You Bring the Distant Near
This elegant young adult novel captures the immigrant experience for one Indian-American family with humor and heart.Told in alternating teen voices across three generations, You Bring the Distant Near explores sisterhood, first loves, friendship, and the inheritance of culture - for better or worse. From a grandmother worried that her children are losing their Indian identity to a daughter wrapped up in a forbidden biracial love affair to a granddaughter social-activist fighting to preserve Bengali tigers, award-winning author Mitali Perkins weaves together the threads of a family growing into an American identity. Here is a sweeping story of five women at once intimately relatable and yet entirely new.

You Bring the Distant Near Details

TitleYou Bring the Distant Near
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 12th, 2017
PublisherFarrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
ISBN-139780374304904
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Historical, Historical Fiction, Realistic Fiction

You Bring the Distant Near Review

  • katwiththehat
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you so much to NetGalley and Macmillan for allowing me to read and review this absolutely beautiful book by Mitali Perkins. What a gorgeous read. I absolutely devoured this multi-generational tale of love and family as seen through the eyes of a Bengali-American family.The book this reminds me the most of is the "Joy Luck Club" although I found this far more humorous and uplifting. It begins in Ghana with a pair of sisters as young girls, and we get to watch little vignettes of their lives Thank you so much to NetGalley and Macmillan for allowing me to read and review this absolutely beautiful book by Mitali Perkins. What a gorgeous read. I absolutely devoured this multi-generational tale of love and family as seen through the eyes of a Bengali-American family.The book this reminds me the most of is the "Joy Luck Club" although I found this far more humorous and uplifting. It begins in Ghana with a pair of sisters as young girls, and we get to watch little vignettes of their lives as they grow, move around the world, find parts of new cultures to make their own, and parts of their Indian heritage that are true no matter where they live. It was especially beautiful to read because there was such a contrast presented in experiences. Sonya, one of the sisters, is strikingly different in personality and life choices than Tara, the other sister. Watching them grow, their mother experience life in an entirely new way, and the experiences of Sonya and Tara's children made the book just feel very whole and complete. It is very much a women-centric book. And while I think some books seek to horrify and shock, Mitali Perkins did such a lovely job of presenting her material gracefully. In making little moments count in big ways. I cried at the end. Truly beautiful. I would give this 6 stars if I could, and it's definitely going on my favorites shelf. 5/5 stars.Please excuse typos. Entered on screen reader.
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  • Olivia (The Candid Cover)
    January 1, 1970
    When a book grabs hold of you and keeps you engaged right up to the end, it is safe to say that it is going to be a favourite. You Bring the Distant Near is a beautifully written saga that tells the story of the Das family and their experiences immigrating to the United States. Told in alternating perspectives, Perkins gives her readers so many unique and interesting points of view through her well-developed female characters. The Indian customs and culture that are told throughout this story ar When a book grabs hold of you and keeps you engaged right up to the end, it is safe to say that it is going to be a favourite. You Bring the Distant Near is a beautifully written saga that tells the story of the Das family and their experiences immigrating to the United States. Told in alternating perspectives, Perkins gives her readers so many unique and interesting points of view through her well-developed female characters. The Indian customs and culture that are told throughout this story are so insightful and add to the magic of the narrative.Having never read any of Perkins’ novels before, I was so thrilled to read the delightful You Bring the Distant Near. The writing is absolutely breathtaking and the descriptions of the various settings are vividly told. Most of the story takes place in the United States, which has a setting that is relatable to some. However, when the story shifts to India, it is as if you are transported along with the characters, as they are reacquainted with their old ways of life.It is hard to choose which of the five Das females is the one that I enjoyed learning about the most. Each of these ladies have such different personalities, that as the events unfold, you really get a taste for the different perspective each one brings. Ranee, the grandmother, is the character that definitely surprised me the most. She is so head strong and stubborn in her desire to ensure that her daughters maintain their Indian culture as much as possible. Ranee is the one that definitely goes through a significant transformation and is such a fun character to read about.The one thing that gives You Bring the Distant Near its unique flavour is the way Perkins has added bits of Indian life into the book. The Indian phrases and pronouns that the family uses are seamlessly included in the story. They are explained in a way that helps readers unfamiliar with certain words to understand their meaning without distracting from the narrative. Food plays a large role in the book, and you will be salivating for a taste of Ranee’s infamous chicken by the end of the story. Even the clothing that is so important to all of the females in the book, adds a feeling of culture and personality to the story. Also, the music that plays a large part of maintaining the family’s heritage almost seems to play in the background as you are reading.If you are looking for a diverse read, You Bring the Distant Near is the one that should be at the top of your list this fall. The writing is gorgeous and the characters are so relatable and interesting. All of the Indian culture that is sprinkled into this book will have you lusting for a taste of the food, clothing and traditions yourself.
