Pet Sematary
Sometimes dead is better....When the Creeds move into a beautiful old house in rural Maine, it all seems too good to be true: physician father, beautiful wife, charming little daughter, adorable infant son -- and now an idyllic home. As a family, they've got it all...right down to the friendly cat. But the nearby woods hide a blood-chilling truth -- more terrifying than death itself...and hideously more powerful.

Pet Sematary Details

TitlePet Sematary
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 13th, 2014
PublisherScribner
Rating
GenreHorror, Fiction, Thriller

Pet Sematary Review

  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. Just wow. I've put off reading this one for years because, well.... I'm a wimp. There, I said it. When one of the most well-known names in the contemporary era of the horror genre says something is his scariest book, I take note. It seems bizarre that I finally chose to tackle this one while having children the same age as Louis Creed's, it was precisely the perfect time to pick this up. I listened to almost the entire book over a 24-hour period while road-tripping, and the experience was u Wow. Just wow. I've put off reading this one for years because, well.... I'm a wimp. There, I said it. When one of the most well-known names in the contemporary era of the horror genre says something is his scariest book, I take note. It seems bizarre that I finally chose to tackle this one while having children the same age as Louis Creed's, it was precisely the perfect time to pick this up. I listened to almost the entire book over a 24-hour period while road-tripping, and the experience was unparalleled to any I've had in the scope of reading thus far. Side note, Michael C. Hall was the most excellent narrator for this. What likely was a 4 star read initially became a 5 star with no second thought. If you haven't experienced this version I cannot recommend it highly enough.Rather than a gory, blood and guts type of horror, this is a slow burning, queasy unease that explodes in the final chapters. The suspense nearly did kill me; by the final 25% I found myself wringing my hands and grinding my teeth, preparing myself for the inevitable that I knew was coming, deep down, ever since the beginning. I don't think I could have fully appreciated what King intended to accomplish with this novel if I'd read it before having children of my own. That's not to say that people without kids won't appreciate this as highly, just as statement in my own personal journey. Only King can accomplish so much horror with so little bloodshed. I finished this days ago but have held off on reviewing until now because I feel like I'm still processing and I can't stop thinking about everything that occurred to this family. I had spent so much time prior to reading this book in preparing myself for the big "things" that I was completely taken aback by how connected I became to the Creed family. This is why the detailed, slow burn; if I didn't care about this family, their neighbors, and the town in general, why would what happens at the end stick with me for the long haul? Oh sure, I would have gasped and guffawed at the disturbing nature of the plot, but I wouldn't have been emotionally invested. If you've been hiding under my big rock for the past few decades and are just catching up on your Stephen King backlog, like me, I highly recommend picking this up. It's not just about the scares with this one, but the contemplation on how grief can turn any of us into a monster. By far the best audible book I've chosen yet.
    more
  • Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies
    January 1, 1970
    It’s probably wrong to believe there can be any limit to the horror which the human mind can experience. On the contrary, it seems that some exponential effect begins to obtain as deeper and deeper darkness falls—as little as one may like to admit it, human experience tends, in a good many ways, to support the idea that when the nightmare grows black enough, horror spawns horror, one coincidental evil begets other, often more deliberate evils, until finally blackness seems to cover everything. It’s probably wrong to believe there can be any limit to the horror which the human mind can experience. On the contrary, it seems that some exponential effect begins to obtain as deeper and deeper darkness falls—as little as one may like to admit it, human experience tends, in a good many ways, to support the idea that when the nightmare grows black enough, horror spawns horror, one coincidental evil begets other, often more deliberate evils, until finally blackness seems to cover everything. And the most terrifying question of all may be just how much horror the human mind can stand and still maintain a wakeful, staring, unrelenting sanity. In my teens, Stephen King has crafted my nightmares. I am masochistically glad to say that in my adulthood, that has not changed.He had been responsible for my bedtime routine. Close all doors, bathroom, closet. Check under bed, a terrifying prospect as it stands. Make sure blanket is firmly tucked in at the feet - who knows what creatures might reach up to grab or nibble on them. Make sure blanket is firmly tucked in on all sides, so that only the head is exposed. And still, all that preparation for the battle that is bedtime is nigh useless as the nightlights cast shadows that turn into shadowy creatures in the depths of night. Glints of light cast upon objects are spun by a restless mind into monsters.It has been years since I've read a Stephen King book. That's because my attention span is much shorter now. It craves the quick denouément, a fast-paced plot. Action action action. I confess that this book did plod along in some parts for me, but despite all that, there is no doubt in my mind that King is a master at building atmosphere. He is tremendously skilled at crafting characters, at making them human, at making them relatable in their poignancy, with moments like a father explaining the inevitability of death to his young child. I think we can all relate to that moment. He held her and rocked her, believing, rightly or wrongly, that Ellie wept for the very intractability of death, its imperviousness to argument or to a little girl’s tears; that she wept over its cruel unpredictability; and that she wept because of the human being’s wonderful, deadly ability to translate symbols into conclusions that were either fine and noble or blackly terrifying. If all those animals had died and been buried, then Church could die (any time!) and be-buried; and if that could happen to Church, it could happen to her mother, her father, her baby brother. To herself. Death was a vague idea; the Pet Sematary was real.In the texture of those rude markers were truths which even a child’s hands could feel. I would say half the book isn't a horror in a traditional sense, but an exploration of human grief and behavior, and human nature itself can be quite terrifying.That isn't to say that this book isn't filled with moments that makes a chill run down your spine. The wind pushed and pulled its fingers through his hair, and for a moment the old, childlike fear of the dark rushed through him, making him feel weak and small and terrorized. Was he really going into the woods with this corpse in his arms, passing under the trees where the wind walked, from darkness into darkness? And alone this time? I've long since outgrown my nightly monster-prepping ritual, but I know tonight I won't be sleeping easily. “I brought you something, Mommy!” he screamed. “I brought you something, Mommy! I brought you something, I brought you something!”
    more
  • Johann (jobis89)
    January 1, 1970
    "Cause what you buy, is what you own. And what you own... always comes home to you."Louis Creed and his family have recently moved to the town of Ludlow, Maine. Behind their house there is a path that leads to a 'Pet Sematary', where the children of surrounding areas have buried their beloved pets in years gone by. Deeper in the woods there lies an ancient Indian burial ground, that Louis discovers has some sinister properties when their family cat dies...It's no secret that Pet Sematary is my f "Cause what you buy, is what you own. And what you own... always comes home to you."Louis Creed and his family have recently moved to the town of Ludlow, Maine. Behind their house there is a path that leads to a 'Pet Sematary', where the children of surrounding areas have buried their beloved pets in years gone by. Deeper in the woods there lies an ancient Indian burial ground, that Louis discovers has some sinister properties when their family cat dies...It's no secret that Pet Sematary is my favourite King book, but this is the case for a number of different reasons. When I first started reading horror I couldn't imagine words on a page actually scaring me, I always felt like I needed something visual to keep me up at night. Then I found Pet Sematary... I'd never had an experience before where I actually felt scared to turn the page - this was of course in the climax at the end of the novel. My heart was racing, my palms felt sweaty, I just kept thinking, "There's no way this book is going to go THAT dark" (clearly I didn't really know King yet!!). And then it did. And a King junkie and Constant Reader was born. IT was my first King, but Pet Sematary was where I became hooked.**NB Plenty of spoilers ahead**Now it's time to get personal... grief and loss has been a huge part of my life. When I was younger, my dad was diagnosed with MS, a debilitating disease that quite literally drained the life from him in front of our eyes. I guess this is similar in some ways to the Zelda and Rachel storyline, apart from the fact that my dad was never angry or resentful over his illness - or if he was, he never showed it in front of me. He progressively got more and more ill, over time losing his ability to speak, walk, eat. Death was ultimately a relief. But what about those who are left behind? It's strange because even though I was only 10 when he died, which is around 18 years ago, there are still days or times when the unrelenting grief can come out of nowhere and floor me. The loss of a parent is something you never get over, it is simply something you learn to live with. The only thing that can possibly be worse is the loss of a child. King's depiction of the grief and loss that both Louis and Rachel go through is so accurate it hurts. This book really resonated with me on a deep level, as I had never before read such a harrowing and realistic outlook on death and loss. There are so many passages that I've made a note of and will revisit over and over again.The way King crafted a book that is terrifying and heartbreaking in equal measures will never fail to astound me. Because this book IS terrifying - to lose someone is terrifying, to have to try to move on is terrifying, for them to come back "different" is also terrifying. Sometimes on instagram I will see people criticising Louis' decisions or making out that he's a bad parent and it makes me want to scream. Grief and loss does not allow for rational thinking. It does not allow for good judgement. It can be all encompassing to the point where you feel like you can't breathe. I defy anyone to tell me that if in a similar position you wouldn't even consider it (not forgetting the fact that there are other forces at work here). I know I would. Couple that with the overwhelming devastation and loss and your decision is pretty made. So to label Louis as a bad parent is absolutely ridiculous to me. Don't get me wrong, there was Ellie to consider, he still had that to live for, but in those heady initial days following such a heartbreaking loss, rational thinking ain't happening.It's a bit of a slow-build this book, but the pay-off is worth it. I enjoyed getting to know the Creeds, watching them form friendships with the Crandalls across the road. All the good stuff, you know, before shit hits the fan. And when shit hits the fan, it is almost too much to take. Gage's little Star Wars shoe in the middle of the road... the cap full of blood. Images that send chills down my spine. Then the unbearable dread as Louis digs up that coffin, not knowing what exactly he is going to be presented with. The way Louis initially thinks that Gage has no head as there is a dark moss covering his face... THIS IS THE STUFF OF NIGHTMARES. The little figure appearing in Louis' room as he sleeps, the child's laughter that Jud can hear... Ellie having these vivid dreams and knowing that her family is in danger. This is really a masterclass in how to craft well-written, piss-your-pants horror. I bow to you, Sai King. Some of King's best writing in here and one of his best endings too. There's also some unforgettable characters in Louis Creed, Jud Crandall, Victor Pascow and Zelda. PUH-LEASE can I find a Jud Crandall that can act as a father figure to me?? The adaptation for this book is also pretty decent: Louis is a hot dad, Fred Gwynne was born to play the role of Jud, Zelda will trigger a cold sweat to run down your back...I could quite honestly write an entire thesis on Pet Sematary, so I'll end it here. All I'll say is this: if you didn't feel something when reading this book...... you need to check yourself *insert sassy emoji* Always my number 1 King book. 5 stars from me - obviously.Update: listened to audiobook in April/May 2018. Incredible narration by Michael C Hall. Still 5 stars. Obviously.
