The Race to Save the Romanovs
According to Hutchinson,The Race to Save the Romanovs is "an incredible detective story" that will piece together and reconstruct the complex behind-the-scenes royal, diplomatic and unofficial efforts to secure a sanctuary for the Romanovs. In the process it will reveal "bitter family rivalries, secret plans, a chain of blame and recrimination and devastating betrayals".

The Race to Save the Romanovs Details

TitleThe Race to Save the Romanovs
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 26th, 2018
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
ISBN-139781250151216
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, Cultural, Russia, Historical, Biography, Russian History, Romanovs

The Race to Save the Romanovs Review

  • Dem
    January 1, 1970
    As the 100th year Anniversary of the deaths of the Romanov family approaches I wanted to read another book the Russian Imperial Family and when I listenend to Helen Helen Rappaport's interview on Dan Snows History Hit Podcast I just had to get my hands on a copy ofThe Race to Save the Romanovs: The Truth Behind the Secret Plans to Rescue the Russian Imperial Family Helen Rappaport is an acclaimed historian and researcher has written in my opinion an extremely well researched and written accoun As the 100th year Anniversary of the deaths of the Romanov family approaches I wanted to read another book the Russian Imperial Family and when I listenend to Helen Helen Rappaport's interview on Dan Snows History Hit Podcast I just had to get my hands on a copy ofThe Race to Save the Romanovs: The Truth Behind the Secret Plans to Rescue the Russian Imperial Family Helen Rappaport is an acclaimed historian and researcher has written in my opinion an extremely well researched and written account of what was happening behind the scenes in the Royal Courts in Europe at the time of the Romanov's imprisonment in Tsarskoye Selo, Tobolsk and Yekateringbury, who could have or should have saved the Imperial Family from being murdered. This book is different than anything else I have read concerning the Romanovs as this book embarks on a quest to uncover the various plots and plans to save them, why they failed, and who was responsible. At last a book that tries to answer the questions I had running around in my head while reading other books on the Romanovs. Many of the Royal courts of Europe were closely related to the family and what plans if any were out to rescue them is well documented here and they reasons why these plans didn't materialise or if indeed they were ever in place.A word of warning this book has a lot of information, dates names and I was grateful to find that the book had two family trees and a glossary of names which I found necessary when trying to keep up with who was who. This isn't a book about the Romanovs and their lives although the author does go into quite a bit of detail about their last few months in captivity but the book concentrates more on why European relatives and Allied governments failed to save Czar Nicholas and his family.I listened to this one on audible and while the narrator Danien Lynch is excellent I had to switch to the hard copy as I found the details, maps and glossary of names and illustrations necessary in order to get the full benefit of the book.
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  • Valerity (Val)
    January 1, 1970
    It seems I’ve always had an affinity for the story of the Romanovs, reading books about them long ago and being interested in them for years. It’s just such a captivating tale, with the large wealthy family in Russia, the ill son that they all dote on, especially when he’s unwell. And of course, the crazy monk that seems to cast a spell over them when he is seemingly able to help several times when the illness was really bad. This book mainly focuses on all the machinations to try to save the Ro It seems I’ve always had an affinity for the story of the Romanovs, reading books about them long ago and being interested in them for years. It’s just such a captivating tale, with the large wealthy family in Russia, the ill son that they all dote on, especially when he’s unwell. And of course, the crazy monk that seems to cast a spell over them when he is seemingly able to help several times when the illness was really bad. This book mainly focuses on all the machinations to try to save the Romanovs during the time they were in Tsarskoe Selo and their future was so uncertain. After Nicholas had abdicated while on the train and then spent time with his mother was probably the ideal time for any real chance to slip away, but with the children ill with measles, it would have been so difficult. It seems that all the planning after that was kind of futile. This book was written with the aid of a whole suitcase of additional newly added papers lent to the author giving more insight to that period and makes this very up to date. It would appeal to most people who have an interest in this time period in Russia, the Romanovs and their fate and the whole story surrounding them. My thanks for the advance digital copy that was provided by NetGalley, author Helen Rappaport, and the publisher for my review. St. Martin’s PressPub: June 26, 2018
