Wishtree
Trees can't tell jokes, but they can certainly tell stories. . . .Red is an oak tree who is many rings old. Red is the neighborhood "wishtree"—people write their wishes on pieces of cloth and tie them to Red's branches. Along with her crow friend Bongo and other animals who seek refuge in Red's hollows, this "wishtree" watches over the neighborhood.You might say Red has seen it all. Until a new family moves in. Not everyone is welcoming, and Red's experiences as a wishtree are more important than ever.

Wishtree Details

TitleWishtree
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 26th, 2017
PublisherFeiwel Friends
ISBN-139781250043221
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy, Fiction, Animals

Wishtree Review

  • Hannah Greendale
    January 1, 1970
    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. A beautiful story and a poignant metaphor. Animals compete for resources, just like humans. They eat one another. They fight for dominance. Nature is not always pretty or fair or kind.But sometimes surprises happen. And Samar, every spring night, reminded me there is beauty in stillness and grace in acceptance.
    more
  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    I cannot wait to give my copy of this book to a kid in need of a wonderful read. It is absolutely beautiful. It’s poetic without being pretentious and narrated by a tree older than any existing human. And yet, this tree is more humane than anyone I know. The tree is an observer. It philosophizes about life and shares his thoughts with his (not always) delightful animal tenants. It doesn’t act, because it cannot move like a human can.But the tree feels compelled to do something, or ‘‘say’’ someth I cannot wait to give my copy of this book to a kid in need of a wonderful read. It is absolutely beautiful. It’s poetic without being pretentious and narrated by a tree older than any existing human. And yet, this tree is more humane than anyone I know. The tree is an observer. It philosophizes about life and shares his thoughts with his (not always) delightful animal tenants. It doesn’t act, because it cannot move like a human can.But the tree feels compelled to do something, or ‘‘say’’ something rather, when a new family moves into one of the two houses in front of it and some people express their unhappiness about having Muslims for neighbors. It’s a deeply moving story about love, friendship and acceptance, as well as the importance of preserving nature that harms us in no way. Like one of the animals mentioned in the story, why would you kill something that literary gives you life – oxygen?Not only that, but this is a page-turner. It’s short but still full of substance. Plus it contains great illustrations that help visualize scenes and add to the lyrical atmosphere. A must buy, read, review. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
    more
  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    ALL THE STARS!!! This is THE middle grade book of fall 2017 and it should be on the pre-order list for every single library and middle grade classroom in the country. While it may be listed as for ages 10-14, I would read this book aloud as far down as first grade. WISHTREE is at first glance a middle grade novel about a tree and animals, but WISHTREE is also, and more importantly, a message book. It uses the medium of a beautiful middle grade story to spread a message about wishes and inclusion ALL THE STARS!!! This is THE middle grade book of fall 2017 and it should be on the pre-order list for every single library and middle grade classroom in the country. While it may be listed as for ages 10-14, I would read this book aloud as far down as first grade. WISHTREE is at first glance a middle grade novel about a tree and animals, but WISHTREE is also, and more importantly, a message book. It uses the medium of a beautiful middle grade story to spread a message about wishes and inclusion and friendship and religious tolerance in a time of great turmoil in the US. And yes, it also has great dialogue between Red the oak tree and Red's animal friends - that's what will first hook kids! But as teachers and parents share this book with children, Red and the animals will fall to the background as discussions about big topics arise.....big topics that we do need to be talking about. What Applegate has done with this book is exquisite, as she has wrapped this vital message up in a book that is incredibly accessible to to even the most reluctant middle grade reader - short chapters, simple sentences and manageable vocabulary are the perfect venue for a message like this. I will be recommending this as a staff book club pick this year and hope to have it read aloud to as many classes as possible in my school. It's THAT good. And THAT important. Please see the book website http://wishtreebook.com/ for resources and to register for a Wishing Day event on 9/28/17. Thanks to NerdCampMI and the publisher for the advance review copy of this title - all opinions are my own. This galley will now be passed on to the #kidlitexchange review network.
    more
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Wishtree is like an iceberg- small on the surface but immensely powerful underneath. This is another quietly powerful book by adored author Katherine Applegate.