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  • Shelly
    January 1, 1970
    Quite honestly one of my favourite reads of the year. In a little over 300 pages, Perkins manages to make you fall in love with 3-generations of the Das family and feel like you're right there along for their journey. You Bring the Distant Near is about identity, change (denial and acceptance of it) and the bond between sisters and family. I loved it and I know it's a novel that'll stay with me for a while. I highly encourage you to add it to your TBR pile if you haven't already done so.
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  • Aneta Bak
    January 1, 1970
    You Bring the Distant Near is a wonderful and heartwarming novel about what it truly feels like to be an Immigrant in another country.There are three options for an Indian girl, either study hard and become a doctor, study hard and become an engineer, or get married off. This rule isn't a problem for Sonia, she has outstanding grades, the issue is that she has fallen in love with an African-American man. Tara doesn't have the grades to become an engineer or doctor, and time is running out for he You Bring the Distant Near is a wonderful and heartwarming novel about what it truly feels like to be an Immigrant in another country.There are three options for an Indian girl, either study hard and become a doctor, study hard and become an engineer, or get married off. This rule isn't a problem for Sonia, she has outstanding grades, the issue is that she has fallen in love with an African-American man. Tara doesn't have the grades to become an engineer or doctor, and time is running out for her before her parents arrange a marriage for her. Her true passion is acting, preforming on stage is the only thing Tara wants to do.The story and the lesson this book teaches is absolutely amazing. Not a lot of people can see this side of immigration, the wanting to stay true to your home land while trying to blend in to the culture of the place you live in. This book shows you the three separate generations and how they dealt with this, and every single one of their stories was absolutely beautiful and truthful. I loved reading about this part and I wish more people would read this book just to understand what it feels like to be an Immigrant.The reason why my rating is so low, is because that I found this book to be a tad boring and very slow paced. This book mostly focuses on the relationships and how the family deals with problems. There is barely any action, and the book stays at the same pace for the whole book. There is no rising action or plot twists or anything of that kind, just relationships. While I loved reading about the family it self, I would have liked it more if there was at least a bit of action to make the story go by faster.Overall, I really enjoyed this book and the characters that were in it. All immigrants can relate to this, and if you're not an immigrant I still highly recommend this book, it's a wonderful way for people to see into the lives of immigrants without being one.Happy Reading,Aneta
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, this was wonderful.
