Lights, Camera, Middle School!
It’s a new kind of book for Babymouse! Fans of Dork Diaries, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and James Patterson’s Middle School books, this is going to be epic. . . .   For Babymouse, middle school is like a monster movie. You can never be sure who’s a friend and who’s an enemy, and the halls are filled with mean-girl zombies. Instead of brains, the zombies hunger for stuff—the perfect wedge sandals or the right shade of sparkly lip gloss—and they expect everyone to be just like them.   But Babymouse doesn’t want to fit in—she wants to stand out! So she joins the film club to write and direct a sweeping cinematic epic. Will making the film of her dreams turn into a nightmare?   Thanks to Babymouse, middle school gets schooled in this hilarious new series from bestselling authors Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm.            

Lights, Camera, Middle School! Details

TitleLights, Camera, Middle School!
Author
FormatKindle Edition
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 4th, 2017
PublisherRandom House Books for Young Readers
Number of pages208 pages
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Sequential Art, Graphic Novels

Lights, Camera, Middle School! Review

  • Mehsi
    July 7, 2017
    Welp, this started off pretty decent, but I quickly grew tired of Babymouse. She was annoying, bossy, and I just wanted to throw into a lake. :| Even before the film started and her head was filled to the brim with that movie. Plus I hated how easily everything was just magically resolved. It just felt too convenient. Oh yes, we have to get on with the movie, let's just say x and y and be done with it.Felicia and Henry were also way too urgh. My gosh, people you are in middle school not in a rea Welp, this started off pretty decent, but I quickly grew tired of Babymouse. She was annoying, bossy, and I just wanted to throw into a lake. :| Even before the film started and her head was filled to the brim with that movie. Plus I hated how easily everything was just magically resolved. It just felt too convenient. Oh yes, we have to get on with the movie, let's just say x and y and be done with it.Felicia and Henry were also way too urgh. My gosh, people you are in middle school not in a real film production, so get your head out of your ..... . I just found them a bit too much over the top. I feel sorry for the producers/directors if they continue acting when they are adults.Also I am a bit confused about the animals/the world. So we have Ducks, Cats, Giraffes and more just walking around being human, but then there are normal elephants and geese that are animals? Plus pets? What? How does that work?What I did like? The combo of comics with normal text and illustrations. That is also what kept me reading. The movie (not the whole ego stuff, but the script/idea) was a fun one. It was indeed quite an epic story, and I was impressed that Babymouse was able to create the script, I was already worried since she seemed to have start-up problems.Plus it was fun to see them having to find suitable locations as they couldn't just go to India or Paris. And to see how they handled certain scenes.But all in all, I won't be continuing this series. It had good moments, but it also had too many not good moments. :(Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/
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  • Mary Ann
    June 17, 2017
    Must have for all elementary school libraries. Terrific blend of comics and prose--great for kids moving into longer novels. Babymouse struggles with friendships in such a relatable way. Yearns to be part of larger friend group, but then ends up pushing her friends away because she's too bossy. Sound like anyone I know (moi???...)
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  • Karen Parisot
    July 14, 2017
    From the authors of the Babymouse series of books for young readers comes the first in a new series of books for middle grade readers. Babymouse is now entering middle school and she’s having a little difficulty adjusting. The book starts off comparing middle school to a monster movie with brain eating teachers, packs of zombies chasing the latest fad, and homework eating lockers. It shows that Babymouse is a very imaginative young girl and just how frightening middle school can be. It’s Activit From the authors of the Babymouse series of books for young readers comes the first in a new series of books for middle grade readers. Babymouse is now entering middle school and she’s having a little difficulty adjusting. The book starts off comparing middle school to a monster movie with brain eating teachers, packs of zombies chasing the latest fad, and homework eating lockers. It shows that Babymouse is a very imaginative young girl and just how frightening middle school can be. It’s Activities Week and everyone has to decide which after school club or sport they want to sign up for. Babymouse chooses Film Club. She soon finds out that things don’t always go to plan and she learns a few things about team work and friendship.With lots of cute illustrations throughout, this book is sort of a combination graphic novel and chapter book. It has a diverse cast of characters and teaches some good life lessons. The reader will also learn the basics of and some of the terminology about film making. Many middle graders are sure to enjoy the humor and maybe can identify a little with Babymouse as she and they learn to navigate the strange new world of middle school.
