Mother Panic, Volume 1
Part of Gerard Way's new imprint, DC's Young Animal!Gotham has long been the city of the Bat, but there's a new vigilante on the streets, and she's got her own brand of violent justice to deal out to the criminals of the city.Enter Mother Panic! By day, Violet Paige is a celebutante with a bad attitude and a temper to match, whom no one suspects of having anything lying beneath the surface of her outrageous exploits. But Violet isn't just another bored heiress in the upper echelons of Gotham City's elite. Motivated by her traumatic youth, Violet seeks to exact vengeance on her privileged peers as the terrifying new vigilante known only as Mother Panic.Collecting: Mother Panic 1-6

Mother Panic, Volume 1 Details

TitleMother Panic, Volume 1
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 18th, 2017
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN1401271111
ISBN-139781401271114
Number of pages176 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Mystery, Crime, Batman

Mother Panic, Volume 1 Review

  • Rory Wilding
    June 19, 2017
    Reading this first volume of Mother Panic from DC’s Young Animal imprint reminded me of what was morally wrong about the character of Batman in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Although I thought the casting of Ben Affleck was spot-on, given the material he worked with, the role itself of a self-loathing vigilante with brutal methods who doesn’t mind the bloodshed seems to contradict what is great about the Dark Knight Detective in the comics.Please click here for my full review.
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  • Chad
    June 16, 2017
    Mother Panic appears to just be a combination of Batwoman and Batman who curses. She's a celebutante who wants revenge on anyone that has to do with this weird boarding school she was forced to go to for 10 years. The flashbacks come in such a disjointed way (sometimes just one panel) that it was really hard to make sense of what happened at the school. I learned more about the characters from the Who's Who entries at the back of the book then I did from the actual story. There wasn't a single l Mother Panic appears to just be a combination of Batwoman and Batman who curses. She's a celebutante who wants revenge on anyone that has to do with this weird boarding school she was forced to go to for 10 years. The flashbacks come in such a disjointed way (sometimes just one panel) that it was really hard to make sense of what happened at the school. I learned more about the characters from the Who's Who entries at the back of the book then I did from the actual story. There wasn't a single likable or interesting character in the book. And the dialogue had such gems as "What the f#cking f#ck is going on?". Feels like the writing of an angsty teenager not the same writer that writes Faith over at Valiant (which is a great book).The only things I really liked about the book were the visual design of Mother Panic's costume (It looks damn cool.) and the backup story. It was a story about an overnight talk radio jock who was pro-Batman. He's murdered and the owner brings in an anti-Batman podcaster to replace him. It has absolutely nothing to do with Mother Panic.Received an advance copy from DC and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Keith
    May 21, 2017
    Thinking about it, I'm pretty sure Mother Panic is not well-written, nor is it good. If you decide to read it, I would recommend reading Gerard Way's afterword first. Not that it is well-written either (it isn't), but it gives an insight into what the creative team was interested in exploring with this book, which isn't particularly clear from the collected issues themselves. According to Way (who all but claims ownership of the book, crediting writer Jody Houser mainly with snappy dialogue), th Thinking about it, I'm pretty sure Mother Panic is not well-written, nor is it good. If you decide to read it, I would recommend reading Gerard Way's afterword first. Not that it is well-written either (it isn't), but it gives an insight into what the creative team was interested in exploring with this book, which isn't particularly clear from the collected issues themselves. According to Way (who all but claims