Kids Like Us
Martin is an American teen on the autism spectrum living in France with his mom and sister for the summer. He falls for a French girl who he thinks is a real-life incarnation of a character in his favorite book. Over time Martin comes to realize she is a real person and not a character in a novel while at the same time learning that love is not out of his reach just because he is autistic.

Kids Like Us Details

TitleKids Like Us
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 14th, 2017
PublisherFarrar Straus Giroux
ISBN-139780374306281
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Romance, Fiction

Kids Like Us Review

  • Cait (Paper Fury)
    January 1, 1970
    WELL I LIKED THIS ONE. It had such an epic combination of things to love: it's set in France, there is so much food, there's a boy who's obsessed with a book (#relatable) and it features autism with an actually good and accurate representation of it! I did get a bit confused at times, like especially with the ASD (autism spectrum disorder) discussions...sometimes I honestly don't know if I was for or against? Like heckin' heck, peoples, pls speak clearly. But I think this is a really lovely book WELL I LIKED THIS ONE. It had such an epic combination of things to love: it's set in France, there is so much food, there's a boy who's obsessed with a book (#relatable) and it features autism with an actually good and accurate representation of it! I did get a bit confused at times, like especially with the ASD (autism spectrum disorder) discussions...sometimes I honestly don't know if I was for or against? Like heckin' heck, peoples, pls speak clearly. But I think this is a really lovely book. AND THAT COVER, RIGHT!I want to sit in a flower.+ So first of all: FRANCE!I can't even with how much I love France...probably completely irrationally because I've never been buuuut ok there are croissants and coffee and it's a place of magic. I know. I have read the books. What I really loved about this was how authentic the setting was! Like it really dived into talking about language and unpacking French abbreviations and slang too...like this teenage boy is going to France and even though he's spoken French forever with his dad, it's VERY different to suddenly being around teens speaking it. I just loved all the details!+ DID WE TALK ABOUT THE COVER.Can I pls have it on my wall.+ I absolutely adored Martin!He's adorable and winning and extremely thoughtful and intelligent. I loved that he was into cooking! Even if half of what he cooked sort of scared me but...like the dude is all into baking cakes and i am here for that. Where might I sign up to be friends with Martin forever. He's also REALLY in love with this old French book. Books are 98% of my life (I save room for snacks tho) so he was automatically relatable and winning and super sweet!+ The romance...Hahaha. No. I love how the tag line is "Martin never thought falling in love was for kids like him." Because NEWS FLASH: the book is not really JUST about falling in love. It didn't even seem the focus to me?? Martin gets obsessed with a girl he thinks is straight out of his book: but then she's not. And I loved his process and journey of discovery (and also his accidental hypocrisy of wishing her to be someone she's not...when he hates when people do that to him. VERY WELL WOVEN INTO THE STORY). But seriously...it's not like a wild love affair. And I didn't like the girl. I feel like we don't really know her well enough so it seemed shallow.+ OK SO LET'S TALK ABOUT THE AUTISM REP!I, myself, am on the spectrum, so I can sort of speak with some solid shouts and hand waving passion on the topic. I honestly LOVED how Martin was written. He isn't a stereotype!! Can we like take a moment?!? This is so freaking refreshing. See, stereotypes are hard because lots of ASD people fit them. But the problem with stereotypes is that media will just latch onto one or two things and erase SO MUCH of what it is to be an individual on the spectrum. So this book actually delved into things I hadn't even seen in autism-related books before.For instance:• Martin does a lot of echolalia -- meaning he repeats back what he's heard instead of saying his OWN words. I loved how they unpacked this topic, with Martin struggling with the idea that he isn't original. But like...nobody is original?? All words and phrases have been said. And while he repeats things a lot, his THOUGHTS are original.• He mixes up his pronouns! I loved seeing this on page because it's an overlooked part of ASD that isn't obviously true for all people on the spectrum, but it should be talked about more! My autistic nephew took years to put his pronouns in the right places (although I personally didn't struggle with that, although I grew up quoting as a huge part of my speech, like Martin).• Martin stims with voice tics and music. So pleased to see these represented here. <3• His anxiety was represented SO SO WELL. Just A+ fren.• He also diverged from a few other ASD stereotypes. Aka, he loved lots of different food and he's good at sports/swimming and he detects sarcasm even if he doesn't like it.