  • Shanah
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! This book was just SO beautiful! I was a little nervous going into it though. After reading the first two chapters I closed the book and set it down on my shelf. I was scared to pick it up again because I felt like I was going to hate it. We are introduced to two sisters (Sonia and Tara) and their mother. I made assumptions about all 3 of them based on those first two chapters, and it worried me that it would be more of that same attitude and behaviour the whole way through….. not the case. Wow! This book was just SO beautiful! I was a little nervous going into it though. After reading the first two chapters I closed the book and set it down on my shelf. I was scared to pick it up again because I felt like I was going to hate it. We are introduced to two sisters (Sonia and Tara) and their mother. I made assumptions about all 3 of them based on those first two chapters, and it worried me that it would be more of that same attitude and behaviour the whole way through….. not the case. Watching these three women (along with 2 other children/grandchildren down the line) grow, learn, and evolve was just so stunning and heartwarming.I absolutely adore books that explore the balances of culture vs society. Stories that follow the struggle of knowing who you are and who you should be (also whether or not society’s beliefs should effect your place in the world) are so fascinating to me. In fact, this is one of the most well done books in that aspect! Here is why I think so: This book follows 3 generations. We have the Grandmother Ranee, her two daughters (Sonia and Tara), and the granddaughters (Chantal and Anna). Each of these women are in different places in their lives and each has different things that they value above others. The chapters showcase their different points of view and we as the reader get insight into why they think the way they do, what events in their lives brought them to their conclusion, and how they work as a family through it all. Them working together was possibly one of the most beautiful things about this story. They realize that it’s ok to be who you are, no matter what society thinks of you, and it’s ok to have desires even if they go against your nature or follow too closely to what people expect of you. I hope all of that didn’t confuse you but I’m having a hard time putting my thoughts into words! I enjoyed this book so much and felt such a connection with each of these women – yet I can’t really explain why. This is just a book that you have to feel and experience. It can’t be explained.The characters were wonderful! Each for their own reasons. At first I hated the mother Ranee. Her actions, emotions, and word choices just made me mad. In the end I felt most sorry for her as she is the one who spent a longer time in India and was more firmly rooted in a non American culture, so adjusting would have been so much harder. The sisters, Sonia (Sunny) and Tara (Starry) were such a great team! So supportive in literally every way as they navigated their new life and adjusted to American culture. I don’t have siblings, but if I did, I wish I could bond and know each other so completely like they did. Tara first comes off superficial and annoying. She seemed to be most willing to change who she was to be accepted. Strangely enough it was her character arc I enjoyed the most and her falling in love made me cry. Yes, I cried! Sadly, after her marriage, her character just fell away unlike all the rest and that really annoyed me! Sonia (Sunny) started off such a quiet little book worm and she is the one that changed the most. The grandchildren, Chantal and Anna were just as wonderful and it was great to see how much had changed for them after being in America for so long.The writing isn’t super fast paced. This is more of an emotional, slow burning, character driven story. There are little twists and turns that each character takes as they grow, but nothing drastic. So if you’re looking for fast pace this isn’t for you. But if you’re looking for a well written emotional story with multiple points of view that will capture your attention – this IS for you!I wish that I could say a little more, but as I said above, this is a story that must be experienced for you to really understand. It’s labeled as a YA book, but I know that this is something that anyone of any age can relate to. I actually will be recommending this one to my mom and my daughter! It was such a well written story, a very quick read, and so emotionally complex. I will be sure to keep an eye out for more books by this author!For this review and many others please visit - https://bionicbookwormblog.wordpress.com
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  • Tanita S.
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a crossover; the characters are young people who age throughout the book, making it heartfelt and accessible for people of all ages. This book is worth every single one of the four starred reviews it has earned so far in print journals ... and many more.Sometimes you need a hopeful book to lift you out of the realities of this world. It's not like there's no pain here, but there's HOPE to lift you aloft, and as Emily Dickinson says, it sings, and "it never stops at all." Absolutely This book is a crossover; the characters are young people who age throughout the book, making it heartfelt and accessible for people of all ages. This book is worth every single one of the four starred reviews it has earned so far in print journals ... and many more.Sometimes you need a hopeful book to lift you out of the realities of this world. It's not like there's no pain here, but there's HOPE to lift you aloft, and as Emily Dickinson says, it sings, and "it never stops at all." Absolutely filled with heart and soul and gorgeous. Pick it up, pass it around, and gift it to your mother and gran. Just beautiful.
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  • Lalitha
    January 1, 1970
    Deeply layered novel that beautifully captures the unique, and at times, fraught experience of existing between two cultures. This book absolutely resonated with my own family's story and felt really personal to me. Ranee reminded me very much of my own grandmother, who, despite living in Western countries for most of her life, held on to her traditional Indian values. Perkins has written a book that will not only be appreciated by teens, but also their parents. She sensitively illustrates the s Deeply layered novel that beautifully captures the unique, and at times, fraught experience of existing between two cultures. This book absolutely resonated with my own family's story and felt really personal to me. Ranee reminded me very much of my own grandmother, who, despite living in Western countries for most of her life, held on to her traditional Indian values. Perkins has written a book that will not only be appreciated by teens, but also their parents. She sensitively illustrates the sacrifices (and subsequent compromises) immigrant families make when it comes to establishing roots in a new country. I also loved the strong feminist perspectives, as well as the intense bonds between grandmothers and granddaughters. Highly recommended.