ownership of the book, crediting writer Jody Houser mainly with snappy dialogue), the character of Mother Panic is designed to explore the invasiveness of modern-day wealth and celebrity. If Bruce Wayne's origin were to play out in today's world (Way suggests), a world in which being a part of the upper crust brings with it paparazzi, the public eye, and a certain loss of identity, how would that impact someone who is already dealing with the dual identity of being a superhero?I think this is a sort of interesting question, but not one that Mother Panic deals with in practice except in the most cursory ways. This volume is divided into two three-part stories. In "Work in Progress," socialite Violet Paige returns to Gotham after an unspecified time abroad and immediately sets up shop as a high-tech superhero, for no clear reason, and with no obvious sense of an origin story. Not to say that there aren't a significant number of flashbacks to Violet's childhood -- there are, in fact, tons -- but it's hard to tell how all the pieces fit together into the character's present-day self. I don't even know if we find out what the character's superhero name is supposed to mean (and if it's a reference to some shitty band, Mr. Way, I will kill myself).There's stuff to like about this first story regardless -- most of it due to the ways that the mood of the book is five degrees left of center, existing in a realm of dissonance and discomfort. Violet is genuinely unlikable -- during the story she kidnaps someone after saving them and promptly forgets she did so; she keeps her senile mother imprisoned in a tower garden; and she's just generally obtuse and unpleasant. The book's first villain is a pretty classic Vertigo-style sadist. There's interesting, subversive pieces here, but they all feel pretty rough-draft.The dialogue is terse, attempting some kind of goth-noir-surrealism that's mostly just confusing and a little frustrating. It's not the kind of book that makes much sense, plotwise, on a first read, and I'm not sure if its methods feel as intentional as something like Batwoman: Elegy, which also takes a few reads to make sense of, but seems to know itself in a way that Mother Panic does not.The next story, "Broken Things," goes more deeply into Violet's backstory, which is essentially that she was trained to be some kind of supersoldier (or super criminal or super something else) at an orphanage that acted as a cover for some weird military (or something) science lab. And I think she's trying to take down the people in the orphanage, or maybe she's just trying to take one of the other supersoldiers from the lab, although for most of the story she seems to be friends with the soldier, but then not...I mean, I genuinely had no fucking idea by the end. "Broken Things" is drawn by Shawn Crystal instead of artist/co-creator Tommy Lee Edwards, and while Crystal has a lovely style, it's way too cutesy for a book as grim as this, and he's also an artist who seems relatively incapable of drawing more than one kind of face. This is a problem when the villain and the hero have the same builds and the same haircuts -- most of the time I couldn't tell who was speaking, much less what was going on.Around the edges of both stories are some scenes in which Violet goes to clubs in order to keep up her alter ego's identity, but it feels no different than most any iteration of Bruce Wayne's doofy playboy. If this is the meat of Way's pitch for this character, there's nothing distinctive regarding these themes on the finished page.If Crystal continues drawing the book, I doubt it's going to be worth reading to see if Way and Co. can figure out how to be self-critical enough to make the thing good. I will probably give this volume a reread, wait to see who's on art duties for Vol 2, and maybe otherwise I am done with Mother Panic.
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  • Arya Stark
    January 8, 2017
    DNF -Read the first two issues and have cancelled my ongoing subscription. Its a good premise but I find the main character to be rather boring and so up themselves that I honestly dont care about them.Was hoping this new batch of DC would be something different but unfortunatley just like Marvel it has been very poor recently.
