Star Wars
Raised on hate, fear and anger...steeped in the ways of darkness...and trained to kill! Darth Maul's time as apprentice to Darth Sidious has long been cloaked in shadows - now at last his tale of revenge is revealed! It's a story of rage unleashed as Darth Maul prepares for his first encounter with the hated Jedi. But when a Jedi Padawan is captured by sinister forces, why is Maul so determined to fi nd her? And what role will a band of bounty hunters, including Cad Bane and Aurra Sing, play? Get to know the galaxy's deadliest Zabrak like never before!COLLECTING: DARTH MAUL (2017) #1-5

Star Wars Details

TitleStar Wars
Author
ReleaseSep 5th, 2017
PublisherMarvel Comics
ISBN-139780785195894
Rating
GenreMedia Tie In, Star Wars, Sequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Science Fiction

Star Wars Review

  • Alejandro
    January 1, 1970
    Darth Maul’s first blood! This Marvel Comics TPB edition collects “Star Wars: Darth Maul” #1-5.This comic book miniseries is set before of the events of “Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace”.Creative Team:Writer: Cullen BunnIllustrator: Luke Ross MAUL’S SECRET MISSION Darth Maul has been the secret apprentice of Darth Sidious, since he was a little kid……and now that he’s a young adult, he still in secret……due Darth Sidious’ plans take a lot of time to be developed……and Darth Maul is Darth Maul’s first blood! This Marvel Comics TPB edition collects “Star Wars: Darth Maul” #1-5.This comic book miniseries is set before of the events of “Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace”.Creative Team:Writer: Cullen BunnIllustrator: Luke Ross MAUL’S SECRET MISSION Darth Maul has been the secret apprentice of Darth Sidious, since he was a little kid……and now that he’s a young adult, he still in secret……due Darth Sidious’ plans take a lot of time to be developed……and Darth Maul is starting to get impatient for beginning to kill Jedis!Darth Maul gets Intel from a captured protocol droid (after being tortured and blinded, of course) about the bidding for a kidnapped Jedi Padawan, and he realizes that it’s his best chance to test his Sith skills against a real opponent, without compromising his secret status imposed by Darth Sidious.Therefore, Darth Maul on his own, hires a group of Bounty Hunters: Cad Bane, Aurra Sing, Vorhdeilo (a disgusting bloodsucking insectoid) and Tek-Tek (a cybernetic rat-like creature), to acomplished his planned operation and getting for his own private duel, the captured padawan.His rage against the Jedi will finally begin to be satisfied!
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  • Calista
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this graphic novella. I don't know if this is different than the cannon before the Disney movies, but it's a great story. This is about Darth Maul's first kill. It fits in well with characters from the Clone Wars. The thing I regret about Solo bombing is that I was interested in how it would connect to the larger universe and Darth Maul had an appearance in that film I was curious about. I hope they finish the story in a comic or show. I do know that Maul comes back in the Clone Wars, I enjoyed this graphic novella. I don't know if this is different than the cannon before the Disney movies, but it's a great story. This is about Darth Maul's first kill. It fits in well with characters from the Clone Wars. The thing I regret about Solo bombing is that I was interested in how it would connect to the larger universe and Darth Maul had an appearance in that film I was curious about. I hope they finish the story in a comic or show. I do know that Maul comes back in the Clone Wars, which is ridiculous, let's be honest. Still, he was such a great villain that how could he not. He is quite the villain.I am loving the art for these new Star Wars books and the story is good. This takes place before the Phantom Menace. I will be reading more of these. I did hope the Padawan got away in this. It's hard to watch the Jedi butchered. I don't like it.
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  • Ben Brown
    January 1, 1970
    I’ll say this for Cullen Bunn’s “Darth Maul” miniseries: it’s decent. At a quick 5 issues, there are enough moments in each individual chapter that are sufficiently cool, intriguing, or fun enough to make the series worth a read. If you’re like me, though, and struggle to find the character of Darth Maul all that interesting…well, suffice to say, this probably won’t be ranking anywhere near the top of your favorite Star Wars comics.This is one of those series where the artwork is far and away I’ll say this for Cullen Bunn’s “Darth Maul” miniseries: it’s decent. At a quick 5 issues, there are enough moments in each individual chapter that are sufficiently cool, intriguing, or fun enough to make the series worth a read. If you’re like me, though, and struggle to find the character of Darth Maul all that interesting…well, suffice to say, this probably won’t be ranking anywhere near the top of your favorite Star Wars comics.This is one of those series where the artwork is far and away the biggest reason to check it out. Alex Ross is an artist whose stuff I have to confess to never having checked out, but if his work here is any indication of the type of output he usually delivers, that’s something that I’ll have to remedy fast…because seriously, this is a GREAT looking comic. Whether it’s Maul battling rathtars in the first issue, Darth Sidious mincing about, oozing evil, or even just Cad Bane and Aurra Sing chatting it up in the cockpit, there’s not a panel in this miniseries that doesn’t look gorgeous. It’s so good, in fact, that it’s hard not to wish that Ross’ art was in the service