  • Katie Ziegler (Life Between Words)
    January 1, 1970
    Five enthusiastic stars for this sweet, beautiful, heartwarming story. It’s charming, and funny, and big-hearted, and touching, and imparts a lovely (and timely) message without it being saccharine or manipulative. I loved every page.
  • Ivonne Rovira
    January 1, 1970
    Katherine Applegate’s The One and Only Ivan is one of the finest books I’ve ever read. Not one of the finest children’s book. Not one of the finest illustrated book — although the drawings are breathtaking. No, one of the finest books, period. I have harangued countless adults to please, please give Ivan a chance!So it pains me to say that Wishtree is no The One and Only Ivan. Yes, as is in Applegate’s 2013 Newbery Medal winner, Wishtree has an important message: We should accept people even if Katherine Applegate’s The One and Only Ivan is one of the finest books I’ve ever read. Not one of the finest children’s book. Not one of the finest illustrated book — although the drawings are breathtaking. No, one of the finest books, period. I have harangued countless adults to please, please give Ivan a chance!So it pains me to say that Wishtree is no The One and Only Ivan. Yes, as is in Applegate’s 2013 Newbery Medal winner, Wishtree has an important message: We should accept people even if they’re different and get to know them before we judge them. But whereas a gorilla as narrator worked so perfectly in The One and Only Ivan, Red the oak tree as narrator seems twee. And who is the audience for this book? The message, as portrayed in the book, is probably too subtly expressed for most 8- to 9-year-olds to follow but too heavy-handed for adults, even kid-lit lovers like myself.In the interest of full disclosure, I received this book from NetGalley, Macmillan Children's Publishing Group and Feiwel & Friends in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Bmquiram
    January 1, 1970
    Wishtree by Katherine Applegate is a great story. It reminded me of the old sayings 'If walls could talk' and ' I'd like to be a fly on their ceiling'. I won't write a synopsis because there is already one on the book and there is always plenty of reviews with summaries available. I'll just jump right to what the writing style is like. This story is very well written. There are interesting facts sprinkled within the text but it doesn't read like a educational book. The facts are stated in a mann Wishtree by Katherine Applegate is a great story. It reminded me of the old sayings 'If walls could talk' and ' I'd like to be a fly on their ceiling'. I won't write a synopsis because there is already one on the book and there is always plenty of reviews with summaries available. I'll just jump right to what the writing style is like. This story is very well written. There are interesting facts sprinkled within the text but it doesn't read like a educational book. The facts are stated in a manner that it seems like the author is explaining part of the story to the reader. This technique is also used for some words that might be difficult for young readers. If all my children's school books were written like this I'd have a much easier time getting them to do their homework. The story was very easy for me to read. I can easily see any of my older children reading this story, and loving it. My younger child is just 8 months old, not reading yet, but I will definitely put this book somewhere special, and read it to her when she gets a little older. (It's to good to take the chance that she might rip the pages now.) My older children are 10,12,and 14. Girl, boy, girl, and I believe they would all love the story. This is a story for all ages.
    more
  • Mary Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful, unique, touching. But most of all, real . It's just what I needed to read today, this week, this year.Rereading and loving Red's voice. Wise and gentle. When bad things happen, he's learned you have to "stand tall and reach deep"
  • Donalyn
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful story about family and community.
  • Amina
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story about how to be human, even if it's narrated by a tree who's more human than some people walking this earth.Red is a 216 years old oak tree, Red is also a wish tree. Every year on the 1st of May, people come to hang their wishes on her branches.When Samar and her muslim family move in Red's neighbourhood, some people aren't pleased and they make the new comers know they aren't welcome. But Red and her inhabitants aren't willing to let that pass without a fight.Friendship, humanit This is a story about how to be human, even if it's narrated by a tree who's more human than some people walking this earth.Red is a 216 years old oak tree, Red is also a wish tree. Every year on the 1st of May, people come to hang their wishes on her branches.When Samar and her muslim family move in Red's neighbourhood, some people aren't pleased and they make the new comers know they aren't welcome. But Red and her inhabitants aren't willing to let that pass without a fight.Friendship, humanity, tolerance, acceptance, love of animals, nature and lots of fun and humour are the main pillars of this light and amazing story!
    more
  • Michele Knott
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful, powerful book.This book needs to be read by every child, every where.