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  • Charles
    June 15, 2017
    Can it be possible to be both interested and disappointed at the same time? Damn. I really wanted to enjoy this book and in fact, I very much did for the first few issues. After that, there seemed to be a marked change in both the art and storytelling, but for now, let’s rewind a bit.So far, I’ve been really intrigued by DC’s Young Animal titles. Some are way out there reboots, re-imaginings, reinterpretations, or retro whackiness! This however, falls under a new property and character that exis Can it be possible to be both interested and disappointed at the same time? Damn. I really wanted to enjoy this book and in fact, I very much did for the first few issues. After that, there seemed to be a marked change in both the art and storytelling, but for now, let’s rewind a bit.So far, I’ve been really intrigued by DC’s Young Animal titles. Some are way out there reboots, re-imaginings, reinterpretations, or retro whackiness! This however, falls under a new property and character that exists in the well-established Gothamverse. Batman and Batwoman show up a bit, but you don’t need to have an in-depth knowledge of either to move with the story. However, because I’m a fan of the two, I saw some cracks in the veneer. First and foremost, this title really feels like it’s trying to channel some Batwoman: Elegy. In fact, you’re almost hit over the head with it if you’re familiar with that story and the fantastical, story book elements and rhymes throughout. I could tolerate it for a while in this, but eventually it wore thin when another character appeared who was in that mould.What also really took me out of this story was the shift in art from Tommy Lee Edwards to Shawn Crystal. The first part was kind of edgy and sketchy looking which sort of fit well in my opinion about a story of a dejected, empty, annoyed, and rebellious young celebrity. However, when it switched to Crystal I was really confused. Yes, it did have a dreamy quality to it at times, but others the art was so jarring I couldn’t recognize characters from Edwards’ take on them. Add to that, Crystal’s felt almost like a hybrid style of MAD Magazine, Ren and Stimpy, and mid-Century manga. Maybe they were trying to appeal to a younger audience, but this story isn’t really age appropriate for them.As for the character design, I found it pretty neat! Is it Bat Family-like or not? I tried to look past the hockey gloves from a marriage of the WWF’s Legion of Doom and the Road Warrior. I tried to remind myself that things are a bit different under the Young Animal imprint.As for the story, I was a bit lost at times. So, wait is the surgeon helping her, the same one from the awful school? How did she become so famous? Why is she a celebrity? Is all to be revealed in another volume? Wait, the super-pretty person was a guy? Super smart rats? I guess it’s ok, cuz Ratcatcher’s in it. Why is Violet suddenly offended when some vapid hook up rejects her (she’s been doing that throughout the story)? The more it went on, the less I enjoyed it. Maybe it was too much of a good thing at first. Now, this might be for you as it’s really quite different for DC but does offer the familiarity of the Gothamverse. Although I had problems with this, I’d still say give it a go just to try something different.
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  • ☙ percy ❧
    May 20, 2017
    i have an ARC of one of my most anticipated comics of 2017 ajsjahadoadkAJSNADJADN watch this space
  • Rick Hunter
    June 22, 2017
    Mother Panic is a brand new character created for the Young Animal line at DC which Gerard Way oversees. You never know what you're going to get with a brand new series about a brand new character. I'd never heard of any of the creative staff before either. That made it even more of an unknown. Mother Panic is a member of the social elite that is always in the spotlight. Her real name is Violet. She's the kind of person that you'd expect to see hobnobbing at events hosting by Bruce Wayne. Some o Mother Panic is a brand new character created for the Young Animal line at DC which Gerard Way oversees. You never know what you're going to get with a brand new series about a brand new character. I'd never heard of any of the creative staff before either. That made it even more of an unknown. Mother Panic is a member of the social elite that is always in the spotlight. Her real name is Violet. She's the kind of person that you'd expect to see hobnobbing at events hosting by Bruce Wayne. Some of her childhood is seen through flashbacks. Man, she had it rough. After her father's death, her older brother took over the family company, sent their mom to facility where she could be seen to round the clock by paid professionals, and shipped Violet off to a boarding school named Gather House. The people that ran this place treated the kids in their care as experiments. Violet survived, but I can't say she's really a better person for it. She now has returned to Gotham to seek retribution against the one-percenters that have wronged her thus far in life. She has spent a fortune on surgeries. Unlike the rest of the people in her social circles who are more apt to being addicted to plastic surgery, the surgeries she's undergone have amplified her strength, along with various other things that will help her out fighting, so she can become a vigilante.The book contains 2 story arcs. The first deals with her just getting back to Gotham and deciding to take down the first person on her list of those that have wronged her. Along the way, we get glimpse of Violet's past that directly pertain to the person she's after. For the 2nd arc, Violet meets someone else that went to Gather House that's just as screwed up as her. He too is trying to take down all of those responsible for how he's become. Violet and this guy don't exactly see eye to eye on how to take down these social elites. As they part ways, I am left with the feeling that we'll be seeing a lot more of this other person as he may well be the main antagonist to Mother Panic.You can't have a book about someone becoming a new vigilante in Gotham without having them meet Batman face to face. Batwoman also has a dust up with Mother Panic. A minor Batman villain named Ratcatcher becomes a supporting player in the drama that unfolds. There is Violet's