    more
  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
    January 1, 1970
    While reading this book, all I that runs through my head is the song the Ramones made for the movie. So, I'm going to link the video so all of you can have it running through your head as well! Kickin' it old school =) Pet Sematary - The RamonesOkay, let me just go ahead and say there will be **SPOILERS** for those that haven't read the book or seen the movie. I have seen the movie about 6 million 5 hundred and 8 times. And I love it! THIS is the first time I have read the book, and as there are While reading this book, all I that runs through my head is the song the Ramones made for the movie. So, I'm going to link the video so all of you can have it running through your head as well! Kickin' it old school =) Pet Sematary - The RamonesOkay, let me just go ahead and say there will be **SPOILERS** for those that haven't read the book or seen the movie. I have seen the movie about 6 million 5 hundred and 8 times. And I love it! THIS is the first time I have read the book, and as there are a few differences in the book and movie, they both rock monkey butt! The book didn't scare me at all for some reason. I think because of the said 6 million 5 hundred and 8 times that I have seen it that maybe it acclimated me to the book. Although, the movie is still creepy as hell. I totally freaked at the introduction to the book. Mr. King tells about moving to said place, teaching at the school, they had a cat named Smucky, their son was running to the road chasing the kite string like in the movie, but uh, didn't get killed! And some other things. It was like a whole new little world right there for me that he actually wrote this based on some home stuff! Remember in the book where Jud (the wonderful neighbor) takes them out to the Pet Sematary? SMUCKY THE CAT, one crate-board marker proclaimed. The hand was childish but careful. HE WAS OBEDIANT.Okay, so there was a real (I wonder if it's still there?) Pet Sematary and their cat Smucky is buried there and that is what Mr. King's daughter wrote! I mean, I can't even. I want to go visit there now and see if the place is still there! So wonderful Jud from across the road has a great friendship with Louis and the kids, a little iffy with Rachel. Anyway, Jud is the one that has Louis bury Church (the cat) when he gets hit on that damn road all of those crazy trucks would fly down. But little did Louis know that Church was going to come back, even when the poor boy from the school (Pascow) who got hit by a car and killed, came back as a ghost to warn Louis. Why don't people just listen? So now Church is back home and he isn't the same any more. But the family didn't find out anything happened to him while they were out of town. They just think he's weird and stinks when they get home. Uh, yeah! So then, it all goes to hell in a hand basket. Gage is killed on the road. . . . . . and in the movie you get to see who presides over the funeral. Yup, the King =)and then. . . don't do it . . . don't to it. He does it, Louis takes Gage to the Pet Sematary and yeah. . . Gage isn't the same when he comes back! He kills Jud! Damn it all! and Ellie had been having bad dreams about her daddy so Rachel comes home and goes to Jud's house and she gets killed because Gage isn't Gage any more. And Louis finally takes out Church and Gage, but does he learn from his lesson? Nooooooooooooooo, he takes and buries Rachel in the Sematary. Well, you can use your imagination for the rest of that one. . . This was an awesome book to read for Halloween time or any time really but it's extra special at Halloween! ♥MY BLOG: Melissa Martin's Reading List
    more
  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    "Sometimes dead is better".................KING calls Pet Sematary his scariest book, and I can understand why. It is super creepy and super "shocking" where he takes the reader, and his interesting prologue explaining how he came to write this unsettling tale brings a bit of truth to the story.While truly a horror of a read, it is excellent in respect to its genre, but just awful too if that makes any sense. PS is not particularly gory, but definitely sad, sick, dark, and disgusting with more t "Sometimes dead is better".................KING calls Pet Sematary his scariest book, and I can understand why. It is super creepy and super "shocking" where he takes the reader, and his interesting prologue explaining how he came to write this unsettling tale brings a bit of truth to the story.While truly a horror of a read, it is excellent in respect to its genre, but just awful too if that makes any sense. PS is not particularly gory, but definitely sad, sick, dark, and disgusting with more than one horribly "shocking" event that will blow your mind.Take heed if you're new to reading horror as this one will make your skin crawl and keep you from taking a walk in the woods anytime soon......especially if your cat is nearby."IT" is still my favorite scary KING thriller (especially the movie) but Pet Sematary (did I say it was "shocking") is a close second, and......."sometimes dead is better." UPDATE: October 16, 2015 WARNING: DO NOT WATCH THE MOVIE UNLESS YOU WANT TO BE TOTALLY CREEPED OUT! THE VISUAL OF THE "SISTER" FLASHBACK SCENE ALONE IS MORE HORRIFYING THAN THE ENTIRE BOOK!!!
    more
  • Emily (Books with Emily Fox)
    January 1, 1970
    That ending though...This ended up being very different than what I expected. The less you know about it, the better!
  • Mario
    January 1, 1970
    Once upon a time when I was a child, I remember talking with my family about horror movies. Somebody asked what was the scariest movie you've watched, and my mom without thinking said 'Pet Sematary'. I remember laughing and saying 'How on earth could a movie named Pet Sematary be scary?' Fast forward to now, I changed my mind. This book is scariest and creepiest book I've ever read, and I'm sure it'll stay number 1 for a long time. It made me think about stuff I don't want, or refuse, to think a Once upon a time when I was a child, I remember talking with my family about horror movies. Somebody asked what was the scariest movie you've watched, and my mom without thinking said 'Pet Sematary'. I remember laughing and saying 'How on earth could a movie named Pet Sematary be scary?' Fast forward to now, I changed my mind. This book is scariest and creepiest book I've ever read, and I'm sure it'll stay number 1 for a long time. It made me think about stuff I don't want, or refuse, to think about. One being death. Most of us don't want to think about death, 'cause we think we're invincible... But we're not. Like this book said, Oz the Great and Terrible (or should I say Gweat and Tewwible?) is always close... waiting.At few parts I even thought about putting the book down, because it was all too much, but I just couldn't. I wasn't even able to stop reading, 'cause I was dying (no pun intended) to know what was going to happen next. I guess horror books do that do you.In conclusion, amazing book, and I'm definitely gonna re-read it in (very, very distant) future.
    more
  • Sr3yas
    January 1, 1970
    I read The Shining, my first Stephen King book back in summer of 2016 and was absolutely blown away by it. Since then I've been reading King's books religiously to find the next masterpiece that could push the limits of a sane mind. Well, It took me two years and eleven more King's books to find it, and on the way, I met many great contenders like Pennywise, Barlow and George Stark. But it was Pet Sematary and the horrors that paid a visit to the small family in Ludlow that finally won me over I read The Shining, my first Stephen King book back in summer of 2016 and was absolutely blown away by it. Since then I've been reading King's books religiously to find the next masterpiece that could push the limits of a sane mind. Well, It took me two years and eleven more King's books to find it, and on the way, I met many great contenders like Pennywise, Barlow and George Stark. But it was Pet Sematary and the horrors that paid a visit to the small family in Ludlow that finally won me over. ❝ The soil of a man's heart is stonier, Louis. A man grows what he can, and he tends it. 'Cause what you buy, is what you own. And what you own... always comes home to you.❞ Louis Creed and his family have just moved from Chicago to the small town of Ludlow. They moved because Louis got appointed as Director of University of Maine's health services. They settle in their house quite nicely. The house big and cozy, and Louis quickly becomes friends with Jud and his wife, their elderly neighbors. His wife Rachel, and two young children, Ellie and Gage is happy. Even Ellie's cat Church is happy! The only tiny problem is the highway road dividing Louis's house and Jud's house, where speeding trucks travels relentlessly... Oh, There is also the matter of Pet Sematary: an old ground where pet owners bury their faithful dead pets. Also, the old Indian legends...The mysterious land with a peculiar hold on people....A secret and forbidden climb...Don't look back...*Shakes head*Did I space out? I spaced out, didn't I?!First of all, Mr. King? That man got some serious guts. He based the premise and characters for this novel from his own life while he was teaching at the University of Maine. There are too many parallels between what actually happened in King's life and what he wrote in his novel. I think that's the reason he calls this book as his scariest book. It's too damn personal.Pet Sematary scared me not the way other horror novels or movies scare people. Pet semetery is not about jump scares or other worldly creatures instilling terror upon our sad species (view spoiler)[ (I mean, reanimation is not on the top of food chain when it comes to being scary. I practically snoozed through Frankenstein, and Lovecraft's Herbert West: The re-animator was fun, not scary) (hide spoiler)] For me, Pet semetery worked because King makes the characters feel like your own family, fill you with care and love for them, and then asks you the question: What will you do If you were standing where Louis is standing? Will you climb or stand your ground?As usual, King characters are well crafted and full of life. The bromance between Jud and Louis is endearing, and Louis's young daughter Elle and toddler Gage are delightful. (view spoiler)[ Why, King, WHYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY? (hide spoiler)] The story also boasts a lot of strong secondary characters, and King scores big with a perfect cast. My favorite part of entire novel is in the first half itself when Louis and Jud take the nocturnal excursion to the woods. That sequence had the right amount of creepiness, mystery and a haunting beauty. I kept on imagining unusually bright stars standing still and looking down at Louis and Jud as a chilly wind blew across the woods; A daunting dreamy quality to the whole affair. Weirdly, I kept on thinking that Guillermo del Toro will be able to do great things with this sequence! Later on, I found out that del Toro was actually in talks to make a remake of Pet Sematary, but the project fell through. I'll be honest here. (view spoiler)[The grief King created in the second half was almost unbearable, and (hide spoiler)] I was stuck between not wanting to read the novel because it was too painful and at the same time, I was unable to put it down because the writing was too damn mesmerizing. King once again excels in horror department because of the way he crafts the unfathomable pull of the Pet Sematary. It's the intangibility of the horror that I found beautiful. (view spoiler)[ The scare factor is not just limited to a couple of reanimated corpses or the Wendigo, but the mystery of the Pet Sematary and inexplicable feelings and intrusions the characters felt, and how they lost battles with themselves (hide spoiler)]Another reason for my perfect rating is the ending. It was flawless.(view spoiler)[Also, I loved the Jerusalem lot's reference. It felt like two cursed lands were fighting among themselves to consume their prey. Perfection! (hide spoiler)]Overall, Pet Sematary has everything I wanted, and my hunt for next perfect story in Stephen King's shelves continues with renewed energy!
