All's Faire in Middle School
The author of Roller Girl is back with a graphic novel about starting middle school, surviving your embarrassing family, and the Renaissance Faire. Eleven-year-old Imogene (Impy) has grown up with two parents working at the Renaissance Faire, and she's eager to begin her own training as a squire. First, though, she'll need to prove her bravery. Luckily Impy has just the quest in mind--she'll go to public school after a life of being homeschooled! But it's not easy to act like a noble knight-in-training in middle school. Impy falls in with a group of girls who seem really nice (until they don't) and starts to be embarrassed of her thrift shop apparel, her family's unusual lifestyle, and their small, messy apartment. Impy has always thought of herself as a heroic knight, but when she does something really mean in order to fit in, she begins to wonder whether she might be more of a dragon after all.

All's Faire in Middle School Details

TitleAll's Faire in Middle School
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 5th, 2017
PublisherDial Books
ISBN-139780525429982
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Family

All's Faire in Middle School Review

  • Lola Reviewer
    January 1, 1970
    A new graphic novel by the author of ROLLER GIRL! How happy I was to receive this book in the mail. ROLLER GIRL was emotional, realistic and engrossing. I couldn’t put it down. ALL’S FAIRE IN MIDDLE SCHOOL is very different. For starters, it’s about a girl whose parents work at a faire. The renaissance faire is quite an important element, so if like me you never think about faires and never really were quite that interested in them, it will not impress you.To be honest, I think this is a fair bo A new graphic novel by the author of ROLLER GIRL! How happy I was to receive this book in the mail. ROLLER GIRL was emotional, realistic and engrossing. I couldn’t put it down. ALL’S FAIRE IN MIDDLE SCHOOL is very different. For starters, it’s about a girl whose parents work at a faire. The renaissance faire is quite an important element, so if like me you never think about faires and never really were quite that interested in them, it will not impress you.To be honest, I think this is a fair book. I liked how Victoria Jamieson tried to tell her readers that one must be careful to make the right friends for us, not the most popular ones. The bullying and mean girl clique was a déjà vu for me, and probably for you, though the way Impy dealt with her situation was very realistic in this book as well. It’s just that if you take the faire element away, you’ll realize this middle grade graphic novel about a girl starting middle school is like a thousand other ones. Actually, there’s this one I read recently from Shannon Hale—REAL FRIENDS—about a girl having trouble making friends. I recommend it wholeheartedly. Some potential, and some fun faire scenes, but I know Victoria Jamieson can do much better and much more original without going into the unlikely-to-happen. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, I loved ROLLER GIRL, but this one is even better. Victoria Jamieson presents a story about navigating middle school but with a twist. Imogene's grown up with her Renaissance Faire family. Every summer since she can remember, she's worked at her parents' shoppe and this year she's finally becoming an apprentice in the cast. She's also starting middle school (her choice) after years of being homeschooled. Middle school, it turns out, is trickier than Imogene had anticipated and she finds her Okay, I loved ROLLER GIRL, but this one is even better. Victoria Jamieson presents a story about navigating middle school but with a twist. Imogene's grown up with her Renaissance Faire family. Every summer since she can remember, she's worked at her parents' shoppe and this year she's finally becoming an apprentice in the cast. She's also starting middle school (her choice) after years of being homeschooled. Middle school, it turns out, is trickier than Imogene had anticipated and she finds herself navigating a twisted maze of friendships, mean girls, strict teachers, and potential love interests. The Ren Faire theme is woven cleverly throughout the book - each chapter begins with an illuminated panel that harkens the reader back to books of the Renaissance time. Little details like Imogene's natural habit of thinking "Oh, fie!" when something goes amiss or her parents friends coming over for a roleplaying game really bring the Ren Faire culture to life. Hand this to fans of contemporary graphic novels that explore themes of friendship like SMILE, EL DEAFO, or REAL FRIENDS. It will garner many admirers. Huzzah!(Coming in September!)