of a character that was equally as compelling. Or a story that was as interesting. Speaking of that story…my main issue with “Darth Maul”s narrative actually, surprisingly, has nothing to do with its (in my opinion) somewhat flat protagonist, but stems more from Marvel’s overall approach to the stories it’s choosing to tell in the “Star Wars” galaxy. If there’s a word that I would use to describe “Darth Maul, “and really, Marvel’s entire “Star Wars” line right now, it’s safe. This is a series that’s safely set pre-“The Phantom Menace,” which means it’s safely out of the way of contradicting any of the big film events, while also being just safely big enough in terms of its scope and stakes to warrant its own existence in the eyes of fans who will eat up everything and anything Star Wars (i.e. me). It’s a frustrating approach to storytelling that Marvel seems more than eager to repeat across all* of its “Star Wars” titles right now, whether it be in their main flagship “Star Wars” series, the new “Darth Vader” series, or even a series that I’m LOVING as much as “Doctor Aphra. And I’ll just say it: I’m getting tired of it. I’m tired of stories that are set in eras that we’ve been getting stories in for DECADES now. I’m itching for something new, and I’m beginning to strongly suspect that the “Golden Era” of Marvel’s Star Wars comics, if it ever does come, won’t be until after the release of Episode XI, when Disney (hopefully) opens the door to allow creators across all mediums to tell original stories within the 30-year gap between “Return of the Jedi” and “The Force Awakens.” I’m ready for something new, which is why stuff like “Darth Maul”-while decent enough for what it is-will continue to feel just a tad bit stale, no matter how good the art may be.*Of course, the one exception to this “all” point is the “Poe Dameron” series, which–while still playing it fairly safe in terms of the types of stories it chooses to tell–feels decidedly fresher and more interesting simply by virtue of the fact that it’s set in a new time frame, with new characters. That is exactly the type of "Star Wars" that I'm craving more of right now.
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  • Lata
    January 1, 1970
    Kind of dull. This story is mostly Darth Maul and his internal monologue describing his rage and how he must kill Jedi and, while on his clandestine mission behind Palpatine’s back, saying repeatedly Palpatine can’t know that Maul’s been disobedient. Or Mauly will be in trou-ble! ......There’s no tension in this story or its outcome with its (whoa!) big revelation that Darth Maul’s filled with rage.
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  • Tiago
    January 1, 1970
    Probably the best thing I've read from Cullen Bunn, I really liked the character monologue, something that is usually overdone in comic books but works really well with Maul, he also wrote a pretty cool Jedi Padawan and brought Cad Bane and his gang into the story, they were pretty fun in the Clone Wars series and deserve more content, but what really made me love this book was the art by Luke Ross, he's on top of his game here, made me a fan, the coloring is really well done too, it is from my Probably the best thing I've read from Cullen Bunn, I really liked the character monologue, something that is usually overdone in comic books but works really well with Maul, he also wrote a pretty cool Jedi Padawan and brought Cad Bane and his gang into the story, they were pretty fun in the Clone Wars series and deserve more content, but what really made me love this book was the art by Luke Ross, he's on top of his game here, made me a fan, the coloring is really well done too, it is from my point of view, one of the most beautifully Star Wars comics released by Marvel, and for that it gets my five stars.
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  • Andreas
    January 1, 1970
    I've always found Maul to be an interesting character, so I quite enjoyed this. Solid 3.5 stars.
  • Michael Mills
    January 1, 1970
    I do like Darth Maul – something that's down to equal parts childhood nostalgia and impeccable good taste. He (along with podracing) is the best thing to have come out of The Phantom Menace, but for all his prominence in the marketing of that film way back when he was barely explored as a character; he was a purpose-built killing machine. There've been a few attempts to flesh him out since and this is the most successful I've come across. He has a certain wounded nobility, a victim complex that I do like Darth Maul – something that's down to equal parts childhood nostalgia and impeccable good taste. He (along with podracing) is the best thing to have come out of The Phantom Menace, but for all his prominence in the marketing of that film way back when he was barely explored as a character; he was a purpose-built killing machine. There've been a few attempts to flesh him out since and this is the most successful I've come across. He has a certain wounded nobility, a victim complex that through this story he starts to ever-so-slightly recognise as mind-washing. How does a killing machine think of himself? What is it he's trying to achieve?The wider plot is also a lot of pulpish fun; the n-teenth take on The Most Dangerous Game but I ain't complaining. And Bunn wins extra points for setting it firmly in the 'scum and villainy' feed of the Star Wars universe – always my favourite.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Ive always been interested in Darth Maul and the confilct that must be within him. A simple story where he goes on a search for a padawan. Not alot of depth to the plot, pretty simple story. However the art does have its moments.