+ It also discusses how OTHER people see autism.And this is where I get a bit tangled...because the people around Martin where very problematic. His mother is definitely after a "cure" although she's not meaning to be awful??? (Still lowkey didn't like her.) But when he flat-out asks her if she wishes he was cured, she starts to say yes and then covers it up. #Pissed #Off And while I liked how it talked about balancing being drawn out of your autistic world and yet not being ashamed of it...I also felt a bit that Martin was convinced he needed to "pop his bubble" to have a good life. Like it was a bit this and that? So not bad. It's a perspective. And while they unpacked discussions about "cure culture" no one made any DEFINITE opinions. I felt this was a cop-out. When it was thrown around that Martin couldn't talk about cure-culture because he wasn't "really that autistic" (since he's high functioning) I KNEW he was in disagreement. But he didn't give an opinion and the discussion sort of fell apart without anyone saying much??! So I GET IT. The book is talking about things! It's a discussion. But it left me feeling frustrated that you'd start something SO HUGE and then slink out of it.OK SO WOW, WHEREIN CAIT JUST GOES ON AND ON ABOUT THINGS. BLESS YOU FOR READING THIS REVIEW IF YOU SURVIVED TILL NOW.+ OK so my only downside with the actual storytelling is...Martin quotes a lot of his old French book and it's super boring.haha, excuse me. My eyes just glazed over those bits because what the heck was he talking about. Not having read the book, I just felt uninvested when he described something about it.+ AND NOW I WANT TO GO TO FRANCE AND EAT RHUBARB JAM AND CROISSANTS.I loved the writing and the sparse but well placed details. I thought this was a thoroughly accurate and interesting exploration of the autistic mind and feelings and experiences. I didn't always agree and I HATED how people treated Martin...but that's the point. Books are about uncomfortable and real things. It's actually quite dense, even though it's short, and gives you a lot to think about.(...like thinking about croissants....)(...dammit cait we are not thinking about french food right now focus...)
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  • ✿KathEryn✿
    January 1, 1970
    2.25 StarsI received a copy of this book from my friend, Ashley, who loved this. Naturally, I was quite exited to read it after listening to her talk about it, so I dove in that same day! I was ready to experience just how "wonderful" this novel was. Truthfully, I was quite exited.That feeling didn't last long. Unfortunately, it quickly became apparent to me that this sort of writing style wasn't really my "taste." Everything moved slowly and tiresomely, and I never felt a connection to any of t 2.25 StarsI received a copy of this book from my friend, Ashley, who loved this. Naturally, I was quite exited to read it after listening to her talk about it, so I dove in that same day! I was ready to experience just how "wonderful" this novel was. Truthfully, I was quite exited.That feeling didn't last long. Unfortunately, it quickly became apparent to me that this sort of writing style wasn't really my "taste." Everything moved slowly and tiresomely, and I never felt a connection to any of the characters. It was just a dry and mediocre story (Ahh, I'm sorry Ashley!).I'm also going to be blunt and say: I didn't like any of the characters - but it's purely because none of them were memorable. They all morphed into one individual - and it seemed like everyone's voice was the same. However, what I did enjoy was the way Martin viewed everything going on in his life. It was an new/original perspective, and I always give stars for originality. Which is pretty much the only reason this novel didn't get 1 star from me. Something that really took away from this story was how everyone/everything seemed so unimportant. I'm not sure how else I'm supposed to phrase that. I just felt disconnected from the entire book. None of the characters left lasting impressions on me, and neither did any of the events. I felt like I was reading one giant eventless book, and this book isn't even that long! It's just that nothing was grabbing my attention. Honestly, it's interesting to me how two people can read the same book - but one can give it 2 stars, and the other 5 stars. It's all about perspective and how you connect with the story/characters. Sadly, with this novel, I didn't experience anything that Ashely had. But that doesn't mean you won't like it! It's a great idea and includes a new perspective on life. I think everyone should at least give it a try.Overall, I'm disappointed I couldn't at least give this 3 stars. But I would've been lying if I'd given it anything but 2 stars. 'Cause usually 3-star books are stories that I can connect to on some sort of level. This one didn't fit that bill.**Anyways, thank you again, Ashley, for lending me this book (especially since it's not out yet!). I'm sorry I couldn't rate it any higher. Regardless, you rock.
