrant and healthy relationship with an overseas missionary. Everyone should have to read this book in seminary or during their ministry training so churches will be ready when missionaries call on them for financial, emotional and spiritual support.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    First sentence: I once rented a vacation apartment on the sixth floor of a building with no elevator. The owner had been very clear in every email, stating, “This apartment is on the sixth floor and there is no elevator.” Still, the significance of her disclosure didn’t really hit me until I was panting on the fifth-floor landing, hauling suitcase number two of three up the winding stairs. Yet, as I stood there trying to remember the symptoms of a heart attack, I couldn’t feel angry toward the o First sentence: I once rented a vacation apartment on the sixth floor of a building with no elevator. The owner had been very clear in every email, stating, “This apartment is on the sixth floor and there is no elevator.” Still, the significance of her disclosure didn’t really hit me until I was panting on the fifth-floor landing, hauling suitcase number two of three up the winding stairs. Yet, as I stood there trying to remember the symptoms of a heart attack, I couldn’t feel angry toward the owner. She had been up-front about it, all along. I should have paid more attention.Premise/plot: The foundational premises of this book on missions are: the mission of missions is primarily spiritual; the mission belongs to God, for His Glory, on His terms; global missions is primarily through the local church; and the Bible has a lot to say about how to approach missions. My thoughts: This book has many strengths. I'll start with naming two: it is concise; it is biblical. There are just seven chapters--nine if you count the introduction and conclusion as chapters. Each chapter is doctrinal and has practical applications. Introduction: Missions at a CrossroadA Biblical Foundation for MissionsFirst Things FirstSending and Supporting WellGetting the House in OrderHealthy Missions PartnershipsReforming Short-Term MissionsEngaging the Nations by Other MeansConclusion: Stepping Toward the NationsI thought the book was insightful. Here is my favorite quote:The heart for God-glorifying missions starts with joy in the gospel. Our churches must first cherish the God who sent his own Son to save sinners like us. The right fuel matters. Do not try to get your church excited about missions until they love and value (really, deeply value) what Christ has done for them in the gospel. Churches won’t extend themselves to commend the gospel until they deeply cherish the gospel. The glory of the gospel—not the neediness of mankind—is the selfsustaining fuel for global missions.
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  • Matt Tyler
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent. As elders consider their church's missions strategy (who to give to, how much to give to, where to go, etc.), I would highly encourage them to read this book. I'm not aware of another book like it. I've seen and read many books that address the mission of the church and what missionaries should do. This is the only book I know of that practically helps church's think through their missions strategy and their relationship with missionaries.
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  • Benjamin
    January 1, 1970
    Super livre. La mission n'est pas l'affaire de quelques passionnés, mais une préoccupation de l'Eglise entière d’œuvrer en faveur du progrès de l'Evangile dans le monde.
  • Hope Wiseman
    January 1, 1970
    Short but excellent book!
  • Johnny
    January 1, 1970
    How can a church accomplish the mission given to us by Jesus Christ and do it in a way that would pleasing to God and be more than just a punching off of a checklist? That is the question that is answered in Missions: How the Local Church Goes Global.Missions: How the Local Church Goes Global is part of 9Marks Building Healthy Churches Series and is written by Andy Johnson, Associate Pastor of Capital Hill Baptist Church in Washington D.C. In this book Johnson gives us some insightful and practi How can a church accomplish the mission given to us by Jesus Christ and do it in a way that would pleasing to God and be more than just a punching off of a checklist? That is the question that is answered in Missions: How the Local Church Goes Global.Missions: How the Local Church Goes Global is part of 9Marks Building Healthy Churches Series and is written by Andy Johnson, Associate Pastor of Capital Hill Baptist Church in Washington D.C. In this book Johnson gives us some insightful and practical guidelines for having a Biblical mission’s ministry in our local churches.The forward by David Platt is just about worth the purchase of the book. In this book you will find the author beginning first with the Word of God as it speaks to missions. The author has a deep sense of the glory of God and a love for the gospel and it comes out on the pages of this book. This book is very much gospel centered.The author addresses the question of how a church can do missions well. What do we need to look for in a missionary that we partner well? How can we be a help and not a harm to those we partner with? How can we involve more of our congregation in personally being involved in the missions ministry? How can we avoid the pitfalls that some churches find themselves in partnering with missionaries? What does a healthy partnership look like? Those are the questions that are addressed in the heart of this book and practical advice is given.Probably one of the most helpful parts of the book that I intend to refer back to is chapter 6 on reforming short-term missions. Not only does he speak to what a short term mission trip should be so that it is helpful, but he also gives ten points that a participant should consider when going on such a trip. This should be given to every participant to read before he or she agrees to go on such a trip. It has made me relook at my own personal short term mission trips.This book is a short read that is filled with practical truth. It challenged me to think how I have done missions. It challenged me to allow the gospel to infect everything that we do as a church. It needs to be on the shelf of every pastor as a resource to help keep his ministry in missions on track. I’m thankful to have it on mine.I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was glad to do that.