  • Lance Shadow
    January 1, 1970
    Star Wars: Darth Maul is the most recent miniseries added to the comic book canon set up by Marvel for the star wars universe. Written by Cullen Bunn, it is exploring what is new territory for the canon star wars universe: while legends has a vast archive of stories taking place in the Old Republic Era, the canon version of the time period is so far largely unexplored. While a couple of episodes from Star Wars Rebels, several episodes of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, the Dr. Aphra comic, and the Star Wars: Darth Maul is the most recent miniseries added to the comic book canon set up by Marvel for the star wars universe. Written by Cullen Bunn, it is exploring what is new territory for the canon star wars universe: while legends has a vast archive of stories taking place in the Old Republic Era, the canon version of the time period is so far largely unexplored. While a couple of episodes from Star Wars Rebels, several episodes of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, the Dr. Aphra comic, and the journal story from Yoda's Secret War have eluded to lore that would be considered "Old Republic", this is the first full-fledged canonical story that is set before The Phantom Menace. While Darth Maul's character has been fleshed out very effectively on The Clone Wars and Rebels animated series, we still haven't gotten much about what his character was like during the Phantom Menace where he was introduced. Here, we finally get more of the version of Darth Maul that most people who experience Star Wars are familiar with: the silent double-saber wielding badass that did all those flips and kicks during "Duel of the Fates".I was very excited to read it because of the time period this comic is set as well as the positive reception, and while it's far from bad, it's probably the most disappointing comic I have read in the canon. THE STORY: The bloodthirsty apprentice of Darth Sidious is growing impatient with his master's insistence on staying hidden from the Jedi. After growing tired of unleashing his power upon Rathtars and crime lords, Darth Maul wants to test himself against his sworn enemies, the jedi. When a captive padawan named Eldra Kaitis appears at an auction, Maul sees the opportunity he has looked for. He hires Cad Bane and Aurra Sing, some of the greatest fan service in the galaxy, to help him. THE BAD: Oh. My. GAWD. One Word: NARRATION. The narration boxes cullen bunn used here are some of the worst I have had the pleasure of trying to sit through. This is Tom Veitch levels of terrible in terms of narration. It was just as annoying, distracting, and unnecessary as narration always is comics. Seriously, all the exposition needed can be given in the opening crawls, which star wars comics ALWAYS HAVE!!! But this took it to a new level: while Veitch's narration is overly excessive because of how much text is in his boxes, Bunn's narration is INSULTING. The vast majority of the narration given is blatantly obvious information that I already knew for a long time, or stuff that can so easily be picked up on just by reading the dialogue and looking at the incredibly expressive artwork. But instead, this narration feels like the author is treating the readers like a bunch of MORONS. Imagine if Star Wars was a subject taught in grade school and considered as valuable as math and reading. The narration feels like surface level facts that would be given to a PRESCHOOLER. That's how bad it is. I'm not even kidding- as I was reading the narration boxes I was angrily shouting at the book saying things like "I KNOW THIS ALREADY!" or "WELL DUH THAT"S KRIFFING OBVIOUS!".Perhaps I'm being too harsh. But I actually read the comic again and skipped over the narration boxes. And you know what? MY READING EXPERIENCE WAS ENHANCED! Screw you, marvel, screw you lucasfilm, for allowing yet another comic in the canon to have its potential wasted by narration because you think the people that read these comics are so stupid that we can't figure out such obvious information on our own. Sincerely, a devoted star wars fan who faithfully follows your new canon and thinks that YOU KRIFFING SUCK. THE GOOD: As much as I deplored the use of narration, everything else ranges from solid to awesome in this comic, and hence I can understand the high praise it has gotten. The story is engaging, and leads to some fantastic worldbuilding. In other comic stories that took place in the early prequel era like Yoda's Secret War or Star Wars - Obi-Wan & Anakin, we got to see what the jedi were like, but here, we get to see some sith psyche and it was quite interesting.The characters are very well done. While Maul's character has been great in the Clone Wars and Rebels, ie, post phantom menace, Bunn does a pretty good job fleshing out the parts of his characterization that have badly needed to be expanded upon, really enhancing Maul as a character throughout canon. The portrayal is also very faithful to the phantom menace's version of the character for better or for worse: a silent man who's personality is more physical than mental. In fact, skipping the narration boxes in my second reading made the portrayal even more compelling than it already was with the minimal spoken dialogue and all the acrobatic action stunts. For some, they will complain that this is not an interesting character, or at least this version of the character. But for those that liked the Phantom Menace's version of Darth Maul the best, they will be very satisfied with this comic's take on the villain. The other characters are really good too. Palpatine gets a lot of juicy dialogue that lets him chew up every micrometer of scenery he's in. Cad Bane and Aurra Sing are faithfully portrayed as the entertaining badasses you saw in The Clone Wars. Eldra Kaitis helps rectify a problem that that Star Wars comics have had for most of their time with Marvel in the new canon years: creating interesting and memorable new characters. Kaitis is a compelling jedi character with a strong personality and some great (but appropriate) chemistry with Maul, making the moment where they finally battle all the more exciting. I've already been alluding to it with the characters, but one of the best parts of this comic is the dialogue. It is just incredible, whether it be the few but impactful lines from Maul himself, lines from Sidious that drip with evil, the evil elegance of the auctioneer, or the quips from Eldra, Aurra Sing, or Cad Bane. The artwork by Luke Ross is some of the better work done for the Star Wars comics. From the dark but vibrant expressions on the characters to the highly detailed backgrounds that don't end up being too cluttered. Not to mention the amazingly rendered battle scenes that offer all the variety you would want from Star Wars: Saber duels, shootouts, fist fights, and force powers- it's all there and it's all done extremely well. Its a massive shame that the narration had to distract from such vivid and beautiful pictures because after reading this book while skipping the narration I found that they could have done a great job telling the story themselves. Finally, bits and pieces of lore and canon from other stories were wonderfully integrated. We see plenty of imagery and characters in the background from comics, the newer movies, the older movies, and of course The Clone Wars. All of it felt natural and fitting and really enhanced the feeling that this comic fits right in with the rest of canon as we have seen it so far. THE CONCLUSION: While far from awful or even bad, this comic frustrates me. There is so much in here that was done really well: the story, characters, worldbuilding, and artwork across the board are excellent. I should have loved this comic, it DESERVED to be one of the best comics in the canon. But the narration took too much away from it. Yes, its great that this works overall if you skip those boxes, but I can't just ignore that the comic has them- after all, I have to consciously avoid them while reading, and that is distracting too. Overall, what I was hoping to be an amazing addition to the new canon ended up being just an average disposable comic book story. Its all the more disappointing that the elements were there for it to BE amazing. If you don't mind narration (as many people don't seem to), then you'll probably adore this comic, but the narration almost ruined my experience with it. Much like Darth Maul himself during the time period of the Phantom Menace, Star Wars: Darth Maul is tragically wasted potential.
