Yesterday
How do you solve a murder when you only remember yesterday?Imagine a world in which classes are divided not by wealth or religion but by how much each group can remember. Monos, the majority, have only one day’s worth of memory; elite Duos have two. In this stratified society, where Monos are excluded from holding high office and demanding jobs, Claire and Mark are a rare mixed marriage. Clare is a conscientious Mono housewife, Mark a novelist-turned-politician Duo on the rise. They are a shining example of a new vision of tolerance and equality—until…...a beautiful woman is found dead, her body dumped in England’s River Cam. The woman is Mark’s mistress, and he is the prime suspect in her murder. The detective investigating the case has secrets of his own. So did the victim. And when both the investigator’s and the suspect’s memories are constantly erased—how can anyone learn the truth?Told from four different perspectives, that of Mark, Claire, the detective on the case, and the victim—Felicia Yap’s staggeringly inventive debut leads us on a race against an ever-resetting clock to find the killer. With the science-fiction world-building of Philip K. Dick and the twisted ingenuity of Memento , Yesterday is a thriller you’ll never forget.

Yesterday Details

TitleYesterday
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 1st, 2017
PublisherMulholland Books
ISBN0316465259
ISBN-139780316465250
Number of pages352 pages
Rating
GenreMystery, Thriller, Fiction, Mystery Thriller, Suspense

Yesterday Review

  • Meredith
    July 24, 2017
    3.5 starsUnique take on the relationship between fact and memory. Yesterday takes place in an alternate reality, in which class distinctions are not based on wealth, race, gender,etc; what separates people is their ability to remember. There are the elite duos and low class monos. Duos can retain two days of memory, whereas monos can only retain one. Both duos and monos record their memories daily, and must rely on what they write to be factual. However, one can write what they want to believe 3.5 starsUnique take on the relationship between fact and memory. Yesterday takes place in an alternate reality, in which class distinctions are not based on wealth, race, gender,etc; what separates people is their ability to remember. There are the elite duos and low class monos. Duos can retain two days of memory, whereas monos can only retain one. Both duos and monos record their memories daily, and must rely on what they write to be factual. However, one can write what they want to believe versus recording what actually happened creating the ability to create alternative “memories.” These memories become crucial in the investigation into the murder of the mistress of a prominent duo. “We are all victims of the pasts we prefer.” Acclaimed duo novelist turned political hopeful, Mark, has been married to mono Claire for 20 years. They are in a rare mixed marriage. Their marriage is less than happy, as Claire often feels inferior to her duo husband. When Mark’s mistress, Sophia a duo who claims to have full memory, is murdered their marriage is put to the test. Sophia is perhaps the most interesting character. Having spent 17 years in a mental institution, she has returned to seek vengeance on Mark and Claire, whom she blames for destroying her life.Yesterday is told through the POV’s of Mark, Claire, Sophia, and Hans, a mono police officer masquerading as a duo. I enjoyed the juxtaposition of fact vs. memory that plays out in Yesterday. I have a lot of unanswered questions about the mono/duo society. Also, the ending unraveled and went to a place that didn’t work for me. Nonetheless, this was an interesting read.I won this book as a Goodreads giveaway.
    more
  • Carrie
    July 9, 2017
    Claire and Mark are a rare mixed marriage in a world that is divided not by race or religion but by how long of a memory you are born with. Claire is a mono, as is most of the population, that can only remember one day of her life at a time. Mark however is a duo and can remember that extra day which makes duos consider themselves better than monos. Every citizen however keeps a daily dairy to study to try to remember that which they forget. One day a body of a woman is found nearby where Claire Claire and Mark are a rare mixed marriage in a world that is divided not by race or religion but by how long of a memory you are born with. Claire is a mono, as is most of the population, that can only remember one day of her life at a time. Mark however is a duo and can remember that extra day which makes duos consider themselves better than monos. Every citizen however keeps a daily dairy to study to try to remember that which they forget. One day a body of a woman is found nearby where Claire and Mark live and soon a detective shows up at the couple's door looking to talk to Mark. It seems that the victim had written quite a bit about Mark in her diary which is now property of the police and he is brought in for questioning in the woman's murder. The detective has his own secrets and is insistent he will solve the case in a day with Mark being his primary focus. Yesterday by Felicia Yap is a bit of mix of fantasy and thriller which really had me intrigued when reading the synopsis. Being one that loves when an author goes a bit out on a limb and tries something a bit different than you normally find I just had to pick this one up and really wasn't disappointed as I found it a fun one to read. The story is told from several different POVs, Mark, Claire, the detective on the case, and the also victim through her diary entries. It's easy to follow along though and fun to see all sides of the story as it developed. I did however find a few flaws with the book but it really didn't bother me too much and bring down my enjoyment reading the story. Just in my opinion it could have used a tad more world building in the fantasy side and the thriller side really only had a few options so it isn't too hard to guess the outcome. However, being that the author took a chance and included both sides in the story I would still recommend checking this one out. I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley.For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.wordpress....
    more
  • Sam
    April 1, 2017
    Review forthcoming.
  • Liz Barnsley
    November 12, 2016
    This one really did it for me due to the cool concept beautifully executed (I'm definitely looking out for the different stuff now) and the fact that its kind of an old school mystery but not as you know it.Clever, unpredictable and highly engaging.A while until its out so I'll hold off on a full review until nearer the time. But you'll want to watch for this one I reckon...