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  • Sabby Fox
    July 5, 2017
    This is the first book I've read of the Babymouse series, and I have to say this book should be a staple of all middle school libraries around the world. It was a fast read, with a good moral behind it.Babymouse signs up for an extracurricular activity in film-making. After writing the script and casting the crew and actors, Babymouse and Gang go through all sorts of things it takes to make a movie. Soon, Babymouse lets the movie go to her head and ends up pushing away her friends and taking adv This is the first book I've read of the Babymouse series, and I have to say this book should be a staple of all middle school libraries around the world. It was a fast read, with a good moral behind it.Babymouse signs up for an extracurricular activity in film-making. After writing the script and casting the crew and actors, Babymouse and Gang go through all sorts of things it takes to make a movie. Soon, Babymouse lets the movie go to her head and ends up pushing away her friends and taking advantage of them. She realizes with the help of her annoying brother that she should apologize. After she does, they quickly wrap up the film and realizes that middle school doesn't have to be so bad after all.Matthew Holm incorporates some pretty quirky illustrations throughout the pages of this book and it makes it a fun, easy, and quick for middle kids in middle school. I received this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions herein are of my own and are not swayed by any outside factors.
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  • Abby Johnson
    July 6, 2017
    I *love* Babymouse and I think I would say that I enjoyed this slightly less than reading a fully graphic novel Babymouse. It's entertaining, but part of me wonders why it exists? I don't think the audience is any different from the graphic novels. It maybe goes into a little more detail than is possible in the graphic novel format, but it's not so complex that it makes a great deal of difference. Judging it on what it IS instead of what it's NOT, I would say it's an entertaining romp that intro I *love* Babymouse and I think I would say that I enjoyed this slightly less than reading a fully graphic novel Babymouse. It's entertaining, but part of me wonders why it exists? I don't think the audience is any different from the graphic novels. It maybe goes into a little more detail than is possible in the graphic novel format, but it's not so complex that it makes a great deal of difference. Judging it on what it IS instead of what it's NOT, I would say it's an entertaining romp that introduces film production in a kid-friendly way. I did not find Babymouse's voice particularly compelling (which is a shame - I kept thinking about what it would read like if it was narrated by Narrator). I think kids already familiar with the Babymouse universe will appreciate this the most. There are enough illustrations and graphic panels to please fans of the original comic. It's fine.
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  • Martha
    June 30, 2017
    Babymouse is leaving her elementary days and graphic novel format, evolving into a heavily cartoon filled humorous novel full of middle grade angst. Finding her place in the bigger middle school world full of mean girls proves uncomfortable. Where does Babymouse fit in? After fighting with her locker combination, locating a seat in the cafeteria without appearing desperate, and skimming the possibilities of sports and extracurricular clubs, Babymouse decides she no longer wants to fit in, she wa Babymouse is leaving her elementary days and graphic novel format, evolving into a heavily cartoon filled humorous novel full of middle grade angst. Finding her place in the bigger middle school world full of mean girls proves uncomfortable. Where does Babymouse fit in? After fighting with her locker combination, locating a seat in the cafeteria without appearing desperate, and skimming the possibilities of sports and extracurricular clubs, Babymouse decides she no longer wants to fit in, she wants to stand out. Chess, soccer, debate club, cheerleading, recycling, what should she pick? Finally the sign for Film Club hooks her. With her trusted group of friends Duckie, Georgie the giraffe, and a bat, bear, etc, plus her best friend Wilson the weasel. She is selected for the high responsibility role of director for the play she has written, by her film teacher Ms. Octavia. Felicity Furrypaws of course gets the starring role. How could anything go wrong? In this tale of fair weather friends, which Babymouse finds harrowing, she retains her backbone and takes the reader through all of the steps a real film maker is responsible for. There is even a glossary in the back defining all of the film terms. Even though the animals are as diverse as bats, bears, giraffes, and mice, to name a few, this story rings true for all students navigating the volatility of middle school friendships. A welcome graduation for readers and Babymouse into delightful middle grade fiction.
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  • Stacey
    April 27, 2017
    Awesomeness from the Holms, yet again? Typical. The idea of this new series is so exciting. The Babymouse fans are (have been) growing up, so these are a great next step for our beloved curly-whiskered, cupcake-loving friend. Babymouse is wondering how she'll fit in now that she's in middle school. When everyone starts signing up for clubs, BM goes with Film Club. Her and the crew decide on an EPIC plan and hilarity ensues. As usual, Babymouse gets a little ahead of herself and she has to work h Awesomeness from the Holms, yet again? Typical. The idea of this new series is so exciting. The Babymouse fans are (have been) growing up, so these are a great next step for our beloved curly-whiskered, cupcake-loving friend. Babymouse is wondering how she'll fit in now that she's in middle school. When everyone starts signing up for clubs, BM goes with Film Club. Her and the crew decide on an EPIC plan and hilarity ensues. As usual, Babymouse gets a little ahead of herself and she has to work her way back out, but she totally does. Typical.