    more
  • Vincent Kaprat
    January 1, 1970
    This may be King's darkest book. If you're goth, read this and you'll be 5% goth'er.
  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    Every Halloween, I like to do a little season’s readings. For most of the year, I generally avoid scary books and movies. Life is scary enough without looking for extra frights. But there’s something about the Fall. Once the wind gets sharp, the days get short, and the leaves start to drop, I inevitably find myself within a small window of time in which horror is appealing. This window closes abruptly at midnight on November 1. Before that time, though, I’m relatively open to the idea of being t Every Halloween, I like to do a little season’s readings. For most of the year, I generally avoid scary books and movies. Life is scary enough without looking for extra frights. But there’s something about the Fall. Once the wind gets sharp, the days get short, and the leaves start to drop, I inevitably find myself within a small window of time in which horror is appealing. This window closes abruptly at midnight on November 1. Before that time, though, I’m relatively open to the idea of being terrified by something other than my student loan debt. In the past, my choices have bounced between classics (Dracula; The Legend of Sleepy Hollow; The Haunting of Hill House) and Stephen King (last year I finally finished It). This year, I relied on the water cooler to help me make my pick. As in, I literally asked people at my office’s water cooler for ideas. After awhile, people started avoiding the water cooler, but by that time I had enough anecdotal evidence to choose King’s Pet Semetary. Before I actually opened the cover, I knew very little about Pet Sematary. What I did know kind of bored me. Pets coming back to life? That’s not scary. My taxes? Now there’s the terror! Yet Pet Sematary is King’s choice for his scariest novel. In his Introduction, he claims that when he finished the book, even he thought he had gone too far. He thought it would never be published. I chuckled a bit when I read this. King is the consummate entertainer, so of course he’d tell that story. His Introduction reminded me of a carnival barker. By the end, though, I sort of agreed with him. This pushes up against the boundaries of what most readers are willing to tolerate in their amusements. At 395 pages (in my paperback edition), this is a relatively thin Stephen King book. I don’t think he’d even finished introducing all the characters in The Stand in 395 pages. (Of course, King reads incredibly fast, so 400 pages feels like half that). Accordingly, this is one of King’s tighter, more efficient stories. There are only a handful of characters, and just a few big set pieces. King only throws a couple punches, but they all land squarely in the groin. Things kick off with the Creed family (Louis and Rachel, and their two young kids, Eileen and Gage) arriving at their new home in Maine, after relocating from Chicago. Louis is a doctor who has taken a job with the University of Maine. Their new house is a big and beautiful New England colonial. Its only detriment is its location, right next to a busy road well-traveled by recklessly speeding semi trucks. The Creed’s new neighbor is the benignly intrusive Jud Crandall, an old man who steps in to fill the paternal role that Louis missed due to his own father’s premature death. It doesn’t take long for Jud to show Louis some of their new home’s features. Prominent among them is a pet cemetery (the sign reads Pet Sematary). We later learn – again through Jud, who is always there, watching, like Wilson from Home Improvement – that beyond the pet cemetery is a Micmac burial ground. Jud tells Louis that his childhood dog was killed in the road. Jud buried the dog in the Micmac burial ground and it came back to life like a canine Lazarus. It was good as new, except it was mean as hell and smelled like death. Did I mention that the Creeds also have a pet? Pet Sematary is long on setup. It takes its time building to the inevitable consequences of living next to a place that cheats Death. For the first 200 or so pages, not a lot happens, though King generously foreshadows much of what is to follow. At the halfway point, he delivers a shot to the solar plexus with a major twist – followed by two cheap writer’s tricks – all in succession. Starting with this breathless succession, things race straight downhill to the chilling finale. The twist itself – which hides in plain sight – is King’s crowning achievement. It is not a scene of supernatural horror or apocalyptic fireworks. Instead, it is an immensely powerful evocation of realistic grief that is closer to Agee’s A Death in the Family than anything from the master of pop horror. (For the record, I spent a day in a closet nursing a bottle of Fireball after I finished A Death in the Family). More than most authors, Stephen King has always worked at both the textual and subtextual level. He places a premium on his stories, to be sure, but always gives over space to meditate on his themes. At his worst (the simplistic, condescending parable of The Green Mile), King wields his motifs with all the subtlety of Jack Nicholson putting an axe into Scatman Crothers. At his best (the portrait of an abusive, alcoholic father in The Shining), however, King’s subtext enriches and deepens what might otherwise be a forgettable spook-story. Pet Sematary is, in some respects, vintage horror. But it worked for me – unpleasantly – on its second level. This is King’s meditation on the enormity of loss and the devastation of grief. All his books are filled with death, but this is the rare book – not just in the King canon, but in general – that deals squarely with dying. It realizes the uncomfortable truth that our own deaths, while frightening, do not come close to the unspeakable prospect of losing the people we love. This reality – and it is very real – is so powerful that it has to be diluted lest the message become unpalatable. That is King’s genius. He is able to riff on ideas of life, death, and the afterlife in the guise of a horror story. His story is almost good enough to keep you from crawling into a corner and curling into the fetal position. Almost. It seems like a lot of people first read Stephen King in their late-teens. Maybe a King novel was the first big “adult” book they ever read. I talked this book over with my Two-Person Russian Book Club partner Jamie, who read it in high school. Her memories of Pet Sematary were images from her mind’s eye: the spookiness of the Micmac burial ground; the grim story that Rachel tells about her sister Zelda; the bloody and macabre endgame. Her experience of the book was therefore totally different than mine. With an exception or two, all the King novels I’ve read I read in my 30s. Thus, the BOO! moments don’t make a terribly profound impression on me. It’s the other stuff that gets under my skin. Pet Sematary’s evocation of death (view spoiler)[ Especially as a parent (hide spoiler)] is heavy. Horror is generally seen as cathartic, a way to healthily channel our fears. For me, there was no catharsis. It gave me nightmares – not of monsters or ghosts, but of busy roads and the hidden clock that starts ticking away the moment we’re born.This is all a way of saying that I was psychologically damaged by this book for entirely unexpected reasons. Pet Sematary might be King’s best novel. As I noted above, it is devastatingly effective on a couple levels. But it is also really well written. King is a natural storyteller. Everything he writes seems to have its own propulsion system. This is sometimes marred by his propensity towards cultural spew. King is a pop cultural maven, and he tends to strew the ephemera of that culture throughout his stories. His novels are oft populated by characters who think and speak in various sound bites: snatches of musical lyrics; jingles from commercials; one-liners from films. For whatever reason (probably a forceful editor), that distracting aspect of King’s writing is kept to a minimum here. This is a story that is honed like a blade, and shorn of gristle. I’m not going to pretend I don’t like the gratuitous digressions of King’s big opuses. But the pared down storytelling in Pet Sematary adds to its overall impact. Confronting fear can be incredibly cleansing. That didn't happen for me here. Yet the miserable mood Pet Sematary foisted upon me is testament to its qualities. It is a transcendent masterpiece of the horror genre.
    more
  • Nikki
    January 1, 1970
    The painful, hard thing about Stephen King's writing is that so often, he takes something real, something that people can experience in the real world, and builds the supernatural stuff onto that. In The Shining, there's Jack's alcoholism; in The Talisman, there's Jack/Jason's mother's cancer; The Stand plays on our fears of something, somewhere, in one of those labs, getting out of control; in Pet Sematary, it's the death of a child. So much of the book is completely real and believable: the ar The painful, hard thing about Stephen King's writing is that so often, he takes something real, something that people can experience in the real world, and builds the supernatural stuff onto that. In The Shining, there's Jack's alcoholism; in The Talisman, there's Jack/Jason's mother's cancer; The Stand plays on our fears of something, somewhere, in one of those labs, getting out of control; in Pet Sematary, it's the death of a child. So much of the book is completely real and believable: the arguments between Louis and his wife's parents, Gage running out onto the road and getting himself killed, Louis being willing to do anything to resurrect his son, anything. It's gruesome, because anyone with an ounce of imagination can put themself in that situation, imagine the horrible choice: do I try this and possibly get my son back or possibly create a monster, or do I pass this chance by and never find out whether it could have worked?Stephen King is definitely not "just" a horror writer. His horror becomes much more "real" because he is also writing about real things.This book hurt the most of the ones of his that he's read, and so it took me longer to get through it. I don't regret it, even if it grossed me out a bit. I think it's pretty brilliant, the ideas and the plot at least. Stephen King is not the most fancy writer in the world, but his prose works and goes down easy, and that makes it good, as far as I'm concerned.