    more
  • Aneta Bak
    July 13, 2017
    Yesterday was an amazing novel. An engaging mystery, a creative world, and unique and entertaining characters. Yesterday will go down as one of my favourite mysteries for the year.Claire is a mono, meaning she can only remember yesterday. When a detective comes knocking at her door, accusing her husband Mark of murdering a young beautiful woman that wrote in her diary that she was Mark's mistress, Claire must piece together what has happened the past few days, and what secrets her and Mark's his Yesterday was an amazing novel. An engaging mystery, a creative world, and unique and entertaining characters. Yesterday will go down as one of my favourite mysteries for the year.Claire is a mono, meaning she can only remember yesterday. When a detective comes knocking at her door, accusing her husband Mark of murdering a young beautiful woman that wrote in her diary that she was Mark's mistress, Claire must piece together what has happened the past few days, and what secrets her and Mark's history truly contains. This novel had some amazing characters. Right from the start I really liked reading from Claire and Mark's point of view. I was a little salty at first with the detective's point of view, I would have much rather either read from the two main characters view points or from the diary of woman that was murdered. Eventually I ended up liking the detective and his story, although I never liked him as much as the other characters.I loved the mystery aspect and the world that the author created. The fast that she wrote a mystery in a dystopian world where you can only remember either the day before or two days, and have to use a diary to remember the rest was extremely creative. The feeling of not knowing whether you killed someone or not because you can't trust what your past self wrote in a diary is crazy when you think about it. This story was so entertaining, I loved the dystopian world and the mystery was fantastic.I was a little disappointed while reading that the mystery was being too obvious. When the plot twist hit, I nearly fell off my chair. I totally wasn't expecting the ending and it honestly made me love the book so much. Overall, the characters, the world, and the plot was absolutely fantastic. I truly loved this book. If it wasn't for the detectives point of view not being as enjoyable as the rest and the obvious beginning of the mystery, I would have given this book a full 5 stars. Either way, I still recommend this book to all mystery, thriller and dystopian lovers.Happy Reading,Aneta
    more
  • Jacob Collins
    May 27, 2017
    All of my reviews can be found at: http://jacob-reviews-books.blogspot.c...I have been looking forward to reading Yesterday since I first heard about early last year and I was thrilled when my copy came in the post. I couldn’t wait to get started. We all take memory for granted. It is only apparent how much we rely on memory during police investigations, exams and when a loved one passes away. In the world Felicia Yap has created in her debut novel, Yesterday, there are two types of people: Mono All of my reviews can be found at: http://jacob-reviews-books.blogspot.c...I have been looking forward to reading Yesterday since I first heard about early last year and I was thrilled when my copy came in the post. I couldn’t wait to get started. We all take memory for granted. It is only apparent how much we rely on memory during police investigations, exams and when a loved one passes away. In the world Felicia Yap has created in her debut novel, Yesterday, there are two types of people: Monos and Duos. A Mono can only remember the day before yesterday whereas a Duo can remember two days before. This is how people are segregated in this world, not by wealth or religion but by how much a person can remember. And Monos are often discriminated against by Duos. Claire and Mark are going through a rocky period in their marriage. Claire is a Mono, her husband, Mark; bestselling novelist turned politician is a Duo. Their marriage is rare in Felicia’s world and The Queen has recently given Royal Assent to an Act of Parliament designed to encourage more mixed marriages between Monos and Duos. When the body of a young woman is found in Cambridgeshire’s river Cam, suspicion quickly falls on Mark. Can Claire really trust the person that she married, can she trust the facts that she has carefully stored over the years they have been together?Felicia’s unique concept for her novel is intriguing: how do you solve a murder when you only remember yesterday? For the detective investigating the suspicious death of the young woman, this is all too true and he vows to have the mystery solved by the end of the day. I admired his determination as he got to grips with the case and his will power to see it through; this definitely added pace to the novel as the detective raced against the clock to get answers. Perhaps it would make for a better world if we could only remember yesterday, after all no one would be able to hold grudges against others as they wouldn’t be able to remember the reason why particularly with the state of the world as it is at the moment. Yesterday is a brilliant debut. If you loved Before I Go To Sleep you’ll love this book. Really, really excellent, I’m sure Yesterday will be one of the biggest hits of the summer. Thank you to Millie Seaward at Headline for sending me an advance proof copy.
    more
  • imyril
    July 3, 2017
    In a present that is almost our own, the world is split in two: the Monos who can only remember yesterday and the Duos who can also remember the day before. Everyone keeps a diary, meticulously recording the important events of each day in order to study them tomorrow in the hope of learning them as facts.When a beautiful woman turns up drowned in the Cam, her diary makes clear she was having a torrid affair with a famous author - one on the verge of running for Parliament. Can his career - and In a present that is almost our own, the world is split in two: the Monos who can only remember yesterday and the Duos who can also remember the day before. Everyone keeps a diary, meticulously recording the important events of each day in order to study them tomorrow in the hope of learning them as facts.When a beautiful woman turns up drowned in the Cam, her diary makes clear she was having a torrid affair with a famous author - one on the verge of running for Parliament. Can his career - and his marriage - survive? Can he and his wife ever be sure what he may have been up to more than a day ago?This is a great concept, and I was really excited to read it. Unfortunately, it's badly executed, and I ended up finding it tedious, repetitive and overwrought. While I can forgive unlikeable characters (especially in narrative like this one), they've got to be interesting. Full review.I received a free copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Tracy Shephard
    November 18, 2016
    This novel is one of the most unusual books I have ever read.Based on the idea that there are only two types of people - Mono and Duo, and the fact that they have to rely on their daily diary to remember things was both intriguing and annoying.Mark is a novelist and a Duo and his wife Claire is a Mono.A girl is found dead in a river and Mark in implicated in her murder, and almost immediately we assume that he is involved, by his actions and the girls diary.Rather oddly, I thought that this book This novel is one of the most unusual books I have ever read.Based on the idea that there are only two types of people - Mono and Duo, and the fact that they have to rely on their daily diary to remember things was both intriguing and annoying.Mark is a novelist and a Duo and his wife Claire is a Mono.A girl is found dead in a river and Mark in implicated in her murder, and almost immediately we assume that he is involved, by his actions and the girls diary.Rather oddly, I thought that this book was based in the future, it isn't . I have never heard of Mono and Duo minds and having read this I am in the mindset that I am a Mono. (a bit slow).Even though it is a good read I do feel that it was trying to be a bit too clever, but I like books that I can dissolve in and not try to make me think to hard about what's going on.It is very well written and the plot will appeal to most readers, however, it was just a bit too unconventional for my reading taste.A promising debut from Felicia, and I look forward to her next tale.
    more
  • Ellie
    July 11, 2017
    Yesterday is set in an alternate reality where the population is split between Monos and Duos. The difference? A Duo can remember two days and a Mono only one. This creates a class divide and Felicia Yap uses it to explore prejudice.At the heart of the story is a dead woman, assumed murdered however murder is pretty rare as most people don't have the same grudges they would if they remembered everything clearly. However, the victim could remember everything, and had been institutionalised becaus Yesterday is set in an alternate reality where the population is split between Monos and Duos. The difference? A Duo can remember two days and a Mono only one. This creates a class divide and Felicia Yap uses it to explore prejudice.At the heart of the story is a dead woman, assumed murdered however murder is pretty rare as most people don't have the same grudges they would if they remembered everything clearly. However, the victim could remember everything, and had been institutionalised because of it. Her diaries suggest she hadn't the only one either, all condemned to madness.With no long term memory you would expect civilisation to collapse. To get round this, everyone keeps a diary, once kept on paper but now, thanks to Steve Jobs, people can store them electronically. If they study their diary regularly, they can commit facts to long-term memory. Also, children can remember everything, with memory loss starting at age 18 for Monos and 23 for Duos. This gap strengthens the stereotype of Monos being stupid, as it prohibits a university education. Just as in our world, the working class have greater hurdles to catch up with the middle class, who have better opportunities afforded to them by wealth and connections.It works if you don't think too hard about it all. With the memory constraints, it's a miracle this alternate world has the same technological advancement. I liked how precious the diaries were, a nod to current concerns over data privacy, as well as the potential for data loss. Claire discovers she is missing a period of time in her old diaries, events she didn't attempt to memorise. They put trust in their diaries just as we trust in hard drives and cloud storage.It seems to me that thrillers these days must have unlikable characters, and Sophia and Mark definitely fit the bill. Sophia is the victim, whose diary tells us of her thirst for revenge against Mark, a famous writer (books are written to be read over a couple of days at most). Her reasons for revenge are not revealed immediately, which helps keep the pace.Fortunately for me, Hans the detective and mark's wife Claire, are much more sympathetic characters. It says a lot that these are the Monos, whilst the Duos come across as arrogant and prejudiced. Normally, Monos' career prospects would be limited by their status but Hans has been pretending to be a Duo, his track record at solving crimes within a day contributing to his success, both as a detective and as a Mono in hiding.Everyone assumes Claire was just the pretty but stupid Mono wife. Mark's running for MP and part of his campaign is about mixed marriages, of which his is one. Yet there's more to Claire than meets the eye. The change in her diary style over 20 years shows she has improved her writing skills.The diaries provide much of the narrative, jumping around in time as well as between characters. There are also press clippings that add some context as well as shedding light on the mystery, or confusing it more in some cases.It's an interesting concept and I'd recommend to anyone who is getting a little fatigued by the usual domestic thrillers.Review copy provided by publisher.
