The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore
A group of young girls descend on Camp Forevermore, a sleepaway camp in the Pacific Northwest, where their days are filled with swimming lessons, friendship bracelets, and camp songs by the fire. Filled with excitement and nervous energy, they set off on an overnight kayaking trip to a nearby island. But before the night is over, they find themselves stranded, with no adults to help them survive or guide them home.The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore traces these five girls—Nita, Kayla, Isabel, Dina, and Siobhan—through and beyond this fateful trip. We see them through successes and failures, loving relationships and heartbreaks; we see what it means to find, and define, oneself, and the ways in which the same experience is refracted through different people. In diamond-sharp prose, Kim Fu gives us a portrait of friendship and of the families we build for ourselves—and the pasts we can't escape.

The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore Details

TitleThe Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore
Author
ReleaseFeb 13th, 2018
PublisherHoughton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN-139780544098268
Rating
GenreFiction, Young Adult, Literary Fiction, Contemporary

The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore Review

  • Celeste Ng
    January 1, 1970
    THE LOST GIRLS OF CAMP FOREVERMORE is a sensitive, evocative exploration of how the past threads itself through our lives, reemerging in unexpected ways. Kim Fu skillfully measures how long and loudly one formative moment can reverberate.
  • Kath Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, here is my main opinion on this book: It should have been a novella.Basically this book is a collection of vignettes collected together to create a novel. And it just doesn't work. We start the book following a group of five 9-11 year old girls at a summer camp called Camp Forevermore. They are going on a kayaking trip where they will be camping overnight on an island, and then returning to the camp the next day. Something awful happens during this trip, and the girls are stuck in a life a Okay, here is my main opinion on this book: It should have been a novella.Basically this book is a collection of vignettes collected together to create a novel. And it just doesn't work. We start the book following a group of five 9-11 year old girls at a summer camp called Camp Forevermore. They are going on a kayaking trip where they will be camping overnight on an island, and then returning to the camp the next day. Something awful happens during this trip, and the girls are stuck in a life and death situation where they must fight for their survival. Its tense and gripping and I really liked this part of the story.The issue with this book comes with all the other parts. The Camp Forevermore part of the novel probably only takes up about 30% - the remaining chunk is taken up with character studies about each of the girl's lives post-camp, up until adulthood. And the chapters alternate - one chapter of Camp, one chapter about one of the girls. And I suppose this could have worked, if the stories had ANYTHING to do with their camp experience. But they didn't. Each story could have been about anyone, and they just didn't seem relevant. It also kind of spoiled the survival story, as we see the girls as adults, so each chapter you read shows that one of them survived. It was well written, but I think this book would have been FAR better if the author had just published the survival story about the girls and left it at that. I probably would have rated it 4 stars without all the unnecessary character studies in between. I read the first few, but towards the end I found myself skimming them to get back to the interesting part. Bit disappointing.*I received a free digital copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley, in exchange for my honest review*
    more
  • Chihoe Ho
    January 1, 1970
    The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore is structured so that we have The Incident at camp, alternated by snippets of the lives the girls have led since their time at Camp Forevermore.You would think that this Incident would play a huge role in the future point of views of these girls. I was really expecting it to be intensely amplified, for Kim Fu to go heavy with her strokes and consequently alter the lives of her characters based on the one shared but very individual experience. What we get is a s The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore is structured so that we have The Incident at camp, alternated by snippets of the lives the girls have led since their time at Camp Forevermore.You would think that this Incident would play a huge role in the future point of views of these girls. I was really expecting it to be intensely amplified, for Kim Fu to go heavy with her strokes and consequently alter the lives of her characters based on the one shared but very individual experience. What we get is a slight nod to that Incident here and a passing mention there in these POVs, and a very subtle underlying theme of loss and being lost.Do I feel cheated by what I thought I'd get from this book? Yes. Do I feel like this novel was any lesser? No, actually. The very different and unique perspectives make this book a standout for me. Sure, The Incident ended up becoming a little more gimmicky than it needed to be, but even those chapters were highly engrossing and set the tone for who these girls are and how their young selves could have gone down the path that they ended up in. And that makes for a very lively discussion on what the links are and how The Incident might have, could have, should have left a bigger scar on the girls beyond the printed lines.Because of how quiet and not heavy-handed The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore has been put together in a narrative form, I have definitely been left thinking of the book a lot more, perhaps forevermore.