    more
  • AMEERA
    January 1, 1970
    Stephen King : king of horror stories 💀👑'
  • Edward Lorn
    January 1, 1970
    Pet Sematary Review (Kinda) I know this review is long, but I have a personal story to tell. Read it if you want to, but the simple fact of the matter is that this book is awesome. If you haven't read it, stop fucking about. When I was ten years old, my mother and her best friend Andrita took a trip to the local drive-in to catch a showing of Pet Sematary. My father was out with his own buddies, so guess who got to tag along? Yup, me. My mother told me to go to sleep in the back seat, and then p Pet Sematary Review (Kinda) I know this review is long, but I have a personal story to tell. Read it if you want to, but the simple fact of the matter is that this book is awesome. If you haven't read it, stop fucking about. When I was ten years old, my mother and her best friend Andrita took a trip to the local drive-in to catch a showing of Pet Sematary. My father was out with his own buddies, so guess who got to tag along? Yup, me. My mother told me to go to sleep in the back seat, and then proceeded to forget all about me. Little E. was very excited by the prospect of watching a real grown-up's film, so Little E. did not follow his mother's orders. Little E. soon regretted his excitement.  Let me reiterate, I was ten. The scariest things I had seen up to that point were the old Universal horror films. But Drac, Wolfie, and that stumbling behemoth Franky didn't hold a candle to Zelda, Rachael Creed's invalid sister (who, interestingly enough, was played by a man in the film). I did fine up until the camera drifted down the hallway of the Goldman house to enter a room wherein Zelda lay on the bed, choking. When that actor rolled over and faced the celluloid, I pissed myself. I'm not ashamed of that fact. Once again, I was only ten. I had been laying curled up in the middle of the back seat of my mother's car, but once I laid eyes on Zelda, I crawled my pee-soaked ass down to the foot well behind the driver's seat. And there I stayed. Every time I tried to close my eyes, I saw that face. I missed the rest of the movie, but Zelda stayed with me. It would be another seven years before I found out Pet Sematary was written by Stephen King. My mother has been a die-hard King fan since she first read The Stand the week it was released. But she kept his scariest novels in her room. It, Pet Sematary, 'Salem's Lot, and The Shining did not enter what she called The Great Book Closet (which was a walk-in number filled completely with stacks of hardcover horror novels, which I would inherit upon turning 21; she didn't die, she just kinda handed them over) until 1997. I'd read Dolores Claiborne and Misery, but had no idea that such terrifying treasures awaited me. When the hidden novels were introduced back into her massive collection of Dean R. Koontz, Peter Straub, John Saul (which is why I have such an affection for that old hack and continue to collect his books to this day), James Herbert, L. Ron Hubbard, and, of course, King, I snatched up the shortest of the four. I was seventeen by this time, but I still wasn't prepared for the story. After I finished the novel, I had mom rent the movie because I didn't think anything could be worse than the book, and I wanted to prove to myself that Zelda really wasn't that scary. Well, I was right. Zelda wasn't nearly as scary as she had been to Little E., but Grossly-Larger E found Gage nightmare inducing. You see, Gage isn't as menacing in the book. He's rather over the top, and cusses like Regan does in The Exorcist after being possessed by Honey Boo Boo... I mean  Pazuzu. Yeah, after being returned from the dead, he's a murderous little fucker, but, all in all, he's kinda silly. The movie version is much worse, because it supposes that Gage is still Gage somewhere deep inside. His utterances of "I have something to show you, Mommy" and "No fair," are both sad and terrifying. Oh, and in both the book and the novel - fuck Church. Fuck Church right in its nutless, glowing-eyed corpse. I love cats, but that one can die in a fire.  Another odd difference between the film and the novel is that Jud's wife Norma and the Creed's nanny Missy are kinda smashed together in the movie. The young women and the old one are morphed into a middle-aged housekeeper with arthritis who winds up hanging herself. Never did like that bit. I suppose this is because I really liked Norma, and cry every time I read about her death in the book. The housekeeper in the movie was just there. I had no reason to care about her, so I didn't give a shit whether she lived or died.  I've told you about my experiences with this book when I was ten and seventeen. I read it once again in my twenties, before my daughter was born, and didn't care much for the plodding beginning and thought the rest of it was simply okay. (I know, I was a dumb bastard back then). Now I'm in my thirties and I have two kids. Two kids that closely resemble Ellie and Gage in this book. Needless to say, this reread was a powerful one, and I almost couldn't finish it because of the feelings I experienced. I soldiered on, though, and made it out the other end. If you are a parent, this novel will affect you in some way. It may not be pretty, but it's striking work of fiction that should not be missed.  Finally (yes, this kinda/sorta review is almost over) this is the first King novel in which King didn't drone on and on after the final horrific scene (if you read them chronologically, all of his other novels up until this one are tied up in one way or another). There's no wrap up. No "This is where they are now" mumbo jumbo. It just ends. As it should. It kicks you squarely in the genitals and fucks off. I dig that. I dig that very much. Notable names: Haven (The Tommyknockers and The Colorado Kid)Jerusalem's Lot (Obvious)Derry (any King fan knows this little town intimately) In summation: This is the second best Stephen King novel in my opinion. You may disagree, but it's my party and I'll do what I want. The only book in his catalog better than this one is coming up next on my massive reread. But first, it's time for some silliness. BRING ON HARRY POTTER!  
    more
  • Heena Rathore P.
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I read this book in RMFAO's November Buddy-Read with some of my awesome friends Magdalena, Titas, Andrew, Kim, Stefani Saloma, Marigold, Konstantina Pap. Pet Sematary is undoubtedly one of Stephen King’s finest works. I tend to be speechless when it comes to writing a review for his books, so forgive me if I write less than necessary, because, nothing that can be said will ever be really enough to praise this book. The story takes you very slowly through the life happenings of Louis Creed Note: I read this book in RMFAO's November Buddy-Read with some of my awesome friends Magdalena, Titas, Andrew, Kim, Stefani Saloma, Marigold, Konstantina Pap. Pet Sematary is undoubtedly one of Stephen King’s finest works. I tend to be speechless when it comes to writing a review for his books, so forgive me if I write less than necessary, because, nothing that can be said will ever be really enough to praise this book. The story takes you very slowly through the life happenings of Louis Creed and his family. Story progresses subtly and ever so slowly. You start to feel a very strong connection developing between you and all the main characters. You start liking each and everyone and everything seems good, but slowly you start to get a feeling that something is going to happen… something very wrong. And after a little teasing, it happens! You start to feel sad… very, very sad and right then something else happens that make you feel something more than normal sadness, a feeling of darkness that comes with death.Then comes a point where you just can’t take anymore and you stop reading it. But within a day or two you feel a strange pull and you start reading again... That’s when you find out that there’s something sinister is going to happen, and happen, yes, it does. You can’t stop yourself from reading... you push yourself to read and get done with this book ASAP and then, again, something happens in the end that leaves you sleepless for nights.No, it’s not a scary story, but it’s a really, really dark story that plays tricks with your mind and makes your skin crawl in the most literal sense - It is a Stephen King’s story.The characterization is Stephen-King-perfect. All the characters are so full of life that one can never really get them off one’s mind. The character-connect was built very slowly and steadily, yet very, very strongly. Each and every character has the potential to make you smile as well as cry.The writing is abso-fuc***g-lutely brilliant. You’ll lose yourself in the writing so much that you’ll lose all sense of time and space while reading this book. As usual, the writing is simple and easily understandable. It is full of eloquent sarcasm and abundant with sharp ironies which will leave you obsessively pondering for days.The beginning is slow-paced and subtle. As a King’s reader (and die-hard fan), the easy and happy flow of the book in the opening pages kept the anticipating part of my mind on high alert as I knew that by the time I'll be done with this book I'll be fearful to even think about reading it again.The ending couldn't have been any better. It left me sleepless for days.I loved the cover art of the edition I read (see above), but otherwise, some editions look very old, creepy and even immature :/The blurb definitely managed to be transparent enough to pique the reader’s curiosity without giving much away.You can also read this review at The Reading Bud.
    more
  • Will M.