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  • Brendan
    January 1, 1970
    *disclaimer; this review was in exchange for an advance copy of the book.The latest addition to the 9 Marks collection is, outstanding. I am not the biggest fan of all of the books in this series, but Johnson manages to both cover the wide range of issues related to missions in the church-long term workers, qualifications for missionaries, short term trips, partnerships-while giving a thoughtful, biblical analysis of each topic as well. Some of the theological distinctives of the 9 Marks tribe a *disclaimer; this review was in exchange for an advance copy of the book.The latest addition to the 9 Marks collection is, outstanding. I am not the biggest fan of all of the books in this series, but Johnson manages to both cover the wide range of issues related to missions in the church-long term workers, qualifications for missionaries, short term trips, partnerships-while giving a thoughtful, biblical analysis of each topic as well. Some of the theological distinctives of the 9 Marks tribe are present in this book, but if you know what you are getting into ahead of time, you can navigate through the uncomfortable parts.Things to love in this easy-to-read book are its obvious concern for the glory of God as the primary motive for missions, its gospel-centrality, and the author's desire for churches to have a well thought out missions strategy that is thoroughly biblical. If you are a pastor or faithful church member, you will find this book rich with the gospel, and a concern for theologically precision and doctrinal clarity. As someone laboring full-time in the missions mobilization world, I bristled a bit at Johnson’s suggestion that we should send “fewer” missionaries but with “greater” support and also his marginalization of missions sermons and slogans that emphasize the urgency of the missionary task. A spirit of urgency, grounded with the motivation of God’s glory, is biblical-consider 1 Peter 3 that says to live in such a way as to “speed forth” the coming of Jesus. He is correct in asserting, however, that we should not replace biblical fidelity with a desire to see results quickly. My personal experience comes from a church that has sent a substantial amount of missionaries, has an excellent preparation process, and so most the reservations and critiques of modern missions Johnson warned of fell flat for me. I recognize however that the majority of people who read this book will unfortunately have seen or participated in many of the phenomenon that Johnson describes, from ill-prepared missionaries, to lukewarm support from church partners, to unfortunately inept short term mission trips. All in all, this book is a solid introduction to the mission of the church and has some great parameters for how to engage as a church in missions.
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  • Chrys Jones
    January 1, 1970
    We know several people who have been on short-term mission trips. Perhaps you’ve even been on one yourself and proclaimed to others that you gained more from that trip than the people you went to serve. Maybe you’re a full-time missionary living in another nation (at least for the majority of the year). Most likely, you’re an average church member who knows the Great Commission, but you don’t feel called to long-term overseas ministry. Regardless of where you stand, “Missions” by Andy Johnson is We know several people who have been on short-term mission trips. Perhaps you’ve even been on one yourself and proclaimed to others that you gained more from that trip than the people you went to serve. Maybe you’re a full-time missionary living in another nation (at least for the majority of the year). Most likely, you’re an average church member who knows the Great Commission, but you don’t feel called to long-term overseas ministry. Regardless of where you stand, “Missions” by Andy Johnson is an excellent introduction to missions. Johnson provides readers with ways to be mission-minded, live missional lifestyles, and serve those who are on mission at home and abroad.Starting with a biblical foundation of missions, readers are called to make the gospel the center of all missionary work. Churches and leaders must send and support our missionaries well, and this means providing for them abroad and hosting them at home. Johnson reminds readers that mission work involves both church planting and supporting church planters. This means that many of our missionaries will go to support current local churches and their efforts rather than planting new churches. It’s vital to remember that partnering with healthy local churches in unreached or barely-reached areas teaches our churches how to wisely serve and support global missions.Whether we support missionaries