Midnighter and Apollo
Midnighter and Apollo are back with a vengeance!From their days as founding members of the Authority, the heroes Midnighter and Apollo have been forever linked, both professionally and romantically. Whether it's pirates in Los Angeles or demons in Opal City, Steve Orlando (Midnighter, Supergirl) continues the adventure and brings the fighting duo center stage! But when the duo are torn apart by a mysterious villian who sends Apollo to the underworld, Midnighter faces the gates of hell for his lover.Collecting: Midnighter and Apollo 1-6

Midnighter and Apollo Details

TitleMidnighter and Apollo
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 25th, 2017
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN1401272010
ISBN-139781401272012
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Glbt, Fiction, Fantasy, Graphic Novels Comics, Queer

Midnighter and Apollo Review

  • Brendan Nicholls
    March 28, 2017
    This character and storyline is a breath of fresh air in the midst of cliché storylines. Midnighter is ruthless and it's this storyline that works well, the damsel in distress not so much. I wanted to give this a 5 but seeing as the momentum drags a little in the middle it wasn't consistent. I hope they push this character into cinema because it would pave the way for other studios. Midnighter and Apollo make for a good team both inside and outside if you catch my drift. The violence is in your This character and storyline is a breath of fresh air in the midst of cliché storylines. Midnighter is ruthless and it's this storyline that works well, the damsel in distress not so much. I wanted to give this a 5 but seeing as the momentum drags a little in the middle it wasn't consistent. I hope they push this character into cinema because it would pave the way for other studios. Midnighter and Apollo make for a good team both inside and outside if you catch my drift. The violence is in your face but never over the top, the character requires it. This is one DC novel to check out.
    more
  • K
    March 1, 2017
    Was inspired to write this review sooner rather than later bc the only review on GR for this series as of this writing is from some white dude who felt the need to leave a review that he's "Uninterested" in this series, lmao.So. MIDNIGHTER & APOLLO, a 6-issue run from Steve Orlando, is pretty much goddamn perfect. The story is well-paced across six issues without feeling too much like a paint-by-numbers fantasy quest. The artwork is gorgeous and there are some seriously stunning and inventiv Was inspired to write this review sooner rather than later bc the only review on GR for this series as of this writing is from some white dude who felt the need to leave a review that he's "Uninterested" in this series, lmao.So. MIDNIGHTER & APOLLO, a 6-issue run from Steve Orlando, is pretty much goddamn perfect. The story is well-paced across six issues without feeling too much like a paint-by-numbers fantasy quest. The artwork is gorgeous and there are some seriously stunning and inventive panel layouts (I'm still thinking about when Midnighter beats up the water beast in Issue 2, or storms Neron's castle in Issue 4). For an Orpheus and Eurydice retelling, Orlando did an exceptional job of letting us forget we're reading an Orpheus and Eurydice retelling, focusing instead on Apollo's backstory (both pre- and post-experimentation) and Midnighter's moral qualms, or maybe lack thereof, regarding his pretty much constant murdering. The design of this particular Hell is phenomenal, still recognizably Hellish while offering up some great new twists--I especially loved the design for the Gardens of Carnage. And I really need a Mansions of Happiness board game now because that shit's wonderfully over the top and amazing.BUT LET'S TALK ABOUT THE QUEER REP OKAYMidnighter and Apollo are gay. Not "you could maybe read it as romantic if you want to but we're not going to define it that way" gay (cough Russo brothers), not "we'll cut away and let you decide for yourselves" gay (cough loads of other Marvel lines), not "okay sure we'll have some dudes kiss but it was OBVIOUSLY just a ploy to get information" gay (cough Daken), not even "wow these dudes sure will travel through complete hell for each other are we SURE they aren't lovers" gay (COUGH PLANET HULK: WARZONES). They are frank relationship discussions, coming-out backstories, dinner parties complete with post-cleanup kitchen sex gay and it's never lampshaded but it's also never treated as anything less. Their friends know and embrace them (and are in many cases queer themselves); their enemies know and don't use it against them any more than they would exploit anyone's romantic bond. The story is very clear about who they are and what they are to each other--a rare enough thing in mainstream comics--without MAKING that the story (almost unheard of in the Big 2).I keep wanting to compare this series to Planet Hulk: Warzones, but that's really unfair, because Midnighter & Apollo is the superior series in every way. On the surface, they're similar: our lead journeys through a gruesome wasteland against all odds in a desperate attempt to save his lover/"warbound", and must confront hard truths about himself along the way while tenuously accepting aid or seeking boons from creatures whose motives are unclear. But where PH:Z fails the most--the art's good but not mindblowing, the setting's ridiculous and questionable in numerous ways, but where it really fails--is in its lack of definition. All its edges are blunted--the flashbacks end before their true emotional