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  • Bekah AwesomeBookNut
    January 1, 1970
    Normally I do not read young adult novels, but due to the subject matter, I felt inclined to do so having two Autistic Nephews and one Autistic Niece. Martin is a teen who is on the Autism Spectrum, and he associates people he meets with his favorite book, In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust. He moves to France with his mother and sister. His mother is working on a movie project and his sister, Elisabeth helps with Martin. Martin’s father is not around, but each time Martin cooks, the memori Normally I do not read young adult novels, but due to the subject matter, I felt inclined to do so having two Autistic Nephews and one Autistic Niece. Martin is a teen who is on the Autism Spectrum, and he associates people he meets with his favorite book, In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust. He moves to France with his mother and sister. His mother is working on a movie project and his sister, Elisabeth helps with Martin. Martin’s father is not around, but each time Martin cooks, the memories of his father are revealed and why he cannot participate in Martin’s life. Martin has friends that are all on the Spectrum as well, living in America. He converses with them through the internet and gets advice from them and his teacher from the center back home.While living in France Martin attends a public French school and falls for a girl, he keeps referring to her as Gilberte. Over time he realizes she is not Gilberte, but Alice and falls in love with her. Martin navigates through the tricky waters of learning to trust others, the value of friendship and love, all while whipping up amazing French cuisine. The author did a great job of telling the story through Martin’s viewpoint. At times the storyline did get a little cheesy and drawn out, but it was a quick read and a feel good book that was fun to read.
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  • - ̗̀ jess ̖́-
    January 1, 1970
    I quite liked Kids Like Us. I was interested at first because I’m on the autism spectrum too, and I could really connect with Martin in a lot of ways. For example, I, too, am obsessed with an old French novel and for quite a while I saw my life through the lens of that novel. (The novel in question is Les Miserables, and I genuinely believe that I lifted a significant amount of my personality from Les Amis de l’ABC, especially Grantaire.) There are other books, too. I could identify with the obs I quite liked Kids Like Us. I was interested at first because I’m on the autism spectrum too, and I could really connect with Martin in a lot of ways. For example, I, too, am obsessed with an old French novel and for quite a while I saw my life through the lens of that novel. (The novel in question is Les Miserables, and I genuinely believe that I lifted a significant amount of my personality from Les Amis de l’ABC, especially Grantaire.) There are other books, too. I could identify with the obsessive interests of Martin and Layla; I know for a fact my ALL-CONSUMING INTEREST in the Percy Jackson series was a significant factor in getting diagnosed. I imagined I was Percy, just like Martin imagines he’s Marcel. We both live in our own little bubbles of fiction. So Martin’s repetitive recounting of In Search of Lost Time was very relatable to me, even if I didn’t understand what was going on because I didn’t read the novel. God knows I’ve done that more times than I can count, so I can’t exactly fault him. Martin was so well-written too. He was’t a stereotype of autistic kids, and he does call it out that he’s expected to be a stereotype. He’s a good character and he tries his best to understand the world around him, which is difficult even for neurotypical kids. He’s very fleshed out and definitely seemed like a real person, and he had wonderful character development throughout the book. His trouble with pronouns was interesting as a literary device, because the book opens in second person, and occasionally veers back to second person, which puts a whole new light on it in literary terms. It transposes the reader into the book like Martin does with Search. I wish we had found out more about Simon and the girl Martin calls Gilberte. I feel like their stories were left kind of hanging. I really liked both of them, though, and all of Martin’s friends. I liked Layla too - and gosh, I think this is the first time I’ve ever seen an autistic girl in media, which I appreciated so, so much. I loved the setting in France. It was so idyllic and set a really lovely tone for the story as a whole. There’s a lot of really interesting discourses about neurodiversity and autism brought up and left for the reader to ponder. I can’t comment on that too much. I myself would probably be considered “high functioning” (even if I don’t particularly like that label, because according to the psychiatrist that diagnosed me, I was hopelessly low-functioning Asperger’s, and basically there are a lot of problems with the high/low functioning binary that I’m not going to get into or we’ll be here all day) and I wouldn’t want anyone to try to cure me. Like, I may not be functioning as well as most young adults my age but I am doing my damndest to live my life how I want to. And Martin is too. But like me, he recognizes that there are things he’s missing out on and it’s not bad to better yourself if it’s making yourself happier. There’s a lot more discourses in the book, and Kids Like Us is a book that makes you think, whether you are on or off the spectrum.
