A Queer History of the United States for Young People
Queer history didn’t start with Stonewall. This book explores how LGBTQ people have always been a part of our national identity, contributing to the country and culture for over 400 years.It is crucial for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer youth to know their history. But this history is not easy to find since it’s rarely taught in schools or commemorated in other ways. A Queer History of the United States for Young People corrects this and demonstrates that LGBTQ people have long been vital to shaping our understanding of what America is today.Through engrossing narratives, letters, drawings, poems, and more, the book encourages young readers, of all identities, to feel pride at the accomplishments of the LGBTQ people who came before them and to use history as a guide to the future.The stories he shares include those of* Thomas Morton, who celebrated same-sex love in Boston’s Puritan community in the 1620s.* Albert D. J. Cashier, an Irish immigrant and Civil War hero, who was born in the body of a woman but lived as a man for over a half century.* Gladys Bentley, an African American blues singer who challenged cross-dressing laws in 1920s Harlem.* Bayard Rustin, Martin Luther King Jr.’s close friend, civil rights organizer, and an openly gay man.* Sylvia Rivera, who along with Marsha P. Johnson, founded the first transgender political group in the United States in 1970.* Harvey Milk, a community organizer and the first openly gay politician to win an election in California.* Jamie Nabozny, a teen who brought national attention to the issue of LGBTQ bullying by bringing his case to the Supreme Court in the 1990s.

A Queer History of the United States for Young People Details

TitleA Queer History of the United States for Young People
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 11th, 2019
PublisherBeacon Press
ISBN-139780807056127
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, LGBT, Historical

A Queer History of the United States for Young People Review

  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    Keeping in mind that I read this as a physical arc and not as a finished edition, I had many issues with this title. It's fairly good for what it is, but there are some really big red flags on this text. I don't know if it's from the original author, the adapter, or for some other reason, but:p. 3: transgender is in a list of words for "women and men who are attracted to members of their own sex"p. 10: "now that we have explored all the terms and words from LGBTQ people" but leaves out people wh Keeping in mind that I read this as a physical arc and not as a finished edition, I had many issues with this title. It's fairly good for what it is, but there are some really big red flags on this text. I don't know if it's from the original author, the adapter, or for some other reason, but:p. 3: transgender is in a list of words for "women and men who are attracted to members of their own sex"p. 10: "now that we have explored all the terms and words from LGBTQ people" but leaves out people who are intersex or asexualp. 58: "intersexed" (also on page 282)p. 191: "knew she was a gay."And, my personal pet peeve, the first glossary entry is for asexuals/asexuality (which is not once mentioned in the text), and it's done in an insulting and inaccurate way.Hopefully, this will all get fixed before the final printing.
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  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book from Edelweissactual rating: 3.5I do have some issues with some of the language used in this book, but overall it is filled with a lot of good information. I did like how it talks about how the language we use to describe different orientations is always changing and tried to put things into their historical contexts, but still there were some things the author said in the modern day sections where I did not necessarily agree with the wording of it in some way I received an ARC copy of this book from Edelweissactual rating: 3.5I do have some issues with some of the language used in this book, but overall it is filled with a lot of good information. I did like how it talks about how the language we use to describe different orientations is always changing and tried to put things into their historical contexts, but still there were some things the author said in the modern day sections where I did not necessarily agree with the wording of it in some ways. Also I wasn't really expecting the ace spectrum to be discussed at all [as someone who is ace themselves I am very used to being disappointed in this regard], but was really put off by the mildly condescending definition that was used in the glossary in the back.I think as with most things that discuss LGBT issues or history you have to use this as a starting point and read other books on the topic to compare or even talk to real life people to get a better idea for the language and labels people actually use outside of an academic context. As I said before, there is a lot of good information here and it talked about many people I had not heard of before, as well as several I was already familiar with. I also liked how it started by talking about Native Americans instead of pretending like the history of the country only started when white people got here.
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  • Tristan Frodelius
    January 1, 1970
    The exclusion of asexuality as a full, substantive identity and historically present part of the queer community belies a lack of research and/or general knowledge of queer history. It is placed in scare quotes and the author claims that asexuality is "recent" (it is not). The author paints a picture that asexuality is a phase and not a true identity, saying that it is "similar to" other identities, ostensibly because the author does not believe it is one. Asexuality has existed through human hi The exclusion of asexuality as a full, substantive identity and historically present part of the queer community belies a lack of research and/or general knowledge of queer history. It is placed in scare quotes and the author claims that asexuality is "recent" (it is not). The author paints a picture that asexuality is a phase and not a true identity, saying that it is "similar to" other identities, ostensibly because the author does not believe it is one. Asexuality has existed through human history, as all sexualities have. And the terminology is many decades old. Asexual members of the community have been there the whole time, and this continued ignoring of their place in the community by this author is deeply unsettling. This is the fault I take issue with most strongly, but the book contains many other faults and slights against the queer community, listed in other reviews.
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  • Rhode
    January 1, 1970
    Haven’t read it, but saw a screenshot of the page saying asexuality is a temporary phase. 😳😳😳 So, it’s an untrustworthy book. Which is too bad because a great book on this topic is needed.
  • Cassidy Raab
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t read this book but apparently it has acephobia in it so the author can EAT SHIT
  • Lauren (LaurenHannah.net)
    January 1, 1970
    Yikes, this book is a big nope. https://twitter.com/coolcurrybooks/st...
  • Louis
    January 1, 1970
    Asexuality is not a "temporary feeling", you ignorant charlatan.
  • C.
    January 1, 1970
    My inclination when I started the book was four stars and although I've debated somewhat, I'm choosing to stick with that - primarily because there were people and events discussed in this book that I didn't know about and I appreciated that thoroughness. I appreciated as well that the book did not only focus on gay, lesbian, or trans individuals specifically, but also dealt with individuals and events that simply pushed outside of the traditional norm of heterosexual relationships or marriage - My inclination when I started the book was four stars and although I've debated somewhat, I'm choosing to stick with that - primarily because there were people and events discussed in this book that I didn't know about and I appreciated that thoroughness. I appreciated as well that the book did not only focus on gay, lesbian, or trans individuals specifically, but also dealt with individuals and events that simply pushed outside of the traditional norm of heterosexual relationships or marriage - and I feel as if the title is an apt descriptor. The book is frank and open, while still being informative and appropriate for preteens and young adults. I did debate three stars, and the reason for that primarily is that at times, the book felt a little preachy, or even as if it was talking down to its readers. I have not read the authors adult Queer History and am curious to look at that now, both because of an interest in additional sources, but also to see if it lacks that element. The four stars holds because it's interesting content and overwhelmingly open and approachable, but there were points throughout the material where the tone did annoy or bother me and I wish some of that had been more carefully considered. Overall, I believe it would be a useful addition to a juvenile or YA LGBT or American history collection. I received an ARC copy of this from Publishers Weekly at ALA Midwinter.
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