  • Bel
    January 1, 1970
    Wishtree is the sort of book that is a lovely easy read, with memorable characters and a great plot, that you think about once you’ve finished it. I find myself mulling over it continuously , grateful to have read it.It is filled with wonderful lines (“It is a great gift indeed to love who you are”) and wonderful worldly wisdom, dispensed by Red, a tree with over 200 rings, a tree who is home to many critters, a tree who cares.I loved this book.
    more
  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    As a former school librarian i must say that this book should be shared in every classroom throughout this country of ours. Applegate has created a a true gem with a special message that needs to be heard.
  • Krista Regester
    January 1, 1970
    This is a quick inspirational piece from a different perspective. The way that Katherine Applegate captures nature is incredible.
  • Freckles
    January 1, 1970
    - Smrdíš jako skunk!- Já jsem skunk.Vážně potřebujete další důvod, proč si to přečíst? Je to skvělý! Dozvíte se třeba to, podle čeho si vybírají jména mývalí a skunkové a stromy (kromě jedné palmy rebelky v Kalifornii - a tam je možné všechno) a taky to, že stromy ve skutečnosti mluví. A taky že kvůli nim můžete brečet. Krásný ❤ - Smrdíš jako skunk!- Já jsem skunk.Vážně potřebujete další důvod, proč si to přečíst? Je to skvělý! Dozvíte se třeba to, podle čeho si vybírají jména mývalí a skunkové a stromy (kromě jedné palmy rebelky v Kalifornii - a tam je možné všechno) a taky to, že stromy ve skutečnosti mluví. A taky že kvůli nim můžete brečet. Krásný ❤️
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely story about a tree that watches over a neighborhood, and holds the wishes of the community in her branches. But when a very special child makes a wish, the tree decides to actually reach out and make that wish happen. Charming and timely.
  • Mary Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Right story at the right time. Pair with COME WITH ME.
  • Vivek Tejuja
    January 1, 1970
    You need to read books for children. I think that because sometimes profundity and really how to live life is simply told in all the chaos of adult literature, only in children’s books. Whether it is, “The Giving Tree” or it is lessons learned from, “Charlotte’s Web”, books written for children are in fact meant for adults, because we need to learn how to be empathetic and compassionate, so we can pass it to kids. “Wishtree” is the third book I read by Katherine Applegate and as usual I finished You need to read books for children. I think that because sometimes profundity and really how to live life is simply told in all the chaos of adult literature, only in children’s books. Whether it is, “The Giving Tree” or it is lessons learned from, “Charlotte’s Web”, books written for children are in fact meant for adults, because we need to learn how to be empathetic and compassionate, so we can pass it to kids. “Wishtree” is the third book I read by Katherine Applegate and as usual I finished it with a lump in my throat and a smile on my face. The book is narrated by Red – a wise old tree. He is obviously cool, steady, and calm. He is a couple of hundred years old and is home to many birds and animals, all of whom communicate. Applegate’s writing then just doesn’t become about the Wishtree Red, but about the entire neighbourhood, people related to the tree, the ones who want to cut it down (not a spoiler really) and the ones who want to save it. At the heart of the book though, is a story of racism, acceptance and finding one’s roots and calling it home. I am not going to speak about the plot all that much but I will tell you that sometimes, simple books such as these end up being so layered and impactful that you are stunned by its seemingly simplicity. “Wishtree” simply put is a story of a Red Oak Wishtree who watches over the neighbourhood and thinks he has seen it all, till a new family moves in and not everyone is welcoming to them. Gift this book to children. Make them understand the need for empathy and kindness, needed more than ever in the world we live. Let them know that you care that they care. Applegate’s books are all about empathy and work beautifully. Read it.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Wishtree is the story of Red, an optimistic oak tree who is home to many wild creatures living in harmony in her branches and hollows. Every year, the residents who live nearby come to tie their wishes onto Red's branches in hopes that they will come true. One wish in particular comes from Samar, a young Muslim girl whose family is the target of a hateful act from one of their neighbors. Samar wishes for a friend, and Red, being the optimist she is, wants to do everything she can to grant this l Wishtree is the story of Red, an optimistic oak tree who is home to many wild creatures living in harmony in her branches and hollows. Every year, the residents who live nearby come to tie their wishes onto Red's branches in hopes that they will come true. One wish in particular comes from Samar, a young Muslim girl whose family is the target of a hateful act from one of their neighbors. Samar wishes for a friend, and Red, being the optimist she is, wants to do everything she can to grant this little girl's wish. Wishtree is a poignant, cleverly written tale that will have readers laughing out loud and crying tears of heartache and joy. A very timely message for readers of all ages!