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  • Text Publishing
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Whether tender and familiar or brilliant and disorienting, Kids Like Us weaves together a truly atypical love story—from pound cake and Proust, from autism and family dysfunction—but always with the rare, luminous humanity that makes a true teen anthem, another Fault in our Stars.’Melissa De La Cruz, NYT bestselling author of Blue Bloods and Witches of East End‘A heartfelt celebration of young life with all its strange and endearing awkwardness, obsessions and first eruptions of love.’Martine M ‘Whether tender and familiar or brilliant and disorienting, Kids Like Us weaves together a truly atypical love story—from pound cake and Proust, from autism and family dysfunction—but always with the rare, luminous humanity that makes a true teen anthem, another Fault in our Stars.’Melissa De La Cruz, NYT bestselling author of Blue Bloods and Witches of East End‘A heartfelt celebration of young life with all its strange and endearing awkwardness, obsessions and first eruptions of love.’Martine Murray‘For a teenager on the spectrum, a simple human connection can be an epic challenge. In her wonderfully touching YA debut, Hilary Reyl tells the story of one boy's effort to connect his imaginary world to the real one. There is love, humor and compassion on every page. You'll be blown away by this boy and by this book.’Holly Goldberg Sloan, NYT bestselling author of Counting by 7s ‘The most original voice since The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime tells the most radiantly human love story since Eleanor and Park. Reyl's extraordinary YA debut isn’t just a book you read; this is one of those rare books that reaches in deep and writes you back.’Margaret Stohl, co-author of #1 NYT and international bestseller Beautiful Creatures ‘Kids Like Us is a song in which, like life, both harmony and dissonance play their part. The writing is beautiful; the setting lush and evocative. I didn't want to leave Martin's world.’Ally Condie, #1 NYT bestselling author of Matched and Summerlost‘Kids Like Us was a really beautiful story…I loved the writing and the sparse but well placed details. I thought this was a thoroughly accurate and interesting exploration of the autistic mind, feelings and experiences.’Paper Fury
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  • Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob)
    January 1, 1970
    I will be pretty surprised if this doesn't end up being a popular YA fiction title. This story is primarily about Martin, a fairly high functioning 16 year old boy with autism. Initially, the story feels a little stilted spoken inside Martin's head, but, gains more fluidity as you continue through the story. The teens are smart and cultured, a bit like John Green's teens. Martin has a bit of an obsession going on with Proust and thus there are tons of references to Proust. Thankfully though, Mar I will be pretty surprised if this doesn't end up being a popular YA fiction title. This story is primarily about Martin, a fairly high functioning 16 year old boy with autism. Initially, the story feels a little stilted spoken inside Martin's head, but, gains more fluidity as you continue through the story. The teens are smart and cultured, a bit like John Green's teens. Martin has a bit of an obsession going on with Proust and thus there are tons of references to Proust. Thankfully though, Martin is primarily reading "Swann's Way", not the entire "In Search of Lost Time". If you feel like reading the 2 books concurrently, it should actually be achievable. There's even several references to madeleines and Cesar Franck's Violin Sonata in A Major.This is one of those books where you can choose to focus on the relationships theme or the 'book within a book' theme. I liked this enough to read it all in one day, that's saying something. It does warm up quickly in just a few chapters, so if you are lukewarm on chapter one, continue until at least chapter three to give it a chance to grow on you.
