Lucy & Andy Neanderthal
From the author of the New York Times bestselling Jedi Academy books comes book two in the laugh-out-loud graphic novel series about Neanderthal siblings Lucy and Andy. Fans of Big Nate, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and The Terrible Two won t want to miss it! Lucy & Andy are Stone Age rock stars!I loved this book! Lincoln Peirce, author of the Big Nate series Neanderthal siblings Lucy and Andy are back to their paleo pranks. This time, they have to put up with more than just each other the cave is feeling awfully cramped since the humans moved in. They re in the Ice Age, and legroom comes at a real premium! Jeffrey Brown skillfully blends humor and history with paleontologist sections: Timeline of Key Discoveries, Ice Age Fact vs. Fiction, Silly Cavemen Myths, and more. Praise for book one: Brown s vivacious plotlines are laugh-out-loud funny. . . . This is an auspiciously clever and engaging series opener. Kirkus Reviews Readers with an interest in fossil discoveries won t be able to put this down. Publishers Weekly"

Lucy & Andy Neanderthal Details

TitleLucy & Andy Neanderthal
Author
ReleaseAug 29th, 2017
PublisherCrown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780385388382
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Juvenile, Middle Grade, Historical, Historical Fiction

Lucy & Andy Neanderthal Review

  • Brenda Ayala
    January 1, 1970
    Now that I know what to expect from this series, I really enjoyed this installment. It basically gives tidbits of information about cavemen and then follows a family of them as they deal with their situations in humorous (but somewhat accurate) ways. Here, we saw them dealing with the Ice Age. How they would move to warmer climates to escape the cold, what food sources they had, how they would avoid larger predators. I learned what the first known instrument was and what they used shells for. I Now that I know what to expect from this series, I really enjoyed this installment. It basically gives tidbits of information about cavemen and then follows a family of them as they deal with their situations in humorous (but somewhat accurate) ways. Here, we saw them dealing with the Ice Age. How they would move to warmer climates to escape the cold, what food sources they had, how they would avoid larger predators. I learned what the first known instrument was and what they used shells for. I also learned that poor Andy never seems to get a leg up--and when he tries, he knocks everybody down with him! It's sweet, and I liked the authors for creating characters that can bridge the gap between what we know as society today and what it was back then.Obviously not all of this is true to life, but as a teaching tool I think it gets all the relevant points across.
    more
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    Copy provided by the publisher. I have a lot of trouble differentiating what is true and what is not in these books. For instance, there are scientists who pop into the story frequently to talk about excavating caves and finding remains of primitive peoples, but then there is a pet saber tooth kitten. The plot centers around a family of humans who need to stay with the family of Neanderthals in their cave because of bad weather, but the characters look pretty much the same. I also wonder about t Copy provided by the publisher. I have a lot of trouble differentiating what is true and what is not in these books. For instance, there are scientists who pop into the story frequently to talk about excavating caves and finding remains of primitive peoples, but then there is a pet saber tooth kitten. The plot centers around a family of humans who need to stay with the family of Neanderthals in their cave because of bad weather, but the characters look pretty much the same. I also wonder about the human families. One looks like the father is darker skinned (and has artful stubble-- did early humans shave?) than the mother, but it seems to me that early humans would have looked very similar to each other because of the conditions where they lived and the inability to travel far distances to meet up with groups that looked different because of where THEY lived. Had there been some explanation of this, that would have helped. The mothers are referred to as "Mrs.", and the characters all have very AngloSaxon names, which is also confusing. I also found it hard to imagine that the human father would have fainted when he saw a baby being born.Andy seems almost like a modern child transported back to prehistoric times, because he doesn't want to be crowded in the cave, he balks at skinning a deer, and he is generally unhappy with small things. The target demographic won't mind this, and will hopefully get a lot of scientific facts from the supplementary information at the end of the book and the comments of the scientists throughout the story, but I was confused by this.
    more
  • Jonathan
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't say enough good things about the first book in the series and this one is just as good!!!! A graphic novel that is chalked full of pieces of factual information. It's like reading a cartoon about history. The only thing I can think of to relate it to is "Magic School Bus", but Lucy & Andy is something unique to itself and these books are awesome!!! I can only hope that Jeffrey Brown takes this concept and expands it into other realms of science and history. One of the other aspect I couldn't say enough good things about the first book in the series and this one is just as good!!!! A graphic novel that is chalked full of pieces of factual information. It's like reading a cartoon about history. The only thing I can think of to relate it to is "Magic School Bus", but Lucy & Andy is something unique to itself and these books are awesome!!! I can only hope that Jeffrey Brown takes this concept and expands it into other realms of science and history. One of the other aspects that really stands out to me is how simply complex his drawings are. They appear to be nothing more than sketches, but then when you really start to examine the cells you notice so much more detail. Can't wait for Lucy & Andy #3. Make it happen, Mr. Brown, like now!!!!
    more
  • Samma
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like this book included more of the scientist characters in "today", revealing what actual humans and neanderthals would have been like, at the end of the chapters. Over all, an enjoyable read, even with the bits of misinformation (which are clarified by the scientist or at the end of the book). I love the artwork and the storytelling.
    more
  • Mikey Golczynski
    January 1, 1970
    My 8 year old son read it in less than a day. He says "It's even better than the first one!"
  • Leonard Kim
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. We need more educational books (not just about Neanderthals) like this.
Write a review