The Last Tudor (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #14)
The latest novel from #1 New York Times bestselling author Philippa Gregory features one of the most famous girls in history, Lady Jane Grey, and her two sisters, each of whom dared to defy her queen. Jane Grey was queen of England for nine days, dying on the scaffold for her faith. But few people know about her two sisters, cousins to Elizabeth I who also faced imprisonment and death sentences for treason. Katherine Grey was the beauty of the family who earned the lifelong hatred of her cousin Elizabeth I when she married for love. Mary Grey was an extraordinary little person known as a dwarf in Tudor times, who defied convention to marry the tallest man at court in her own secret love match. The fascinating story of three idiosyncratic Tudor girls and their challenges to the most powerful Tudor woman of all is the subject of the next novel from the author who defines what it means to be a writer of historical fiction (RT Book Reviews)."

The Last Tudor (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #14) Details

TitleThe Last Tudor (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #14)
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseAug 8th, 2017
PublisherTouchstone
ISBN147675876X
ISBN-139781476758763
Number of pages528 pages
Rating
GenreHistorical, Fiction, English History, Tudor Period

The Last Tudor (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #14) Review

  • Caidyn (BW Book Reviews)
    April 28, 2017
    I don't want to touch this book with a 100-meter pole because of the description. (All below quotes are taken from it.)"Jane Grey was queen of England for nine days, dying on the scaffold for her faith. But few people know about her two sisters, cousins to Elizabeth I who also faced imprisonment and death sentences for treason."Jane died because of Parliament. She did not want to be Queen. She was forced by her parents and in-laws. She immediately surrendered her forces to Mary I (Elizabeth I's I don't want to touch this book with a 100-meter pole because of the description. (All below quotes are taken from it.)"Jane Grey was queen of England for nine days, dying on the scaffold for her faith. But few people know about her two sisters, cousins to Elizabeth I who also faced imprisonment and death sentences for treason."Jane died because of Parliament. She did not want to be Queen. She was forced by her parents and in-laws. She immediately surrendered her forces to Mary I (Elizabeth I's half-sister) and went to the tower. Mary did not want Jane to die. She tried to save her life, but the influential councils denied it and she was executed. Much like what happened between Elizabeth and Mary, Queen of Scots.Actually, most of the books I've read about the Grey sisters focus on Katherine and Mary. Not Jane. She usually only gets a few chapters. Same with non-fiction books. I think I read a book by Alison Weir that was about Katherine. Jane doesn't have too much written about her since she's not sexy."Katherine Grey was the beauty of the family who earned the lifelong hatred of her cousin Elizabeth I when she married for love."Uhmmmm, no??? There was a literal act in Parliament that forbade anyone who had royal blood in them -- and Katherine Grey did because of her heritage* -- from marrying without the consent of the monarch. Katherine broke that law by marrying Edward Seymour (yes, one Jane Seymour's nephews**). So, she wasn't hated. She just literally broke the law and got thrown in jail since Elizabeth was rightfully upset about her trust being broken."Mary Grey was an extraordinary little person known as a dwarf in Tudor times, who defied convention to marry the tallest man at court in her own secret love match."Mary was not a dwarf. She had a hunchback. At least, all of the books I've read about her have said she had a hunchback. Also, Mary did the same exact thing that her sister did. Married without permission. So, yeah, she got in trouble for it."The fascinating story of three idiosyncratic Tudor girls and their challenges to the most powerful Tudor woman of all is the subject of the next novel from the author who defines what it means to be a writer of historical fiction."I'm sorry, but what fucking place gave Philippa Gregory her damn degree in history? Who did this? I mean, she can't even get simple history correct. These times were interesting enough. Stop pitting women against each other!! Elizabeth I didn't marry for many reasons. Fear of what a husband could do to her, fear of childbirth, wanting to maintain all her power, etc. However, she had love in her life. She had Robert Dudley. They loved each other until the end. Practically a married couple.Also, "defines what it means to be a writer of historical fiction". I call fucking bullshit. I smell it wafting in the air. No. No. NO. NO. This is a woman who can't get simple history correct. This is a woman who makes up homosexual plots. This is a woman who malaigns other women for the hell of it and buys into false charges of incest. I've read ten times better historical fiction by historians -- specifically Alison Weir -- who uses history heavily in her work and keeps it accurate.*Katherine Grey was the child of Frances Grey. Frances Grey was the child of Charles Brandon and Mary, Dowager Queen of France. Mary, the Dowager Queen, was sister to Henry VIII. And Elizabeth I was Henry's daughter with Anne Boleyn. So, they were cousins.**Edward Seymour was the son of Edward Seymour (Sr) and Anne Somerset. Edward Sr was the brother of Jane Seymour.