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  • Sam Kozbial
    January 1, 1970
    This review originally appeared on We Live and Breathe Books•Pro: The author takes us to France, delights our senses with delicious food, and even interacts with locals. •Pro: Martin just touched my heart. He was so genuine, and being in his head was pretty interesting. •Pro: I learned so many things about neurodiversity that I did not know. It wasn't done in an info dump way, it was told through Martin's self reflections. •Pro: Martin's sister, Elisabeth was pretty special, and so was their sib This review originally appeared on We Live and Breathe Books•Pro: The author takes us to France, delights our senses with delicious food, and even interacts with locals. •Pro: Martin just touched my heart. He was so genuine, and being in his head was pretty interesting. •Pro: I learned so many things about neurodiversity that I did not know. It wasn't done in an info dump way, it was told through Martin's self reflections. •Pro: Martin's sister, Elisabeth was pretty special, and so was their sibling bond. She loved Martin for Martin, and they shared some really beautiful moments in this story. •Pro: I really loved the Skype session with Martin's friends from the center, but my favorite was Layla. The way she expressed herself with Martin, how she did not feel the need to adopt neurotypical ways, and the fact that she kept asking, "Do you think our phones are instruments of communication or torture?"•Pro: This book's tagline hints at romance being the focus of this story, but that short changes this story. The romance is so secondary to Martin's summer of coming into his own, his journey, and it's a wonderful one. •Pro: This one gave me a lot to think about. There is this awesome scene between Martin and his mother, where he is trying to express his autism is a part of who he is, not a disease to be cured, and I think neurotypical people lost sight of that. Overall: A beautiful and touching coming of age story, which filled me with warm-fuzzies and made me look at autism in a different light.**Thank you to the publisher for the ARC I won through a Goodreads giveaway! BLOG | INSTAGRAM | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Khouloud Azouzi
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating is 3.5 🌟Let me start by saying that as a person who deals with mental illness the decision to read this book was inevitable. This book was a slow enjoyable read , but it wasn't really for me , TBh i care about the characters more than anything else and frankly none of them was memorable maybe because the writer didn't give them any importance. i really liked how the writer focused more on Martin's mental illness . I loved how Martin kept referring to the book that helped him. Unfo Actual rating is 3.5 🌟Let me start by saying that as a person who deals with mental illness the decision to read this book was inevitable. This book was a slow enjoyable read , but it wasn't really for me , TBh i care about the characters more than anything else and frankly none of them was memorable maybe because the writer didn't give them any importance. i really liked how the writer focused more on Martin's mental illness . I loved how Martin kept referring to the book that helped him. Unfortunately I didn't like the romance that much maybe I was really interested in Martin's family and social circle! The writing style wasn't really my type but like i said i enjoy this book and i would recommend it . I do intend to re-read it maybe the rating will change by that time .
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  • Penny Waring
    January 1, 1970
    This is a refreshing take on a coming-of-age story, told from the perspective of a 16 year old boy, Martin, who is on the autism spectrum. It is about family, friendship, relationships and change. Martin is piercingly observant and deeply analytical, and through his eyes, the author explores some of the many nuances of human interaction and emotion. I really enjoyed reading it.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This is a wonderful coming of age story about a 16 year old boy with autism. He is the book's narrator, and the writing is wonderful. Though fiction, it is still a fascinating glimpse into the mind of a person who has autism. It explores areas of his autism, but also areas of life we all face - school, friends, family, romance. I highly recommend it to teens and adults alike.I received an ARC from NetGalley. This book will be released on November 14, 2017.