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  • Jaymie
    June 30, 2017
    Cute addition to the Babymouse world. Small sections in comic format like the original series and the rest is text. Story feels just like the ones told in full graphic novel format.
  • Alyson (Kid Lit Frenzy)
    July 8, 2017
    Babymouse is growing up and going to Middle School. Babymouse's format is also changing to resemble a book more like Diary of a Wimpy Kid or Dork Diaries. Fans of Babymouse will enjoy this one.
  • Sarah
    June 25, 2017
    This lacked a bit of the magic of the Babymouse graphic novels. I think kids will definitely still eat it up, but I didn't love it as much.Thanks to the publisher for a digital advance reader's copy, provided via Edelweiss.
  • Michele Knott
    January 15, 2017
    I put this on my middle grade shelf and transitional chapter book shelf because I think this book is a perfect crossover of the two formats.I'm thrilled with this new series because it's going to reach so many readers. Brilliant idea, Jenni and Matthew Holmes. Or should I say, "typical".
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  • Amy
    July 22, 2017
    Summary: Babymouse has made the jump from graphic novels to chapter books! Styled after books like I FUNNY, DORK DIARIES, and DIARY OF A WIMPY KID, BABYMOUSE: TALES FROM THE LOCKER features heavily illustrated spreads and enough pre-teen angsty awkwardness to appeal to both younger and older readers. In this volume, Babymouse dreams of fame and joins the school’s film club to get her there. She finds herself as the director of a movie …. And responsible for the shooting, the cast, and the script Summary: Babymouse has made the jump from graphic novels to chapter books! Styled after books like I FUNNY, DORK DIARIES, and DIARY OF A WIMPY KID, BABYMOUSE: TALES FROM THE LOCKER features heavily illustrated spreads and enough pre-teen angsty awkwardness to appeal to both younger and older readers. In this volume, Babymouse dreams of fame and joins the school’s film club to get her there. She finds herself as the director of a movie …. And responsible for the shooting, the cast, and the script.Appeal: The plotting and pacing here are tight, and siblings Jennifer and Matthew Holm get the story done in under 200 pages. Babymouse doesn’t talk down to her readers, and her character flaws are relatable.Possible issues with comprehension: This book utilizes the story-within-a-story concept, as readers are following the story of Babymouse’s mission to make this movie happen along with the constant challenges of filming, directing, writing, and editing a movie script called Au Revoir, Locker. The movie’s plot is nonsense, which is funny for readers who are ready to understand that humor but could confuse and frustrate readers who read literally. Also, the illustrations and sequential art sections don’t often line up to the plot … sometimes they are drawings of other characters, but sometimes they depict one of Babymouse’s daydreams or what’s going on in the movie. Readers might have a hard time separating what’s what.Recommended for: Readers in grades 4-7, especially those who are already familiar with Babymouse and are interested in her adventures. On the Fountas and Pinnell scale I’d estimate that this book is approachable for readers in the P-T band. A student who reads around a level P will be able to identify major plot points and explain the challenges Babymouse faces to making her movie. A student who reads around a level T will be able to identify how the illustrations fit in with the story and might be able to explain what parts of the story are the script, what parts are Babymouse’s edits, and what parts are the main narration.Review from ARC. ARC received from publisher at International Literacy Association.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    June 17, 2017
    ARC provided by the PublisherBabymouse is headed to middle school, which is the scariest place on earth, akin to a monster movie, where the popular zombies wear sparkly lip gloss, lunch is horrible, lockers are beyond understanding, and the library is the refuge of choice. She is worried that her lack of good whiskers will impair her social progress, even though she doesn't really want to fit in. She'd rather stand out! What better way to do that than to get involved in film club? Ms. Octavia is ARC provided by the PublisherBabymouse is headed to middle school, which is the scariest place on earth, akin to a monster movie, where the popular zombies wear sparkly lip gloss, lunch is horrible, lockers are beyond understanding, and the library is the refuge of choice. She is worried that her lack of good whiskers will impair her social progress, even though she doesn't really want to fit in. She'd rather stand out! What better way to do that than to get involved in film club? Ms. Octavia is glad to have Babymouse, who writes a script for an epic film adventure called Au Revoir, My Locker. The roles are cast, scenes are blocked, and filming begins. There are any number of set backs-- filming is deleted, scenes go wrong, and bathrooms are flooded. Through it all, however, Babymouse perserveres with a tiny bit of help from her friends, and her film premiers to... unexpected laughter which leads Babymouse to the insightful remark that "MIddle school wasn't a monster movie. It was a comedy. A bad comedy."Strengths: Middle school students are certainly more than ready for Babymouse to get older and follow them to middle school. I was particularly pleased with the change in format. The book is slightly bigger, but maintains the 18 point font, and there are enough pages with pictures on them to lure in reluctant readers. The story is true to Babymouse's established eccentricities, but adds new, age appropriate concerns. This will be hugely popular.Weaknesses: There are so many books that tell students how miserable middle school will be, and I find them slightly tiring. I also am not entirely convinced that middle school libraries are quite the haven during lunch that they are portrayed to be in literature. Mine is much too busy during lunch for it to be a good place for students to hide!What I really think: A must purchase for all middle school libraries. Just not my personal favorite. Does Babymouse have an actual name?