    more
  • Susana
    January 1, 1970
    "Trees can't tell jokes. But we can certainly tell stories. And if all you hear is the whisper of leaves, don’t worry. Most trees are introverts at heart.This was all kinds of wonderful. A sweet and engaging story_ featuring a very charming Oak and his friends _ that will surely appeal to most readers.
    more
  • Crystal
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone who pretentiously states children's books can't be beautiful and profound has never read Katherine Applegate. I loved The One and Only Ivan, so was ecstatic to hear of this one. It did not dissapoint. What a beautiful book on acceptance and friendship.
    more
  • Ellie Terry
    January 1, 1970
    Short. Sweet. And oh, so important.
  • Tereza Eliášová
    January 1, 1970
    Všichni máme spoustu přání. Tajných, nevyslovených, a když tak leda šeptem. A nebo úplně obyčejných, o kterých vědí všichni. Všechny finalistky soutěží miss si přejí svět bez válek. Holčičky novou panenku, kluci auto. A nebo holky auto a kluci panenky, protože proč ne. Svými přáními a tužbami se často necháme svázat, a to je určitě i jeden z důvodů, proč si lidé vymysleli Wishtree. Česky mu tedy říkejme Strom naděje, protože právě o něm vypráví stejnojmenná knížka. Proč to česky není Strom přání Všichni máme spoustu přání. Tajných, nevyslovených, a když tak leda šeptem. A nebo úplně obyčejných, o kterých vědí všichni. Všechny finalistky soutěží miss si přejí svět bez válek. Holčičky novou panenku, kluci auto. A nebo holky auto a kluci panenky, protože proč ne. Svými přáními a tužbami se často necháme svázat, a to je určitě i jeden z důvodů, proč si lidé vymysleli Wishtree. Česky mu tedy říkejme Strom naděje, protože právě o něm vypráví stejnojmenná knížka. Proč to česky není Strom přání může mít jak prozaický důvod, že tak už se jedna knížka jmenuje, tak i trochu jiný. Protože co víc souvisí s přáními než naděje?Víc tady: http://teresinha.cz/post/174296699333...
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I almost missed out on this beautiful book. My stack of library books had grown a bit out of control and when I say “a bit” I mean like taking over the living room. Soooo... I *sighed*, bowed my head in defeat, and accepted that many of the books had to go back unread. BUT at the last minute I snagged this little gem off the top of the “return” pile to read. And I am so happy I did!A giant wishtree named Red guides us through this sweet story. Every year in May, people come from all over to whis I almost missed out on this beautiful book. My stack of library books had grown a bit out of control and when I say “a bit” I mean like taking over the living room. Soooo... I *sighed*, bowed my head in defeat, and accepted that many of the books had to go back unread. BUT at the last minute I snagged this little gem off the top of the “return” pile to read. And I am so happy I did!A giant wishtree named Red guides us through this sweet story. Every year in May, people come from all over to whisper and tie their wishes, hopes, and dreams to Red’s limbs. Little rags, ribbons, and slips of paper cover Red’s trunk and branches with wishes of all kinds. From sad to silly! This beautiful, kind hearted, optimistic, “buttinsky” of a wishtree has lived in the neighborhood for a long time. 216 tree rings worth of time and wishes! You could say Red has deep roots in the community. Hehe…*cough* Sorry—that was just as bad as Red’s sense of humor. But this year could be Red’s last! So Red along with a few furry friends set out to make sure one little girl’s wish comes true.Ms. Applegate brings Red and all the animals to life with huge heart, humor, and humanity. I loved them all! And every single one of their plans! I’m not going to say much more in fear of spoiling your reading experience. It caught me completely off guard. Just go meet Red, Bongo, the hiccupping opossum and more. You’ll find suspense, trouble, wisdom, sadness, pride, friendship, and life with all its ups and downs in the pages of this book. A book filled with beautiful language and delicate illustrations. Plus messages readers of all ages should hear and take to heart….like—“You’re never too old to be surprised” or “It is a great gift indeed to love who you are.”I hope you take the time to visit with Wishtree. Your heart will love you for it.Highly recommended.