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  • Neil R. Coulter
    January 1, 1970
    As with almost all Star Wars graphic novels, Darth Maul is entirely unnecessary and inconsequential. But it's not as obnoxious as most of Marvel's new-canon books have been, and the art is appealing.The story takes place sometime before The Phantom Menace, and the problem is that it doesn't convey anything new about Maul, Palpatine, or the Sith in general. What you learn from this story is that Maul is an angry young fellow who longs to kill as many Jedi as possible. That's not very new. One As with almost all Star Wars graphic novels, Darth Maul is entirely unnecessary and inconsequential. But it's not as obnoxious as most of Marvel's new-canon books have been, and the art is appealing.The story takes place sometime before The Phantom Menace, and the problem is that it doesn't convey anything new about Maul, Palpatine, or the Sith in general. What you learn from this story is that Maul is an angry young fellow who longs to kill as many Jedi as possible. That's not very new. One doesn't expect a Maul story to be dialogue-heavy, and that's true here. Much of the writing is Maul's internal thoughts, and here are a few representative samples:"Fear.""Anger.""Hate.""My desire to test myself against the Jedi only deepens.""For so long, I have watched the Jedi from the shadows.""Anxiousness . . . anger . . . hatred . . . flowing through me.""But my rage . . . my hatred . . . has only intensified."Well, you get the idea. It's a lot of that sort of thing.The story is rather lightweight, and is not as intense or graphically violent as one would expect from a story about Maul--which is partly relieving, and partly odd and out of place. There isn't a lot of connection to Maul as he appears in the Rebels series, other than a brief visit to the underground Sith temple on Malachor. Its appearance in this graphic novel adds little to the fantastic ambience created in the TV episode.Against all odds, Darth Maul has become one of the more interesting characters from the prequel era, but there is always one main problem with any story about him: He obviously died at the end of The Phantom Menace in a really stupid way! I can't believe he was the galaxy's greatest killer when he was cut down like that, and I certainly can't believe he survived being cut in half and thrown down a deep chasm. Sometimes Lucas's missteps can't be corrected, no matter how sincerely everyone else desires to do so.
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  • 47Time
    January 1, 1970
    It's beautiful to see how a great character like Maul is still being used in new stories. His hatred alone carries him forward and his arrogance at being the best is yet to be tested. In the days before Episode I, Darth Maul is restless. The battle with two dangerous tentacled creatures doesn't quench his thirst to face the hated Jedi.Several oher characters from the extended universe are used here and they're all villains, profiteering mercenaries or members of crime syndicates that don't shy It's beautiful to see how a great character like Maul is still being used in new stories. His hatred alone carries him forward and his arrogance at being the best is yet to be tested. In the days before Episode I, Darth Maul is restless. The battle with two dangerous tentacled creatures doesn't quench his thirst to face the hated Jedi.Several oher characters from the extended universe are used here and they're all villains, profiteering mercenaries or members of crime syndicates that don't shy away from things like slavery and violence. This story is not humorous in the least, but I expect this from a anything involving the Dark Side. Maul talks to himself a bit more than I expected and seems less of a maniac. He has strategic thinking, but he keeps resorting to his hatred. We all know that just isn't enough.(view spoiler)[During a mission that helps the Neimoidians, Maul finds out about a Jedi padawan captured by the Xrexus cartel. He is warned by Sidious to stay away, but he secretly searches for information on the padawan and meets the bounty hunters Cad Bane and Aurra Sing. The padawan is named Eldra Kaitis and she is set to be auctioned off by Xev Xrexus. Maul wants to aquire her to fulfill his need for revenge on the Jedi, but he can't outbid the other auctioneers. He resorts to attacking the winner of the auction and kidnapping the padawan. Xev has a contingency plan: she shoots down Maul's ship and organizes a hunt where any auctioneer can participate for a price. Maul is forced to free the padawan and have her join him in surviving until they escape the moon where they were forced to land. Maul and Eldra's alliance is soon broken. Their fight is spectacular and ultimately ends in Elara's death.When all witnesses are dead, Maul returns to Sidious who knew of his apprentice's defiance. Sidious is pleased, but Maul still feels an emptiness (hide spoiler)]
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  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    This was the epitome of OK-ness.**Calm down, Maul, I have some nice things to say, too!**If you wanted to read this to learn something new about Episode I's bifurcated baddie, keep looking. Maul is a rage-fuelled revenge machine, and he chafes under Darth Sidious' tutelage when all he really, really, REALLY wants to do is kill some Jedi.How do we know this? Because he himself (through some clunky first-person monologuing) tells us so, again and again- it's like the editorial staff couldn't trust This was the epitome of OK-ness.**Calm down, Maul, I have some nice things to say, too!**If you wanted to read this to learn something new about Episode I's bifurcated baddie, keep looking. Maul is a rage-fuelled revenge machine, and he chafes under Darth Sidious' tutelage when all he really, really, REALLY wants to do is kill some Jedi.How do we know this? Because he himself (through some clunky first-person monologuing) tells us so, again and again- it's like the editorial staff couldn't trust that the reader had actually read the previous issue.On the plus side, it was nice to see old Clone Wars favourites Cad Bane and Aurra Sing again, though sadly they didn't get too much of interest to do.On the whole, check it out if you want to see the horny-headed one kicking some butt, just don't expect much else.