    more
  • Casey (caseyrosereads)
    June 14, 2017
    4.25 starsI was intrigued from just the description of the book and then was thrilled to discover that a world limited in memory was every bit of a fun as a setting for a mystery as I had anticipated.Yap sets up some really compelling social ideas for how society would chose to divide over length of memory instead of by religion or skin color. While there was also plenty of compelling reasons to explain why the memory issues existed for all human beings, the only thing I wish I understood better 4.25 starsI was intrigued from just the description of the book and then was thrilled to discover that a world limited in memory was every bit of a fun as a setting for a mystery as I had anticipated.Yap sets up some really compelling social ideas for how society would chose to divide over length of memory instead of by religion or skin color. While there was also plenty of compelling reasons to explain why the memory issues existed for all human beings, the only thing I wish I understood better was exactly how long this issue had been effecting people. I also really enjoyed the way that the technology that has become such a standard part of our daily lives has been reappropriated to fit within the world the author has created. I won’t spoil anything beyond that, other than to say that I had a chuckle over this kind of blend of real world people and other world ideas.What surprised me the most about this story is that there are really three main threads to the narrative, one being the most obvious- the attempt to solve a murder, the second being a B plot about the detective’s desire to hide that the fact that he is a mono (this is revealed fairly early on) and the third and most surprising is that the story turned out to have a lot of real love at the heart of the story. I don’t usually find a lot of genuine romance in murder mysteries, at least not in the kinds I read.Overall this book offered a unique world and an intriguing murder with some fun twists in the end.
    more
  • D.J.
    July 8, 2017
    A multiple character viewpoint novel told from the perspectives of the detective and the suspects. Very absorbing, and with several unexpected twists thrown in, my attention was firmly hooked 'till the last sentence.
  • Annie
    November 2, 2016
    This is a 3.5-4 stars. I picked this up as an ARC at Frankfurt Book Fair.The premise is that there are two types of people in the world. Those who can only remember yesterday, and those who can also recall the day before. Those who can remember yesterday and the day before are "superior" to those who can only remember yesterday. People can remember facts. They just don't have memory of details or activities.So people have just one lifeline to the past: their diary. Each night, you write down the This is a 3.5-4 stars. I picked this up as an ARC at Frankfurt Book Fair.The premise is that there are two types of people in the world. Those who can only remember yesterday, and those who can also recall the day before. Those who can remember yesterday and the day before are "superior" to those who can only remember yesterday. People can remember facts. They just don't have memory of details or activities.So people have just one lifeline to the past: their diary. Each night, you write down the things that matter. Each morning, your diary tells you where you were, who you loved and what you did.The story starts with a murder victim. "Today, the police are at your door. They say that the body of your husband's mistress has been found in the River Cam. They think your husband killed her two days ago."Can you trust the police? Can you trust your husband? Can you trust yourself?Intriguing story and premise. By the time you get to the end you have a good idea of who the murder victim is not but not WHO the murder victim is. An engaging read but very frustrating to read because of the lack of memories--I wanted to fix everybody.
    more
  • Renny Barcelos
    June 24, 2017
    I am sorry to say that this did not work for me at all.The world building would have to be way better for me to be the tiny bit convinced of this reality and it was not. It was barely scratched, actually, and had many many holes in it. The whole idea of it being the same world, the same time actually as we are living in, only that in perhaps some parallel universe? (it's never even tried to be explained) people only are able to remember either the last day or the last 2 days, hence the division I am sorry to say that this did not work for me at all.The world building would have to be way better for me to be the tiny bit convinced of this reality and it was not. It was barely scratched, actually, and had many many holes in it. The whole idea of it being the same world, the same time actually as we are living in, only that in perhaps some parallel universe? (it's never even tried to be explained) people only are able to remember either the last day or the last 2 days, hence the division between monos and duos. So everyone has to write everything down on diaries and then study them so the memories can become facts that can be retained. Impressed? I wasn't. And despite it never making much sense, there was also the problem of it never going to work. How would humanity even start in such a scenario before written language? Oh, and even better, there were snippets, here and there, of how science was working on expanding the memory but...if it's always been like that, then how or why would they even think of it??To make matters worse, it is all told in different povs, all using first-person, present tense. It adds to a very boring, poor reading. The characters describing their actions as they're being acted is always an embarrassing thing if not done correctly (which it is not here) and imagine it when they have to repeat all the time about their diaries and how they can only remember a bit? It became kind of unnerving pretty quickly. The only way for me to finish this was by skimming a lot and still I could have the whole picture. A picture that was badly imagined and badly executed. The dialogues are dreadful in real time but having to read them as told in their diaries made me cringe. And I still cannot understand why, at certain points, instead of just using quotation marks when a character is telling how things happened, the author decided for long paragraphs in italics. Distracting and unnecessary.Mark was such a cliche that I swear I kept imagining him striking his mustache like those villains in silent movies. Everyone sounded like terrible actors in a B movie, actually.The ending? Oh my... OK, the author wanted a twist, something super surprising. What we got was an implausible end to a completely impossible novel.I'd like to thank NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC I was given in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Kara
    July 5, 2017
    This just didn't work for me at all. I'm giving an extra star for the lovely writing, but there were holes in the world-building that didn't make a lot of sense, plus a predictable plot that honestly bored me. I like to ask questions in my head about what is going to happen next and who I think committed a crime like this, not ask myself how the world-building would work. That's an execution fail to me. Great idea in theory, but when it was put down on paper, it just didn't come together like it This just didn't work for me at all. I'm giving an extra star for the lovely writing, but there were holes in the world-building that didn't make a lot of sense, plus a predictable plot that honestly bored me. I like to ask questions in my head about what is going to happen next and who I think committed a crime like this, not ask myself how the world-building would work. That's an execution fail to me. Great idea in theory, but when it was put down on paper, it just didn't come together like it should have. I will write more later about why this book didn't work.
    more
  • Rob Scragg
    July 14, 2017
    Review to follow
  • Gemma
    July 20, 2017
    I read this in one day (tbf I did nothing else but read).Let me organise my thoughts for the review!