    more
  • Catherine Coles
    January 1, 1970
    Five girls on a camping trip suddenly find themselves stranded in the middle of a dense Pacific Northwest forest. This survival story alternates with stories from the girls' lives in the aftermath, as teenagers and adults. The idea being, I think, that they are just as much lost souls as grownups as they were when literally lost in the bush as kids. THE LOST GIRLS is a character-driven novel first and foremost, but it also boasts an interesting structure. It's even a bit suspenseful at times -- Five girls on a camping trip suddenly find themselves stranded in the middle of a dense Pacific Northwest forest. This survival story alternates with stories from the girls' lives in the aftermath, as teenagers and adults. The idea being, I think, that they are just as much lost souls as grownups as they were when literally lost in the bush as kids. THE LOST GIRLS is a character-driven novel first and foremost, but it also boasts an interesting structure. It's even a bit suspenseful at times -- just don't go into it thinking you'll find a thriller. https://www.instagram.com/p/BZ9H3BPDP...
    more
  • Megan Lyons
    January 1, 1970
    This book was intriguing and immersive. Multiple storylines and perspectives are sometimes done poorly, but in this case they were well balanced and complimentary. Structurally, it alternates between quick snippets of the disastrous summer camp trip, and longer novella like stories about the girls lives, mostly after their fateful summer. I actually preferred the self contained stories of the girls lives. The "lost" from the title refers as much to the adult women trying to find their way in tod This book was intriguing and immersive. Multiple storylines and perspectives are sometimes done poorly, but in this case they were well balanced and complimentary. Structurally, it alternates between quick snippets of the disastrous summer camp trip, and longer novella like stories about the girls lives, mostly after their fateful summer. I actually preferred the self contained stories of the girls lives. The "lost" from the title refers as much to the adult women trying to find their way in today's world as it does to the summer camp incident. The girls are very different, and lead very different lives. Some are more likable than others, but all the stories are compelling. There are interesting themes throughout. Fu explores many of the issues facing women in today's world, including , sexualization, exploitation, entitlement, low self esteem, the pressure to have a family, and the balance between work and motherhood. She studies these issues unflinchingly, and her characters are all deeply flawed. I didn't love the camp story, but I thought the ending was satisfying. I really did enjoy this. *I received an advanced reader copy of this book from Indigo Books and Music Inc./the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    Hmm...this book was not at all what I expected from the synopsis, so I'm having a hard time being objective about it. The synopsis makes it sound like a traumatic childhood experience shared by 5 girls, and then following those girls through their lives and seeing how that incident shaped them. Instead it is a Chekhov-level-depressing collection of short stories that are loosely connected by a central narrative. There is no exploration of how the camp incident changed their lives (unless, maybe, Hmm...this book was not at all what I expected from the synopsis, so I'm having a hard time being objective about it. The synopsis makes it sound like a traumatic childhood experience shared by 5 girls, and then following those girls through their lives and seeing how that incident shaped them. Instead it is a Chekhov-level-depressing collection of short stories that are loosely connected by a central narrative. There is no exploration of how the camp incident changed their lives (unless, maybe, it made them all suck?), so no real point to that story. There is no connection between the girls afterwards, which I found extremely odd. The camp story itself isn't great. The "short stories" about the girls are well-written and the characters are well written but they're all JUST SO DEPRESSING. And having one girl's story written from the perspective of her sister didn't seem to make any sense.
    more
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    This was my first venture into the "New Adult" genre, and I'm so glad that I decided to give it a try. I suppose that New Adult explores themes that Young Adult books will shy away from, although I have to admit that I've read some YA that leaned quite heavily into mature subject matter. In The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore, we read about five young girls go through a traumatizing event during a summer camp, interspersed with snippets about their adolescent and grown-up lives. Most of these gir This was my first venture into the "New Adult" genre, and I'm so glad that I decided to give it a try. I suppose that New Adult explores themes that Young Adult books will shy away from, although I have to admit that I've read some YA that leaned quite heavily into mature subject matter. In The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore, we read about five young girls go through a traumatizing event during a summer camp, interspersed with snippets about their adolescent and grown-up lives. Most of these girls carried issues with them throughout adulthood, and it was interesting to see how one event could be experienced so differently by all of them. It's definitely more psychological than a YA novel would be. There's very little of the novel that explores what happened at Camp Forevermore -- the bulk of the book is reserved for these character stories. Still, it's honestly a page-turner, and Kim Fu doesn't paint these girls through rose-coloured glasses. It almost, at times, reads like a memoir of these characters, and I really enjoyed it.I have only two complaints about this book. The first complaint would have to be about the ending. It was rushed, and I believe that there could have been a full chapter more, at the very least. The entire story just feels like a big buildup with little satisfaction at the end. My second complaint is about the choice of one specific "present-day" stories - one chapter explores the life of the sister of one of the girls who went to Camp Forevermore, which means that we only got a little bit of insight on how the camp sister's life went after the event. However, the rest of the book is so well crafted that those two complaints don't really change my overall perception of the book. I'd like to thank Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, as well as Netgalley, for the free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed it, and I encourage you to pick up a copy when it'll hit the shelves next month!*Note to Netgalley reviewers: this is e-pub format only and thus will not load on your Kindle.