personal doctor that takes care of Violet after battles and surgeries. A male that Violet rescues in the first arc looks to be headed towards becoming her Violet's version of Alfred. Then there's Violet's bat shit crazy mom who likes to sit around in the basement having tea parties with her imaginary friends. All of these supporting cast members make for an interesting mix. Being set in Gotham, I know we can look forward to more well established characters popping in from time to time as well. Writer Jody Houser has already shown baby steps in Violet's growth as a character in the first volume of this series. While I don't think that this story is groundbreaking, I do like the direction it's headed and really enjoy seeing how the upper class is portrayed as far less than perfect. I also connected with the adult themes in this book since the story is aimed for mature audiences only. Things didn't have to be toned down to so that young teens could be incorporated into the target audience. This was a decent introduction of Mother Panic to the world, and I'm looking forward to seeing where things go from here. The writing gets 3.5 stars. Tommy Lee Edwards starts off as the illustrator on the book. He draws the first 3 issues which is the entire first arc. I wasn't really a fan of the art in this half of the book. Too many of the characters' faces where either hidden in shadow or had these really scratchy looking details in them like the artist didn't really know how accent details are supposed to look. A good portion of the first half is really dark and there aren't a lot of panels that color really plays a major role unless you consider everything having too much black as being colored. I love the old Image style of art with heavy inks, but here the inks seem out of place, as I mentioned with the facial details. Towards the end of his half of the book, Edwards does lighten things and has some really beautiful coloring in his panels. For the second arc of the book, Shawn Crystal takes over the pencil and ink work. Jean-Francois Beaulieu colors Crystal's work. All the characters drawn by Crystal look better than anything Edwards drew. Violet is actually attractive in the latter half. When Edwards drew her, you could barely tell she was a woman, much less the beautiful celebrity she is supposed to millions with hordes of followers. If the stories remain good and Crystal stays on as main artist for the series, I could grow to love this title. Edwards' art is around 2 stars. Crystal's is about 4 stars. Average those 2 together and I'll give the art a 3 star score and call it a day.I had no preconceived notions before reading this book and went into it with low expectations. I ended up enjoying more than I thought I would. Had Shawn Crystal been the artist on the whole book, the score would be a little higher. As is, Tommy Lee Edwards' art just hurt the first portion of the book too much. If you enjoy stories about the debauchery that takes place in Gotham, but want something with a more mature story, this is the book for you. Overall rating 3.25 stars. ***** I got a digital copy of this from Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Wing Kee
    April 28, 2017
    This book is as lost as Violet.World: The art for the first 3 issues was good, I like the style, reminded my of Sean Murphy which is always a great thing. The other 3 issues were not so good, the exaggerated facial expressions shifted the tone and made for a janky read. The world building here is fragmented and broken much like the main character (more below), there is not enough context to engage readers and also not enough to build and establish Violet's little piece of Gotham that we are supp This book is as lost as Violet.World: The art for the first 3 issues was good, I like the style, reminded my of Sean Murphy which is always a great thing. The other 3 issues were not so good, the exaggerated facial expressions shifted the tone and made for a janky read. The world building here is fragmented and broken much like the main character (more below), there is not enough context to engage readers and also not enough to build and establish Violet's little piece of Gotham that we are suppose to care about. The Bat family cameos tried to tie her into Gotham but they didn't do anything other than take away from the Bat family since after 6 issues you feel like the Bat family would have stepped in to do something about this character. A lot of work needed in the world building to make this book something.Story: Fractured and broken and half assed. To dig into the core of the issue of the story we need to dig into the character of Violet (which I'll get into below), but wow the story is a mess. The pacing is all over the place, the scene jumps are choppy and not in a stylish way where pieces fit together in the end. After two 3 issues arcs readers are still lost to what the point of the series is and what the point of Violet's mission is. There is also not enough time with the side characters to care about what they are doing and what even is the matter. We get little glimpses of Gather House and don't get enough to truly know how this ties into the point of the story. We don't get enough context for the point of the story and in the end Violet's actions seem pointless and the story is mindless.Characters: The heart of the book and the biggest issue of the book. I don't mind flawed and broken characters, Batman is the most broken of characters but he's well written and therefore relatable and can capture the interest of readers. Violet is damaged, we know very early on and we want to sympathize, we see her family, we see snippets of her past (there are a lot of similarities to her and Kate Kane). But her actions are not well motivated enough, or more precisely she's not well written enough for us to understand her actions and to see her crusade, all we get are snippets of her acting like a directionless character that has a moral compass that spins around so erratically we don't know what do expect and do. It's not that we can't predict how she will act, cause unpredictable characters are also fun, but it's inconsistent. The rest of the cast are throwaways, given the rich potential there is there they get snippets here and there and even no set-up and we are to accept them as is...this is just bad writing.Poor writing and pacing hurts this series.Onward to the next book!