  • Kenny
    January 2, 2017
    Brilliant! I ❤it. Brilliant! I ❤️it.
  • Thelastwordreview
    July 23, 2017
    Summer is the time when we all tend to relax with a good book, well I am now going to let you in advance of a book that is hitting the bookshops in a few weeks’ time that is going to be THE thriller of the summer. Those that follow my Twitter feed will know that I have been talking of the stunning debut thriller Yesterday by Felicia Yap. This is a name that you will be hearing a lot more about. The premise for this book is ‘How do you solve a murder when you can only remember yesterday’ and this Summer is the time when we all tend to relax with a good book, well I am now going to let you in advance of a book that is hitting the bookshops in a few weeks’ time that is going to be THE thriller of the summer. Those that follow my Twitter feed will know that I have been talking of the stunning debut thriller Yesterday by Felicia Yap. This is a name that you will be hearing a lot more about. The premise for this book is ‘How do you solve a murder when you can only remember yesterday’ and this is where the title of the novel comes from. This is a future world with two types of people, Mono’s those that can only remember yesterday and the more elite group of people called Duos who can also remember the day before yesterday. I world were iDiaries are the must have for everyone as this is the only way of knowing what you have been doing on a daily basis, just imagine every night before bed if you were a responsible adult you completed your iDiary filling in your day’s activities. Welcome to a dystopian mystery that is just brilliantly written with such unique characters unlike any I have come across in a thriller. In this engrossing novel we have two central characters in Claire who is a mono (can only remember yesterday) and is married to Mark a Duo (remembering two days). This is a couple with their own personal marital problems which are all too plain to see from the opening pages. Then a young beautiful woman is found dead in the River Cam she has been murdered and the detective is standing on the doorstep of Claire and Marks home. It appears that on the dead woman’s I Diary she claims that she is Mark’s mistress and now Mark is the prime suspect in her murder. So we go back to the premise of the novel in ‘How do you solve a murder when you can only remember yesterday.’We now find Claire trying to piece together the days leading up to the murder of the young woman and the story is told from the perspective of all four of the leading characters and a story so well thought out and told, an incredibly well balanced debut thriller based in a future world were memory really is short term. There are many twists in the story to keep you on your toes and some you will not expect. Great characters are important to me in novels and in Yesterday Felicia Yap has created some very strong characters that make this an unforgettable book and one that you will not forget easily. I was lucky enough to meet Felicia Yap earlier this year at a get together at the publishers and learnt more of the story from her directly. One of my major books of 2017 and one I know many people are going to be reading on the beaches through this summer. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.My copy of Yesterday was provided by the publisher in return for a review.
    more
  • Mary
    July 23, 2017
    What an intriguing novel. It is told from the viewpoint of the four main characters, an increasingly common literary device. It is set in contemporary UK but with an interesting concept. The population comprises two types; Monos who can only remember what happened the day before and Duos who have the advantage of being able to remember the previous two days. This is the major societal divide and creates a cultural prejudice against the Monos. As the novel opens an Act of Parliament, encouraging What an intriguing novel. It is told from the viewpoint of the four main characters, an increasingly common literary device. It is set in contemporary UK but with an interesting concept. The population comprises two types; Monos who can only remember what happened the day before and Duos who have the advantage of being able to remember the previous two days. This is the major societal divide and creates a cultural prejudice against the Monos. As the novel opens an Act of Parliament, encouraging more mixed marriages between Monos and Duos is about to be given Royal Assent.In order to combat the lack of long term memory both Monos and Duos keep diaries from which they learn facts about what has happened in their lives. This is the only way they can know what they have done. The population is therefore dependent on the veracity of what they have recorded. In the past the diaries were hard copies but with technological advancements everyone now uses an iDiary. This is a clever solution to the obvious question that if a person has such a short term memory how can she or he remember their relationships with other people.Mark, a Duo and a successful novelist, has been married to Claire, a Mono, for twenty years. This is an unusual situation and Mark has been disinherited by his wealthy family for entering the partnership. Whilst Claire believes she loves her husband she feels she is his social inferior and to combat these feelings she takes antidepressants. The third character is Sophia Alyssa Ayling. She claims to be the only person in the world who remembers her past without the aid of a diary. She has recently been released from St Augustine, an institution for the mentally disturbed. She was placed there, by her father and step mother, against her will for burning her diaries. Sophia is out for revenge. Sophia’s body is discovered in the river Cam and Mark becomes a prime suspect in her murder as it becomes apparent from her diary that they have been having an affair.Sophia’s murder is investigated by DCI Hans Richardson, a Mono masquerading as a Duo. It is through his reading of Sophia’s diary and flashbacks by all the characters that the story develops. It is clear that Claire has suppressed memories of a tragic event, that Mark is an unfaithful husband and that Sophia may not be all she appears to be.This is an inventive and well written novel (although it sometimes resorts to rather hackneyed phrases) with a suitably satisfying twist at the very end.I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review. Thank you.
    more
  • Katy Noyes
    July 11, 2017
    Dystopia of memory - intriguing idea, works some of the time3.5 starsWhat an idea - a world where people are either lower class citizens who an only retain one day's worth of memories, or the slightly higher-class people who can remember everything that has happened for the last TWO days. How would you cope? What would be lost? And what happens when a murder is committed and the killer must be caught? Definitely caught my interest. And yes, we do follow a police detective as he hunts for the kil Dystopia of memory - intriguing idea, works some of the time3.5 starsWhat an idea - a world where people are either lower class citizens who an only retain one day's worth of memories, or the slightly higher-class people who can remember everything that has happened for the last TWO days. How would you cope? What would be lost? And what happens when a murder is committed and the killer must be caught? Definitely caught my interest. And yes, we do follow a police detective as he hunts for the killer (himself under time constraints for reasons he's kept secret), but also the man (a Duo) who is suspected of the murder and his wife (a Mono) - Mark and Claire. Mark is a successful writer, many of his books use the concept of memory in thriller plots. The victim herself is also a narrator - as each can tell us the story through their diaries, the way in which adults in this world preserve their memories to later attempt to recall as 'facts' when they are lost to them.It kind-of worked, but also didn't. We read diary snippets, we heard the voices of our characters, we saw the past of the victim, and how her life intersected with that of other characters.Some 'big reveals' and twists, I didn't think were well executed, most twists were obvious, though inexplicable at times. I was confused at points in terms of time period, voice and the setting didn't always feel like a world with no memory.I would have expected more world-building, to show how different a world lacking in fluidity and shared memory would be, but it didn't really come alive for me. Mark was a bit of a damp squib (especially at the end), with Claire's character arc not as severe or overt as I would have expected, and the ending left me cold. Our detective is BEGGING for everyone to find out his secret, he refers to it so many times "I MUST get it solved today". And the victim's past and present incarnations were rather confusing and it never made much sense, what happened to her.I did want to read on, to find out more about the world and to come to learn what had been happening, but in the end, with one or two poignant scenes regarding Mark and Claire's own family aside, the murder plot didn't really climax satisfyingly for me.Great idea, I always love a good dystopia. But the execution wasn't as tight as it needed to be.With thanks to Netgalley for the advance reading copy.