    more
  • Meg (PopReadsBox)
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story about five girls lost in the woods and their lives after this event. The majority of the story is about the girls lives after their time spent in the woods and how events in childhood influence adolescence and adulthood. I went into this story expecting more of a tale about survival but it is less a story of navigating the wild and more a tale of growing up. Though it was not what I thought, I did enjoy this book and think others will as well.
    more
  • Heather Kuhl
    January 1, 1970
    “The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore” is a book of rare honesty regarding female coming-of-age, especially for a Millenial like myself. I attended an all girls school in 1997 at the age of 11 and our first week of school was a week-long hike in the Rocky Mountains of Canada so this book hit very close to home for me.I read this book in 2 sittings and closed the cover at 3am because I just could not set it down.I enjoyed the author’s use of time and perspective shift in the different chapters, it “The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore” is a book of rare honesty regarding female coming-of-age, especially for a Millenial like myself. I attended an all girls school in 1997 at the age of 11 and our first week of school was a week-long hike in the Rocky Mountains of Canada so this book hit very close to home for me.I read this book in 2 sittings and closed the cover at 3am because I just could not set it down.I enjoyed the author’s use of time and perspective shift in the different chapters, it really helped in showing how the events of this kayak trip both enforced the characters personalities and changed them forever.The book opens from the perspective of Siobhan who is attending this girls camp for the first time and in the opening scene we see that the entire experience begins with the somewhat torturous moment of having to try on clothes, or a lifejacket, in front of your peers. And then to have to complete athletic endeavours directly afterward. I definitely recall the awkward horror of trying to figure out where you fit into a group at this physically and emotionally vulnerable stage and the author captures it incredibly well in one sentence “Would it reveal her to be too tall, too wide, too infantile, anything other than the universal girl-size implied..?”I also love that we get to see how these characters develop. Each girl comes into camp with a history: Nita is the oldest, and a solidly logical one; Dina is desperate for attention and it makes her a bit selfish; Isabel is intelligent and empathetic; Andee is hardened but still a protective older sister. Each of these personalities serves the group in some way and the diversity and depth of the characters is what will make this an excellent book for young women. Young women need more role models like these girls that show how strength, intelligence, and perseverance persist.As adults Nita and Andee remain incredibly strong and possibly stronger because of the scar tissue resulting from this kayak trip. They are smart and capable and don’t let life just happen to them. They love and are loved but they are not broken. They both face life and fear.Isabel and Dina are a different case; they are both a little bit softer going into this camp and this weekend shows them their fears and flaws but they seem to hide from it instead of facing it and this behaviour follows them into adulthood.There is a passage near the end of the book that really struck me. “ If her mother were here, Siobhan could finally give up. She could crawl into her mother’s arms and cry, and her cry would signal that she was the center of the universe, her pain matter more than anything else, and it was someone else’s job to fix it, it was everyone else’s job to fix it, she was too small and too helpless to do anything but cry.”This is what the end of childhood is, I think. As adults we are forced to realize, even in our weakest moments, that we are not the centre of the universe, that we have to fix it, that we, possibly, are part of the problem. When I read this passage the truth of it brought tears to my eyes because I had never heard someone define the transition between childhood and adulthood so painfully well.The author chose to end each storyline with questions and I thank her for it. A story of true character development should not be summarized neatly.This book hit me because of the similarity in age between me and the characters but it feels like it will stand the test and also resonate with younger people (women especially) and the themes won’t grow old or dated. I will definitely be recommending this book to friends, and especially to my friends with teen daughters.
