Birding Without Borders
Traveling to 41 countries in 2015 with a backpack and binoculars, Noah Strycker became the first person to see more than half the world’s 10,000 species of birds in one year. In 2015, Noah Strycker set himself a lofty goal: to become the first person to see half the world’s birds in one year. For 365 days, with a backpack, binoculars, and a series of one-way tickets, he traveled across forty-one countries and all seven continents, eventually spotting 6,042 species—by far the biggest birding year on record.This is no travelogue or glorified checklist. Noah ventures deep into a world of blood-sucking leeches, chronic sleep deprivation, airline snafus, breakdowns, mudslides, floods, war zones, ecologic devastation, conservation triumphs, common and iconic species, and scores of passionate bird lovers around the globe. By pursuing the freest creatures on the planet, Noah gains a unique perspective on the world they share with us—and offers a hopeful message that even as many birds face an uncertain future, more people than ever are working to protect them.  

Birding Without Borders Details

TitleBirding Without Borders
Author
ReleaseOct 10th, 2017
PublisherHoughton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN-139780544558144
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Animals, Birds, Environment, Nature, Autobiography, Memoir, Travel, Biography Memoir, Science, Natural History

Birding Without Borders Review

  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    In 2015 the author traveled through 41 countries and 7 continents on his quest to find 5,000 birds in a year long journey. I have definitely become an armchair birder as I love reading about peoples journeys to track birds, and also watch the ones that live around me. This was a really informative and fun book to read, as it gives us the mindset of a person with a passion to achieve a goal, and not only that of the author, but other birders with as much love of this recreational activity, and wh In 2015 the author traveled through 41 countries and 7 continents on his quest to find 5,000 birds in a year long journey. I have definitely become an armchair birder as I love reading about peoples journeys to track birds, and also watch the ones that live around me. This was a really informative and fun book to read, as it gives us the mindset of a person with a passion to achieve a goal, and not only that of the author, but other birders with as much love of this recreational activity, and what made them get into it.Before the author left on his year long quest, he had a lot of preparations to do, from one way plane tickets, to searching out birders in each place that he was going, for the company and for the knowledge of the areas that these people could provide. He was so grateful for the interest of so many on making his trip memorable. One can feel what a tight group birders are. He had many exciting adventures along the way and he loved to stay as locally as he could to absorb the whole experience of the areas he visited. This is a book that even if you are not a birder you could appreciate, it is a wonderful travel memoir.I would like to thank NetGalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the ARC of this book.
    more
  • Victoria Peipert
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating story! As a very casual bird watcher and nature enthusiast the story in this book intrigued me. It was engaging and was hard to put down since I was dying to know how everything would turn out at the end of the year. -1 star for the editing - it could have been stronger.
    more
  • Dennis Winge
    January 1, 1970
    Noah wrote an excellent account of his big year in setting the record for most bird species seen in a single calendar year. He presents a nice overview on his strategy to set the record and then provides a compelling travelogue on his travels and importantly his uses of local birding experts to accomplish his goal. The role these various local guides provide in his quest is incredible and Noah gives them great credit for their guidance. It is impressive to read about an individual who sets a lof Noah wrote an excellent account of his big year in setting the record for most bird species seen in a single calendar year. He presents a nice overview on his strategy to set the record and then provides a compelling travelogue on his travels and importantly his uses of local birding experts to accomplish his goal. The role these various local guides provide in his quest is incredible and Noah gives them great credit for their guidance. It is impressive to read about an individual who sets a lofty goal and then follows a well-honed strategy to achieve it. Noah is an inspiration as he had to move through fatique and illness to achieve his goal. Although the books is about birds, it is also a testimony about the unfolding of one's passion toward achieving a goal. This was an outstanding read. I first learned about Noah when he was the featured guest at the Salt Lake Bird Festival and we heard his presentation on his big year. That captivated me to want to read his book and I enjoyed the book as much as his lecture. One notable aspect is his humility and clear acknowledgement of others. Great job Noah!
    more
  • Viva
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a backyard birder and I quite looked forward to this book. Unfortunately it's hard to read. I feel bad for my rating, I commend this guy on writing a book on what he loves and I want him to succeed. But I don't think he's a natural writer and he might need a good editor.It says on the back "this is no travelogue or glorified checklist". Funny but I think it would have been better for the reader if it had been either as those were the parts I liked. His travel anecdotes were amusing and there I'm a backyard birder and I quite looked forward to this book. Unfortunately it's hard to read. I feel bad for my rating, I commend this guy on writing a book on what he loves and I want him to succeed. But I don't think he's a natural writer and he might need a good editor.It says on the back "this is no travelogue or glorified checklist". Funny but I think it would have been better for the reader if it had been either as those were the parts I liked. His travel anecdotes were amusing and there is a species checklist with date and location on the back! For the rest, some of it was just boring and some meandering and it's not pieced together well. This book is best read piecemeal, looking up passages on the birds or countries you are interested in. In any case, my best wishes for him and his hobby. The 2 star rating according to GoodReads = it was ok and I felt this was an ok book for me. I got this book as a free ARC.
    more
  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it! This is a fantastic complement to the blog Noah wrote while on his global Big Year, and it adds more about the many local people he met along the way and the situations he found himself in. I'm so impressed that such a brilliant birder also has such super writing skills. It's a page turner.
    more
  • kglibrarian
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this! So many fascinating details about his time exploring different countries and their birds. As a casual bird watcher I’m now determined to get a pair of binoculars and take it to the next level.
  • Erika
    January 1, 1970
    AwesomeI've read a lot of birding narratives, and this one is a must have. With exquisite attention to detail and the people he travelled with, Noah Strycker takes birders on a whirlwind tour of the globe's best birding locations. "But I read the blog about his trip on Audubon," some say. Me too, but this book pulls it altogether beautifully, including a great deal more detail and reflection. When I try to explain to someone new why I love birding, I'm going to recommend this book.
    more
  • David Holtzclaw
    January 1, 1970
    This is a delightful account of Mr. Stryker's journey & record breaking bird count. Even if you're not a birder, this is totally enjoyable & makes me want to buy some new binoculars to hit the trail.
  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    I met Noah Stryker at a book signing for his first book, Among Penguins, in his hometown, Eugene, Oregon. He is a remarkable young man who completed his Big Bird Year in 2015, 6,042 birds in 47 countries and on 7 continents. He is a fine writer as well. I've followed his blog and continue to be astonished by how much he has accomplished before the age of 30. This book follows his Big Year where he delights in not only birds, but the numerous people he met and who helped him along the way. A true I met Noah Stryker at a book signing for his first book, Among Penguins, in his hometown, Eugene, Oregon. He is a remarkable young man who completed his Big Bird Year in 2015, 6,042 birds in 47 countries and on 7 continents. He is a fine writer as well. I've followed his blog and continue to be astonished by how much he has accomplished before the age of 30. This book follows his Big Year where he delights in not only birds, but the numerous people he met and who helped him along the way. A true 21st Century adventurer, complete with i phone, mac computer, and 54 field guides of birds downloaded on his computer.
    more
  • Susan Walker
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great read. The author describes so many different birds in his travels, over 6,000 in a year. This book would make a wonderful gift for any "birder"..
  • Barbara Quinlan
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely wonderful!
Write a review