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  • K.A. Wiggins
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliantly told story of an American boy with high-functioning autism filtering his first love through the lens of a classic French novel.Disclaimers: this book was provided through NetGalley, I'm choosing to leave an unbiased review, and also I know relatively little about autism.Moving on. I'm not really qualified to comment as to how accurate a depiction this was of a person with autism, but it provided a fascinating perspective on the MC, Martin's life. He goes to a school for kids with neu Brilliantly told story of an American boy with high-functioning autism filtering his first love through the lens of a classic French novel.Disclaimers: this book was provided through NetGalley, I'm choosing to leave an unbiased review, and also I know relatively little about autism.Moving on. I'm not really qualified to comment as to how accurate a depiction this was of a person with autism, but it provided a fascinating perspective on the MC, Martin's life. He goes to a school for kids with neurodivergent/developmental differences/autism...? It's not quite clear, but they seem to have a special program for teaching these kids how to learn and communicate with others more effectively. Martin and a friend from the program both understand the world by comparing people and experiences to a beloved piece of media. In Martin's case, it's a classic French novel. In his friend's, it's the TV show Downton Abbey.I enjoyed the way Martin was portrayed as deliberately thinking through his surroundings and choosing to respond. It was a bit surprising in the first few pages, but then felt very comfortable and surprisingly relatable. In the story, he's visiting a French town and attending school there on a casual basis while his mother films a movie in town. He struggles with the new situation and new people, but works out relationships mostly by helping others and examining their reactions for insight into why they act a certain way. He enjoys translating for his friends, finding meaning, purpose and acceptance while overcoming anxiety in the act. He struggles, like many children, with his impact on his parent's lives and relationship, feeling guilt for being different and creating conflict and challenges in their lives. He falls for a local girl who he regards as equivalent to the heroine of his favourite book, and while it takes a while for him to separate his fantasy from reality, he is capable of thinking through the differences and seeing her as unique. In a way, it's a very quiet story about Martin's journey of understanding and relating to the world around him, but satisfying in the way it concludes and entertaining in that the world told in Martin's voice is intricate, interesting and challenging. A satisfying story that lets you experience the world through a distinctive lens. 4/5 as entertainment, 5/5 as a very well produced book.
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  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    A brave and unique take on a first love YA novel. It is refreshing not to read about wizards or spies or gut-busting feats of physical prowess - no one in this novel is a ninja or can become invisible: It is a simple story about a fairly innocent (by today's sad social media standards) teenage summer and a group of kids from very different worlds getting to know each other, overcoming certain fears and prejudices and dealing with very real problems (a dad in gaol, a car accident, drinking too mu A brave and unique take on a first love YA novel. It is refreshing not to read about wizards or spies or gut-busting feats of physical prowess - no one in this novel is a ninja or can become invisible: It is a simple story about a fairly innocent (by today's sad social media standards) teenage summer and a group of kids from very different worlds getting to know each other, overcoming certain fears and prejudices and dealing with very real problems (a dad in gaol, a car accident, drinking too much, an autistic boy in a new school). Martin, the hero and our narrator, is autistic (very broad term to use - he never has a proper diagnosis but as the story develops we build up a picture), observant and articulate and tells his story clearly and with purpose - I found him engaging and I was cheering for him very quickly.It is part Ulysses and part Breakfast Club at times but very much a many-layered and gentle collection of love stories (love for our an absent parent, love for a girl or a boy you don't know, love for a friend, love of cooking). The author did her homework on autistic traits and manages to smoothly introduce the extra challenges of Martin's life without evoking pity or fear. She succeeds in making the reader think a bit harder about people who are different but perhaps are not so different after all.Although billed as YA I felt this was quite an adult book at times, not in themes (no drugs or teenage pregnancies), but in its honesty and sophistication - the near constant situational comparisons to episodes and characters in Proust's À la recherche du temps perdu (albeit simplified and well explained) add an interesting second narrative that help us better understand Martin and his fears. Suitable for girls' at 13 and up and maybe boys at 15 or 16. (And any adult who wants to remember their first awkward experience of love and affection)
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    Did not meet the needs of my collection at this time. A it too high school oriented.
  • Alison Lowrey
    January 1, 1970
    Thoroughly charming.
  • Ashley Zizich
    January 1, 1970
    I received an arc of this book at the ALA conference I went to over the summer. Listening to the publishers of this book speak about it made me want to snatch up a copy right away. Its a tricky slope sometimes with YA books being either so far-fetched or super cheesy, so I hope this one is as good as it sounds!
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    What a gorgeous cover.