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This is a wonderful book with an inclusive and timely message. Artists have been taking their broken hearts and turning them into art for over a year now, and I suspect this book, published in 2017, was such a project. Beautifully written and illustrated, the main character is an old, glorious red oak tree that is known in the neighborhood as a wishing tree. Each May Day, people hang their wishes there and hope they will come true. This wishtree watches over the neighborhood, and when a new fami This is a wonderful book with an inclusive and timely message. Artists have been taking their broken hearts and turning them into art for over a year now, and I suspect this book, published in 2017, was such a project. Beautifully written and illustrated, the main character is an old, glorious red oak tree that is known in the neighborhood as a wishing tree. Each May Day, people hang their wishes there and hope they will come true. This wishtree watches over the neighborhood, and when a new family moves in that not everyone accepts, Red and her friends find a way to band together and help. Light shines brightest in the darkest hours. We've seen real grassroots change bubbling up as people become more aware of injustice. This book, for me, encapsulates that, and I think it is a meaningful book to share with young people everywhere. I read this with a friend who is about the same age as I am and we both loved it. I encourage you to read it. ❤️
    more
  • Skip
    January 1, 1970
    Better than One and Only Ivan and Crenshaw, Applegate's newest novel is narrated by a 216-ring red oak tree, named Red, where people leave their wishes. A new Muslim family moves into the neighborhood, and a young, shy girl named Samar is lonely, spending time each evening with the local wild animals who live in the tree or nearby. Samar wishes for a friend, and Red decides to get involved, especially after someone carves "Leave" on the tree. Just as things take a turn for the better, Red is thr Better than One and Only Ivan and Crenshaw, Applegate's newest novel is narrated by a 216-ring red oak tree, named Red, where people leave their wishes. A new Muslim family moves into the neighborhood, and a young, shy girl named Samar is lonely, spending time each evening with the local wild animals who live in the tree or nearby. Samar wishes for a friend, and Red decides to get involved, especially after someone carves "Leave" on the tree. Just as things take a turn for the better, Red is threatened with being cut down. A nice book, with a message of tolerance and friendship and lovely illustrations too. Like Wonder, another book that is great for middle schoolers of all ages.
    more
  • debra
    January 1, 1970
    3*ish The moral lessons this story delivers are all important! I was not, however, in love with the delivery. The story often seemed too simplistic, slow, and boring for the intended age group. Some of the vocabulary-e.g. "suitor" sounded somewhat off as well. The conversations of the humans, both adults and kids, were primer-like. It has been a while since I have had a lot of contact with 8-12-year old children, but I can't imagine a child of that age reading this and sticking with it. I though 3*ish The moral lessons this story delivers are all important! I was not, however, in love with the delivery. The story often seemed too simplistic, slow, and boring for the intended age group. Some of the vocabulary-e.g. "suitor" sounded somewhat off as well. The conversations of the humans, both adults and kids, were primer-like. It has been a while since I have had a lot of contact with 8-12-year old children, but I can't imagine a child of that age reading this and sticking with it. I thought the parts about the animal families, how they acquired their names,their interactions, etc. were better written and flowed well. My opinion is probably in the small minority of just one, but I felt it was a great idea poorly executed. Sorry ; ((PS Nevermind
    more
  • Andy Plemmons
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone needs hope. Who knew so many current topics could be brought up through the point of view of a tree. Applegate leaves the setting generic which makes it apply to almost any community with a tree and an elementary school 😁. The book is filled with community, love, hope, and the complexities that we face in our diverse world. I hope readers will take time to reflect on our world and how we can all support one another's hopes and dreams.