    more
  • Melissa
    July 23, 2017
    Yesterday is a high-concept thriller, set in a world where no one’s memory lasts more than two days. The majority of the population are “Monos”, who retain all memories before the age of 18, and just a single day’s worth of short term memories. “Duos” are luckier - they remember up to the age of 23, and have two days short term memory to play with. Everything else is based off the facts that people record in their diaries every night and strive to learn.I was intrigued by the concept, and especi Yesterday is a high-concept thriller, set in a world where no one’s memory lasts more than two days. The majority of the population are “Monos”, who retain all memories before the age of 18, and just a single day’s worth of short term memories. “Duos” are luckier - they remember up to the age of 23, and have two days short term memory to play with. Everything else is based off the facts that people record in their diaries every night and strive to learn.I was intrigued by the concept, and especially by the premise of a murder mystery set in this world. I would have liked much more world building. How do people in professions cope? Especially doctors, who yes, have time to fit in five years of medical school before the memory shut down, but must have to learn every other development thereafter as “fact”, alongside all elements of their personal lives.The novel doesn’t really address this, although we are presented with a Mono detective who strives to pass himself off as a Duo, and feels pressured to solve his cases within 24 hours. One of the main characters is a novelist, and the text notes that books in this world only take around four hours to read - which still seems like a supreme waste of time given the memory restrictions.The characters here were widely dislikable, especially the victim, who is blessed with a full memory. It never felt believable that she’d spent seventeen years in an asylum before having to be told by another inmate that the way to release was just to pretend to be a Duo and resume writing in her diary. For all the extra insight she was supposed to have, surely that would have been obvious?Few of the novels “twists” are surprising, and the detective is often lagging behind the reader in terms of realisations, which can be frustrating. Still, it’s a really interesting concept, and this is only Yap’s debut novel - I’ll be interested to see where she goes in the future.Sincere thanks to Wildfire for providing a free copy in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley.[Review originally published on my blog at Line After Line.]
    more
  • Kevin
    June 21, 2017
    I have a certain fondness for alternate reality stories. At least the ones that find a sweet spot of familiarity and strangeness, which Yap manages well with this murder mystery. The difference we have here is that people basically can't move memories from their short-term memory into their long term memory, so when they go to bed they write in their diary and when they wake up they learn the day before until they can remember these relevant facts. It's a simple angle but works well because it's I have a certain fondness for alternate reality stories. At least the ones that find a sweet spot of familiarity and strangeness, which Yap manages well with this murder mystery. The difference we have here is that people basically can't move memories from their short-term memory into their long term memory, so when they go to bed they write in their diary and when they wake up they learn the day before until they can remember these relevant facts. It's a simple angle but works well because it's used to split the world into monos and duos - two social classes derived from how many days they can recall. The similarities are clever too; Apple sell an iDiary for example. Just enough of an anchor to the reality we know to help us understand the differences presented.That memory issue leads to a big factor of the storyline. When a murder occurs the detective wants to solve the case in one day. The more time passes the more chance the killer will have forgotten.The narrative jumps around slightly, both in perspective and timing. We see events unfolding through the eyes of four different characters, each telling their story from their own perspective. It's a style that could easily be gimmicky but here it helps keep the mystery alive and the story fresh. Of course part of the mystery also comes from the strange memories that the characters have. They check their diaries for facts, to see what happened everywhere from a couple of days ago to a couple of decades ago. This memory recall allows for some very effective reveals to keep the plot twisting - it gives characters a credibility when something surfaces.The book is well written. The characters are relatable despite being so different to the world we know. The early chapters flow quickly and easily into each other, although things do slow slightly as the conclusion bubbles to the surface. But, by then you're hooked and it's not as if they struggle, they just don't have quite the same pace they start with.A clever angle that adds a fresh twist to the genre. Grab a copy and ready your diary - you'll want to remember this one.
    more
  • Gary Dowden
    July 12, 2017
    Imagine a world where only you can only maintain your memory for either one day (Mono) or two (Duo)! That's a world, set in the present day, occupied by the characters in this debut novel by Felicia Yap. To be fair, the scenario isn’t explored very deeply, aside from the characters entering their day's actions, thoughts and “facts” onto an iDiary at the end of each day which can then be accessed in the future for reference, however the storyline itself is intriguing enough to almost manage witho Imagine a world where only you can only maintain your memory for either one day (Mono) or two (Duo)! That's a world, set in the present day, occupied by the characters in this debut novel by Felicia Yap. To be fair, the scenario isn’t explored very deeply, aside from the characters entering their day's actions, thoughts and “facts” onto an iDiary at the end of each day which can then be accessed in the future for reference, however the storyline itself is intriguing enough to almost manage without the whole memory story.When Sophia Ayling's body is dumped into a nearby river, weighed down by stones in her coat pockets, the finger of blame points to novelist and hopeful-politician Mark, who previously had an affair with Sophia, much to the anger of Mark's wife Claire (the pair of whom are in a rare and often frowned upon, but seemingly happy Mono-Duo marriage). However when the police officer in charge, Hans, looks into the case, it would appear that all three have a separate shocking back story! Yesterday is told via individual chapters from the four main characters which is fine as long as it's not overdone with too many different viewpoints and it works quite well here, especially comparing the differing views of the same incident/situation. It's an interestingly written story with shades of Before I Go To Sleep (very short term memory) and The Girl On The Train (Yesterday is told from four different viewpoints) and bounces between the present and past, notably when we hear from Sophia and her diary and although I enjoyed it, I cant say with honesty that's it's one that I'll pick up and read again in the near future. That said, the last quarter drags you off in various directions and scenario's that you think you understand what's been happening before being clobbered by an often clever plot twist.It's certainly very promising as a debut novel and will likely do well and have a good following of fans and I'll probably read any future novels by her, although I can't quite figure out whether the ending is set up for a sequel or not!