  • Luci
    January 1, 1970
    I entered the competition on good reads to win this book and I am so glad I did! I love this novel, the writing was beautiful and the character development was well thought out. I work with children with special needs and mostly with children who are on the autism spectrum, the author has done an excellent job at writing about the issues that children on the spectrum face such as making friends and finding love and developing relationships outside of his bubble. Martin is a 15 year old boy who h I entered the competition on good reads to win this book and I am so glad I did! I love this novel, the writing was beautiful and the character development was well thought out. I work with children with special needs and mostly with children who are on the autism spectrum, the author has done an excellent job at writing about the issues that children on the spectrum face such as making friends and finding love and developing relationships outside of his bubble. Martin is a 15 year old boy who has moved to a small village in France for 3 months whilst his mother directs a big Hollywood film. He has grown up with a lot of love and support from his papa who is no longer around, he has such wonderful support from his older sister who is going through love life issues of her own. The journey Martin takes in those three months is wonderful, he learns a lot about himself and the people around him. There is one thing I wasn’t too impressed with and that was his mother wanting him to be ‘normal’. I love the contrast between working out fantasy from reality, and how living your fantasy world takes away from the reality of what is going on in front of you. This novel also teaches readers to be accepting of people on the spectrum, at the moment more tv shows and books are coming out to bring awareness that people living on the spectrum are people to and you can build a relationship with them if you look past their autism and accept them for who they are.
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!I was so excited when I received Kids Like Us because I have been wanting to read more stories that focus on characters with autism. I think my expectations were a bit too high, because when I started the book I was into it, then I hit the middle and wasn't enjoying it, and then the ending happened. It was an interesting ending.I think my biggest problem with this book is the very stilted narration. Martin's voice, though I'm sure could be authentic, is v Huge thank you to Raincoast for this ARC!I was so excited when I received Kids Like Us because I have been wanting to read more stories that focus on characters with autism. I think my expectations were a bit too high, because when I started the book I was into it, then I hit the middle and wasn't enjoying it, and then the ending happened. It was an interesting ending.I think my biggest problem with this book is the very stilted narration. Martin's voice, though I'm sure could be authentic, is very awkward. It also does one of my bookish pet peeves where the main character will say a word and then define it for the reader. It's also a hard book to enjoy because I think at times Martin's voice would fluctuate between a middle grader or a high schooler. The book is also so, so, so slow and given how short the book is, I found myself not liking the meandering pace that it had.I see value in a story such as Kids Like Us, but ultimately I feel like it wasn't to my taste, even as a reader who loves tough issue YA. Still, I feel like I did learn a lot about autism, but I've heard there are definitely better books out there on the subject. I think with the right reader this book can have the emotional impact I think it was trying to have, but it just didn't work for me.
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  • Tracey
    January 1, 1970
    adult fiction with high-functioning autistic teen main character ('teen' fic for people who want something more serious?)This was atypical teen fare, focusing on Martin's character and his perceptions of the world rather than being all action-action, romance-romance, so I'm not sure I would label it "teen fic" even though it was classed that way at my library (and even though the jacket description labels it as the author's first teen novel). The lack of flashy cover might mean that it won't get adult fiction with high-functioning autistic teen main character ('teen' fic for people who want something more serious?)This was atypical teen fare, focusing on Martin's character and his perceptions of the world rather than being all action-action, romance-romance, so I'm not sure I would label it "teen fic" even though it was classed that way at my library (and even though the jacket description labels it as the author's first teen novel). The lack of flashy cover might mean that it won't get checked out that much either, and that it is in danger of getting weeded out in a few years accordingly, which would be a shame.I did like how Martin and Layla were portrayed as individuals; the varied differences between individual people on the spectrum and their different sensitivities was briefly discussed and that was nice too.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    I truly enjoyed reading this book. Unlike some of the other reviewers, I felt that Martin's voice was very authentic and reminiscent of some of my students with autism. Although the setting and family situation was not one that most readers would connect with, the family dynamics and interactions offer young readers a way in. I gave an ARC of this book to an early 9th grade reader. Her comments were that she loved the characters and the story but had to stop often in order to understand Martin's I truly enjoyed reading this book. Unlike some of the other reviewers, I felt that Martin's voice was very authentic and reminiscent of some of my students with autism. Although the setting and family situation was not one that most readers would connect with, the family dynamics and interactions offer young readers a way in. I gave an ARC of this book to an early 9th grade reader. Her comments were that she loved the characters and the story but had to stop often in order to understand Martin's references to Proust. I'm not sure that that is such a terrible thing. A book should take a reader someplace he or she has never been. It was an easy read for me (an adult) but it may be a stretch for some young YA readers.