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  • Barbara
    July 1, 2017
    As fans of the Babymouse series grow up, they might be enchanted by this new title that follows everyone's favorite mouse heroine into middle school. As is the case for many middle graders, Babymouse struggles with finding her place there. Where once she worried about fitting in, now she worries about that--and about being someone special. Suddenly, everything is different, and being popular seems to be about having the right stuff. After she joins the film club, things start to come together fo As fans of the Babymouse series grow up, they might be enchanted by this new title that follows everyone's favorite mouse heroine into middle school. As is the case for many middle graders, Babymouse struggles with finding her place there. Where once she worried about fitting in, now she worries about that--and about being someone special. Suddenly, everything is different, and being popular seems to be about having the right stuff. After she joins the film club, things start to come together for Babymouse. When the advisor, Ms. Octavia, taps Babymouse as the director, she takes her job seriously and toils over the script. But getting all those lines and directions down is only part of the work. Now Babymouse and her crew must make the film. Although it starts out as an epic, due to time constraints, budgetary concerns, and temperamental actors, things take a lot longer than the crew expects and cuts must be made. Babymouse herself gets out of control, and takes charge of everything, offending her friends in the process. When the film is finally shown, the reaction of the audience leaves Babymouse at a loss. I look forward to the next books in this series. Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm have done it again, this time capturing middle school in all its glory and confusion, even including scenes concerning the protagonist's struggles with her locker, a common issue for many middle schoolers. Although reading the book might not fix all the problems someone will encounter during those particular years, it just may help readers laugh at some of their experiences and gain a new perspective on life while learning an important lesson or two about how to treat friends. The references to Squish are an inside nod to the siblings' other series.
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  • Teresa Bateman
    July 25, 2017
    I love Babymouse. The graphic novels are fabulous and hilarious. We can't keep them on our library shelves. Thus, I was delighted to see her advancing to middle school and a new audience. However, I didn't find this effort to be as compelling. There are plenty of illustrations, with occasional ventures into her imagination, but this is a chapter book that provides students with some nice factual information about film-making as Babymouse joins the Film Club and has to learn the skills she'll nee I love Babymouse. The graphic novels are fabulous and hilarious. We can't keep them on our library shelves. Thus, I was delighted to see her advancing to middle school and a new audience. However, I didn't find this effort to be as compelling. There are plenty of illustrations, with occasional ventures into her imagination, but this is a chapter book that provides students with some nice factual information about film-making as Babymouse joins the Film Club and has to learn the skills she'll need, including interpersonal skills, to get the job done. The readability is still at the elementary level, not middle school. The plot was very basic and character development was minimal. I'm sure there will be an audience for this, but I'm reminded of the "Sparks" series by Jeff Smith. Fans of his graphic novels did not universally embrace the chapter books. I'll buy this for my library and test the waters, but I'm a fan of the author and illustrator and was a tad disappointed.