    January 1, 1970
    THE ELECTRICITY JUST FLUCTUATED WHILE I WAS WRITING THIS REVIEW. THE LIGHTS WENT BATSHIT CRAZY. WTF IS HAPPENING? I'M NOT KIDDING AROUND, IT'S 6:15PM AND I'M ALONE IN MY ROOM. WHAT DID YOU DO TO ME, KING?Louis Creeds moves into a beautiful old house in Maine with his wife, daughter, son, and cat. It was all normal and perfect at first, but the nearby woods became apparent and so was the Pet Sematary. When people regard King as the master of horror, I used to raise an eyebrow. I've read a few o THE ELECTRICITY JUST FLUCTUATED WHILE I WAS WRITING THIS REVIEW. THE LIGHTS WENT BATSHIT CRAZY. WTF IS HAPPENING? I'M NOT KIDDING AROUND, IT'S 6:15PM AND I'M ALONE IN MY ROOM. WHAT DID YOU DO TO ME, KING?Louis Creeds moves into a beautiful old house in Maine with his wife, daughter, son, and cat. It was all normal and perfect at first, but the nearby woods became apparent and so was the Pet Sematary. When people regard King as the master of horror, I used to raise an eyebrow. I've read a few of his horror books and didn't get scared at all. I read The Shining at 2am with no problems at all. It's all different with Pet Sematary though, because even though I was reading it at 9am, I still got scared. The vibe of the book was authentic horror, and it scared the hell out of me. It took me around 2 days to read this, because I constantly had to stop. First it was 2am, then I tried again at 4 am, but I couldn't read further because I was more worried about ghosts in my room. The next instance was 9am the next morning, but my room was dark and there was a storm going on outside, so I had to stop again. If I'm not that scared of horror, then I would've finished this book in a few hours. Really amazing thing King wrote here.In the introduction he said that this is the most frightening book he has written. I haven't read all of his novels yet, but I'm not disagreeing that this was scary as hell. He also stated that he and his wife moved to Maine, with his daughter, son and cat. Does this found familiar? IT'S THE FUCKING SUMMARY AT THE BACK! He also said that his son almost died because he was chasing him and his son apparently went to the road where the ginormous trucks are. But everything after that was made up, Thank God. He is absolutely right when he said that he had gone too far with this one, because he did! I'm not sure if the introduction was just a gimmick to make the novel scarier, but it really did for me. I can't seem to remove the idea that the happenings in the novel might have really happened in King's life. I know it's crazy, but King made me think of those things.So we have this cemetery for pets in Maine. It's weird, because why would there be a cemetery exclusively for pets. Louis and his family owns this cat, Church. He's still lurking around the house and very active because they haven't fixed him yet. Louis' neighbor, Jud, warned him that pets and children shouldn't be allowed to play near the streets. Apparently there are ginormous trucks that drive at top speed. The paranormal story begins.I honestly don't know how to explain my reaction of the novel without tackling the plot, and the mystery of it. Here's a spoiler tag for those who have read this.(view spoiler)[ Am I the only one who freakin' loves Gage? He's this cute little kid/baby who was really lovable at first, but then turned damn creepy in the end. There's this place (at the back?) of Pet Sematary, wherein people bury their pets, if they want them to come back to life. But there's a catch. The pet isn't the same as it was before. To keep the adjectives short, it's now a zombie, and it has this really disgusting muddy smell that never wears off no matter how much you wash it. Was Louis aware of this paranormal phenomenon? No. Jud was just an asshole who apparently wanted to make Louis' life a living hell. If he didn't show Louis the secret place and buried Church in there, none of the terrible events that happened to Louis would've happened. In my opinion Jud is the devil, who got "guilty" in the end and tried to stop everything, and got murdered. I didn't feel any kind of grief for Jud. So if Pets can come back to life, can humans? In this novel, yes. Gage got killed by the ginormous trucks I was talking about. Louis was devastated, and there were chapters wherein the death was all in his imagination, then his imagination was just an imagination, and in the end, Gage died. I'm considering that as a really good plot twist. I got tricked! Back to the humans resurrecting thing. Jud tells this story of Timothy(if I remember correctly) and how he came back to life, and also smelled like the muddy earthy thing Church smelled like. But Timothy was also different. He knows all of the secrets and blurts it out. He's also crazy, so just like Church the cat. Despite knowing all the crazy consequences, Louis still wanted to resurrect his dead child. And he did. The result? His wife and "best friend" getting murdered, and him murdering the resurrected crazy murdering child. Did he learn his lesson? No, because he did the exact same thing with his wife. But that was in the epilogue, and all I got was the wife saying "darling" because he had this theory that Gage went crazy because he waited too long to do the resurrection thing. We'll never know what happened to Rachel, if she became just like she was, or like crazy Gage. (hide spoiler)] I think I wrote a really long spoiler tag. The ending was epic. I can't complain about that because I really loved it. The whole novel was really amazing for me to begin with. The characters were really likeable, and some were relatable too. I didn't like Jud that much, but everyone else managed to entertain me. The plot was a bit weird/new, and I really like that. This novel is really old, but it's my first time reading it, and it will surely not be the last. I really loved this novel. I think this is the only novel I've read that's worthy to be called a horror novel. I used to call King the king of authors, but I think I can finally give him the deserving title of King of Horror. I can't really say though that this is my one and only favorite book of his, because I loved The Stand for a very different reason. There's a bit of a difference, genre-wise, but no matter what, this just became one of my favorites. This is a novel that I'm sure I'll be reading again in the future. I really enjoyed it and I'm highly recommending it to anyone. 5/5 stars, just read it (I hope you don't own a cat).
    more
  • Luffy
    January 1, 1970
    While a third into this Stephen King book, it dawned on me why King had such a strong fan base around the world in the 80s, and was the hottest name in popular fiction. It came to me that reading such a well-written horror book was legitimately one of the most primal, adult things I could do. That's because this type of book can have its own brand of hangover. Luckily, I've not yet dreamed of Zelda, the most terrifying monster in this book. King had a handle on the human mind. He could then - While a third into this Stephen King book, it dawned on me why King had such a strong fan base around the world in the 80s, and was the hottest name in popular fiction. It came to me that reading such a well-written horror book was legitimately one of the most primal, adult things I could do. That's because this type of book can have its own brand of hangover. Luckily, I've not yet dreamed of Zelda, the most terrifying monster in this book. King had a handle on the human mind. He could then - and here did - draw horror-laden imagery from ordinary people. The characters in these pages had life in their lungs. The Pet Sematary is a character. Route 15 is another one. The Creeds lived on the edge of horror, and I feared for them. From the first chapter you knew in time you would pinpoint the danger before the hapless Creeds would. The trials of the Creeds, ignited by the Jud character, and set in motion by Louis, were cruel, but not larger than life. The crudeness I felt, didn't stem from the situation but in the ancient fear of the wild. The fact that there were two kids in the Creed family was not a surefire bet we would be emotionally invested in them. The reason for it was that a great writer at the top of his game was behind them. After all, simply putting a child in the spotlight was not a guarantee we would empathize with their fate. Outside of anime, I've never seen a depiction of such fierce love between two characters as when Louis bonded with his growing son Gage. It was a mesmeric scene. Totally believable. The other child, Ellie, was very thoroughly written into the book. You know, I'm amazed at how much of the scenes in the book have not yet been exploited by other writers and by Hollywood. The writing in the book was so taut. The last chapters duly didn't dally and the end was fitting. There was no drama in the pejorative sense, let alone melodrama. What happened after the book ended is left open to interpretation...
    more
  • Babybook
    January 1, 1970
    Što bi bilo kad bi ljudi mogli poništiti smrt? Svi smo barem jednom poželjeli da drage nam osobe koje više nisu s nama vratimo u zemaljski život ne razmišljajući o posljedicama. A što ako posljedice imaju visoku cijenu?Inače nisam fan horora ali barem jednom godišnje dopustim sebi da se malo isprepadam. Prošle godine negdje u ovo doba sam čitala "It" koje me se nije posebno dojmilo, ovaj put izbor je pao na groblje kućnih ljubimaca. Jesam li se isprepadala? Bome jesam. Ali više od samih gnjusnih Što bi bilo kad bi ljudi mogli poništiti smrt? Svi smo barem jednom poželjeli da drage nam osobe koje više nisu s nama vratimo u zemaljski život ne razmišljajući o posljedicama. A što ako posljedice imaju visoku cijenu?Inače nisam fan horora ali barem jednom godišnje dopustim sebi da se malo isprepadam. Prošle godine negdje u ovo doba sam čitala "It" koje me se nije posebno dojmilo, ovaj put izbor je pao na groblje kućnih ljubimaca. Jesam li se isprepadala? Bome jesam. Ali više od samih gnjusnih scena me se dojmila jezovita atmosfera. Doslovno iz stranice u stranicu osjetiš to zlo kako nadire i znaš da neće stati, a tebi ne preostaje ništa drugo nego bespomoćno čitati.Posljedica čitanja ove knjige će biti da ću neko vrijeme budno motriti svaku mačku koja mi zaluta u dvorište... onako za svaki slučaj ;)Odlučih knjizi dati veliku 4 samo iz razloga što su neke stvari ostale nedorečene, a ja ne volim kad me ostave u neznanju.
    more
  • Dustin
    January 1, 1970
    Holy crap, re-reading this book is like watching a car crash about to take place in super slow motion: You know what's coming, you know how it can be avoided, but all the same, you find yourself walking the well-tended path into the deep woods of Northern Maine...In my reading of this, as a new father myself, I find the entire concept of the Pet Sematary itself really sort of secondary to the main plot of parents, doing everything in their power, to protect their children from all the dangers in Holy crap, re-reading this book is like watching a car crash about to take place in super slow motion: You know what's coming, you know how it can be avoided, but all the same, you find yourself walking the well-tended path into the deep woods of Northern Maine...In my reading of this, as a new father myself, I find the entire concept of the Pet Sematary itself really sort of secondary to the main plot of parents, doing everything in their power, to protect their children from all the dangers in the world, real and imaginary; and it's about what happens when they fail. The magic of the pet sematary is never explained, the reasons or excuses for its existence are loosely refered to, as its clear no one knows, but that's not a failure on King's part...its just not important to the plot!I remember being kind of bored by the book the first time I read it, and the only part of the movie that ever scared me was Zelda, but re-reading this book from my new vantage point made the tale far more harrowing, the decisions more believable, and the inevitability of the plot that much more unstoppable. The book jacket claims that King had to stop writing it for a while, unable to continue. Knowing him to be a father to girls of his own, I think that's completely believable, and more to the point, understandable!