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  • Shenwei
    January 1, 1970
    this was a lot of fun to read. it shows the ways peer pressure and the desire to fit in can lead you astray and how to cope with being socially isolated, make up for mistakes/hurting others, and be true to yourself
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineImogene (Impy) lives with her family in a run down apartment, and has been homeschooled for years, because her mother and father both work at the local Renaissance Fair. With middle school approaching, Impy has decided that she wants to go to public school, although she is apprehensive about how the other children will treat her and how she will fit in. She is lucky on the first day when Mika invites her to sit with her at lunch with her friends Sasha and E E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineImogene (Impy) lives with her family in a run down apartment, and has been homeschooled for years, because her mother and father both work at the local Renaissance Fair. With middle school approaching, Impy has decided that she wants to go to public school, although she is apprehensive about how the other children will treat her and how she will fit in. She is lucky on the first day when Mika invites her to sit with her at lunch with her friends Sasha and Emily. Impy agonizes over fitting in, ans struggles with some of the school work. Going to the Renaissance Fair is a huge relief, since she feels comfortable there and is getting paid to be a squire and interact with visitors. She meets a girl from school, Anita, who comes every weekend with her father. Anita is a lot of fun, but warns Impy that they can't be friends at school because Mika and her crowd are mean to Anita. Soon, Impy learns the depths of Mika's snarky meanness, and when she stands up to her, things fall apart. Will Impy be able to find her own place in middle school where her unique background can shine?Strengths: Families who work at Renaissance Fairs-- there's a bit of diversity that has certainly been lacking in middle grade literature. Home schooled children occasionally have difficulties getting into the swing of public school, and Impy's feeling of "otherness" will appeal to a wide range of readers who feel that what they are wearing and how their family lives isn't quite as mainstream as it could be (And that would be all of them. I remember feeling weird because both of my parents were in education, which is pretty common!). Rich world building, realistic problems with friends and school, and some nice moments, like when Impy's mother takes her to the thrift store to try to replicate the outfits of the "cool kids". (Been there, done that!) Also liked that Impy stood up for herself with Mika and worked through the difficulties she created with Anitam, all while remaining true to herself. Weaknesses: It just occurred to me that the three writers who turn out a perfect middle grade graphic novel-- Holm, Telgemeier and Jamieson-- all have girls as their main characters! This is fine, but it would be nice to see a little more gender diversity! Still waiting for Jump Start! comic artist Robb Armstrong to come out with a graphic novel. What I really think: Might as well buy two copies of this right now, because it will never be on the shelf. I'm not a huge fan of graphic novels, but I do love that Jamieson does tell a story with a lot of depth and character development and has just the perfect format for middle grade readers when it comes to style of illustrations, size and amount of text, and complexity of story line. Definitely looking forward to her next effort!
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  • Heather Taake
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it!!!! Fun fact: I was in a renaissance fair in the second grade. It. Was. Awesome.
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    This is an impossible-to-put down graphic novel about a Renaissance Faire knight-in-training homeschooler, Imogene (Impy), who is starting public school for the first time. Impy's family life is socially and economically tied to the local Renaissance Faire so she has grown up in an unconventional household. She is eager to enter a "normal" environment and make "normal" friends. Impy learns some tough lessons about friendship, family, and that being true to one's self is the real normal. Jamieson This is an impossible-to-put down graphic novel about a Renaissance Faire knight-in-training homeschooler, Imogene (Impy), who is starting public school for the first time. Impy's family life is socially and economically tied to the local Renaissance Faire so she has grown up in an unconventional household. She is eager to enter a "normal" environment and make "normal" friends. Impy learns some tough lessons about friendship, family, and that being true to one's self is the real normal. Jamieson has again told an entertaining story with a big-hearted, inclusive message.
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  • Shauna Yusko
    January 1, 1970
    Perfection in a book. Dare I say better than Roller Girl???