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  • Shenwei
    January 1, 1970
    really loved this book. it explores the experiences of being an immigrant, being multicultural, and being multiracial through the stories of five women in three generations of an Indian Bengali family loving in New York. they had distinct personalities and their own ways of seeing the world. also loved the explicit feminist themes. :)
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and Macmillan Children's Publishing Group for providing me this ARC in exchange for an honest review.This isn't usually something I'd read, but I'm really trying to expand my choices when it comes to genres. What I'm saying is, if this gets a lower review than you'd expect, it may not be entirely the book's fault.
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  • Jen Petro-Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Just beautiful. Such evocative details of the immigrant experience, from first to third generation.
  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    Actual Rating:3.5 starsI honestly did really like it, but then towards the end, I feel like the author just stretched it out too long, other wise it was a beautiful story!
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineSunny (Sonia) and her sister Star (Tara) have moved a lot because of their father's job. From Ghana to London, they have always felt somewhat outside of the mainstream culture due to their Bengali origins. When their mother finally convinces her father to move to America, the family ends up in Flushing, New York. Sunny is glad to be near a library and hopes that she will be able to wear jeans to school (quite daring for 1973!), and Tara tries to channel Mar E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineSunny (Sonia) and her sister Star (Tara) have moved a lot because of their father's job. From Ghana to London, they have always felt somewhat outside of the mainstream culture due to their Bengali origins. When their mother finally convinces her father to move to America, the family ends up in Flushing, New York. Sunny is glad to be near a library and hopes that she will be able to wear jeans to school (quite daring for 1973!), and Tara tries to channel Marcia Brady and hopes to get by academically. The family manages to save up enough money to move to the suburbs, and Tara is glad to finally be involved in a drama group. Their parents' relationship seems to improve once the stress of relocating has abated, but other problems occur. The book jumps ahead in history a bit, and we hear from several generations of the family. Both sisters eventually marry (Tara a "nice Bengali boy", and Sonia an African American classmate), and their daughters Anna and Chantal get a chance to describe what their lives are like dealing with a variety of grandmothers! Strengths: This was a fantastic immigrant family story that reminded me of the movie Avalon or some of the sweeping family epics written for adults. (Or a happier version of Tarkington's The Magnificent Ambersons, which I think is one of the great unsung novels of the 20th century.) The details of both Bengali culture and also about how difficult it can be to read a new culture and fit into it are very interesting. I think my favorite character might be the mother; when her granddaughters are teenagers, she decides to "Americanize" herself in ways that are both touching and comical. This is a very timely book, given the recent issues with immigration. Weaknesses: This is definitely more of a Young Adult book, more like this author's The Secret Keeper. Not that anything is objectionable, it just has more mature concerns. What I really think: I enjoyed this tremendously, and would definitely purchase for any high school collection.
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  • Debbi Florence
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful story about family and love. Mitali Perkins weaves with seamless brilliance the tales of five women over three generations as they each endeavor to discover who they are and who and what they want out of life. I cried and I laughed out loud. I fell in love with Ranee, her daughters Tara and Sonia, and her granddaughters Anna and Shanti. I would call this an Indian/American YA version of The Joy Luck Club. I love this book!