financially, with hospitality, or through short-term trips, we are commanded to be on mission. Church leaders and pastors must lead the cause in teaching and modeling a missionary heart and mindset for the local church. Whether it’s overseas or in our own nation, Christians are missionaries. Johnson reminds us throughout the book that missions is not an option, it is a vital aspect of healthy churches. I highly recommend Missions for church members as well as church leaders. It will help spark some good conversation and move our churches toward more mission-centered living.I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    The 9marks “Building Healthy Churches” series is such a great set of books for churches. Each book is small and concise—something you can give as assigned reading to even the busiest of leadership teams and find that they enjoyed the reading assignment. Better yet, it is good reading for anyone including congregation members and not just church leaders. “Missions: How the Local Church Goes Global” continues this tradition. The entire book is based in the Biblical foundations of missions. The key The 9marks “Building Healthy Churches” series is such a great set of books for churches. Each book is small and concise—something you can give as assigned reading to even the busiest of leadership teams and find that they enjoyed the reading assignment. Better yet, it is good reading for anyone including congregation members and not just church leaders. “Missions: How the Local Church Goes Global” continues this tradition. The entire book is based in the Biblical foundations of missions. The key goal of global missions is bringing God glory. Many other mission books begin with the need for the lost to be found, the opportunities for serving, the call for workers to the harvest. None of these are bad things, but missions is about bringing glory to God. Glory to God as the lost is found. Glory to God as lives are changed—both those being served, and those who are doing the serving. The book helps to define missions and missionaries as many things seem to be called missions. The book challenges churches and church members how to support missionaries as we develop a Biblical mission strategy for our churches and live out the Great Commission. As in each of the “Building Healthy Churches” series books, pastors and church leaders will find the information most relevant and useful, but any believer will find the information helpful and challenging as we are all called to lead from our own place in leadership. I highly recommend this book to anyone to get a good understanding of Biblically-based missions. I received a copy of this book from Lifeway Publishers in exchange for my honest review here.
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  • Jeanie
    January 1, 1970
    We love and honor him not merely by working toward the final he's given-worshipers from every language, tribe, people, and nation, but also by using the means he has decreed. And he has told us that his global mission will advance through holy lives, faithful prayer, gospel proclamation, and healthy reproducing churches. The series of the Nine Marks of healthy church is one of missions. What is the leadership like? How is missions used in the church? What role does short-term missions play? What We love and honor him not merely by working toward the final he's given-worshipers from every language, tribe, people, and nation, but also by using the means he has decreed. And he has told us that his global mission will advance through holy lives, faithful prayer, gospel proclamation, and healthy reproducing churches. The series of the Nine Marks of healthy church is one of missions. What is the leadership like? How is missions used in the church? What role does short-term missions play? What type support should you give your people who proclaim the gospel. The following 7 chapters give a clear indication of what mission is build on.A Biblical Foundation for MissionsFirst Things FirstSending and Supporting WellGetting the House In orderHealthy Missions PartnershipsReforming Short-Term MissionsEngaging the Nations by Other meansMy favorite chapter was reforming short term missions. The damage it can do if not properly addressed to both parties. The one receiving and the one giving. Missions should be well thought out with the gospel in mind as results may vary at any given time. This read is not only for leadership but also for members to know what healthy missions look like. Knowing what healthy missions look, we can be good stewards of any support we give to missions. Missions are a great way to proclaim who God is to unbelievers and believers alike. I highly recommend.A Special Thank You to Crossway Books and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.