impact can land, in some cases where it clearly feels it's BECAUSE they wanted to avoid putting a name to Steve & Bucky's relationship, so instead you just get Steve wailing "Buuuucky" a lot without giving us much grounding in why. (They aren't even 616 S&B, so we can't fall back on their 616 history together for any kind of context. They're just two dudes who joined the Supersoldier program together after some sort of pie heist, then hulkapalooza happens.)But Midnighter & Apollo gives us that emotional connection upfront. It gives us their relationship, and most of all, it gives us a complex relationship. They have their fights, they have unresolved issues--this isn't their first go, and even as they work past what hindered their relationship before (I haven't actually read that story arc but I feel like this series provided the context perfectly) they're both Dealing With Their Own Shit. Midnighter undertaking this task feels momentous rather than contrived; it will change their relationship, but not as much as it will change each of them. And the ending--just--glorious. It's satisfying and character-growing in all kinds of excellent ways.(view spoiler)[AND THERE'S NO "BURY YOUR GAYS" TROPE. THEY LIVE. ALL THE QUEER PEOPLE LIVE. THEY FUCKING GET A HAPPY ENDING AND A PERFECT RESCUE KISS BECAUSE THIS IS AN EPIC LOVE STORY OKAY. THEY GET TO HAVE THAT. (hide spoiler)]I'm glad this was always intended to be a limited run because the story is all the more powerful and tightly knitted for it, but I do hope we'll get more Midnighter & Apollo in other DC lines. They're accused of being the bargain-basement takes on Batman and Superman, but the story confronts that--acknowledges their origins as such, especially in Apollo's case--and gives them the depth they need to be so much more. More Midnighter & Apollo, please. More comics like this, please. And more queer representation in comics that laughs at the very idea of being considered "token." For Midnighter & Apollo, they're anything but.
    more
  • Chris Lemmerman
    July 16, 2017
    [Read as single issues]Midnighter was one of the few things to come out of DCYou that should have lasted longer than it did. Twelve issues was enough to tell a complete story, but you got the feeling that Steve Orlando had a lot more to say on the character, especially his relationship with estranged boyfriend Apollo. Enter this mini-series, in which Orlando puts that relationship front and centre by ripping the two apart and literally dragging them to Hell and back.Midnighter is one of those ch [Read as single issues]Midnighter was one of the few things to come out of DCYou that should have lasted longer than it did. Twelve issues was enough to tell a complete story, but you got the feeling that Steve Orlando had a lot more to say on the character, especially his relationship with estranged boyfriend Apollo. Enter this mini-series, in which Orlando puts that relationship front and centre by ripping the two apart and literally dragging them to Hell and back.Midnighter is one of those characters that would be easy to write as overpowered and boring - he's basically already won every fight before they begin, thanks to the fight computer in his brain, but that's not the case here. You can really feel the struggles he has to go through to save Apollo, and what he's willing to give up to get him back. It makes their ultimate reunion all the sweeter.ACO unfortunately doesn't pencil this series, but Fernando Blanco is a very good replacement. He doesn't try to replicate ACO's style, instead bending the unique Midnighter visuals to his own, and he's well-versed in drawing demons and stuff from his runs on both I, Vampire and Phantom Stranger earlier in the New 52.You don't have to have read the earlier Midnighter series to enjoy this one (although I would highly recommend them), but you owe it to yourself to check this one out.
    more
  • Alan
    March 13, 2017
    This was actually pretty close to a four star rating, but to get that higher rating I think a little more work on characterization would have been needed(possible side effect of binge reading while my car was being worked on-finished this and Scarlet Witch in the pretty much in the same sitting). Regardless, this is the best super hero love story that I have read in years.I feel compelled to say that my comment about the love story is not because I'm trying to be politically correct. No matter w This was actually pretty close to a four star rating, but to get that higher rating I think a little more work on characterization would have been needed(possible side effect of binge reading while my car was being worked on-finished this and Scarlet Witch in the pretty much in the same sitting). Regardless, this is the best super hero love story that I have read in years.I feel compelled to say that my comment about the love story is not because I'm trying to be politically correct. No matter what, I think Orlando does convey the fact that Apollo and Midnighter love each other (and yes I understand that they apparently split up in some titles I have not read).They might be opposites of each other , but Midnighter literally goes to Hell to retrieve Apollo's soul. That may not be a new story, but I bought the physical and emotional agony Midnighter experienced to get to Hell and to fight for his lover's release.There are small bits of humor in this tale, and some DC Universe Easter eggs (pointing a finger at Gregario).
    more
  • Gillian
    July 27, 2017
    Love love love Midnighter and Apollo!
  • FanboyBen
    February 1, 2017
    Uninterested.
Write a review