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  • Caitlin Christensen
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t know that I’m going to be able to find adequate words to describe my feelings for this book. This intergenerational heart-wrenching gem of a book, with its slow burn that creeps into your veins and takes hold of you; there really aren’t words that do it justice. Mitali Perkins has crafted something precious here. A deceivingly simple story about three generations of women – just 5 girls growing up, changing, learning, making mistakes, and, of course, falling in love. You may be tempted t I don’t know that I’m going to be able to find adequate words to describe my feelings for this book. This intergenerational heart-wrenching gem of a book, with its slow burn that creeps into your veins and takes hold of you; there really aren’t words that do it justice. Mitali Perkins has crafted something precious here. A deceivingly simple story about three generations of women – just 5 girls growing up, changing, learning, making mistakes, and, of course, falling in love. You may be tempted to think that this book will be a quick read, but let me tell you: You Bring the Distant Near is not a “quick” book. The story is soft and slow, and it’ll stay with you long after you finish it. I don’t know if I’ve ever read a book that reminds me so much of The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton, and if you know me, then you know that there is no higher compliment I can give a book than to compare it to what is one of my all-time favorite stories. You Bring the Distant Near is not a replica of Ava Lavender, not by a long shot (in fact, besides being an intergenerational story, they have almost nothing in common), but it has the same power that Ava Lavender has. It’s the power to completely transform your way of thinking. It’ll sink into your heart, into your mind, into your very bones. Tara and Sonia are sisters growing up around the world – from Ghana to London and finally to New York, where they must learn how to forge their own path amidst the pressures of their parents’ cultural expectations. Then, when tragedy strikes, they must choose once and for all who they’re going to be. Will they choose to follow their mother’s wishes that they become successful Bengali girls or will they step outside of their comfort zones and pursue their passions in theater and civil rights activism? Then, we follow Shanti and Anna, cousins who couldn’t be from two more polar backgrounds. Shanti is striving to connect her black and Bengali heritages (and keep her grandmothers from killing each other) while Anna is staunchly protecting her Indian culture and refusing to assimilate into America. But when the grandmother they share, Ranee, decides to become an American citizen, they both must come to terms with what it means to be American, and face their heritage – all of it – head on. The prose is beautiful, and the story even more so. The Bengali-American Das women are sure to win you over with their charm, their grit, their tenacity, and their strength to more forward through everything life has to offer. I think, in the end, that’s what I love most about You Bring the Distant Near – it’s a book that truly captures life: the good and the bad, the happiness and the sorrow – it explores the very marrow we all are made of. Humans are capable of such incredible things, but the true beauty of living is that the small things are what end up making a life. From choosing to marry someone despite your family’s cultural objections to deciding when to stop wearing traditional mourning clothes after the death of a loved one, this book celebrates the small stuff. It revels in the details. In the many minute facets that truly make our lives. It’s a beautiful thing, and you don’t want to miss it. If you read one contemporary this year, make sure it’s this one. Rating: 5+/5 stars Find me and my reviews on www.thebookshire.com and on instagram.
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  • Mars
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful and gorgeous book! There's nothing more satisfying than when a story stays with you for a long time, and you carry it in your thoughts. If you know anything about me, I truly love multi-generational complicated stories that highlights relevant themes. This book is a truly powerful voice that is needed in the YA community. We follow three generations of an Indian-immigrant's, Bengali family, and we get a look into the nuance of culture and what it means to be biracial, and lots o What a beautiful and gorgeous book! There's nothing more satisfying than when a story stays with you for a long time, and you carry it in your thoughts. If you know anything about me, I truly love multi-generational complicated stories that highlights relevant themes. This book is a truly powerful voice that is needed in the YA community. We follow three generations of an Indian-immigrant's, Bengali family, and we get a look into the nuance of culture and what it means to be biracial, and lots of