    more
  • Jocelyn
    January 1, 1970
    Update: Here is an actual review that captures so much of what I couldn't say.-------------------------------------I finished this book the other night and I have no idea what I'm thinking so I'm just going to write things down.I read Camp Forevermore in just a few hours, breaking only for dinner. It was my second time starting it. I picked it up in December, read a couple chapters and thought 'I like this but I think if I'm actually in the mood for it I'm going to love it' and then resolved to Update: Here is an actual review that captures so much of what I couldn't say.-------------------------------------I finished this book the other night and I have no idea what I'm thinking so I'm just going to write things down.I read Camp Forevermore in just a few hours, breaking only for dinner. It was my second time starting it. I picked it up in December, read a couple chapters and thought 'I like this but I think if I'm actually in the mood for it I'm going to love it' and then resolved to restart it later. So that's what I did.I have a decent memory of what happened in those chapters and I was excited to reread them. They didn't disappoint, and like I had assumed, I enjoyed them even more on the second go. Kim Fu has a gift for creating fully-fleshed out characters in a short space of time. By the time I finished this book, I cared so deeply about these girls - especially Nita and Isabel - that not even ten minutes afterward I just started sobbing. There was so much leftover emotion, and just general sadness and a desire for them to be okay.So I guess I should give some sort of rundown as to what actually happens? We open in a summer camp for girls aged 9-11, Camp Forevermore. On the day of a big kayak trip, five girls from different areas of the US and Canada are put in a group and then a life-altering something happens. Everything Siobhan was wearing was brand new: a black fleece she’d chosen for its silver heart-shaped zipper pull, her first pair of hiking boots, even her underwear. She felt a thrilling, terrifying dissolution of self. She was far from her parents, her classmates, anyone who had ever known her. She was curious to find out who she would be. Leaving the first chapter, we don't know exactly what happens on this kayak/camping trip, and the story itself unfolds in alternating chapters. First come Camp Forevermore chapters wherein we begin to slowly piece the entire incident together, followed by chapters where we follow the girls as they become women, seeing how their lives have been impacted after the fact. Because of this setup, this isn't the most straightforward narrative, but that didn't bother me. I have a sort of weakness for well-crafted vignettes strung together loosely (see: Winesburg, Ohio and The Illustrated Man ) and Kim Fu's prose enveloped me fully. As I read tragedy strike these women often again and again, I was devastated. Even clicking through pages I bookmarked just now made me tear up!As always happens with books I loved (yes, it's been decided now; I'm glad my thoughts have come together since I started writing this), I can't talk about this properly. I'm simply not able to translate the raw, emotional journey I went on with these girls into words. I hope others are able to review this more coherently, to convince others to pick it up. All I can say now is I think these women's lives are some that will stay with me for a while.tw: rape, instances of abuse*I received a copy of this book from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt via Netgalley, but all opinions expressed are my own.
    more
  • Shilpa
    January 1, 1970
    The first chapter of the book draws you in with the lives of these girls in those early days. Labelled Camp Forevermore, this chapter gives a snapshot of the relationship between the girls. The chapter somehow gives you the impression that most of the story really centres around a girl called Siobhan. That is a bit misleading. The chapters in the rest of the book, focuses on unique perspectives from each of the girls who were on that fateful kayaking trip. The author chooses to not tell Siobhan' The first chapter of the book draws you in with the lives of these girls in those early days. Labelled Camp Forevermore, this chapter gives a snapshot of the relationship between the girls. The chapter somehow gives you the impression that most of the story really centres around a girl called Siobhan. That is a bit misleading. The chapters in the rest of the book, focuses on unique perspectives from each of the girls who were on that fateful kayaking trip. The author chooses to not tell Siobhan's story until the very end of the book. As a reader, this was flabbergasting. The chapters follow each of the girls' lives lives after the incident, although the big caveat is that the incident that seems to have changed their lives forever hasn't been detailed in the beginning. The reader is kept guessing. Throughout the chapters there is very little mention of it, although there are hints of a great loss, and suffering because of whatever horrible thing it was that happened at Camp Forevermore. For me, the story did not come to full closure. There was too much of the "after the incident" verses the incident itself...something I would have thought would be key to understanding the cause and effect relationship of traumatic events. Having read books the likes of The Troop by Nick Cutter, may have made me judge the book critically, as comparisons are not necessarily apples to oranges. Full Review: http://sukasareads.blogspot.ca/2018/0...