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  • Kyle Robertson
    January 1, 1970
    This book by Andy Johnson is part of the 9Marks: Building Healthy Churches series. All of the books in the series have one goal in mind: helping you to grown in loving your church as Jesus loves your church. The text of this book (and the others in the series) comes directly from scripture. These are the things we are commanded to do through God's Word. After an excellent intro by David Platt, Andy Johnson dives right in with a scenario that many church members might be familiar with: a church m This book by Andy Johnson is part of the 9Marks: Building Healthy Churches series. All of the books in the series have one goal in mind: helping you to grown in loving your church as Jesus loves your church. The text of this book (and the others in the series) comes directly from scripture. These are the things we are commanded to do through God's Word. After an excellent intro by David Platt, Andy Johnson dives right in with a scenario that many church members might be familiar with: a church missions committee is struggling to define their mission emphasis and the best way to put it onto action. In a healthy, mission-minded church, members see missions as a core ministry of the church, not an occasional short-term project. Likewise, the church budget should reflect funding for missions as well. This short, powerful book will help church members and leaders to develop a Biblical mission plan and live out the Great Commission. It provides practical steps to evaluate and develop a mission strategy for your church. I would recommend this book to all Christians, especially pastors and church leaders. It is important to see beyond the walls of our church and into to the community we live in. Not to mention the bigger picture of being involved in a national and international mission opportunity. I received this as a free ARC from Crossway on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Bob O'bannon
    January 1, 1970
    This is an excellent primer for how a local church should engage in the task of world missions. So many helpful points:* you can’t get excited about missions if you are not excited about the gospel. (32).* missions involves not just declaring the gospel, but also gathering Christians into local churches in the place where they live. (25,71).* “God’s mission is not frantic or in danger of failing,” so there is no need to put people on the field who are not qualified. (41-42). Choose carefully who This is an excellent primer for how a local church should engage in the task of world missions. So many helpful points:* you can’t get excited about missions if you are not excited about the gospel. (32).* missions involves not just declaring the gospel, but also gathering Christians into local churches in the place where they live. (25,71).* “God’s mission is not frantic or in danger of failing,” so there is no need to put people on the field who are not qualified. (41-42). Choose carefully who you support.* missionary work is not simply for Christians who love to share their faith, but for godly self starters who know the Bible, are theologically sound and can engage international people. (47-48).* visiting missionaries on the field can do wonders to encourage them in their work. (54).* avoid the temptation to focus on quick results and “grand promises of quick, easy shortcuts.” (72). * when planning short-term trips, focus on serving the missionaries on the field and doing what they ask, not in seeking some personal spiritual experience. (ch.6).* consider the value of supporting or starting expatriate churches in other lands. (ch. 7).* support missionaries generously, so that they lack nothing. (49).Every missions team in a local church should read this book and seek to implement its recommendations where appropriate.
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  • Mark Donald
    January 1, 1970
    This book is fantastic! Short and sweet, packing an enormous punch.What a helpful resource to local churches as they consider the mission that God has given to the church to "display the glory of God by declaring the gospel to all peoples, by gathering churches in every place, and by filling them with disciples who obey God and will praise him forever for his grace." (p. 28) Not only does Johnson have the reader consider the mission itself but also how local churches can practically and faithful This book is fantastic! Short and sweet, packing an enormous punch.What a helpful resource to local churches as they consider the mission that God has given to the church to "display the glory of God by declaring the gospel to all peoples, by gathering churches in every place, and by filling them with disciples who obey God and will praise him forever for his grace." (p. 28) Not only does Johnson have the reader consider the mission itself but also how local churches can practically and faithfully reshape their missions strategy to help accomplish it."Christ will have the nations for his inheritance. Frantic speculation and guilt are weak motivators compared to the truth of God's unstoppable plan to rescue every child for whom Christ died. Christ will not lose any of those whom the Father has given him, and God has chosen to use us - in countless local churches - as the agents of his gospel triumph." (p.128)
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  • Nick Esch
    January 1, 1970
    Great book! Not only helpful for reforming our understanding of missions, but also for calling us back to a biblical gospel-centered ministry wherever we are. A couple of the great take aways for me were: 1) Gospel work = urgently patient faithfulness... True gospel work doesn’t typically happen fast. It is urgent, but it takes patience and faithfulness. 2) And the work is hard... And though it may not seem like it at times, the work is hard everywhere... But, the Bible and the gospel it contain Great book! Not only helpful for reforming our understanding of missions, but also for calling us back to a biblical gospel-centered ministry wherever we are. A couple of the great take aways for me were: 1) Gospel work = urgently patient faithfulness... True gospel work doesn’t typically happen fast. It is urgent, but it takes patience and faithfulness. 2) And the work is hard... And though it may not seem like it at times, the work is hard everywhere... But, the Bible and the gospel it contains are sufficient everywhere... And if the Bible is really sufficient everywhere, the basics of preaching from the Bible and biblical church structures are right everywhere.I'm thankful for Andy and 9Marks and their vision for biblical healthy churches all around the world... And this book is another great edition to the 9Marks collection, and most certainly helps in the mission they are working at.
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  • Justin Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    Our church has been working to reform our Missions ministry for a little over a year now. The work has been tough and slow. At a moment of exhaustion and frustration, Andy Johnson's book on Missions was a much needed "wind in our sails." Though this books focuses on giving practical advice for organizing a local church's mission ministry, I found that it also relit my personal zeal as a Pastor to send, serve, and support gospel-workers who are called to the nations. I joyfully recommend this boo Our church has been working to reform our Missions ministry for a little over a year now. The work has been tough and slow. At a moment of exhaustion and frustration, Andy Johnson's book on Missions was a much needed "wind in our sails." Though this books focuses on giving practical advice for organizing a local church's mission ministry, I found that it also relit my personal zeal as a Pastor to send, serve, and support gospel-workers who are called to the nations. I joyfully recommend this book to all pastors and elder councils who desire to see the nations reached with the gospel. Reaching the nations begins with a corporate zeal for the gospel in the local church. May we be faithful in the obeying the commission of Christ both here and abroad!