    more
  • Jadranka
    January 1, 1970
    Stephen King je istakao da „Groblje kućnih ljubimaca“ smatra svojom najstrašnijom knjigom, i da je nakon završetka pisanja rukopis stavio u fioku, misleći da je konačno otišao suviše daleko. I sam je toliko bio užasnut onim što je napisao...e pa Stevo kako i ne bi bio užasnut!!Knjiga koju još uvek držim pred sobom dok pišem ovaj prikaz je verovatno jedna od najgroznijih, najgnusnijih, najuznemiravajućih, najmučnijih knjiga koje sam u životu pročitala. Dotakla je u meni sva ona mračna mesta koja Stephen King je istakao da „Groblje kućnih ljubimaca“ smatra svojom najstrašnijom knjigom, i da je nakon završetka pisanja rukopis stavio u fioku, misleći da je konačno otišao suviše daleko. I sam je toliko bio užasnut onim što je napisao...e pa Stevo kako i ne bi bio užasnut!!Knjiga koju još uvek držim pred sobom dok pišem ovaj prikaz je verovatno jedna od najgroznijih, najgnusnijih, najuznemiravajućih, najmučnijih knjiga koje sam u životu pročitala. Dotakla je u meni sva ona mračna mesta koja svako od nas ima, protresla me iz temelja, izazvala pravu pravcatu mučninu u toj meri da sam u pojedinim trenucima morala da spustim knjigu kako bi se "opasuljila".Možda preterujem, možda sam previše subjektivna, možda mi je trenutno raspoloženje takvo da je knjiga pogodila pravi živac...možda. King se ovaj put poigrao najvećim od svih strahova, strahom od smrti. Smatram da je u prirodi svakog pojedinca, ili barem većine, da se bori za opstanak i da se boji smrti, i to kako svoje, tako i smrti sebi bliskih lica. A kada taj najužasniji trenutak nastupi, svako reaguje drugačije: neko u sebi nađe snagu da tera dalje uprkos svemu; drugi možda dignu ruku na sebe jer ne mogu da se izbore sa gubitkom; dok trećima jednostavno nešto pukne pred očima, nešto se u njima slomi i više nikada ne budu kao ranije. Verujem da svako ko je u životu izgubio neku dragu osobu zna koliko je teško izboriti se sa gubitkom i nastaviti dalje, koliko je hrabrosti i snage potrebno za tako nešto.King je rešio da ponudi odgovor na čuveno pitanje – šta bi bilo? Sam kaže:“Nisam samo razmišljao o nezamislivom, već sam to i pribeležio.“ Možda je on samo uspeo da izvuče iz mračnih ćoškova svoje duše na dnevnu svetlost ono o čemu većina nas samo u najmračnijim i najtežim trenucima u potaji razmišlja. A možda je on samo jedan bolestan čovek :) kome svakakve lude i nezamislive ideje padaju na pamet.Ono što moram da istaknem to je da ova knjiga definitivno nije za nekoga ko tek počinje da čita Kinga, jer bi vrlo lako mogla da čitaoca odvrati od daljeg čitanja njegovih knjiga (da Ivana, u tebe gledam dok ovo pišem!!) što bi bila šteta. Takođe mislim da je ovo jedna od retkih prilika kada sam pomislila da bi na knjigu možda trebalo staviti oznaku koja bi čitaoce upozorila na osetljivu tematiku kojom se bavi. Nakon čitanja ove knjige imam neodoljivu potrebu da istu negde sakrijem i da zaboravim na nju na neko vreme...Ocena:5* (zar ste sumnjali? ;) )
    more
  • Calista
    January 1, 1970
    I read this 2 decades ago and I can still picture the scene where he is talking about the ancient magic in the woods that the Native Americans lived with. This was a creepy book and it was a great read. Love it.
  • Erin ☕ *Proud Book Hoarder*
    January 1, 1970
    Pet Semetary is horror-scary with its story, but the prime focus that comes across to me is overwhelming grief meeting the breaking point/barrier the brain has before it goes insane.Stephen King has said this was one of the books that frightened him the most to write. It likely meant so much to him because of being a father himself. It's actually a creepy book (so much horror isn't actually scary), but while reading it I found it wasn't always the actual moments that were what stood out as creep Pet Semetary is horror-scary with its story, but the prime focus that comes across to me is overwhelming grief meeting the breaking point/barrier the brain has before it goes insane.Stephen King has said this was one of the books that frightened him the most to write. It likely meant so much to him because of being a father himself. It's actually a creepy book (so much horror isn't actually scary), but while reading it I found it wasn't always the actual moments that were what stood out as creepy, but the theme itself. Grief is one of the worst things in the world, perhaps the very worst thing. Change is hard, but change in the form of loss is unimaginable. To lose those you love more than anything in the world, to have that grief, is a great fear. Life will never be the same again and the heartache of some of it can be so harsh it ends you entirely. So much of horror is aimed at the loss of personal life and fear of the main character dying. The creepiness comes from a monster out there waiting to end you. Pet Sematary takes it even further than that by bringing the fear home harder - it isn't the loss of personal life, but the loss of other lives and how that will affect you. Not just a sad book that isolates grief, but by then twisting it further by turning your own grief - that worst fear - against you. Saying okay, you have this horrible death happen, life is horrible now, but here's a way to stop the pain, here's a possibility to retrieve that life, erase that loss, press the magic erase button. The cruelty in that is the small hope is perfectly squashed when the deceased returns as 'other' - you got your wish, they are back, but they're still dead, they're not the same, and the only chance you have of surviving is to end them again, this time with your own hand. Pretty horrible stuff. And of course the book does have actual creepy moments. The moment in the cemetery where it all goes wrong, where Jud errors and bring Louis despite his better judgment but in answer to an ancient call, hearing the sounds of "loons" he's warned to ignore. Louis being told yeah, scary stuff is going to happen, but just ignore it best as you can, block it out to do this OTHER creepy thing and get through it. And that cat Church. He comes back the creepiest. The empty look, the shuffling awkwardness of body, that bizarre stare. Creepy indeed.I've always thought King rocked with villains, works among the best with plot conception and layout, but his weakness is endings. Here he wins because he brings irony into the twist, an almost morbid despair that fits into the story, making it all that more horrible but fitting. I do wish he had kept the mysterious road open. It's fine for early dialogue from Jud to muse about what could cause the sour land, but to bring in the mildly cheesy culprit in the end took away a little magic. I also found Gage's dialogue cheesy at the end, unlike the movie where it actually worked better (even though I didn't like the movie overall)As always, characters fit the story like a glove. Louis as a doctor was a good fit as protagonist - his role in life is healing people, and he's thrust into this mess with this cemetery and the height of grief. Rachel's past phobias with her sister tie into the morbid fear or death and moving into this new house, which looks so perfect but borders on the imperfect. Jud as a man with a history of the town who fits in as a trusted father figure, only to accidentally unleash horror on his new 'family.' The touch with Pascow is perfect, and Gage is an adorable little boy. Ellie is fortunately less annoying than the movie version *shudder*. I wonder what became of her? King put in a few nods to other books like Cujo in this one, does he put a story of Ellie somewhere in another book? For obvious reasons, this is a top horror novel. King's writing is top notch here, not too long and detailed, his characterization fits the story in so many ways, there's genuine creepiness, the theme is one of the worst things imaginable, and the ending wraps it up on in ironic way that lets the evil that always has existed keep existing. Bravo.