feminism that's highlighted. If I could use one word to describe to this book, it would be important. Ranee is raising her two daughters, Sonia and Tara in a relatively American-focused culture and is worried that they'll use a part of their Indian culture. Sonia is in a "forbidden" biracial relationship, and a raging intersectional feminist that is trying to remake herself. Tara dreams of becoming a actress in the spotlight. Ultimately you will be delighted reading about the complicated relationships of sisterhood, parenthood, and the nuances of being a biracial individual. Then we also follow the perspectives of the two daughters of Tara and Sonia. In total, there are five kickas* women's stories that we get to explore, and I thoroughly enjoyed that aspect.I couldn't stop reading this, because of the character's who were propelling it forward. All of the characters were so interesting and messy and I absolutely adored it. At first, there were a couple of extremely unlikable but the author frames it this way where you understand why the character does what it does. Diverse, lush, fantastic, a new favorite that I want everyone to push up on their tbr.**Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.**
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  • Sreya Van
    January 1, 1970
    ~I received a free copy of this from Macmillan Children's Publishing group through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review~This is the story of three generations of Bengali women in America. It's told through five different perspectives and a really great mix of friendships, love, and finding yourself.It's so rare to find books about South Asians, especially YA. Add in not one, but THREE interracial relationships as well as really strong female characters and this book is very diverse, which ~I received a free copy of this from Macmillan Children's Publishing group through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review~This is the story of three generations of Bengali women in America. It's told through five different perspectives and a really great mix of friendships, love, and finding yourself.It's so rare to find books about South Asians, especially YA. Add in not one, but THREE interracial relationships as well as really strong female characters and this book is very diverse, which I love.I really like how Renee's marriage is portrayed. It's arranged, but it doesn't fall in the extreme of an abusive forced relationship, or a perfect and extremely adorable one that most books about arranged marriages tend to do. It's able to toe the line of two clashing personalities and two people who genuinely care about each other perfectly. It's very realistic and such a refreshing take.Most of the characters were very well written - realistic and flawed, yet likable at the same time. The only character I didn't like was Anna (or Anu). She had an uppity personality; like she was better than everyone else because of how 'truly Bengali' she was. She had a negative attitude towards Americans as well, and while it's understandable to have unrealistic expectations, the things she thought were quite arrogant. Her character growth wasn't really shown as much as it could have been.Overall, I really enjoyed this book. The ending is a little abrupt, but other than that, the pacing is well done. It kept me captivated the entire time and I really love the writing. Definitely one of my favorites that I've read recently.
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  • Tiffany-Reads
    January 1, 1970
    When I heard this was a multigenerational tale that starts with an Indian family that is immigrating to America, I was sold. This book focuses on various relationships within the Das family all of which are women. I wanted to read this because it reminded me of Homegoing, another multigenerational book, that is probably my favorite book of the year thus far. While this didn't quite blow me away in the same way and was different from Homegoing, I can say that I loved all the woman power and chara When I heard this was a multigenerational tale that starts with an Indian family that is immigrating to America, I was sold. This book focuses on various relationships within the Das family all of which are women. I wanted to read this because it reminded me of Homegoing, another multigenerational book, that is probably my favorite book of the year thus far. While this didn't quite blow me away in the same way and was different from Homegoing, I can say that I loved all the woman power and character growth seen as this book goes from around 1976 until the current time. I loved all the character point of views, and I loved seeing how the different family members felt about each other. There are 5 main points of view but all the women have very distinct voices. If you like books that focus on one character this book isn't for you, but I really enjoyed it as it covers things like racism, cultural differences, feminism, and female relationships among family and friends. I'm not doing this book justice, but I highly recommend it.