    more
  • Shawna
    January 1, 1970
    ***Received an ARC from Harper Collins Canada with thanks***This was a beautifully written story about five girls around the age of 11, united for a brief time at Camp Forevermore. All five came from different walks of life, but all five left with some serious mental trauma that continued to follow them throughout their lives.Sioban, Andee, Dina, Nita and Isabel went on a kyaking excursion with their Camp Leader Jan. This was a trip that was supposed to give them a feeling of confidence and inde ***Received an ARC from Harper Collins Canada with thanks***This was a beautifully written story about five girls around the age of 11, united for a brief time at Camp Forevermore. All five came from different walks of life, but all five left with some serious mental trauma that continued to follow them throughout their lives.Sioban, Andee, Dina, Nita and Isabel went on a kyaking excursion with their Camp Leader Jan. This was a trip that was supposed to give them a feeling of confidence and independance. Sadly, Jan dies and the girls are left to fend for themselves.The girls strengths and weaknesses are quickly brought to light over the course of the following two days. Some are leaders, some a followers.....all are scared.The novel is divided into "parts" with each of the girls sharing what their lives were like before and after Camp Forevermore. I felt some parts were stronger than others and found Andee's part told in a slightly odd way compared to the others, but over all each of the girls stories were unique and made me feel part of their worlds.If you enjoy a book that makes you soul search, this would definitely be a book you would enjoy. The writing is flawless and flows effortlessly throughout the book. After the first few pages, I was quickly sucked in and finished the book relatively quickly.
    more
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an ARC from a Goodreads giveaway. This book surprised me. I thought it was going to be an adventure story about what happened at a summer camp, possibly aimed at a young adult audience, and while the story of camp is the shorter story that runs through the book, it encompasses so much more. The book is divided into sections that get into the rest of the lives of each of the girls, and these read like four mini-books that are connected to each other in interesting and unex I received this book as an ARC from a Goodreads giveaway. This book surprised me. I thought it was going to be an adventure story about what happened at a summer camp, possibly aimed at a young adult audience, and while the story of camp is the shorter story that runs through the book, it encompasses so much more. The book is divided into sections that get into the rest of the lives of each of the girls, and these read like four mini-books that are connected to each other in interesting and unexpected ways. Perhaps this is a new take on a coming of age story, or even an anti-coming of age story, because it allows the weight of difficult circumstances to remain with the characters. I hope this isn't a spoiler but it could be, so I've hidden it: there is no ah-ha moment where everything magically falls into place in the lives of these girls and I think that's a more honest portrait of what life is like, something that is not often found in books like these. Excellent.
    more
  • Carol Custer
    January 1, 1970
    This was a rather strange book, but I liked it. The writing style took some getting used to with the jumping around in time and characters and going from the camp setting to totally different stories. I expected there to be something to tie them all together at the end but the book was more like short stories showing the individual girls' lives as adults and we could surmise how the camp experience influenced their adult lives.I can't say that I particularly liked any of the girls though Isobel This was a rather strange book, but I liked it. The writing style took some getting used to with the jumping around in time and characters and going from the camp setting to totally different stories. I expected there to be something to tie them all together at the end but the book was more like short stories showing the individual girls' lives as adults and we could surmise how the camp experience influenced their adult lives.I can't say that I particularly liked any of the girls though Isobel was probably the most appealing of the bunch. I went to camp once when I was ten years old and I hated it; but I'm certainly glad I didn't have any traumatic experience even approaching the 'Lord of the Flies" type situation here!It's an interesting book and one that I'll be thinking about for awhile.
    more
  • Anky Singh
    January 1, 1970
    It's been a while since I DNF'd a book. I hate doing that because I keep thinking, "what if it had gotten better?"But I just couldn't read this one anymore. The story starts with these four girls who are in a camp together. And then the next chapter goes on to tell the future of one of those girls. Then another 'in the camp' chapter followed by another girl's story.I read half of the book before finally giving up. I just couldn't see the point of reading all of it. The past and the future, there It's been a while since I DNF'd a book. I hate doing that because I keep thinking, "what if it had gotten better?"But I just couldn't read this one anymore. The story starts with these four girls who are in a camp together. And then the next chapter goes on to tell the future of one of those girls. Then another 'in the camp' chapter followed by another girl's story.I read half of the book before finally giving up. I just couldn't see the point of reading all of it. The past and the future, there were no connections. And it was getting quite boring. So, after a long struggle, I gave up.The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore was, quite unfortunately, just not for me.