  • Stefanie
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars for Victoria Jamieson's latest graphic novel! Imogene has grown up at the Renaissance Faire where her parents work and up until now, she's been home schooled. Imogene's journey begins as she enters Middle School for the first time. No amount of training as a knight can prepare her for the trials and tribulations of....sixth grade! Tests of friendship, bullies, sibling rivalry and a strict teacher all help her along the path to discovering who she is on this bumpy adventure! I love Jami 4.5 stars for Victoria Jamieson's latest graphic novel! Imogene has grown up at the Renaissance Faire where her parents work and up until now, she's been home schooled. Imogene's journey begins as she enters Middle School for the first time. No amount of training as a knight can prepare her for the trials and tribulations of....sixth grade! Tests of friendship, bullies, sibling rivalry and a strict teacher all help her along the path to discovering who she is on this bumpy adventure! I love Jamieson's style of drawing as well as her real representation of middle school struggles. A real winner! Huzzah!
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  • Mississippi Library Commission
    January 1, 1970
    Victoria Jamieson's follow-up to Roller Girl is practically perfect in every way. Impy and her family are part of the Renaissance Fair world. They work and breathe 15th and 16th century Europe smack-dab in the middle of Florida, all day, every day, until newly dubbed squire Impy departs upon an important quest: middle school. Her close-knit world of Ren Faire lovers and homeschool are drastically different from the crowded middle school she begins to attend. Although she struggles to fit in and Victoria Jamieson's follow-up to Roller Girl is practically perfect in every way. Impy and her family are part of the Renaissance Fair world. They work and breathe 15th and 16th century Europe smack-dab in the middle of Florida, all day, every day, until newly dubbed squire Impy departs upon an important quest: middle school. Her close-knit world of Ren Faire lovers and homeschool are drastically different from the crowded middle school she begins to attend. Although she struggles to fit in and "be normal", some of the changes she begins to see in herself seem more fitting for the villain of a story than the knight in shining armor she hopes to be. Jamieson has created a fully realized backdrop for this tale of pre-teen worries and woe and peppered it with endearing and lovable characters. (We're looking at you, Anita!) The artwork is bright and lively, wrapping the whole delightful shebang into a superb comic about friendship, family, and being true to yourself.
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely adored Imogene. She makes a lot of big mistakes, but she learns from them too. Regardless of whether or not you've ever been homeschooled, I think her middle school experience rings true and every middle schooler is going to identify with at least one aspect of it. The renaissance faire setting adds a unique appeal and helps move the story forward. First in Roller Girl and now with this, Victoria Jamieson has a knack for writing irresistible, underdog-esque characters.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    As a 25-year-old reading this book, I'm like a.) where can I sign up to be Impy's best friend and b.) really surprised by how much I relate to Impy's "I love the Renaissance Faire so much and that's a super nerdy hobby but how do I tell people?" conundrum. 11/10, will definitely read again.
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    6th&upThis medieval meets middle school graphic novel was so adorable! After years of being homeschooled by her Renaissance Fair employed parents, Imogen has decided that it's high time she entered the strange arena of public school. Navigating the two worlds is a challenge, but surely a new squire like herself can handle mean girls, peer pressure, friendship issues, sibling trouble, and more without a problem. Right?My only hesitation (and thus the 6th&up recommendation) is that Impy ge 6th&upThis medieval meets middle school graphic novel was so adorable! After years of being homeschooled by her Renaissance Fair employed parents, Imogen has decided that it's high time she entered the strange arena of public school. Navigating the two worlds is a challenge, but surely a new squire like herself can handle mean girls, peer pressure, friendship issues, sibling trouble, and more without a problem. Right?My only hesitation (and thus the 6th&up recommendation) is that Impy gets her hands on a romance novel from one of her "friends", and reads entries where a guy unties a girls bikini top, etc, and then- naturally curious- she writes the word sex in her journal. When her mom sees the book (and her journal I think?) she tries to start a conversation about sex, but Imogene shuts her down. With that in mind, parents could well feel comfortable handing to a child younger than 6th grade, but as a librarian I'll take the safe road and recommend it to my 6th and up patrons/students.This ARC was obtained at BookExpo17- with thanks to Dial/Penguin- in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    This was a lighter read than Roller Girl, but still a great story! Since we have a RenFaire here in town, I think my Tween Book Club is going to love this book just as much.