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  • Cale
    January 1, 1970
    This story takes place before The Phantom Menace, and sees Maul impatient to start killing Jedi. So he goes against the Emperor's orders and makes some messes as tracks down a kidnapped Padawan that he can kill. It's not the strongest story, but it does have some good action in it, even if it barely makes use of Aurra Sing (although it makes slightly better use of Cad Bane). Maul puts off the barely-restrained animus that characterizes him throughout this story, although he makes some strange This story takes place before The Phantom Menace, and sees Maul impatient to start killing Jedi. So he goes against the Emperor's orders and makes some messes as tracks down a kidnapped Padawan that he can kill. It's not the strongest story, but it does have some good action in it, even if it barely makes use of Aurra Sing (although it makes slightly better use of Cad Bane). Maul puts off the barely-restrained animus that characterizes him throughout this story, although he makes some strange decisions. Ultimately everything works out in the end through a somewhat trope-ish maneuver that Star Wars has used way too often, but it was a decent story in the interim. The art is well done and the characters are portrayed well, both visually and plot-wise. At least those that have a purpose for being present.
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  • Jim C
    January 1, 1970
    This collection takes place before The Phantom Menace. In this one, Darth Maul wants to test his power of the force against a Jedi. His master forbids this as it would reveal the Sith still exist. Darth Maul discovers a captured padawan and realizes if he gets to her this could be the opportunity to battle a Jedi.I really enjoyed this collection. I thought the author nailed the voice of Darth Maul as we get him being a student to Darth Sidious but also as a caged beast waiting to strike. This is This collection takes place before The Phantom Menace. In this one, Darth Maul wants to test his power of the force against a Jedi. His master forbids this as it would reveal the Sith still exist. Darth Maul discovers a captured padawan and realizes if he gets to her this could be the opportunity to battle a Jedi.I really enjoyed this collection. I thought the author nailed the voice of Darth Maul as we get him being a student to Darth Sidious but also as a caged beast waiting to strike. This is the Darth Maul we get to see in the cartoon series and the one we should have seen in the movies. I had no problem hearing his voice as well as the voice of Darth Sidious. We also get some more time with characters from The Clone Wars as well as new ones. I really liked the new ones a lot. The highlight of this book is the artwork. It is fantastic and I loved how it portrayed Darth Maul in several panels as feral, vengeful, and evil. I liked the story but this is the reason I could not give this five stars. I know the author's hands are tied as they cannot change anything that will happen in the movies. Therefore, this story pretty much played out like I thought it would.I believe this is one of the better collections from this universe. I believe all fans will like this collection as we get some background information from a Sith that was so under utilized in the movies.
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  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    I've always wanted to know more about the quiet and deadly looking Sith from Episode 1 and this new cannon graphic novel provides some nice background into the character without reverting to the all-too-easy troupe of being an 'origin story'. In Star Wars: Darth Maul, the familiar Sith master-apprentice tension common in the Darth Vader / Palpatine dynamic is again factored into Maul's story, with Palpatine a dangerous and intense presence which casts a shadow over Maul's every action. As far as I've always wanted to know more about the quiet and deadly looking Sith from Episode 1 and this new cannon graphic novel provides some nice background into the character without reverting to the all-too-easy troupe of being an 'origin story'. In Star Wars: Darth Maul, the familiar Sith master-apprentice tension common in the Darth Vader / Palpatine dynamic is again factored into Maul's story, with Palpatine a dangerous and intense presence which casts a shadow over Maul's every action. As far as the story goes, there's not a lot of depth. Maul wants to kill a Jedi despite Palpatine urging him to bide his time. Eventually he finds a Padawan being held for auction by a shady underworld type and quickly assembles a band of bounty hunters to accompany him to the venue where the auction is being staged. There's not much more to it - which is a shame. The art is great though and there are a couple of nice moments between Maul and the Padawan. One thing that really sticks out as a negative is the fact that Maul is two dimensional; there's not a lot of character development and I got tired of reading of how angry he was all the time.My rating: 3/5 stars, I'm happy I read it but its a book you can skip and not feel like you're missing out on anything.