    more
  • Terri
    January 1, 1970
    Based on the description, I went into this book with certain expectations - that this would be a post modern satire of Lord of the Flies or a fierce coming of age story. It’s none of those things. The narrative structure is new and interesting and the characters are fully fleshed out. There are no foils and Fu introduces certain tropes only to confound them. She leaves the reader with a number of uncomfortable questions about the way our personalities form and about our expectations for life and Based on the description, I went into this book with certain expectations - that this would be a post modern satire of Lord of the Flies or a fierce coming of age story. It’s none of those things. The narrative structure is new and interesting and the characters are fully fleshed out. There are no foils and Fu introduces certain tropes only to confound them. She leaves the reader with a number of uncomfortable questions about the way our personalities form and about our expectations for life and for heroic stories. Highly recommended. (Advanced Readers Copy)
    more
  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I have never read anything by Kim Fu before but I will be reading lots more. This is one of the best written novels I have read in a long time. She is an excellent storyteller, weaving each of the five girls' stories into the narrative of what happened on that one disastrous camping trip. I loved seeing how the event affected each of the girls so differently as the novel tracks their lives on into adulthood. Her descriptions are vivid and placed me at each scene effortlessly. The ONLY reason I'v I have never read anything by Kim Fu before but I will be reading lots more. This is one of the best written novels I have read in a long time. She is an excellent storyteller, weaving each of the five girls' stories into the narrative of what happened on that one disastrous camping trip. I loved seeing how the event affected each of the girls so differently as the novel tracks their lives on into adulthood. Her descriptions are vivid and placed me at each scene effortlessly. The ONLY reason I've given 4 stars instead of 5 is that I was brought up short by the rather abrupt ending.
    more
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2017/12...This book has been getting a TON of buzz and let me tell you, it lives up to the hype. It’s centered on a group of young girls at a summer camp in Vancouver, and a kayaking trip that goes awry, flashing back and forth between that event and the girls' young adulthoods. It’s compelling and evocative stuff. Just really outstanding. A.__A review copy was provided by the publisher. This book will be released in February.
    more
  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Goodreads and trade publishing group for the advanced copy of this book! I really enjoyed this book. It was a coming of a story told from the standpoint of several different characters. Overall, it was a quick and interesting read.
  • Miranda
    January 1, 1970
    An entertaining, although sometimes dark, look into the tenacity of children and how one event can shape the rest of their lives. Reading about the lost girls was a reflective experience in looking back on how childhood events can alter the lives of those they touch for years afterward. Kim Fu does a great job creating complex characters full of flaws that are entirely relatable.
    more
  • Victoria Peipert
    January 1, 1970
    Kim Fu created a stunning book that creates the most perfect harmony between the voices of her core main characters and their evolution through time from being teenagers to mature women. This book was so hard to put down! It was filled with suspense, adventure, and humanity.
    more
  • Heather Mulvihill
    January 1, 1970
    This book reminded me of my years working at a camp for disabled children. I loved this book. This book was very intriguing
  • Christina Kinsella
    January 1, 1970
    Check out my review for The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore here: https://tinyurl.com/yddgvgkq
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This book was not quite what I was expecting. I was hoping for more of the survival story of a group of girls who are stranded in the wilderness and how the event shaped their future lives. We got the some of that, but the other part, not so much. There are two parts to this story, the events that transpired at Camp Forevermore and and the lives of the girls afterwards, told in alternating chapters. The strong points Disclaimer: I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This book was not quite what I was expecting. I was hoping for more of the survival story of a group of girls who are stranded in the wilderness and how the event shaped their future lives. We got the some of that, but the other part, not so much. There are two parts to this story, the events that transpired at Camp Forevermore and and the lives of the girls afterwards, told in alternating chapters. The strong points of this novel are definitely the parts that tell of Camp Forevermore. It had a Lord of the Flies setting, but with girls, and less death. It showed how easily alliances can be made and broken between children in a life or death situation. It was far more intriguing and had a plot that was more easily followed. If I was just rating the camping part of this novel, I would have given it 4 stars. While I enjoyed the tale of the disastrous camping trip, the vignettes of each girls' lives seem random and incomplete.  