    more
  • Roula
    January 1, 1970
    Ας ξεκινησουμε με κατι αναλαφρο που μεχρι στιγμης δε γνωριζα: το τραγουδι pet cemetary των πολυαγαπημενων ramones εχει γραφτει ειδικα για την ταινια στην οποια βασιστηκε αυτο το βιβλιο και μαλιστα στενοτατη φιλια συνεδεε τον King με τα μελη του συγκροτηματος...αυτο...αυτο ειναι το ΜΟΝΟ αναλαφρο στοιχειο σχετικα με αυτο το βιβλιο.τελος τα αναλαφρα.Κατα τα αλλα αυτο το βιβλιο εμενα προσωπικα με ταραξε ιδιαιτερως.με τρομαξε, ναι, αλλα κυριως με βυθισε σε μια πολυ παραξενη και δυσαρεστη αισθηση.ηθελ Ας ξεκινησουμε με κατι αναλαφρο που μεχρι στιγμης δε γνωριζα: το τραγουδι pet cemetary των πολυαγαπημενων ramones εχει γραφτει ειδικα για την ταινια στην οποια βασιστηκε αυτο το βιβλιο και μαλιστα στενοτατη φιλια συνεδεε τον King με τα μελη του συγκροτηματος...αυτο...αυτο ειναι το ΜΟΝΟ αναλαφρο στοιχειο σχετικα με αυτο το βιβλιο.τελος τα αναλαφρα.Κατα τα αλλα αυτο το βιβλιο εμενα προσωπικα με ταραξε ιδιαιτερως.με τρομαξε, ναι, αλλα κυριως με βυθισε σε μια πολυ παραξενη και δυσαρεστη αισθηση.ηθελα να το παρατησω τη μια στιγμη και την αλλη με τραβουσε να το διαβασω.ο Κινγκ τελικα δεν ειναι ενας απλος παραμυθας που στοχο εχει να τρομαξει με φθηνα κολπα.φτανει σε πολυ βαθυτερα νοηματα και σε πολυ βαθυτερες φοβιες.βρισκει μεσα σου τους "παλιους" , καλα ριζωμενους φοβους που νομιζες οτι εχεις αντιμετωπισει ή οτι εχεις κοιμισει για τα καλα και τους ξυπνα.και σε διαψευδει περιτρανα σε οσα νομιζες οτι εχεις αντιμετωπισει.Αυτο το βιβλιο λοιπον μιλα για τον μεγαλυτερο ισως φοβο του ανθρωπου(σιγουρα τον μεγαλυτερο δικο μου φοβο),αυτον του θανατου.με οτι αυτος συνεπαγεται.απο που προκυπτει αυτος ο φοβος, που σε οδηγει, πως τον διαχειριζεται ο καθενας...και εχει να κανει και με την θλιψη.και που ειναι ικανος ο καθενας να φτασει εξαιτιας της.να ανεβει τα ψηλοτερα βουνα, να κανει τη μεγαλυτερη τρελα, να αρνηθει τη λογικη, αρκει να ξεφυγει απο τη θλιψη(ή τουλαχιστον ετσι νομιζει).ναι, αυτο το βιβλιο ξυπνησε σιγουρα κατι μεσα μου, κατι που ισως δεν ηθελα να ξυπνησει, ηταν σιγουρα ενα απο τα πιο φρικιαστικά, τρομακτικα βιβλια που εχω διαβάσει και σιγουρα με επεισε να επανεξετασω την αποψη μου για τον Κινγκ.και τελος σιγουρα με εκανε να βαλω να ακουσω αυτο το τελειο τραγουδι των ramones υστερα απο πολυ καιρο, ετσι για κατι αναλαφρο, χρειαζεται μετα απο αυτο το βιβλιο...4.5 αστερια θεεκαι κυριε!!! αυριο φιναλε...ελπιζω τα χειροτερα να εχουν περασει..Αρχιζω να αμφιβάλλω για το αν θα καταφερω να αντεξω τη φρικη που αρχιζει να ξεδιπλωνεται...δυσκολακι...Συμφωνα με την εισαγωγη του βιβλιου-γραμμενη απο τον Κινγκ- αυτο ειναι το πιο τρομακτικο βιβλιο του..παρολο που δυσκολευομαι να σκεφτω κατι πιο τρομακτικο απο τον Κουτζο αυτη τη στιγμη(με στοιχειωσε), ανυπομονω να δω εαν συμφωνω μαζι του...
    more
  • Glenn Sumi
    January 1, 1970
    “When I’m asked (as I frequently am) what I consider to be the most frightening book I’ve ever written, the answer I give comes easily and with no hesitation: Pet Sematary.” - Stephen King, 2000While I was reading this book, my Goodreads friend Julie made a comment on one of my updates: “Ooo – old school!” or something like that. It’s true. This is old school horror, like the first Stephen King book I ever read, The Shining. In his 2000 introduction, King says of all his works, Pet Sematary (198 “When I’m asked (as I frequently am) what I consider to be the most frightening book I’ve ever written, the answer I give comes easily and with no hesitation: Pet Sematary.” - Stephen King, 2000While I was reading this book, my Goodreads friend Julie made a comment on one of my updates: “Ooo – old school!” or something like that. It’s true. This is old school horror, like the first Stephen King book I ever read, The Shining. In his 2000 introduction, King says of all his works, Pet Sematary (1983) is the book that frightens him the most, and I can see why. Its theme of doing the unthinkable – making the dead return to life, like Lazarus in the Bible – crosses every boundary of sane normal behaviour. What King does so expertly is create a situation where this action seems not only credible but natural… even inevitable.Physician Louis Creed moves with his wife Rachel and two children (Ellie and Gage) from Chicago to Ludlow, a town in rural Maine, where he’s about to start his job working at the infirmary of the local university.The house they’re in is spacious and beautiful, but there’s one drawback. Right next to it is a highway where enormous trucks regularly thunder by. As Jud, Louis’s kindly octogenarian neighbour, tells him, “That road has used up a lot of animals.” In fact, behind the Creed home, up a hill, is a makeshift cemetery for killed pets, called, complete with typo, Pet Sematary. That’s where many of the town’s run-over pets are resting under cute little memorials. What Louis doesn’t know but will soon find out, thanks again to Jud, is that just beyond the pet cemetery is ANOTHER kind of cemetery. And this one isn’t so cute. Turns out it’s on Micmac ground, and burying things there results in… well you can probably guess.The great thing about Pet Sematary is that it doesn’t matter if you know where the plot is heading, because King finds intriguing ways to keep you hooked.The pace in the first third is quite leisurely; sure, some bad things happen, including a horrific incident that Louis attends to on his first day on the job. When the subject of the mortality of Ellie's cat, Winston Churchill (nicknamed Church), comes up, it drives a wedge between husband and wife, and we gradually learn about Rachel’s early trauma regarding the death of her sister. King plants these stories like little bombs in the narrative… and of course you know they’ll detonate later on for maximum explosive power.The author even knows that we’ll anticipate the novel’s biggest piece of action, and so the way he introduces it is pretty damn brilliant. I’m on the fence about another narrative curveball he throws at us, but whatever. To me, the most horrifying things aren’t the deaths (some of Jud’s stories are pretty haunting), the resurrections or even the mysterious, mythical monsters that may or may not be roaming around beyond that pet cemetery. Instead, there’s a scene between family members at a funeral home where perfectly rational humans behave in irrational and horrible ways, saying and doing things that are irrevocable.In the end, whether we’re motivated by guilt or anger or booze or sadness, or an unhealthy mix of all of the above, we’re the ones who contain the monsters. King knows that. And it’s a pretty terrifying truth.
    more
  • BooksTwins
    January 1, 1970
    Mientras uno avanza cada vez se pone mejor y mejor, hasta llegar a la tercera partes: la más intensa y horrible de todas, ahí ya no se puede soltar el libro 😵 Me encantó! No puedo no darle sus merecidas 5🌟RESEÑA EN EL BLOG: https://bookstwins.wordpress.com/2017...
    more
  • María Paz Greene F
    January 1, 1970
    UF. Es la primera vez que leo un libro que me da miedo DE VERDAD. Es que hay veces en que NO LO PODÍA CREER. Incluso llegué a preguntarme si no sería mejor dejarlo, porque podía quedarse atrapado en mi subconsciente o algo así, jajaja.PERO SEGUÍ ADELANTE, y... UF. No es solo el tipo de terror de lo sobrenatural, que es fuerte (FUERTE, porque está además muy bien hecho), sino que también y en especial, el recordatorio sobre la muerte, algo que es de lo más natural y a lo que todos llegaremos even UF. Es la primera vez que leo un libro que me da miedo DE VERDAD. Es que hay veces en que NO LO PODÍA CREER. Incluso llegué a preguntarme si no sería mejor dejarlo, porque podía quedarse atrapado en mi subconsciente o algo así, jajaja.PERO SEGUÍ ADELANTE, y... UF. No es solo el tipo de terror de lo sobrenatural, que es fuerte (FUERTE, porque está además muy bien hecho), sino que también y en especial, el recordatorio sobre la muerte, algo que es de lo más natural y a lo que todos llegaremos eventualmente. Y esa parte ni siquiera es inventada: ES CIERTA.Creo que eso fue lo peor de todo, sobre todo al principio, cuando la historia era todavía "normal", y entonces era más fácil identificarse con ella. La angustia de la niñita cuando descubre que algún día todos se van a morir... es muy impresionante y muy profunda. Porque todas la vivimos, y porque no hay respuestas todavía. No concretas, al menos. No sólidas y seguras y firmadas por alguna suerte de secretario celestial QUE PODAMOS TOCAR.A mí el libro me hizo terminar llamando a mi mamá, jejeje. Como cuando era chica y tenía las mismas dudas de Ellie. Así de vulnerable me sentí o, bueno... así de vulnerable soy, y lo somos también todos. Por suerte, las mamás saben cómo consolar esas crisis (hola, mamá).En fin, que es muy terrible la muerte. O sea, no, no es terrible, es bondadosa y necesaria... pero no saber si en verdad es el fin, a un nivel práctico y contante y sonante... bueno, es heavy. Aunque quizá sea cierto, como dicen los personajes del libro, y como también me ha tocado oír a personas de la vida real, que cuando uno llega a "la edad apropiada", tiene ganas de partir, ya de forma natural, de una forma casi FISIOLÓGICA. Partir adónde, no lo sé, pero ha de ser un consuelo que el cuerpo lo quiera. Hoy mi cuerpo todavía tiene muchas ganas de vivir, y sería capaz de saltar a un tren en movimiento si eso garantizara su sobrevivencia, pero igual algún día se dará por vencido. Sin embargo, como dicen en las pelis, NO ES HOY ESE DÍA, y espero que no lo sea por bastante tiempo más.En fin, que tampoco era mi intención convertir esto en un tratado existencial, pero eso es lo que hace Stephen King: te hace pensar. Todas sus historias horribles, al final son solo una excusa para indagar en cómo somos las personas, cómo es la vida, cómo podría ser la muerte, etcétera. Es bastante impresionante y, pese a que estoy traumatizada (o a que me acordé de que lo estaba, jaja), es un negocio redondo. Es decir, vale mucho la pena leerla.La historia misma, además, es GENIAL. Durísima y muy retorcida, pero GENIAL. El final, eso sí, lo encontré disperso y volátil, exceptuando el remate que es genial también, tanto que me dejó BOQUIABIERTA. Y me hizo reír, admítolo, como dice Chaplin "la vida fuera desde adentro es una tragedia, pero desde afuera, una comedia".Yo lo pasé chancho, leyendo esto. Pero también pésimo, jajaja, porque entendí a todos los personajes, siendo que no me ha pasado (por suerte) nada parecido. Y también porque las partes de horror están muy bien hechas... es realmente HORROROSO. Me quedé helada varias veces, con oleada fría en la espalda y todo, paralizada en el tiempo. Y, bueno, también me reí varias veces, porque resulta que el señor tiene sentido del humor. O sea, que además es DIVERTIDO.Recomendado, sí, pero ajústense los cinturones. No hay censura, ni límites, ni ninguna compasión en toda esta novela. Es muy CREATIVA, jajaja, por decirlo de alguna manera. Stephen King, de hecho, dice que es lo más terrorífico que ha escrito, y puedo entender por qué. Yo JAMÁS HABÍA LEÍDO ALGO ASÍ.La peli (que pretendo ver el finde): http://www.pelispedia.tv/pelicula/pet...