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  • DiscoSpacePanther
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun graphic novel - the first of the new Disney canon that doesn't seem to be ashamed to incorporate fun elements from the prequels, from droidekas and Neimoidians to Aurra Sing and of course Darth Maul himself, as well as elements from The Force Awakens. Maul taking on a couple of rathtars seems entirely in character.Of course, there are plenty of cameos from the Clone Wars CG TV show too - Cad Bane plays a significant part in the story, and there are a couple of glimpses of Hondo This was a fun graphic novel - the first of the new Disney canon that doesn't seem to be ashamed to incorporate fun elements from the prequels, from droidekas and Neimoidians to Aurra Sing and of course Darth Maul himself, as well as elements from The Force Awakens. Maul taking on a couple of rathtars seems entirely in character.Of course, there are plenty of cameos from the Clone Wars CG TV show too - Cad Bane plays a significant part in the story, and there are a couple of glimpses of Hondo Ohnaka. Amusingly, given Maul's later role in the Shadow Collective, we also see representatives of the Pyke Syndicate and Falleen from Black Sun.The plot is simple - but that is pretty much what you'd expect from a Darth Maul plot. He's not a character given to complex emotions. We do get introspection, but it is pretty much all about anger, hate and revenge - and do we really want anything else from pre-Phantom Menace Maul?There is a Jedi padawan, and a whole bunch of gangsters, and it all comes together in an entertaining package.The artwork is good, and really capture the essence of Star Wars - I could hear Ben Burtt's sound effects and the characters' voices clearly in my head.I hope there are more Star Wars graphic novels this good.
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  • Brandon St Mark
    January 1, 1970
    I also read this as single issues.This miniseries started out pretty slow, but it worked it's way up to a really good ending. Maul is one of my favorite Sith characters, so I may be a little biased. I really like how this shows the anger than Maul is fueled by, and how he... is influenced by it, I guess you could say.Over all, I think this really proves to me that the new canon comics are better and more interesting to me than most of the new canon book.
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  • Jamie Connolly
    January 1, 1970
    It was cool. Not bad. Honestly I'd had higher hopes for a Darth maul comic from the mind of Cullen Bunn. Still fun though. A contained little story about mauls lust for revenge against Jedi. 3 stars.Also I'd read this a couple years ago and forgotten. This is why I need to put all my books that I read on Goodreads. Eventually, if you read a lot, you will lose track of what you read. Regular books too, but graphic novels especially.
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  • Jeff Lanter
    January 1, 1970
    This is a tough graphic novel to review because there some things in it that I really liked but also some things that keep it from being as good as it could be. The plot is really good with backstabbing, scheming, and a nice surprise close to the end. Some of my favorite Star Wars stories are the ones where bounty hunting and other seedy stuff is the focus and you get that here in a story about a Jedi (surprisingly). I think the art has some really nice and detailed panels that bring this story This is a tough graphic novel to review because there some things in it that I really liked but also some things that keep it from being as good as it could be. The plot is really good with backstabbing, scheming, and a nice surprise close to the end. Some of my favorite Star Wars stories are the ones where bounty hunting and other seedy stuff is the focus and you get that here in a story about a Jedi (surprisingly). I think the art has some really nice and detailed panels that bring this story to life as well. Anytime there are a bunch of aliens in a panel, it is a visual delight. Darth Maul is a cool-looking character which doesn't hurt either.What doesn't work so well are the Darth Maul "monologues" where he more or less complains about how he wants to be able to kill Jedi and be a force of violence and cannot because he must stay hidden due to his master's wishes. Darth Maul doesn't have much depth as a character and this kind of look into his head doesn't really make for great reading and almost makes him appear kind of whiny. Those parts also happened to be the most boring parts of the plot so that didn't help either. The art also has some really rushed panels to balance out all of the great ones I just mentioned so each page is a bit of adventure as to what you'll see. Its not easy to write a book about Darth Maul and Cullen Bunn puts in a good effort here. Its definitely worth reading if you like the character because chances are good that you can get around the inconsistencies and minor annoyances and still enjoy this one.
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  • Ricky Ganci
    January 1, 1970
    I'm enjoying Marvel's approach to pre-TPM stories in these short-form comics, and DARTH MAUL is a well-written, well-drawn Sith story that captures the era and the characters well. It feels like a Clone Wars episode in a lot of ways--setting, supporting characters, and especially in the resolution scene, which features a classic reckoning true to form in the PT era.The best part about this limited series, however, is the inner monologue that Cullen Bunn writes, a monologue that sounds exactly I'm enjoying Marvel's approach to pre-TPM stories in these short-form comics, and DARTH MAUL is a well-written, well-drawn Sith story that captures the era and the characters well. It feels like a Clone Wars episode in a lot of ways--setting, supporting characters, and especially in the resolution scene, which features a classic reckoning true to form in the PT era.The best part about this limited series, however, is the inner monologue that Cullen Bunn writes, a monologue that sounds exactly true to character. I can hear Sam Witwer speaking the lines as Maul tells the reader about his mission and why he's chosen it, and that really immersed me in the story and elevated the whole story to some of the other great miniseries that Marvel has run in the past three years. Highly recommended.