  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't expect to like this book so much, but I loved it!! This book is by the same author as "Roller Girl", but I thought that "All's Faire in Middle School" was even better!
  • Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    A VERY worthy successor to Roller Girl -- actually, forget it, I LIKED IT EVEN BETTER THAN ROLLER GIRL. I mean, it's definitely a recycled plot - as in, if you've seen Mean Girls, then you've basically read this book (right down to the burn book and Regina George villain) - but it's a tried and true formula for a reason. Anyone struggling to find their place in middle school (or high school) will not only relate to, but take great comfort in Impy's wonderfully realistic quest for identity, int A VERY worthy successor to Roller Girl -- actually, forget it, I LIKED IT EVEN BETTER THAN ROLLER GIRL. I mean, it's definitely a recycled plot - as in, if you've seen Mean Girls, then you've basically read this book (right down to the burn book and Regina George villain) - but it's a tried and true formula for a reason. Anyone struggling to find their place in middle school (or high school) will not only relate to, but take great comfort in Impy's wonderfully realistic quest for identity, integrity, and belonging.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    There is something fun about ren fairs, science fiction conventions, or just about anything where you are taken out of your every day life, and allowed to play. As a teen, I went to both Ren fairs, as well as Star Trek conventions, and it helped me feel less of an outsider. As the princess says, in this book, she found her family there. Yes, that is very much what it feels like, family.This middle-school level graphic novel is about a girl who is part of the ren faire, has been home schooled, an There is something fun about ren fairs, science fiction conventions, or just about anything where you are taken out of your every day life, and allowed to play. As a teen, I went to both Ren fairs, as well as Star Trek conventions, and it helped me feel less of an outsider. As the princess says, in this book, she found her family there. Yes, that is very much what it feels like, family.This middle-school level graphic novel is about a girl who is part of the ren faire, has been home schooled, and now is going to try middle-school, and it works out as you would expect it would, in that there are all those rules one doesn't know about, and has to learn, so not to be trampled by the "mean girls" out there.This sort of story, the mean girls bit, has been done before, but not with the Ren Faire angle, and this is what makes this novel so fun.I mean, yes, there is always the outsider part of middle school books. We all feel like the outsider at that point, but the cool thing about this book, is that Imogene is not an outside at ren faire. Fun book, sad in bits, but very cool, and for those who have never been to ren faire, gives you a behind the scenes look at how it all works.Highly recommend this fun book, written by the author of Roller Girl, which was also a good book.
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    3.5? After being homeschooled all her life, Imogene (Impy) decides to enroll in middle school and finds that it comes with all sorts of problems and challenges. I loved the Ren Faire setting, seeing how the cast was such a tight community and how they all helped each other, plus seeing how Impy looked at school as her squire quest. She is a nerd, and an utterly delightful one, and I loved seeing how she figured out her place as a worker and character at the faire. The middle school set scenes we 3.5? After being homeschooled all her life, Imogene (Impy) decides to enroll in middle school and finds that it comes with all sorts of problems and challenges. I loved the Ren Faire setting, seeing how the cast was such a tight community and how they all helped each other, plus seeing how Impy looked at school as her squire quest. She is a nerd, and an utterly delightful one, and I loved seeing how she figured out her place as a worker and character at the faire. The middle school set scenes were less fun, and more typical of your average book about middle school. You could totally see exactly where things were going to go horribly wrong, and so they did. I thought the consequences were natural and Impy worked hard to make things right, though I didn't think her family was as supportive of her new environment as they could have been. I wish more had been done with Impy's feelings about her Hispanic/Latino father always being cast as the villain of the fair, something that she says used to bother her, but now she was kind of used to. I didn't enjoy it nearly as much as Roller Girl, but it's a good read.