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  • Daniel Ligon
    January 1, 1970
    Without using hyperbole, this is an incredible book! It's hard to find a book about missions that combines a passion for reaching the lost with a clarity of purpose that is overwhelmingly practical in its application. Andy Johnson manages to achieve these things in this short work. Missions: How the Local Church Goes Global is quite literally about the how of missions and not primarily the why. Johnson starts with an explanation of the centrality of missions to the work of the church. He writes, Without using hyperbole, this is an incredible book! It's hard to find a book about missions that combines a passion for reaching the lost with a clarity of purpose that is overwhelmingly practical in its application. Andy Johnson manages to achieve these things in this short work. Missions: How the Local Church Goes Global is quite literally about the how of missions and not primarily the why. Johnson starts with an explanation of the centrality of missions to the work of the church. He writes, "Missions is a core part of the ministry of the church, not one among many optional ministries on the periphery, for certain people who are 'interested in that sort of thing'." From there, the book describes how to be a good sending church, how to be a good supporting church, how to take effective short-term missions trips, how to keep missions and missionaries in the minds of the people of your church, how to encourage members of your church to serve in missions, and a host of other helpful topics. The clarity of thought in this book is refreshing and helpful. I would recommend this to any church member, but especially to pastors or church staff members.I received a digital copy of this book for free from the publisher and was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I express in this review are entirely my own.
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Outstanding thoughtful work on missions. The author does a great job of showing the biblical motivation for missions and the biblical pattern for missions. While the book has a theological foundation, it is highly practical and applicable in putting those principles into action. Any church missions committee, body of elders, pastors or lay members would greatly benefit by reading and using this book. Highly recommended! Tolle Lege (pick up and read!)
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  • Donald Stevenson
    January 1, 1970
    A very helpful book for any people interested in Missions. A must read for elders, missions committees. Sound, biblical and helps the church think more clearly about its mission involvement. In its shortness it does not address issues of support ministries and where they may fit into the overall mix of mission, but clearly the priority lies with the local church and the gospel!!
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  • Cody Cunningham
    January 1, 1970
    This is an excellent book written for churches who want to pursue missions in a way that solidly grounded in the Word. There are no fancy, groundbreaking methods offered here. Rather, Johnson gives pastors and church leaders a realistic vision for how they can faithfully start or strengthen the missions ministry of their church. I highly recommend this one!
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  • Richo Vargas
    January 1, 1970
    Es un libro muy prácticoEs un libro muy práctico para trabajar misiones en nuestra iglesia. No solamente se trata de involucrarse en misiones sino de hacerlo bien. Me gusta mucho la honestidad con la que trata la realidad misionera de hoy en las iglesias y las soluciones que propone.
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  • Jacob
    January 1, 1970
    MissionsThis book helps not only individuals but churches obtain an appropriate understanding of why the local church should be involved in missions. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and would highly recommend it to a church staff or church members.
  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Concise, clear, and helpful. A guide to getting a church on a healthy path to caring for world evangelism and supporting missions which are effective. Reading this in conjunction with When Helping Hurts would be beneficial to all church members.
  • Gareth Russell
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent, Biblical, practical, primer on how your church can and should be involved in the work of world mission. It's definitely a book I'll find myself returning to again, and again, and giving many copies away.
  • Carlyn Cole
    January 1, 1970
    Quick read that I find especially useful in helping think through the issue of missions in the local church. It provides the base from which biblical thinking and local context can move the discussion forward toward a Good glorifying approach.
  • Radius International
    January 1, 1970
    This should be mandatory reading for all church leaders and missionary candidates! This small book is an excellent resource for the Church. If you support a missionary, know a missionary, or want to be one you should read this!
  • CJ Bowen
    January 1, 1970
    Good solid resource on thinking wisely and well about how a local church should engage in world missions. Focuses on principles more than methods, and lays out a good framework for sustainable, meaningful, faithful missions. Well done.
  • Brennan McCafferty
    January 1, 1970
    Simple & straightforward, yet profoundly helpful little book on missions. Johnson's commitment to and emphasis on the local church is to be greatly applauded.
  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Simple quick read, but very practical and grounded in solid doctrine.
  • Daniel Henderson
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent.
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