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  • Drown Hollum
    January 1, 1970
    This was completely...passable! This might not stand out as a must read, but for Darth Maul fans, it's a totally readable comic. There are some good observations on Maul and the Sith, which add some depth to what is otherwise a pretty standard plot. Cad Bane also makes an appearance, which, if I'm being honest, made me much more excited for a possible Cad Bane series. The art is solid, and there is a pretty satisfying conclusion to Maul's hunt. If you're thirsty for a good Maul book, you can This was completely...passable! This might not stand out as a must read, but for Darth Maul fans, it's a totally readable comic. There are some good observations on Maul and the Sith, which add some depth to what is otherwise a pretty standard plot. Cad Bane also makes an appearance, which, if I'm being honest, made me much more excited for a possible Cad Bane series. The art is solid, and there is a pretty satisfying conclusion to Maul's hunt. If you're thirsty for a good Maul book, you can read this without risk, and come out feeling pretty good about yourself. Otherwise, you really won't be missing much by skipping this corner of the new Star Wars canon.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    The Diary of Darth Maul, and Angry One.* * * * * * *This story was a good one. We get into Darth Maul head, learn his reasons. Oh, it's a dark place in there.What was a bit off for me is that the Maul's dialog was so repetitive, he sounded like a machine. But I guess, it's the way he is. Focused on anger and revenge, crashes the obstacles, fears only his Master.The art is simply beautiful, I stopped to stare. Another awesome illustrator - Luke Ross - to the favourites list.And a story is a The Diary of Darth Maul, and Angry One.* * * * * * *This story was a good one. We get into Darth Maul head, learn his reasons. Oh, it's a dark place in there.What was a bit off for me is that the Maul's dialog was so repetitive, he sounded like a machine. But I guess, it's the way he is. Focused on anger and revenge, crashes the obstacles, fears only his Master.The art is simply beautiful, I stopped to stare. Another awesome illustrator - Luke Ross - to the favourites list.And a story is a glimpse, but an important one. I liked learning more about Maul's character and bit of history.Continuing my journey with The Prequels.
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  • Ahdom
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fantastic story and contained incredible artwork. It really gives Darth Maul a little more depth, especially if you only know him from Episode 1.This takes place before the events of Phantom Menace and illustrates well what is behind Maul's hatred and rage in the film. One of the better 5 issue Star Wars comics.
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  • Cameron Foster
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been wanting to explore more of the Star Wars universe and also read more comics/graphic novels...so I combined the two!This was such a great story that showcased another side of the mysterious Darth Maul and his role as a Sith apprentice!
  • Neville Ridley-smith
    January 1, 1970
    Decent and straightforward story and art. Entirely appropriate backstory for Maul - hunting his first Jedi padawan... Very Star Wars
  • Garrett
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent Darth Maul comic. I thought the inner dialogue was a bit much--show, don't tell, especially with comics! Other than that, though, it was excellent. Well drawn, well written, captivating.
  • Ja-Køb
    January 1, 1970
    Star Wars: Darth Maul is a comic miniseries by Marvel Comics that is set before Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace and details Darth Maul’s first Jedi kill.The premise is simple. When pirates attack a Trade Federation outpost, a bloodthirsty Darth Maul replies to Darth Sidious’s orders to defendt . He hears of an auction going on, on the other side of the galaxy for a captured Jedi Padawan. Intrigued, Darth Maul along with a cast of characters from the Clone Wars such as Cad Bane and Aurra Star Wars: Darth Maul is a comic miniseries by Marvel Comics that is set before Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace and details Darth Maul’s first Jedi kill.The premise is simple. When pirates attack a Trade Federation outpost, a bloodthirsty Darth Maul replies to Darth Sidious’s orders to defendt . He hears of an auction going on, on the other side of the galaxy for a captured Jedi Padawan. Intrigued, Darth Maul along with a cast of characters from the Clone Wars such as Cad Bane and Aurra Sing and with new characters such as a Chandra-Fan named Tek Tek and a Mosquito like creature named Vordheilo. Together they go to the auction in hopes to capture the Padawan. Unfortunately they don’t win the bid, resulting them killing the winning party. They take off in the winning party’s ship before being blown out of the sky. Now against their luck Maul and his gang have to team up with the Jedi Padawan Eldra Kaitis to fend off the other bidders chasing after them. In due time the Gang kill off the other bidders with relative ease. Maul goes off alone with Eldra Kaitis where she is then slain by Maul.What I liked: the history of the Sith order and their history was only hinted at in this story. We learned of a Great Jedi Holocaust on what looked like Malachor V and that there were little to no survivors. In that we learn that Maul simply wants revenge against the Jedi for what they did to the Sith in past time. Finally we see a cool insight on the relationship between Maul and Sidious. We see that absolutely nothing can be kept secret from Sidious and I absolutely loved that.What I disliked: Honestly the worst thing about this comic were the new characters. None of them had depth, development and their names were easily forgotten. I had to use Wookiepedia as reference to the names even though I’ve finished it five minutes prior to my review.