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  • Amanda Sass-Henke
    July 23, 2017
    I have to be honest -- I wasn’t familiar the Babymouse series until social media became abuzz with excitement last summer over Jennifer Holm’s and Matthew Holm’s graduation of the character from an elementary setting to middle school. When I finally received my copy of Babymouse Tales from the Locker #1, I found a spunky, ambitious pre-adolescent rodent with delusions of grandeur, which makes for a great middle-grade read. Babymouse finds her passion for film and sets forth to direct an epic fil I have to be honest -- I wasn’t familiar the Babymouse series until social media became abuzz with excitement last summer over Jennifer Holm’s and Matthew Holm’s graduation of the character from an elementary setting to middle school. When I finally received my copy of Babymouse Tales from the Locker #1, I found a spunky, ambitious pre-adolescent rodent with delusions of grandeur, which makes for a great middle-grade read. Babymouse finds her passion for film and sets forth to direct an epic film, but finds her plans thwarted by demanding cast and crew members, a tiny budget, and some unrealistic expectations. Babymouse Tales from the Locker will be a great addition to a library’s middle grade collection, especially as an enticing read for some of those hard to reach readers. Recommended for ages 8-12.
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  • Brenda Ayala
    June 22, 2017
    I'm worried I don't remember middle school properly. This portrays it as mostly still like elementary school for me; they characters seem particularly young, like children who play at recess versus preteens attempting to figure out the beginnings of hormonal changes. I remember it a little differently. Girls were shaving their legs and wearing thongs by the time school started in the fall. Someone asked me if I knew what a blowjob was. Clubs weren't exactly the cool things to do. Girls and boys I'm worried I don't remember middle school properly. This portrays it as mostly still like elementary school for me; they characters seem particularly young, like children who play at recess versus preteens attempting to figure out the beginnings of hormonal changes. I remember it a little differently. Girls were shaving their legs and wearing thongs by the time school started in the fall. Someone asked me if I knew what a blowjob was. Clubs weren't exactly the cool things to do. Girls and boys were figuring out that maybe they didn't hate each other so much after all.I always come back to the same thing--when I was 13, I was reading Stephen King. This seems a bit too childish for middle school kids, but maybe I just did middle school wrong.
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  • Jill
    July 30, 2017
    Good Premise Need WorkThe characters and setting will appeal to younger readers. The main plot is about Babymouse making a movie. However, it read like a bunch of bits and pieces put together with little thought to scene transitions. For example, it jumped from her working on a computer to trying to open a locker to sitting down in front of a monitor. The sentence structure needed editing in several areas.I received this book through a Publisher's promotional giveaway. Although encouraged as a c Good Premise Need WorkThe characters and setting will appeal to younger readers. The main plot is about Babymouse making a movie. However, it read like a bunch of bits and pieces put together with little thought to scene transitions. For example, it jumped from her working on a computer to trying to open a locker to sitting down in front of a monitor. The sentence structure needed editing in several areas.I received this book through a Publisher's promotional giveaway. Although encouraged as a courtesy to provide feedback, I was under no obligation to write a review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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  • Sarah
    July 6, 2017
    Gotta say I was super excited to have an opportunity to read an early copy of this because I love pretty much everything Jennifer Holm touches, but it just didn't do much for me. Then again, I'm an adult... not the target audience. This is the next step up to middle school for Babymouse, so it's more of a chapter book with some comics sprinkled in. But I found the plot to be a pretty big stretch in terms of being possibly realistic for a middle schooler, and it really lost something for me with Gotta say I was super excited to have an opportunity to read an early copy of this because I love pretty much everything Jennifer Holm touches, but it just didn't do much for me. Then again, I'm an adult... not the target audience. This is the next step up to middle school for Babymouse, so it's more of a chapter book with some comics sprinkled in. But I found the plot to be a pretty big stretch in terms of being possibly realistic for a middle schooler, and it really lost something for me with more text and less comic book. Hopefully the series catches its own groove quickly. I still love Babymouse no matter what!!!
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  • Julie Kirchner
    July 7, 2017
    My students will love this new series from Jenni and Matt Holm! So many students love Babymouse, I know version 2.0 will be a huge hit! Babymouse has moved onto middle school and is struggling with all the ups and downs that go with it. She joins the film club and when she is made director with a limited budget, she needs to keep herself in check and remember making a movie requires a team, not a bossy director. I love that this book is written in a middle school setting, but the events are not My students will love this new series from Jenni and Matt Holm! So many students love Babymouse, I know version 2.0 will be a huge hit! Babymouse has moved onto middle school and is struggling with all the ups and downs that go with it. She joins the film club and when she is made director with a limited budget, she needs to keep herself in check and remember making a movie requires a team, not a bossy director. I love that this book is written in a middle school setting, but the events are not overtly middle school content that I need to steer my younger students back to the original series. It's a wonderful bridge for kids that have loved the original Babymouse.