    more
  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Before I get into this very long review, I do want to state that I didn't hate the book. It's very nice, and I think would be a decent read aloud. But I keep seeing it bandied about as a possible Newbery contender, for many people the top choice, and that brings out the hyper critical in me. I found this book to be insufferably twee. It also grated on my nerves that every single non-human character was highly anthropomorphized, but were supposedly living in the real world. I'm perfectly happy to Before I get into this very long review, I do want to state that I didn't hate the book. It's very nice, and I think would be a decent read aloud. But I keep seeing it bandied about as a possible Newbery contender, for many people the top choice, and that brings out the hyper critical in me. I found this book to be insufferably twee. It also grated on my nerves that every single non-human character was highly anthropomorphized, but were supposedly living in the real world. I'm perfectly happy to have talking animals wearing clothes and being essentially human, and I am also perfectly happy to have talking animals in the wild if I have a belief that they're at least somewhat realistically animal-like. And obviously even the best attempt to showcase animal thought is going to fall short, because the nature of being human is that we cannot shake our own assumptions and worldviews. But all of these animals, and the tree, were 100% human, and specifically American human. There was no attempt at all to present a non-human worldview. All of the values held by the creatures are solidly human values, with a dash of unacknowledged American culture (friendship! love! acceptance! group protest!) The book couldn't quite decide if it was a fantasy with twee talking animals or a realistic fiction book with a dash of imagination to allow us to understand what the animals were thinking (the way that, say, One and Only Ivan, did.) It was a tone problem throughout.The naming practices of the animals is cute, but bothered me on other levels as well. I didn't like the sort of condescending tone that Red uses when talking about how the other animals name themselves. It wasn't something I could put my finger on, but there was just a sense that we were supposed to be amused by the ridiculousness of it. I suspect that it's one of those things that had I been really into the book I would have seen as fond amusement instead of mocking, but it's still amusement. Names have power. Naming culture varies widely around the world and we should respect that rather than being amused by it. Also, the owls who give themselves "sensible no fuss names" are Harold and Agnes. Which signals that very WASPy names are "sensible." I also found the writing choppy, as if it wanted to be free verse, but couldn't quite bring itself to go all the way.It didn't make any sense to me that Francesca, who is repeatedly described, by herself and others, as not being sentimental, decides, after reading the journal, that she shouldn't cut the tree down for basically sentimental reasons. The whole thing with the journal and the key felt out of place. It wasn't important enough to be called a subplot, but was given enough weight not to be ignored. Special keys and hidden journals are also tropes in children's literature enough that I was expecting these story elements to have more weight, whereas they're just sort of ...there.
    more
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineRed is an oak tree who has been around for over 200 years. She has a number of animal families inhabiting her branches, along with her best friend, the crow Bongo. It is tree policy not to talk to humans, but when a boy carves "Leave" into her bark in an effort to scare off Samar's Muslim family from living in the neighborhood. The tree makes an effort to make Samar's wish come true, and employs various animals in various ruses in order for next door neighb E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineRed is an oak tree who has been around for over 200 years. She has a number of animal families inhabiting her branches, along with her best friend, the crow Bongo. It is tree policy not to talk to humans, but when a boy carves "Leave" into her bark in an effort to scare off Samar's Muslim family from living in the neighborhood. The tree makes an effort to make Samar's wish come true, and employs various animals in various ruses in order for next door neighboor Stephen to talk to her and become friends. Francesca, who owns the houses where Stephen and Samar live, decides to cut down the tree, which is pushing up the sidewalk, interfering with the plumbing, and causing problems on "Wishing Day" when people follow an old Irish tradition of tying wishes to the tree. Red isn't happy, but starts to make her peace with leaving, although she does break her policy and tells Samar and Stephen the story of a baby left in her care years before. The animals who live in her are less than pleased, and work on a plan. Bongo gives Samar a key on a ribbon; it's the key to Francesca's ancestor's diary, which Samar locates in a storage shed. Stephen rallies his classmates around the tree, and around Samar's family, but will it be enough to save Red from being cut down?Strengths: This is certainly on point with current topics in the news, and with multicultural awareness. The sign at left is appearing more and more in my neighborhood. Applegate is a lyrical, effective writer, and I have to admit that I cried a little at certain points of the book. I can see this being used in classrooms, like Palaccio's Wonder, to promote kindness and awareness. I wouldn't be surprised if this won a Newbery Honor.Weaknesses: This is a very gentle, slow book, narrated by a tree. All of my readers seem to want books that are more fast paced or humorous. Perhaps this would do better with elementary readers. What I really think: Will probably not purchase. It's a lovely book, but I don't think I have the readers for it.
    more
Write a review