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  • Jedi Master Megan
    January 1, 1970
    Oof okay, lots of mixed feelings about this. Maul's character bores me most of the time, like yeah, we get it, you want revenge on Kenobi and you never seem to actually die. That's cool for some people and I suppose Sith lovers could idolize him for that, but I'm not a Sith lover, nor am I one of those people who just happens to like him. This book however, made me feel the tiniest bit for him. Tiny bit. Let me just say, first of all, Sidious is really freaking conniving and it blows my mind Oof okay, lots of mixed feelings about this. Maul's character bores me most of the time, like yeah, we get it, you want revenge on Kenobi and you never seem to actually die. That's cool for some people and I suppose Sith lovers could idolize him for that, but I'm not a Sith lover, nor am I one of those people who just happens to like him. This book however, made me feel the tiniest bit for him. Tiny bit. Let me just say, first of all, Sidious is really freaking conniving and it blows my mind every time I think about all his elaborate plans and schemes and I just- whoops, getting off topic there. Anyways, so I feel a bit for Maul cause having him for a Master sounded absolutely crazy. I don't feel bad for him though, cause it will take more than a sad backstory to make me like a character.Things I didn't like: the fricking monologuing!! Okay, we get that you feel anger! You don't need to restate it like 50 times! You are a freaking Sith! It's kind of a given.Things I did like: the cameos!! Bounty Hunters!! Yes!! Also, that ending was pretty good. Like I felt some goosebumps you know. Dang, Sidious does it again!And now for the longest part of this review (and it's not even about Maul hahaha whoops):Eldra Kaitis!!! She!!! Was!!! Amazing!!! Honestly, as soon as she entered the story (not by mentions, but by her actually talking and stuff) I thought it started picking up. She was amazingly skilled for a Padawan and I love how she kept standing up to Maul without a trace of fear. Like yes!! You go girl!! And every time their battle was drawn I just had to gasp at the beautifulness of it because the contrast between Maul's red and her blue was simply amazing! (view spoiler)[ Oof, I really wish Maul would have taken the time to THINK cause then she might not have died like I don't even care how she would have lived, whether Maul turns her to the Sith (cause he kept thinking about that and now I'm thinking about it and it sounds COOL!) or if somehow he let her go cause I would have LOVED to see her as a fearsome Jedi General in the Clone Wars!! (Ooh do you smell that? Smells like fic writing time.) (hide spoiler)] So yeah, I loved her in this story, maybe you could tell :)I would definitely recommend this book, despite the fact that I low-key hate this character. That's how good it is!
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  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Yet another mediocre entry in Disney's new Star Wars canon. Not all of this is terrible, which I'll get to in a bit. Ever since the introduction of Maul in 1999, one of the most lamented aspects of the prequel trilogy is the underuse of Darth Maul. Easily one of the coolest-looking bad guys, with his black and red visage and double lightsaber, he seemed to do nothing but appear for a few lines and unceremoniously get bisected by Ewan McGregor. A comic set before the events of The Phantom Menace Yet another mediocre entry in Disney's new Star Wars canon. Not all of this is terrible, which I'll get to in a bit. Ever since the introduction of Maul in 1999, one of the most lamented aspects of the prequel trilogy is the underuse of Darth Maul. Easily one of the coolest-looking bad guys, with his black and red visage and double lightsaber, he seemed to do nothing but appear for a few lines and unceremoniously get bisected by Ewan McGregor. A comic set before the events of The Phantom Menace dealing with Maul should remedy that, right?Not really.All we get from this entire issue is that Maul is just an angry fella who lives for violence - which isn't anything new. The plot revolves around him going against his master's orders and hunting down a a Jedi Padawan for his own private duel to test his fledgling Sith skills. The plot is fairly interesting, with some nice fight scenes, however not as graphic and violent as I'd expect from a story about Maul. The art is appealing, and the fan favourites Cad Bane and Aurra Sing appear - however pretty underused as well. One good thing about this however is that it's set in the pre-TPM era, which not a lot of things in the current canon are doing, and hopefully this kickstarts a few more series set in that time period.Bottom line, not particulary important, but worth if you love Darth Maul, or can get it for a cheap price.
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  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    Hard to come up with anything to say about this. It's polished and competent enough and makes an attempt at characterization and psychology. But Maul just isn't an interesting character and it's hard to imagine anything overcoming that problem, though there are far more attempts than I would have thought called for. This is maybe one of the better ones, framing him as more of a bitter ideologue than the vaguely animalistic creature of pure id we got in previous portrayals. I guess if Maul has a Hard to come up with anything to say about this. It's polished and competent enough and makes an attempt at characterization and psychology. But Maul just isn't an interesting character and it's hard to imagine anything overcoming that problem, though there are far more attempts than I would have thought called for. This is maybe one of the better ones, framing him as more of a bitter ideologue than the vaguely animalistic creature of pure id we got in previous portrayals. I guess if Maul has a proper storyline after TPM (I've forgotten most of what they did with him in Clone Wars and Rebels) it's useful to have something like this to anchor him. It just still feels pretty shallow and superfluous, despite not being egregiously dumb.
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