The description makes it seem that each of their lives are forever affected by the events that transpired, but it's only in two of the stories that there seems to be any lasting effect; Dina with her eating and Siobhan in her career choice. But for the other three characters, they could have been any random people, their stories having nothing that tied back to the camp events. One of the characters lives isn't even told by that character, rather it's from the perspective of her sister. Also, each girls story just seemed to end, with no conclusion to their narrative. The book leaves you anticipating resolution that never comes. That is the end of my official review. Please continue reading for a "small" rant about kayaks. As chance would have it, this book would come to someone who has experience with summer camps and kayaking and kayaking at summer camps. I won't claim to be an expert, but there are somethings I feel that are just not right with Camp Forevermore. First of all, these children are given half a day of training in kayaking before being sent into the ocean on an overnight trip. Half a day. I'm sure most of these girls had never been in a kayak before in their life. An afternoon of learning the basics should not be acceptable preparation for a trip. Second, I'm pretty sure they were not in the right kind of kayaks for this kind of trip. Generally, for big open water kayaking you should use what are called 'sea kayaks'. They are longer, narrower, and usually have a rudder to help with steering. It's this design that makes them better suited for open water, and they are less likely to capsize with waves and easier to control. Jan's kayak is described as being "three times the length" as the girls kayak. So judging that the average sea kayak is about 15 feet, that means that the girls were in 5 foot kayaks. NOT SOMETHING THAT SHOULD BE MAKING LONG TRIPS INTO THE OCEAN. If one of these were to be hit with a wave, it would tip the kayak, and the small child inside, right over. It might be that the area in which they were traveling was a no wave zone (are these a thing? I don't live by the ocean so I'm not sure), but I believe it was mentioned that they had spray skirts, which is usually only something that is used when waves are a concern, to keep the cockpit from being flooded. Third, you expect untrained children to kayak 3 hours on the effing ocean? Let me tell you, I had trouble handling a 3 hour paddle, on Lake Superior, as an experienced 14 year old. I can't imagine what it must be like on the ocean, being younger and less trained. I don't know if these were part of the story on purpose or if there was just not enough research done on the subject, but Camp Forevermore is definitely not somewhere I would send a child for a fun and safe camping trip.
    more
  • Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard
    January 1, 1970
    I received an eARC from Edelweiss+I really struggled with this book and ended up DNFing it on page 137 of the eARC.The positives:I really love this cover. Even though I didn't really enjoy the actual book, the cover does a good job or reflecting the central event that ties all the characters and their POVs together. I also enjoyed the inclusion the paddles decals at the start of each section. The writing was also decent. Despite the choppiness of the story/stories, it somehow managed to make thi I received an eARC from Edelweiss+I really struggled with this book and ended up DNFing it on page 137 of the eARC.The positives:I really love this cover. Even though I didn't really enjoy the actual book, the cover does a good job or reflecting the central event that ties all the characters and their POVs together. I also enjoyed the inclusion the paddles decals at the start of each section. The writing was also decent. Despite the choppiness of the story/stories, it somehow managed to make things flow. This story with lower quality of writing would have been an early DNF for me. The writing is the only reason I tried to push through. I think I will keep an eye out for this author in the future and maybe pick up a book that's in a genre more to my tastes.The negatives:I just did not care about any of the characters. I found most of them to be pretty unlikeable and the massive jumps in time/events in their lives made it impossible to get invested in the characters. I almost got through all of Isabelle's POV before I realized I was completely skimming the last 5+ pages because I just didn't care.I think these types of books are for a very specific audience. By "these types," I mean books where nothing really happens and you just observe events that are somehow supposed to make you evaluate or reflect on yourself or a part of the world around you. Unfortunately, I do not tend to be that general audience.
    more
  • KayMarie
    January 1, 1970
    The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore by Kim Fu weaves together a tale of 5 girls from their time at a sleep-away camp all the way through to adulthood. After an incident at Camp Forevermore, these girls have only themselves to rely on in order to make it home. Initially I had musings of this being akin to Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants but I came to realize that The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore is an entirely separate entity. Upon being introduced to our main characters, Fu is able to capture The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore by Kim Fu weaves together a tale of 5 girls from their time at a sleep-away camp all the way through to adulthood. After an incident at Camp Forevermore, these girls have only themselves to rely on in order to make it home. Initially I had musings of this being akin to Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants but I came to realize that The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore is an entirely separate entity. Upon being introduced to our main characters, Fu is able to capture the young innocent ages of the girls as they attend camp and shows the changes in the years following that fateful summer.After reading the synopsis, I was immediately drawn in and intrigued to take an amazing journey through the lives of these 5 girls. To get to know them, to grow with them, to truly invest in what became of our fateful five. I smiled to myself as I read how Fu described camp and the different groups who attended because I could genuinely picture it all, even though I had never attended a proper summer camp. That being said, I did find that a few things did not flow properly for me while reading and left me with a constant feeling that I had missed something entirely. The pacing was sporadic and jumped between extremely different thoughts within the span of a page which was jarring. This very well could be a style of writing that works for some people but it was too much in the vein of ‘stream of consciousness’ for me to fully invest in what was happening as it kept taking me out of the story.The premise behind the story is extremely intriguing and taking on 5 different perspectives/points of view is a large undertaking in this type of book. Still, this is the kind of story that I can see a group of young girls reading and looking for parts of themselves in each of the characters.