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  • Erica
    June 21, 2017
    Babymouse is back! This time she's in middle school in a middle grade chapter book. Middle school is hard until Babymouse joins the film club. The club sets out to make a movie with Babymouse as the director. Things go as we would expect with Babymouse. The fun of the graphic novels is still there with parts of the book being told in graphic form. Some parts can only be told through the comics. This is a great transition for Babymouse and may introduce a whole new group of kids to Babymouse. ❤ Babymouse is back! This time she's in middle school in a middle grade chapter book. Middle school is hard until Babymouse joins the film club. The club sets out to make a movie with Babymouse as the director. Things go as we would expect with Babymouse. The fun of the graphic novels is still there with parts of the book being told in graphic form. Some parts can only be told through the comics. This is a great transition for Babymouse and may introduce a whole new group of kids to Babymouse. ❤️
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  • Cheryl Gladfelter
    July 20, 2017
    I think this book is great for kids who love Babymouse and are looking for a chapter book version. I don't think it's necessarily aimed at readers who've outgrown Babymouse. I feel the larger font would get a thumbs down from older readers. I love Babymouse and will keep reading the GN versions, and I can see kids enjoying this, but it's just not for me. As an adult, LOVED the parts about middle school popular girls being zombies and wanting your outfit to express everything about you (I'm sensi I think this book is great for kids who love Babymouse and are looking for a chapter book version. I don't think it's necessarily aimed at readers who've outgrown Babymouse. I feel the larger font would get a thumbs down from older readers. I love Babymouse and will keep reading the GN versions, and I can see kids enjoying this, but it's just not for me. As an adult, LOVED the parts about middle school popular girls being zombies and wanting your outfit to express everything about you (I'm sensitive! I love koalas!)
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  • Read Ribbet
    July 17, 2017
    The popular graphic novel character Babymouse appears in a new format. This time she appears in a chapter book with lots of graphic support (think Diary of a Wimpy Kid) which makes it a great addition to acceptable and accessible titles. the story is actually written as a go how-to-make a movie guide as Babymouse uses film making to try to cope with the new challenges of middle school. The new format might be a great way to move avid graphic novel fans to move to a chapter book with more narrati The popular graphic novel character Babymouse appears in a new format. This time she appears in a chapter book with lots of graphic support (think Diary of a Wimpy Kid) which makes it a great addition to acceptable and accessible titles. the story is actually written as a go how-to-make a movie guide as Babymouse uses film making to try to cope with the new challenges of middle school. The new format might be a great way to move avid graphic novel fans to move to a chapter book with more narrative text.
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  • Marybeth
    July 5, 2017
    Everyone's favorite mouse heads to middle school where she struggles to find her place (Didn't we all ?!) In hopes of standing out, she joins the film club where she directs an EPIC movie. She tries to control the entire process and ends up alienating her crew. Is she the monster in this monster movie?Fun, relatable tale for middle grade readers. Readers will laugh at shared experiences while learning a valuable lesson on how to treat friends. Great glossary defining film terms included.
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  • Halli
    July 3, 2017
    Thank you to Penguin Random House for the ARC! Babymouse's transition from graphic novels to illustrated chapter books is much smoother than her transition from elementary to middle school! While I'll miss the graphic novel series, I did like the new format, and was glad there were illustrations and graphic panels throughout.
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  • Jenn
    July 15, 2017
    I won a copy of this book.Baby Mouse is in middle school now and she's learning to navigate the world she is living in. She joins the film club. A mix of chapter book and graphic novel. Cute read that any 8-12 year old should enjoy.
  • Margie's Must Reads
    July 23, 2017
    Lights, Camera, Middle School! is a great transition from elementary to middle school books and it is done in true Baby Mouse fashion. This book will work in both middle and high school libraries. *ARC from publisher for library collection development.
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  • Beth
    July 26, 2017
    Very cute and punny! I think the kids are really going to enjoy this book, especially those getting ready to go to middle school. It would also be a good book for kids that are exclusively reading graphic novels to add some text to their reading. Fun, fast read.
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  • Kim
    July 18, 2017
    So happy that Babymouse is growing along with her readers.
  • Pam
    July 13, 2017
    A fun new graphic series about Babymouse going to middle school. She learns a valuable lesson about thinking of others along the way.
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