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  • Logan
    May 14, 2017
    Very good! The DC Young Animal line up as been really exciting, I haven't read the other titles yet but I plan to eventually in trade but Mother Panic is the one I pick up monthly and I'm happy I did! So this series stars Violet Page, a billionaire heiress who comes back to Gotham after a long period and dress up in a costume and beats up criminals, where have I heard that before? That's the first thing you kind of have to let go, yes its the batman premise, but it does enough things different t Very good! The DC Young Animal line up as been really exciting, I haven't read the other titles yet but I plan to eventually in trade but Mother Panic is the one I pick up monthly and I'm happy I did! So this series stars Violet Page, a billionaire heiress who comes back to Gotham after a long period and dress up in a costume and beats up criminals, where have I heard that before? That's the first thing you kind of have to let go, yes its the batman premise, but it does enough things different to be a cool series for me at least! Violet Page is very different to Bruce Wayne, while they do pull the whole the secret identity is the mask and the hero is the real person; unlike Bruce Wayne, Violet is not charming, she goes out of her way to make people not like her, she punches Paparazzi when they harass her, plus she hates Batman! (Who does cameo, doesn't play a huge role but does have a underlying presence in the book throughout!)But enough about characters, lets talk story! So this volume is half/half, first half is the 'Work in Progress' story arc; I did like it but it did start off a bit slow in the first two issues but then the third issue the arc picked up and it had a pretty good finale! The Villain was interesting and that's also where your gonna get your Batman and Batwoman cameos! Artwork was....well it was pretty ugly; but I get why they went with it, because this is a violent and dark comic so they need that gritty artwork to compliment the tone of the book. Overall its the weakest arc of the two, but it does great setup and had a good finish!Then the second half of this book we have 'Broken Things', which was solo arc (No cameos, but did have easter eggs), with a villain who's tied to Violets origin, I thought that was pretty cool as we get more characterisation of Violet and she starts to grow on you a bit more. The Artwork switches to a more cartoony style of artwork, but still had a gritty feel to it, I felt it worked better then the first arc, since it captures that gritty tone but also is nicer to look at. Overall I liked the villain, I liked the story and I really am enjoying this series, can't wait for more!
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  • Tim
    June 21, 2017
    Good, not great, but certainly more interesting than I was expecting.
  • Marjolein
    June 11, 2017
    Full review to follow!
  • Nora
    June 23, 2017
    I love this so much. gritty and nasty and just MEAN. brute force visuals and attitude.