    more
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to #HCCFirstLook for this ARC, in return for my review.I really wanted to love this book, but I did not. I really dislike books that hop around from the past to the present, which this one does. I thought that it would have read much better if the author had told the summer camp episode first, and THEN caught up with each character in their current lives; rather than skipping back and forth.Having said that, I did love the subject matter...who doesn't love summer camp?! There definitel Thank you to #HCCFirstLook for this ARC, in return for my review.I really wanted to love this book, but I did not. I really dislike books that hop around from the past to the present, which this one does. I thought that it would have read much better if the author had told the summer camp episode first, and THEN caught up with each character in their current lives; rather than skipping back and forth.Having said that, I did love the subject matter...who doesn't love summer camp?! There definitely needs to be more books with this theme.I will say that the author did a great, and thorough, job with the character vignettes. They were detailed, and you could really feel what each character had been going through since the episode at summer camp. I did find it weird that except for 2 girls (and only then because one was married to the other's brother), none of them stayed in touch. I also wish that the 'episode' part on the island was more adventurous - I found that it read really weak compared to the alternate character vignettes.All in all, I liked this book. It had a wise lesson of when traumatic things happen to you, the effects can reverberate through yours and others' lives for years to come.
    more
  • Sarnfield
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from Harper Collins Canada to review. I’m sorry to say it was just middle of the road for me. Despite being extremely well written with fully fleshed out characters, the book as a whole was not cohesive. The story about what happened on a camp canoe trip is interspersed with descriptions of each of the five girls’ lives in the years after camp. Very little of this has anything to do with the camp scenario. Two of the girls have a connection later in life but with l I received an ARC of this book from Harper Collins Canada to review. I’m sorry to say it was just middle of the road for me. Despite being extremely well written with fully fleshed out characters, the book as a whole was not cohesive. The story about what happened on a camp canoe trip is interspersed with descriptions of each of the five girls’ lives in the years after camp. Very little of this has anything to do with the camp scenario. Two of the girls have a connection later in life but with little indication of how their camp experience impacted them. The strangest part of the book was the section for one of the girls after camp, but it was 90% about her sister. Why? This book was more like reading a series of short vignettes or character studies than an ongoing novel. Just snippets of lives with no real story. The whole camp experience seemed an aside. And the ending? So blasé.
    more
  • Rosanna
    January 1, 1970
    While this book is very well written, it was not a book that appealed to me. I enjoyed it while I reading it, but then it abruptly ended and I felt cheated.The story centers around five young women who were part of an “incident” at their summer all-girls camp. I know the story was about the young women, and not the incident, but I really needed more information about it. I needed some backstory.Each girl had her “story,” while young, and then while older. Again, the stories were well written, bu While this book is very well written, it was not a book that appealed to me. I enjoyed it while I reading it, but then it abruptly ended and I felt cheated.The story centers around five young women who were part of an “incident” at their summer all-girls camp. I know the story was about the young women, and not the incident, but I really needed more information about it. I needed some backstory.Each girl had her “story,” while young, and then while older. Again, the stories were well written, but I really didn’t care for the characters.I felt like this could have been packaged as a group of short stories, not as a novel.
    more
  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the ARC! It's my first book Kim Fu, so I honestly didn't know what to expect. I know we shouldn't judge books by their covers, but this one is absolutely beautiful and I instantly fell in love with it. The story wasn't quite how I expected, but I liked it. The first chapters are a bit too slow, because we're still getting to know the characters and they have such different backgrounds. I needed a minute to actually understand them. But anyway... It gets be Thanks to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the ARC! It's my first book Kim Fu, so I honestly didn't know what to expect. I know we shouldn't judge books by their covers, but this one is absolutely beautiful and I instantly fell in love with it. The story wasn't quite how I expected, but I liked it. The first chapters are a bit too slow, because we're still getting to know the characters and they have such different backgrounds. I needed a minute to actually understand them. But anyway... It gets better. Nice read.
    more
Write a review