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  • Lily Rose
    March 30, 2017
    I had decided to overcome my distaste for Philippa Gregory and give this book a shot, since Lady Jane Grey has always been a historical figure of great interest to me. Simply reading the synopsis made me change my mind. "..who earned the lifelong hatred of her cousin Elizabeth I when she married for love."Really? When is Miss Gregory going to stop shading strong and exemplary women of our History just to write a spicy romance that's going to sell? Isn't she content that she destroyed Anne Boleyn I had decided to overcome my distaste for Philippa Gregory and give this book a shot, since Lady Jane Grey has always been a historical figure of great interest to me. Simply reading the synopsis made me change my mind. "..who earned the lifelong hatred of her cousin Elizabeth I when she married for love."Really? When is Miss Gregory going to stop shading strong and exemplary women of our History just to write a spicy romance that's going to sell? Isn't she content that she destroyed Anne Boleyn's legacy?
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  • Touchstone Books
    June 29, 2017
    This is THE GRAND FINALE of Philippa's Tudor Court series ladies and gents! And let me tell you, it delivers.
  • Laura
    July 24, 2017
    Disclaimer: An advanced reader copy was generously provided to me by the publisher via NetGalley. Fans of Philippa Gregory will enjoy her newest novel. The name is incredibly misleading, since the last reigning Tudor is only a background character in this novel. It's actually about the three tragic Grey sisters (Jane, Katherine, Mary). Each sister narrates 1/3 of the book. Readers who are unfamiliar with the Tudor court may struggle with this novel, since Gregory does devote much time to histori Disclaimer: An advanced reader copy was generously provided to me by the publisher via NetGalley. Fans of Philippa Gregory will enjoy her newest novel. The name is incredibly misleading, since the last reigning Tudor is only a background character in this novel. It's actually about the three tragic Grey sisters (Jane, Katherine, Mary). Each sister narrates 1/3 of the book. Readers who are unfamiliar with the Tudor court may struggle with this novel, since Gregory does devote much time to historical context or explaining events beyond the three captives. There is no character development, and the sisters conform to their stereotypes (Jane the martyr; Katherine the silly stupid romantic, etc) without Gregory even trying to add depth to their experiences. Gregory's distain for Elizabeth I, as seen in her novel 'The Virgin's Lover' is very clear in this novel as well: she is repeatedly referred to as vain, jealous, unstable and selfish, without any effort given to display or mention any redeeming qualities. Overall I thought the book was quite terrible, but her target audience will probably like it.
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  • Tracy
    July 11, 2017
    Quite fascinating and brings the three girls to life. When you read a history book, and "Katherine Grey was under imprisonment until her death", you sort of file that away. But reading of her hopelessness after losing her firstborn child and husband, how tragic! I'm not certain I even knew anything about Mary Grey at all. A well chosen story
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  • Shannon Dyer
    July 15, 2017
    Review to come at AAR.
  • Katie
    May 29, 2017
    My favorite thing about Philippa Gregory's books is that you can sit down for an hour and easily turn through half of the story. This 500 page tome took a lot of commitment. Gregory writes from the perspective of the three Grey sisters, Jane, Katherine, and Mary. Jane is the godly one, Katherine is young and reckless, and Mary...well Mary ends up narrating every detail about the fiasco with Mary Queen of Scots and how horrible Queen Elizabeth is. She doesn't really have her own personality.I lik My favorite thing about Philippa Gregory's books is that you can sit down for an hour and easily turn through half of the story. This 500 page tome took a lot of commitment. Gregory writes from the perspective of the three Grey sisters, Jane, Katherine, and Mary. Jane is the godly one, Katherine is young and reckless, and Mary...well Mary ends up narrating every detail about the fiasco with Mary Queen of Scots and how horrible Queen Elizabeth is. She doesn't really have her own personality.I liked the structure where each of the sisters gets her own section. I liked the challenge of telling this story primarily from within the Tower of London. I didn't like that 80% of it ended up being a stream of consciousness about Queen Elizabeth's reign, and how the Grey sisters perceived her as vile, egotistical, and completely manic.I think this would have been 4 stars for me if the detail on Elizabeth had been toned down and Gregory let the focus rest on the queen's cousins. I wanted to read the Grey sisters' stories--I already know Elizabeth's.