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  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars.I loved the first couple of sections in this book that followed Sonia and Tara. Following their lives as they grew up and found themselves was so interesting and engaging. I didn't feel as captivated by the last section, which involved their daughters, Chantal and Anna. There were still some really important things discussed with these two characters and it was interesting to see how they saw one another - with their different family structures and interests and upbringings, the two ha 3.5 stars.I loved the first couple of sections in this book that followed Sonia and Tara. Following their lives as they grew up and found themselves was so interesting and engaging. I didn't feel as captivated by the last section, which involved their daughters, Chantal and Anna. There were still some really important things discussed with these two characters and it was interesting to see how they saw one another - with their different family structures and interests and upbringings, the two had a lot to work through in their relationship. I thought that this section lost a bit of the magic that I felt earlier in the book; some of the dialogue seemed unnatural and clunky and the writing wasn't as tight. Overall, this book has such great messages and lets these messages be filtered through different time periods and personalities. I just wish it had stayed consistent for me throughout.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    What first drew me to the book beside the cover and title was hearing Mitali Perkins speak at a recent event and you can tell she's the genuine article. I hadn't actually read her other works, so this was my first venture. It was rich and layered and told over the course of several generations which is not as common in YA lit, but it represents a family, a culture, an unfolding. While I was lost in the circuitous way that some things were explained the reality is that the characters and their re What first drew me to the book beside the cover and title was hearing Mitali Perkins speak at a recent event and you can tell she's the genuine article. I hadn't actually read her other works, so this was my first venture. It was rich and layered and told over the course of several generations which is not as common in YA lit, but it represents a family, a culture, an unfolding. While I was lost in the circuitous way that some things were explained the reality is that the characters and their relationships were everyday. In that you could know any of the characters passing them on the street. Plus the backstory of how much of her own family and life went into it and how Perkins' herself describes her parents' relationship is so sentimentally sweet! Her rich family life is absolutely mirrored in this book.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars I was incredibly enthusiastic about the premise of this book--three generations of women in an Indian family, going through life and love--but none of the characters ever really came to life for me and quite a few of the plot developments passed by too quickly to really have an emotional impact.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Not quite as immersive as I had hoped (and the recent historical setting doesn't impact the plot/atmosphere as much as I had hoped), but still a good read! I was invested in each character's story arc, and I loved watching each one grow over the decades-long span of the story.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It hit me with every emotion possible, which is rare for a book to do to me. I smiled and even laughed out loud at times. Parts made me angry and sad and even teared up a few times. I will be buying this one to read again. Such a great book.
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  • Jessica Lewis
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful story for today's world, and a unique take. Will write more soon.
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    A good look at growing up immigrant in the US
  • Monica Edinger
    January 1, 1970
    Read this a few months back as I was moderating a Day of Dialog panel with Mitali. Am glad others are appreciating it as much as I did.
  • JM Cabral
    January 1, 1970
    In You Bring The Distant Near, readers became witnesses to how it is to be an Indian immigrant in the United States. Lasting for three generations, Mitali Perkins' book told the story of 3 women of color from the same family, showcasing the differences in their generations, as well as the similarity of their culture and traditions that bound them altogether.Full review to come. :)Huge thanks to my friends from Macmillan International for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest r In You Bring The Distant Near, readers became witnesses to how it is to be an Indian immigrant in the United States. Lasting for three generations, Mitali Perkins' book told the story of 3 women of color from the same family, showcasing the differences in their generations, as well as the similarity of their culture and traditions that bound them altogether.Full review to come. :)Huge thanks to my friends from Macmillan International for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. This did not, in any way, affect my overall opinion of the book and/or the story.
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  • Mary Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Inspired by her own experiences immigrating as a young teen in the 1970s, local author Mitali Perkins weaves together an intergenerational story of Ranee Das, her teenage daughters Sonia and Tara, and then later their own daughters. When Sonia and Tara move to New York as teenagers, they must navigate the possibilities that new opportunities might bring while they are acutely aware of the cultural expectations of their Bengali parents. Full of strong sisterhood, humor and meaningful reflections Inspired by her own experiences immigrating as a young teen in the 1970s, local author Mitali Perkins weaves together an intergenerational story of Ranee Das, her teenage daughters Sonia and Tara, and then later their own daughters. When Sonia and Tara move to New York as teenagers, they must navigate the possibilities that new opportunities might bring while they are acutely aware of the cultural expectations of their Bengali parents. Full of strong sisterhood, humor and meaningful reflections on family, culture and self-determination, this novel shines. (ages 12-18)