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  • Gretchen Alice
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent primer on navigating both a Ren Faire *and* middle school. Impy's been homeschooled for most of her life, but this year she's going to try out middle school. She and her folks (and her annoying kid brother) spend their weekends acting in the local renaissance festival and I found those parts of the book to be much more charming and alive, mostly because the cast of characters is so much richer. At school, Impy has to learn how to be a good student and a better friend. Like my fave R An excellent primer on navigating both a Ren Faire *and* middle school. Impy's been homeschooled for most of her life, but this year she's going to try out middle school. She and her folks (and her annoying kid brother) spend their weekends acting in the local renaissance festival and I found those parts of the book to be much more charming and alive, mostly because the cast of characters is so much richer. At school, Impy has to learn how to be a good student and a better friend. Like my fave Roller Girl, this hit the spot between relatable and quirky. Hand this to kids who are wondering what to read next after devouring Real Friends.(Sidenote: I have shockingly never been to a Ren Faire, but I'm making it a goal to go this year!)
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  • Brenda Ayala
    January 1, 1970
    As a graphic novel this has sort of the best case scenario for contemporary settings. Impy is a girl who has been raised at the renaissance faire--every year, her friends and her parents' friends dress up and put on shows for the community to peruse. As someone who visits our local faire every year, I loved this inside look at how a faire works before and after the gates are closed to visitors. Top that off with a believable story about a girl trying to find her place in public school for the fi As a graphic novel this has sort of the best case scenario for contemporary settings. Impy is a girl who has been raised at the renaissance faire--every year, her friends and her parents' friends dress up and put on shows for the community to peruse. As someone who visits our local faire every year, I loved this inside look at how a faire works before and after the gates are closed to visitors. Top that off with a believable story about a girl trying to find her place in public school for the first time, and you get a successful middle grade novel about friendship, bullying, and accepting yourself.
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  • Patrick
    January 1, 1970
    Imogene has been homeschooled in a renaissance setting as her family works at the Faire. She decides to go to middle school. These two worlds collide and Imogene learns how to navigate the muddy waters.
  • Giovanna Forsyth
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this so much. Victoria Jamieson writes/illustrates amazing graphic novels that are full of heart and really gives her characters a depth that can be hard to achieve in the graphic form. I will be gifting this to all the middle grade boys and girls in my life.
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  • Karina
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book! Victoria Jamison does it again with another brilliant graphic novel. I love the Renaissance Fair theme and the main character's entry into middle school. A beautifully written and illustrated book that I look forward to recommending to lots of young people!
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    Good portrait of the difficulties of kids with peer pressure
  • Scott Fillner
    January 1, 1970
    Victoria hath done it again! Ye shall feel all thy emotions and learn so many life lessons in this amazing story. Huzzah! Thy cannot wait to bequeath this story upon thy students come this Fall!
  • Katie Strawser
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this one so much more than anticipated. Victoria Jamieson has the perfect voice for middle grade books!
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Yes! Another great graphic novel about identity and acceptance in youth. The renaissance faire aspect was fun to read about and I love that this included a homeschool to public school transition.
  • Felicia
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this much better than Rollergirl. This felt more real and honest. I wish I had comics like this when I was growing up. Also, aww, Tiffany.
  • Monica Edinger
    January 1, 1970
    Delightful.
  • Mandy Cummings
    January 1, 1970
    Fabulous take on surviving middle school. Great story for 6th graders. 😊
  • Leonard Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Probably Jamieson's best so far. Maybe better than Roller Girl, but I am not certain about that. It could just be Impy is a little more likable and sympathetic than Astrid even though both are flawed in somewhat similar ways.
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