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  • Angela
    July 24, 2017
    This book was received as an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I had hopes to discover a new viewpoint about a trio of sisters that stood perhaps a little too closely to a throne that was guarded so jealously by the Tudors. What this wound up being was a story stretched far too thin on women that either died young or were able to mostly stay out of the spotlight. The book is separated into rough thirds, each part narrated by a different sister. The oldest, Jane, gets very litt This book was received as an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I had hopes to discover a new viewpoint about a trio of sisters that stood perhaps a little too closely to a throne that was guarded so jealously by the Tudors. What this wound up being was a story stretched far too thin on women that either died young or were able to mostly stay out of the spotlight. The book is separated into rough thirds, each part narrated by a different sister. The oldest, Jane, gets very little time which fits since she is dead by sixteen. The other two, Katherine and Mary spend most of their time imprisoned, complaining of being imprisoned, or being in love, which is the reason they wind up imprisoned. The plot revolves around as much vilification of Elizabeth as Gregory is able to pack into the Grey sisters, who wholeheartedly believe their claim to the throne is superior, yet dare do nothing to displease Elizabeth. When they finally do defy the queen, they do nothing to further their private ambition and then spend the rest of their lives viewing everything from the sidelines.Their cousin and contemporary, Mary, Queen of Scots, may have lived many of her years imprisoned, but she never failed to plot and intrigue her way out and back into power. The Greys just waited for it to be handed to them.
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  • Selena
    July 5, 2017
    I hate to say it, but this was not my favorite. I was disappointed because I remember being fascinated with Jane Grey in high school and was interested in learning more about her and her sisters. It just kind of drug along with the same continuous plot. I realize you can't change history though. I was happy with the way it ended for at least the one.
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  • Ashley
    July 24, 2017
    I received this as an ARC from NetGalley.com.Review to come during the release week per request from the publisher.
  • *TUDOR^QUEEN*
    July 30, 2017
    When I saw the two names attached to this book, Tudor and Philippa Gregory, that was all I needed to tap the "Request book" button within a second. My fascination with The Tudors has spanned decades, and no one makes it more digestible than Philippa Gregory. My only misgivings were that I would not find the central figures in this tome that interesting: the "Nine Days Queen", Lady Jane Grey, and her two younger sisters, Lady Katherine and Lady Mary. Queen Elizabeth I was England's Monarch at thi When I saw the two names attached to this book, Tudor and Philippa Gregory, that was all I needed to tap the "Request book" button within a second. My fascination with The Tudors has spanned decades, and no one makes it more digestible than Philippa Gregory. My only misgivings were that I would not find the central figures in this tome that interesting: the "Nine Days Queen", Lady Jane Grey, and her two younger sisters, Lady Katherine and Lady Mary. Queen Elizabeth I was England's Monarch at this time, and hers is a story I am not that charmed by as well. However, the special writing gift author Philippa Gregory has is to so humanize the characters through her first person narration that the reader can easily connect with them. She takes history, marries it with a bit of poetic license and serves you up "edible" history...while the reader eats out of her hand. This book is divided into three "narrations" as I call them. The first Part begins with Lady Jane Grey (who at sixteen was Queen of England for just nine days), followed in succession by her younger sisters Katherine, and then Mary. Each "Part" is narrated by each of the sisters. Philippa Gregory weaves the tapestry of history with twists of irony, great love, shattering heartbreak, and anger ...which is acutely felt by the reader through the method of each sister's first person narration. You will surely shed a tear while reading this book.Across the decades, I have read an abundance of books on the Tudors and specifically on Queen Elizabeth I. However, I hadn't quite realized just how paranoid, ruthless, jealous and heartless Queen Elizabeth I was until I read this particular book. In addition, I thought I wouldn't be that interested in reading about the Tudor line of the Grey sisters, but author Gregory handily lured me in with her enchanting writing magic. I feel very fortunate to have read this tome as I learned much about another branch of the Tudor Dynasty I had given short shrift . My previous knowledge was limited to the movie starring British actress Helena Bonham Carter as Lady Jane Grey. Now I know a much richer story which is truly sad and makes me wonder what might have been had the Tudor line extended on an alternative pathway, as it most likely should have.This was brilliant, and I shall approach unread present and future offerings from Philippa Gregory with the knowledge that I will both learn and feel much...and forever be touched by history.Many thanks to NetGalley for the privilege of receiving an advance reader copy in return for my honest review.
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