  • Nicola Mansfield
    June 23, 2017
    This is the second release from DC's new imprint "Young Animal". Described as between DCU and Vertigo, Mother Panic would actually be right at home in the Vertigo line too. Victoria Paige is a celebutant and a wicked vigilante. Her role is a female, 21st-century version of Batman and she is indeed also part of Batman's world as she has come to seek her own form of justice in his city, Gotham. Batman and Batwoman both show up briefly to keep an eye on this new suit. It's a very dark and strange s This is the second release from DC's new imprint "Young Animal". Described as between DCU and Vertigo, Mother Panic would actually be right at home in the Vertigo line too. Victoria Paige is a celebutant and a wicked vigilante. Her role is a female, 21st-century version of Batman and she is indeed also part of Batman's world as she has come to seek her own form of justice in his city, Gotham. Batman and Batwoman both show up briefly to keep an eye on this new suit. It's a very dark and strange story. I didn't have a clue exactly what was going on all the time and the characters are all new but the dark, gritty, violent atmosphere kept me interested and I'm ready to explore this new anti-hero further but would especially like it to keep up the cross-over into the Bat Family's world.
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  • Kristine
    June 20, 2017
    Mother Panic, Vol. 1: Work in Progress by Jody Houser et. al. is a free NetGalley e-comicbook that I read in mid-June.Rather a lot like someone started pasting 'zine panels over a DC comic - Violet Paige is a well-off, imbittered daughter that dons the all-white costume of Mother Panic while musing negatively over her daily life, class disparity, and the health of her demented mom.
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  • Nathaniel Darkish
    May 27, 2017
    I largely disliked this. The concept feels like it's something that's been done over and over (and has been overdone for a long time before this book was written). A billionaire vigilante in Gotham? And other than re-treading familiar territory, I hated that Batman and co. largely ignored her, and the story was angsty and uninteresting.
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  • Elizabeth
    May 23, 2017
    Thanks to DC Entertainment for early access to this title via NetGalley! Needed to see if this mature comic was okay for my teen collection, and decided that it is. Rated M for some partial nudity and profanity. but when your teen collection also has Attack on Titan and Walking Dead, there's some leeway.
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  • Steven McDonald
    June 17, 2017
    Having already heard a lot about this title I was delighted to be approved and jumped in a quickly as I could. In Mother Panic we are introduced to a new character Violet Page who patrols the streets of Gotham in this new Mature Teens series from DC. It's an interesting premise and while it's beautifully drawn and certainly more mature than previous DC titles it's not really for me.
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  • Fiction State Of Mind
    May 20, 2017
    I really struggled with ths book. The concept is interesting. Violet page is a young socialite on a mission of vengeance .She has a list and the strength to take out her targets yet is haunted by her past I didnt care about violet while reading this . She is text book anti establishment but I couldnt connect with the pain she goes through or the choices she makes.
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  • Bianca Walters
    June 18, 2017
    I love Jody Houser's Faith and I want to see more of her that is not this. This is the title that forces you to be tired of it before anything redeeming happens. You can't negate the fact that you're doing the same old by stating over and over "WE AREN'T DOING THE SAME OLD THING see I said FUCK SO EDGEY AHHhhh" Maybe I just wasn't a big enough MCR fan in high school. Who knows. Moving on.
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  • Kyle
    June 23, 2017
    A different type of superhero book looks at the "image" of people in a modern society. Dark but good story. Art styles are fun, contemporary, and abstract at times. Good read but better images.
  • Ramon
    May 23, 2017
    Great art, still very much an introductory volume (guess that title's accurate), without much in the way of resolution. Remains to be seen if it evolves into something worth the effort.
  • Brooke
    May 21, 2017
    I received this from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This is sort of a mixed bag - I liked the first arc (first three issues) 'Work in Progress', and was excited to read more. At that point, I was thinking that perhaps it was the best thing I had read from DC in awhile. And then I read the second arc. As a result in the artist changing, the art style changes tremendously (for the worse, in my opinion) and the story starts going in ways that I found hard to understand. Overall, I'm not I received this from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This is sort of a mixed bag - I liked the first arc (first three issues) 'Work in Progress', and was excited to read more. At that point, I was thinking that perhaps it was the best thing I had read from DC in awhile. And then I read the second arc. As a result in the artist changing, the art style changes tremendously (for the worse, in my opinion) and the story starts going in ways that I found hard to understand. Overall, I'm not sure how I feel about this one.
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