    more
  • Nicholas Masters
    July 5, 2017
    What a refreshing read. Yesterday not only provides what is essentially an engrossing crime mystery, but wraps it up in an alternate reality where memory is either painstakingly committed as facts, or forgotten. Did it work, well mostly I think. The premise whereby Mono and Duos live in a reality where there short term memory is completely wiped clean every 1-2 days seems a little too absurd once or twice, but the author does do an exceptionally job of making you accept what is simply the realit What a refreshing read. Yesterday not only provides what is essentially an engrossing crime mystery, but wraps it up in an alternate reality where memory is either painstakingly committed as facts, or forgotten. Did it work, well mostly I think. The premise whereby Mono and Duos live in a reality where there short term memory is completely wiped clean every 1-2 days seems a little too absurd once or twice, but the author does do an exceptionally job of making you accept what is simply the reality by suggesting that the alternative (our reality where memory is what we know it to be) is as equally absurd when viewed from the other perspective.So yes, if the reader accepts it, the book has a lot to offer. Throw in a couple of twists and turns and in you are in for an enjoyable experience.I must admit that I felt some of the interactions and narratives could have been portrayed slightly better. Yap said it best when she suggested that a conversation that reads well, is not necessarily how one would actually take place in real life (or something to that effect). Perhaps she strayed from that ideal once or twice. Additionally some of the investigative narratives seemed to be a little to 'Murder She Wrote'. But even with me harbouring these opinions, the book is still very enjoyable. And hey, perhaps these observations are simply normal for a world where the lack of memory plays such a crucial role. Perhaps only holding onto your immediate short term memory and crucial facts moulds the way we interact and act in general, to such an extent whereby what I lightly criticized is actually the intended behaviour.Anyway, give it a go; I'm sure you won't be disappointed.Thank you NetGalley and Headline for a review copy in exchange of an honest reviewFavourite Quote: "Happiness is a process. Unhappiness is a state"
    more
  • Allison M
    June 18, 2017
    I received this book free from NetGalley. It will be published by Wildfire in August.This novel starts with an unusual premise, that people are divided into two categories, Monos who possess a 24-hour memory, and Duos who can remember everything for 48 hours. Rather than class, gender or race, society revolves around the differences between Monos and Duos, with Duos being seen as more intelligent and generally superior to Monos. From this come rules restricting what grades of job a Mono can appl I received this book free from NetGalley. It will be published by Wildfire in August.This novel starts with an unusual premise, that people are divided into two categories, Monos who possess a 24-hour memory, and Duos who can remember everything for 48 hours. Rather than class, gender or race, society revolves around the differences between Monos and Duos, with Duos being seen as more intelligent and generally superior to Monos. From this come rules restricting what grades of job a Mono can apply for or aspire to.People remember 'facts' by writing them in their iDiaries every night before they can forget them. These facts seem to be memorised very easily and that is how people function and understand their lives.This intriguing fantasy is segued with a thriller plot: Yesterday is a murder mystery. It is also an exploration of memory and how we understand the world, the narratives we tell ourselves, and an examination of love and hate.So far so fascinating. Yet I am awarding this book only 3 stars because of the way it is written. The narrators of the book are the four main characters, yet I found their voices to be much the same voice (with the exception of one very sweary account). I am of course speaking of my personal taste but I found the writing clunky, and overly laden with adjectives - for example this is what one character says to another:'The figure was moving about with an ethereal, feline grace that could only be feminine. Yet she was also circling the room in a slightly agitated manner; she resembled a hungry, desperate panther. I squinted; she was clad from head to toe in midnight black. A sinuous sable scarf concealed most of her face.' This sort of overwriting partly spoils the book for me: it slows action, defuses tension and, well, irritates me.Yet still I awarded the book 3 stars. It is a great story.
    more
  • Jo
    July 19, 2017
    Review to follow
  • Susan
    July 25, 2017
    You know that movie with Dennis Quaid, "DOA", where the professor has been poisoned and has 36 hours to solve his own crime before he dies? This book reminds me of that movie. DCI Hans Richardson is a Mono; he can only remember things for one day and then they disappear. He doesn't die but it makes it difficult for him to solve murders, even with scrupulous notes. At the same time, the reader follows the story through the eyes of Claire, another Mono and wife of the main suspect, her husband. Th You know that movie with Dennis Quaid, "DOA", where the professor has been poisoned and has 36 hours to solve his own crime before he dies? This book reminds me of that movie. DCI Hans Richardson is a Mono; he can only remember things for one day and then they disappear. He doesn't die but it makes it difficult for him to solve murders, even with scrupulous notes. At the same time, the reader follows the story through the eyes of Claire, another Mono and wife of the main suspect, her husband. Through her we see how Monos are treated by the assumed superiors, Duos who can remember two days in their past. The concept was very interesting and Ms. Yap manages to find ways to handle most issues with the memory black hole. There were a couple twists in the book; one I guessed and the other I didn't. I am not sure if Ms. Yap gave away the first one to hide the second one or if I just guessed it. However, I felt like there was almost too much for the book to tackle. In addition to the bigotry between the two classes, there was also the relationship between Claire and her husband and his mistress, and how the detective handled trying to pretend to be a Duo in order to succeed at work. Honestly, his story was the most fascinating and I wish the book would have focused more on him, but that might not have been as interesting to a majority. No matter which part interests you, there is something in this book for everyone. A copy of this book was provided by NetGalley and Mullholland Books in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Tina
    July 9, 2017
    I received a copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. When requesting this book I must not have read the description properly as this book has a sci-fi element to it that is definitely not a genre I have an interest in. Please bear this in mind whilst reading this review. This book is set in current times but in a world where there are two classes of people monos and duos. Monos can only remember one day but duos can remember two and are therefore more superior. Monos ar I received a copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. When requesting this book I must not have read the description properly as this book has a sci-fi element to it that is definitely not a genre I have an interest in. Please bear this in mind whilst reading this review. This book is set in current times but in a world where there are two classes of people monos and duos. Monos can only remember one day but duos can remember two and are therefore more superior. Monos are looked down upon. Claire and Mark are in a rare mixed marriage, Claire being a mono and Mark a duo. Both monos and duos have to keep a diary and memorise information. Away from the world building, the body of Mark's mistress turns up. Mark is the number one suspect in her murder. The detective just has one day to solve the case. I felt that there was a few holes in this world that the author had created and I was a bit confused as to how some things were remembered and other things had to be searched for in their diaries. It made no sense to me. The story is told from multiple points of view which I liked. I didn't particularly warm to any of the characters though, they were all annoying for different reasons. I could be wrong but I felt at certain parts of this story the author wanted us to feel some empathy towards Mark, I just wanted to slap him. This book was something a bit out of my comfort zone and I am pleased that I finished the book without struggling. I commend the author for that.