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    There seems to be this new up and coming trend of using obscure or just plain really old literature as a point of reference for our contemporary heroes. I think this is fine as the few times I've seen it done the authors do a seamless and fluid explanation and summation of what is being referenced. I enjoyed the setting of this book, I enjoyed the fact that this book read like a summer in the French countryside (beautiful, warm, slow, and easy with great food). What I enjoyed most about this boo There seems to be this new up and coming trend of using obscure or just plain really old literature as a point of reference for our contemporary heroes. I think this is fine as the few times I've seen it done the authors do a seamless and fluid explanation and summation of what is being referenced. I enjoyed the setting of this book, I enjoyed the fact that this book read like a summer in the French countryside (beautiful, warm, slow, and easy with great food). What I enjoyed most about this book was the relationship between brother and sister, I get so tired of bad sibling relationships but this one was nicely portrayed.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    There were many things about KIDS LIKE US that did not appeal to me, but I felt I needed to read as it has an Autistic protagonist which is rare in YA literature. However, he is male, which is more common than seeing female Autistic characters (WRITE MORE ABOUT FEMALE AUTISM!). While the setting is in France while his mother is shooting a movie, the focus of the author is primarily on the day to day experiences of Martin being Autistic and how that affects his relationships with his peers, gen-e There were many things about KIDS LIKE US that did not appeal to me, but I felt I needed to read as it has an Autistic protagonist which is rare in YA literature. However, he is male, which is more common than seeing female Autistic characters (WRITE MORE ABOUT FEMALE AUTISM!). While the setting is in France while his mother is shooting a movie, the focus of the author is primarily on the day to day experiences of Martin being Autistic and how that affects his relationships with his peers, gen-ed kids, and his family. The story wasn't as spectacular as other YA I've read on similar topics, but it does do a good job of imaging the inside of Martin's thoughts and feelings on being Autistic.
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  • Danielle Chambers
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC this book from epic reads in exchange for an honest review. I hate leaving low star reviews because I know someone worked hard on this and loves this book, but it just wasn’t for me. Something about the writing style just turned me off. I’m sure the story was good, but I couldn’t get very far because of the writing style. I was really looking forward to reading this book and am sad I wasn’t able to finish it. Maybe I will come back to it at a later date and find that I love it. I received an ARC this book from epic reads in exchange for an honest review. I hate leaving low star reviews because I know someone worked hard on this and loves this book, but it just wasn’t for me. Something about the writing style just turned me off. I’m sure the story was good, but I couldn’t get very far because of the writing style. I was really looking forward to reading this book and am sad I wasn’t able to finish it. Maybe I will come back to it at a later date and find that I love it.
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  • Nadia King
    January 1, 1970
    An original YA story set in France. Martin is a highly functioning autistic teen spending the summer in France with his sensitive older sister and movie-making mother. Kids Like Us gives readers a charming and tender insight into Martin's struggle making new friends, separating life from his favourite book, Proust's In Search of Lost Time, and navigating French high school.A wonderful addition to diverse teen lit. Highly recommended for those looking to better understand the Autism Spectrum.
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  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve finally finished it!! First of all, this was such a cute book with adorable relationships and characters that I thought everyone could relate too. I gave it a 4/5 stars because it was able to engage we even when I didn’t want to be engaged 😂 (if that makes any sense). I must say, that in the beginning, Martin’s story was a little hard to understand but I grew used to his mannerisms and language. The review for this novel will be up on my Blog Monday night (Australian time).
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for this E-ARC copy of this novel.The story is told by Martin, an autistic teen, who is trying to navigate France for the summer. I have to say that having an autistic teen myself I found this novel fascinatingly written. I think that Hilary Reyl has a beautiful, odd and unique look at teens with autism with this book. The character of Martin is realistic and tender.
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  • Cynthia
    January 1, 1970
    Read Alike for "Anything but Typical" . Written in voice of a teenage boy with autism currently living in France while his mother works on a movie. He continues to communicate with his friends in the United States and works to make new friends in a new country which doesn't understand his challenges.
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe 3.5...
  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Netgalley for the free book in exchange for an honest review. A full review with all of my thoughts is forthcoming. Let me just say, I hope this book gains the popularity it deserves.
  • Jessie (Ageless Pages Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5
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