    more
  • Franco Santos
    January 1, 1970
    La muerte es un misterio. El entierro, un secreto. Este es el libro que más miedo me dio de King. En Cementerio de animales convergen el horror, la angustia y una desesperación oscura y acuciante. Es un poco pesado en algunas partes, pero les puedo asegurar que les va a helar los huesos.Se los recomiendo muchísimo. Es una maravilla del autor. Es denso, no obstante, muy bueno.
    more
  • Laz
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this was certainly the freakiest, creepiest book I've ever read. It was an intense, brilliant thriller full of scary stuff brought straight out of nightmares.It was not a long book and that certainly made me love it more because the story was not dragged on but it was straight to the point. It was not as much as gory as I expected it to be but it still managed to freak me out all the same. The storyline is that of the Creed family moving to a new house. Louis Creed, his wife Rachel and his Well, this was certainly the freakiest, creepiest book I've ever read. It was an intense, brilliant thriller full of scary stuff brought straight out of nightmares.It was not a long book and that certainly made me love it more because the story was not dragged on but it was straight to the point. It was not as much as gory as I expected it to be but it still managed to freak me out all the same. The storyline is that of the Creed family moving to a new house. Louis Creed, his wife Rachel and his two kids Eileen and Gage. We get a little insight into the family's past and we just realize that they are all nice people. Bad things start happen when they discover the Pet Sematary, their cat dies and everything starts going to hell from here on out. This book is centered around the idea of death and how some people are afraid of death. We see how people who are afraid of death react towards it and how people who are supposedly fearless of death cope with it. The problem is no one is ever ready for death, we may be accustomed to the idea of it but we are certainly not ready and not brave enough to face the death of people we hold dear in our hearts. This novel is also about how people are genuinely pulled by things they can't control, how they pretend that everything is alright when it most certainly it's not. Louis let something control him, he kept it all to himself and he didn't trust those he loved when he should have. It all ended bad for him and everyone else in his family. Read it but I warn you that it's freaky and nightmarish! So beware.
    more
  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    Buddy-read with Brad.My very first book by Stephen King and I'm still in awe. This was some experience! Bwahahahahaha!First, in my edition, we are treated to an introduction by Stephen King from September 20th, 2000:[His young daughter's cat was killed by a car or truck, died and was buried. Then, some time later ...]"All seemed to be well until that night, when I heard a thumping from the garage, accompanied by weeping and popping sounds like small firecrackers. I went out to investigate and fo Buddy-read with Brad.My very first book by Stephen King and I'm still in awe. This was some experience! Bwahahahahaha!First, in my edition, we are treated to an introduction by Stephen King from September 20th, 2000:[His young daughter's cat was killed by a car or truck, died and was buried. Then, some time later ...]"All seemed to be well until that night, when I heard a thumping from the garage, accompanied by weeping and popping sounds like small firecrackers. I went out to investigate and found my daughter, furious and beautiful in her grief. She had found several sheets of that blistered packing material in which fragile objects are sometimes shipped. She was jumping up and down on this, popping the blisters, and yelling "He was my cat! Let God have his own cat! Smucky was my cat!" Such anger, I think, is the sanest first response to grief that a thinking, feeling human being can have, and I've always loved her for that defiant cry: Let God have his own cat! Right on, beautiful; right on."That. Right there.Also, a few lines later:"I'm particularly uneasy about the book's most resonant line, spoken by Lois Creed's elderly neighbour, Jud: "Sometimes, Louis," Jud says, "dead is better." I hope with all my heart that that is not true, and yet within the nightmarish context of Pet Sematary, it seems to be. And it may be okay. Perhaps "sometimes dead is better" is grief's last lesson, the one we get to when we finally tire of jumping up and down on the plastic blisters and crying out for God to get his own cat (or his own child) and leave ours alone. That lesson suggests that in the end, we can only find peace in our human lives by accepting the will of the universe. That may sound like corny, new-age crap, but the alternative looks to me like a darkness too awful for such mortal creatures as us to bear."As I said in my status update: Jesus H. fu**ing Christ (yes, I can swear as well as any sailor), Mr. King, would you PLEASE not break my heart in the introduction already???And by the way, sometimes dead IS better, I think. I'm one of "those people" who also support assisted suicide because I firmly believe that everyone should have the right to go with dignitiy and in their own time.This book deals with a lot.On the surface we have a doctor, his wife and two kids (Ellie, the daughter, is about 7 and Gage, the son, is about 3 years old). They move to Ludlow because Louis (the father) starts a job at the university. There, they befriend one of their neighbours, Jud, and his wife Norma. Then all kinds of things happen (I don't want to get into too much detail).Amongst other things, this book is about loss. Pets and people alike.It's also about people and their characters.Don't get me wrong: I know nobody is perfect but there were a few things these people did that didn't sit well with me at all. So yeah, I wanted the protagonist to get hurt. Him and at least two others. Some things should not go unpunished. And since SK seems to have written a cautionary tale, they do get punished. Sort of. And yes, it was brutal. xDWe also have a supernatural element but it was far more subliminal than I expected (at least until the end). At first that was a bit off-putting because not much seemed to be happening other than the author going into detail about all kinds of things. However, as I suspected, that seems to be Stephen King's MO: he lures the reader in, lulling one to believe it's not actually that bad and then he hits you smack over the head with a baseball bat ... then you get back to a sense of security, the bad thing being over but having so many pages left which makes you feel confused ... BAM there's that baseball bat again ... OK, now you deserve to rest easy ... oh wait => baseball bat!It was really amazing how the author snuck certain very important details into just half a sentence or even only three words, making you dread reading like you would dread looking around a corner in a dark house after hearing strange noises. Terror spreads in your innermost but you have to double back and have a look what just made you feel this white-hot moment of terror. That is brilliant!However, I did not have nightmares and don't think I will have one tonight. Maybe because I wanted the cat to kill everyone for being so mean to it *lol* or because nowadays we are so used to all kinds of horror stories (one can't help but take into consideration how old this book is) or maybe I'm not that easily creeped out by this sort of thing (too pracmatic?). Who knows.Terror? Yes, definitely, and the mind-fuck at about halfway through the book was heavy. But horror? Not all that much.Another theme here were good intentions.Boy do I hate people who "just mean well". Most usually do it to feel better themselves anyway instead of making someone else feel better which drives me up the walls. That is something SK actually mentions here, through Jud.But even if we do believe in a selfless act, it can still go very much wrong. "The road to hell is paved with good intentions" is one of the truest sayings ever.Then, we also have a huge amount of denial.Did I hate that! Rachel for example. I mean, yeah she had an awful past and it's actually her parents that should get beaten to death for it (both, but her father most of all). Nevertheless, I never liked how she got her way by being a bitch. Her character was so weak (not as in underdeveloped by the author but as in not being able to do a single thing herself) but when she felt entitled to something, she knew how to get it. And the things she didn't like? She just shut them out, closed her eyes. I hate such people (I'm related to a few specimen).Oh and the medication. Jeez, people. Even if we project this onto our time, here and now, instead of the 80s ... it is almost inconceivable for a non-American how so many people take such drugs as if they were candy!You see where I'm going with this?Stephen King takes all these every-day character traits and scenes and layers one on top of the other. Again and again and again.It's an ordinary portrayal which is why every reader will immediately recognize a situation or two, maybe even feel as if looking into a mirror. It makes this story so utterly real - until he adds a pinch of that supernatural terror into it. If he was a chef, he'd run a 9-star-restaurant!To answer my buddy-reader's question: YES, I do think that I am better than Louis, Rachel and Jud. In many ways. Would I not try to bring a loved one back? I don't know (I definitely would) but I would 100% NOT do many of the other things they did.I actually was in some of the situations they were in, right down to (view spoiler)[having to bury a child. It wasn't mine but my unborn cousin who died a week before she was supposed to be born (hide spoiler)] and I know enough tasteless people who have ruined one or more funerals (without having had the excuse of being drunk). All in all, there have been a lot of funerals in my family. Up to a point I certainly understand some motives - but only up to a certain point.And I was thinking that they lacked compassion (Church) or had too much of it (which were both equally bad). Or maybe I was just annoyed by how STUPID they often were (not getting it wrong once, not even twice but three times). xDBut you see, I had all the feels so this is definitely a wonderful author and a very good book!
    more
  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    Two things about this book:1. It is one of two Stephen King books I finished on one sitting (the other being The Dead Zone)2. When I was a kid, I had to make sure the cover of this book was not facing out or I could not sleep. I didn't even like to look at it when I was awake!
    more
  • Agustina
    January 1, 1970
    Qué buen libro. El que más me dio miedo hasta ahora. Hubo una noche que de verdad me costó dormir.Genio SK !
Write a review