    more
  • Melisa Broadbent
    May 20, 2017
    I really enjoyed this book - completely different with a superb and interesting storyline.There are two types of people in the world, people that can remember the last day only (Mono's)and the more privileged that can remember the last two days (Duo's). Not a concept that I have ever read about and I think it was just so clever.It got me thinking about what it would be like to only remember a couple of days and only then based on what I written about it (Idiary is a must in this book!). Would pe I really enjoyed this book - completely different with a superb and interesting storyline.There are two types of people in the world, people that can remember the last day only (Mono's)and the more privileged that can remember the last two days (Duo's). Not a concept that I have ever read about and I think it was just so clever.It got me thinking about what it would be like to only remember a couple of days and only then based on what I written about it (Idiary is a must in this book!). Would people want to remember bad things that had happened and prefer to be happy in the knowledge they needn't have to remember it if they chose not to?The social classes are interesting too - this is obviously apparent in the world today. The Mono's looked down on as the 'inferior' of the two with Duo's living the more privileged lives.Very interesting take on this and I can understand why this is touted as one of the books to look out for in 2017.
    more
  • Jennyh
    July 19, 2017
    Claire and Mark have been married for 20 years; nothing unusual in that except that Claire is a mono and can only remember events for one day, and Mark is a duo with a memory of two days. Key facts have to be written up and memorised each day and i diaries kept secure with passwords and digital screening. Mark is a believer in the mono/duo system of remembering only what is written in the diaries as people are “secure in the comfort of not remembering, exempt from the punishment of knowing.”The Claire and Mark have been married for 20 years; nothing unusual in that except that Claire is a mono and can only remember events for one day, and Mark is a duo with a memory of two days. Key facts have to be written up and memorised each day and i diaries kept secure with passwords and digital screening. Mark is a believer in the mono/duo system of remembering only what is written in the diaries as people are “secure in the comfort of not remembering, exempt from the punishment of knowing.”The body of a female is found in the river and Detective Hans Richardson soon finds evidence in the female’s diary that she had connections with Mark and that Mark had secrets he did not want to share.This is a story of love, redemption, betrayal, murder and secrets. The time can be a little confusing as events happen over a 20 year span and chapters jump around. The chapters are narrated by alternating people which allows the reader a good insight into the character and explains some of their behaviour.When the final secrets are revealed it is Mark’s insightful comment “because love makes us want to remember”, which helps to explain motives and actions.An interesting take on what could have been a standard murder mystery novel but the extra dimension took it beyond ordinary.
    more
  • LJ
    July 13, 2017
    Okay when I picked this book I expected a plain old psychological thriller but what I didn’t expect was the element of Sci-fi. In this world after the age of twenty three you become divided into two groups Monos, who can only remember the previous day and Duos who can remember two days. Then there is the victim Sophia Alyssa Ayling who can remember everything.She is hell bent on revenge against duo novelist wannabe MP Mark Henry Evans and his mono wife Claire but she is suddenly found dead in th Okay when I picked this book I expected a plain old psychological thriller but what I didn’t expect was the element of Sci-fi. In this world after the age of twenty three you become divided into two groups Monos, who can only remember the previous day and Duos who can remember two days. Then there is the victim Sophia Alyssa Ayling who can remember everything.She is hell bent on revenge against duo novelist wannabe MP Mark Henry Evans and his mono wife Claire but she is suddenly found dead in the River Cam. It then up to Inspector Hans Richardson (a mono masquerading as a duo) to uncover the truth.I absolutely loved this book. The characters were fantastic and even though the storyline was a bit ‘out there’ so to speak, I enjoyed seeing their story unfold. I honestly thought I’d figured out the murderer by about half way through but boy was I wrong (which I have to say doesn’t happen very often!). There’s plenty of twists and turns to keep you on your toes.If you are looking for an out of the box mystery/thriller this is the book for you.
    more
  • Jennifer
    July 10, 2017
    How do you solve a crime in a world where no one remembers more than 48 hours of their past? That is the high-concept premise of Yap's novel. As a concept, it is certainly thought-provoking. I found myself wondering how much of one's time would be spent memorizing "facts" about one's own life, how easy it would be to lie to oneself, how easy it would be for someone to hack the whole system, and what it would be like to know your own life experience the way we know facts learned in history class. How do you solve a crime in a world where no one remembers more than 48 hours of their past? That is the high-concept premise of Yap's novel. As a concept, it is certainly thought-provoking. I found myself wondering how much of one's time would be spent memorizing "facts" about one's own life, how easy it would be to lie to oneself, how easy it would be for someone to hack the whole system, and what it would be like to know your own life experience the way we know facts learned in history class. It also made me wonder about the mechanics of things like literary prizes and PhDs in a world where you could not remember what you had read two days before or what you had learned in class the previous week. So thought-provoking, yes. But, unfortunately, not well executed. The prose is trite and full of cliches, almost to the point of being cartoonish at times. And, without giving too much away, some of the consequences of the memory premise did not hold up logically.I admit, however, that the end surprised me, which ultimately is what you want in a mystery novel. Definitely had mixed feelings about this one.
    more
  • Maggie Holmes
    July 4, 2017
    What if you couldn’t retain your short term memories and had to relearn about your life from reading your daily diary? Would you tell yourself the truth? How would you know what others were really like if you couldn’t accumulate memories of them? How would you investigate a murder or your husband’s affair? The premise for Felicia Yap’s Yesterday is a world in which people are limited in their short term memories to either one day (Monos) or two days (Duos) once they reach late teens/early twenti What if you couldn’t retain your short term memories and had to relearn about your life from reading your daily diary? Would you tell yourself the truth? How would you know what others were really like if you couldn’t accumulate memories of them? How would you investigate a murder or your husband’s affair? The premise for Felicia Yap’s Yesterday is a world in which people are limited in their short term memories to either one day (Monos) or two days (Duos) once they reach late teens/early twenties. What they do remember is what they “learn” as facts recorded in their daily diaries. Enter into this world a woman, Sophia, who has all her memories intact, who is put into an asylum when she claims this, and who, when she gets out, seeks revenge on the people who hurt her. The story is told from the point of view of Sophia, Claire and her husband Mark and Hans, a Mono policeman. All of them have things to hide including what happened to the dead woman found in the river. The beauty of this story is that you cannot tell who the murderer is because you can’t trust what anyone is telling even themselves. The twists are amazing! Because of the strange premise, the book takes getting used to, but it is well worth the read and probably a reread. Recommend to everyone
    more
  • Emma Leeworthy
    July 12, 2017
    I received a free copy of 'Yesterday' in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 stars. It took me quite a while to make my mind up about this one... I was intrigued by the concept and enjoyed the way the author executed it. I found some aspects fairly confusing though! The story is set in a world where there are two types of people - 'Monos' and 'Duos.' Monos have a memory span of one day, and Duos, two days. The tale follows a married couple, consisting of a Mono and a Duo. A body is found and turn I received a free copy of 'Yesterday' in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 stars. It took me quite a while to make my mind up about this one... I was intrigued by the concept and enjoyed the way the author executed it. I found some aspects fairly confusing though! The story is set in a world where there are two types of people - 'Monos' and 'Duos.' Monos have a memory span of one day, and Duos, two days. The tale follows a married couple, consisting of a Mono and a Duo. A body is found and turns out to be the body of the husband's mistress. The story is told from four different viewpoints, and I felt that this was a nice touch. I found some parts to feel slightly repetitive, but being able to read from different views helped that out a bit. There are a couple of twists in the book - the first of which I found to be completely predictable. Though I really didn't see the next one coming!The main thing I struggled with in this book, is how accurately some of the characters seemed to know parts of their past, apparently through 'memorising diary entries.' (Both Monos and Duos are required to keep a daily diary and learn important 'facts' from it.) It didn't affect the story, but I have to admit it bothered me a little! Overall, this is a good read with a very interesting concept. It was nice to read a murder mystery with a bit of a difference -it felt quite dystopian.