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  • Rafael Ray (The Royal Polar Bear Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    Find my book review here: https://theroyalpolarbearreads.wordpr...Hopeful. Inspiring. Promising. I didn’t expect that I will be attached to You Bring The Distant Near considering that this book is under YA Contemporary category. Three Generation of women imprinted a powerful lesson in my heart, my mind, and my soul. You Bring The Distant Near had more impact than I expected. It talks about diversity, racism, immigrants, culture, friendship, family, and love. Almost everything was discussed in th Find my book review here: https://theroyalpolarbearreads.wordpr...Hopeful. Inspiring. Promising. I didn’t expect that I will be attached to You Bring The Distant Near considering that this book is under YA Contemporary category. Three Generation of women imprinted a powerful lesson in my heart, my mind, and my soul. You Bring The Distant Near had more impact than I expected. It talks about diversity, racism, immigrants, culture, friendship, family, and love. Almost everything was discussed in the book and I find it difficult to believe that Mitali Perkins written the book so well and gave us an amazing novel that had a louder voice.This book made me feel, made me questions about my beliefs, cultures, and traditions. It speaks so much purity, truth, and rawness of the society. It handles little intricate details of different sensitive subjects that could emphasize in the book. That’s one fo the reasons why I love this book. And it empowers women, women has a louder voice in this book. As a male, I think it is really good to have a woman on your side with a strong personality.Actually, I really have a hard time reading it from the first page because I was unfamiliar with some words and I couldn’t get through but it didn’t hinder my reading and I ended up reading the book in one day. Let’s put it as the same as how a person having a hard time to believe something he wasn’t used to believing because of cultural differences. What we could be doing here in Southeast Asia could haven’t been practicing in Western countries. That’s another point! Mitali Perkins talked about diversity on his book and how it shows in her book that people have different beliefs and we have to be knowledgeable to understand each other. It could lead to misunderstanding and misunderstanding leads to unfortunate events.There’s a line that I couldn’t forget in the book but I’m not sure if it was the same but it sounds something like this, how could you respect them if they didn’t respect you? This line? It made an impact on my being. Because it was once my line when I had a hard time last year and it exudes so much philosophy and truth. I believe that no matter what your age is, no matter what your accomplishments in your life, whatever gender you have been classified into, whatever your religion is or your beliefs or where you came from or your nationality, or even a father and a son. Everyone needs respect. If you are an elderly and you think highly of yourself, I think, you better think twice. Why? Because no matter what your status in society, we all deserve respect and you should respect everyone. This is not about authority, this is about respect as a person, not as someone who has a sovereign.OKAY, ENOUGH OF MY OWN PRINCIPLES. I’m also pointing out the writing style because it is so easy to read. I never had a hard time and it feels like I’m devouring the book — or did I just devoured it? Tara and Sonia, the two lovely daughters are amazing and lovable. They may be siblings but they shows two completely opposite personalities and it is quite interesting to see their characters along the way and I think, Mitali Perkins gave justice on their developing characters. What stood out to me is their mother’s personality. I loathed her in almost half of the book because she’s a control freak whom I don’t understand where she is coming from. I believe because she has a strong belief regarding on their Indian Culture that has been affected by their immigration on London and now being influenced by American culture. I respect that and totally understand that but how could she control her daughters and give lesser freedom? Their dad is the exact opposite of their mom and the one thing that really touches my heart because I never thought that their Dad would be this understanding and passionate. He loves his family so much and I can see it on his personality while reading the book. I assure you, you’ll love their father too.Living in different traditions, adapting in a different environment, adjusting to a new social circle. I really find it hard for the characters because even if I were in their position, I would definitely get tired at some point. I appreciate their driving force to live the life they wanted. What amazing about this novel is it stays original, authentic and natural. I love how it was composed and written as good and I never read something like this before. It also talks a lot about perspective in life. For being an immigrant, for being who you are, for being both of among the two, for being black, and for choosing what makes you happy.You Bring The Distant Near is a satisfactory and compelling read. I really enjoyed it a lot more than I expected. I took a liking to this book because it just has a little amount of everything – little amount of life that really makes what a person is. Diversity, from culture shock to culture difference to culture adaptations, racism, acceptance, and loving are just a few to mention that you could find in the book and it way more outstanding if you read the whole book because it really speaks for everyone. I hope, I just hope that You Bring The Distant Near is one of the first novels that speaks to their readers and made the world a happier place.I would like to end my book review with a quote from the book that I shouldn’t be posting because it wasn’t yet a finished copy but because I love it, here you go:“Novels change hearts, though. And minds.”MY RATINGS: 5 STARS!
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  • Emily Scheinman
    January 1, 1970
    Such a beautiful epic read!
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