    more
  • Rochelle
    July 5, 2017
    **I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley in return for my own personal and honest review**What an interesting concept for a book. Set at a time much like ours now, this parallel world is filled with two types of people; monos and duos. Unlike our current world, it's not your race or religion that defines you, but it is the quality of your memory. Felicia Yap has been so clever by weaving in aspects of history that we thought we knew - Steve Jobs at Apple for instance, but replacing it wi **I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley in return for my own personal and honest review**What an interesting concept for a book. Set at a time much like ours now, this parallel world is filled with two types of people; monos and duos. Unlike our current world, it's not your race or religion that defines you, but it is the quality of your memory. Felicia Yap has been so clever by weaving in aspects of history that we thought we knew - Steve Jobs at Apple for instance, but replacing it with things we've never thought we needed, but in a world where memory is everything are important, like iDiaries. I particularly loved the commentary on how humanity would be if the world was as it was now, wars and terrorism, something that is devoid when you can't remember it to hold grudges.On top of this beautifully created world we have the story of Sophia, who, much like the rest of us, remembers everything. Unheard of! Unspeakable in this dystopian version of our world. But as Sophia remembers everything, she also remembers how important it is to get revenge. So unfolds the mystery of Mark Evans, Claire Evans and Sophia and how their lives all intertwine.I enjoyed this book immensely, although perhaps I will say that I expected more from the twists that were presented. But it was well written, cleverly presented and because of the change of scenery something new and original.
    more
  • Charlotte Pattison-Rideout
    July 4, 2017
    How do you solve a murder when you only remember yesterday? Imagine a world in which classes are divided not by wealth or religion but by how much each group can remember. Monos, the majority, have only one day’s worth of memory; elite Duos have two. In this stratified society, where Monos are excluded from holding high office and demanding jobs, Claire and Mark are a rare mixed marriage. Clare is a conscientious Mono housewife, Mark a novelist-turned-politician Duo on the rise. They are a shini How do you solve a murder when you only remember yesterday? Imagine a world in which classes are divided not by wealth or religion but by how much each group can remember. Monos, the majority, have only one day’s worth of memory; elite Duos have two. In this stratified society, where Monos are excluded from holding high office and demanding jobs, Claire and Mark are a rare mixed marriage. Clare is a conscientious Mono housewife, Mark a novelist-turned-politician Duo on the rise. They are a shining example of a new vision of tolerance and equality—until…...a beautiful woman is found dead, her body dumped in England’s River Cam. The woman is Mark’s mistress, and he is the prime suspect in her murder. The detective investigating the case has secrets of his own. So did the victim. And when both the investigator’s and the suspect’s memories are constantly erased—how can anyone learn the truth?This is a clever concept book told from four different perspectives, that of Mark, Claire, the detective on the case, and the victim. The added obstacle of their memory limitations really adds to the storyline as details begin to emerge of earlier episodes in their lives which have brought them all to the current situation. The characters are dynamic and easily relatable and much is added by hearing the voice of the victim from her own diary. There were some great twists in this book, and I did not expect the ending! A great debut and well work a read if you don't mind a bit of sci-fi.
    more
  • Justine McGrath
    June 28, 2017
    I was given an ARC of this book, courtesy of NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.This book sounded right up my alley. An alternate reality in which people are divided into categories based on their mental capacity? Intriguing! A killer on the loose following a grisly murder? Excellent! After slogging halfway through this book, I simply found I could not finish it. In my 26 years of life, I've only put down two other books without finishing them. I just couldn't do it with Yesterday. Not I was given an ARC of this book, courtesy of NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.This book sounded right up my alley. An alternate reality in which people are divided into categories based on their mental capacity? Intriguing! A killer on the loose following a grisly murder? Excellent! After slogging halfway through this book, I simply found I could not finish it. In my 26 years of life, I've only put down two other books without finishing them. I just couldn't do it with Yesterday. Not only was the Mono/Duo divide poorly constructed (how could they recall memories from their past so quickly without referencing their diaries?! I HAD SO MANY QUESTIONS!), but the characters read like bad stereotypes. Perhaps I missed out on the surprise ending of a lifetime, but I was too unconcerned with the characters to care.
    more
  • Maja Lisa
    June 23, 2017
    This book just didn't jive with me.The concept was interesting but a bit TOO weird. Like, is this a parallel universe with people who can only remember one or two days? When I read the blurb, I got the impression that this was more of a fantasy/sci-fi book, but instead it is just regular life with memory problems. I found this read heavy on exposition. There is a part where a character, after writing for pages about her revenge plots, states something along the lines of 'this is my revenge journ This book just didn't jive with me.The concept was interesting but a bit TOO weird. Like, is this a parallel universe with people who can only remember one or two days? When I read the blurb, I got the impression that this was more of a fantasy/sci-fi book, but instead it is just regular life with memory problems. I found this read heavy on exposition. There is a part where a character, after writing for pages about her revenge plots, states something along the lines of 'this is my revenge journal'. Well, yeah. Some heavy-handed 'tell' instead of 'show' there.I gave an extra star because I thought the writing overall was good. I would definitely pick up more of this author in the future--she has good ideas and a solid writing style, so I'm excited to see what she comes up with next.Thanks to Mulholland Books and Felicia Yap for providing an ARC.
    more
  • Cia
    July 12, 2017
    Received e-copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Interesting premise and although it took me a while to get into at first, I really enjoyed the novel. The multiple narrative voices and the theme of memory worked really well, and if anything, the concept of Mono and Duo memory classes and the time limit in which the murder central to the plot needed to be solved kept me hooked. It gave additional depth to the characters, and really played with the reader's trust in narrators and t Received e-copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Interesting premise and although it took me a while to get into at first, I really enjoyed the novel. The multiple narrative voices and the theme of memory worked really well, and if anything, the concept of Mono and Duo memory classes and the time limit in which the murder central to the plot needed to be solved kept me hooked. It gave additional depth to the characters, and really played with the reader's trust in narrators and their reliability. Very clever. I'd definitely be interested in reading more about this novel's world, and perhaps delving deeper into the class issues associated with the memory politics of Yesterday.
    more
Write a review