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- Investigating the murder of the Russian Imperial Family, Helen Rappaport embarks on a quest to uncover the various international plots and plans to save them, why they failed, and who was responsible.The murder of the Romanov family in July 1918 horrified the world, and its aftershocks still reverberate today. In Putin's autocratic Russia, the Revolution itself is consid I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- Investigating the murder of the Russian Imperial Family, Helen Rappaport embarks on a quest to uncover the various international plots and plans to save them, why they failed, and who was responsible.The murder of the Romanov family in July 1918 horrified the world, and its aftershocks still reverberate today. In Putin's autocratic Russia, the Revolution itself is considered a crime, and its anniversary was largely ignored. In stark contrast, the centenary of the massacre of the Imperial Family was commemorated in 2018 by a huge ceremony attended by the Patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church.While the murders themselves have received major attention, what has never been investigated in detail are the various plots and plans behind the scenes to save the family—on the part of their royal relatives, other governments, and Russian monarchists loyal to the Tsar. Rappaport refutes the claim that the fault lies entirely with King George V, as has been the traditional claim for the last century. The responsibility for failing the Romanovs must be equally shared. The question of asylum for the Tsar and his family was an extremely complicated issue that presented enormous political, logistical and geographical challenges at a time when Europe was still at war.Like a modern-day detective, Helen Rappaport draws on new and never-before-seen sources from archives in the US, Russia, Spain and the UK, creating a powerful account of near misses and close calls with a heartbreaking conclusion. With its up-to-the-minute research, The Race to Save the Romanovs is sure to replace outdated classics as the final word on the fate of the Romanovs.I really wanted to review this book but my request got lost in the shuffle…I was approved the day before it was released and archived… I started it but did not get it finished. I enjoyed what I could get read: it is well researched and the guide to “who was who” at he beginning was very helpful. I will give it four stars on what I managed to read in time:
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  • Gill Paul
    January 1, 1970
    The Romanovs were closely related to several European royal houses – the British, German and Danish in particular – so why did none of their relatives manage to save them after their arrest following the Revolution? And what of the Russian officers loyal to the monarchy who were said to be amassing in Tobolsk and Ekaterinburg? Why did none of their efforts succeed? Helen Rappaport tells a riveting tale of the political football the Romanov family became during their months of captivity. George V The Romanovs were closely related to several European royal houses – the British, German and Danish in particular – so why did none of their relatives manage to save them after their arrest following the Revolution? And what of the Russian officers loyal to the monarchy who were said to be amassing in Tobolsk and Ekaterinburg? Why did none of their efforts succeed? Helen Rappaport tells a riveting tale of the political football the Romanov family became during their months of captivity. George V has long been blamed for not saving them but what of Kaiser Wilhelm? Why did the Danes not do more? Alfonso XIII of Spain is the only monarch who stuck his neck out, and he continued to try to save the women throughout August 1918, unaware they had been murdered alongside Nicholas.Rappaport's research is deep and meticulous. She has uncovered memos, telegrams and documents not seen by previous historians so this is the most complete and balanced account available. She is also pragmatic: Russia's northern coastline could only have been an escape route from July to September because it was frozen the rest of the year; the vast distances in Russia, compounded by the workers' seizing of the rail network, made any other escape route precarious; and the family's unwillingness to leave Russia also played a part. I raced through this book and I would urge anyone else interested in the Romanovs, and in Russian history, to do the same. It's a fascinating read!
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  • Terri Wangard
    January 1, 1970
    Not being a Russophile, I was unaware of the blame game going on as to whose fault it was that the Romanov family was killed. With all of the royal families in Europe being related, one of them should have whisked the family to safety.England’s King George gets the biggest rap, but Germany’s Emperor Wilhelm seems to have been in a better position, since Germany was dictating terms in the war with Russia. Plus, most of the Romanov women had been German princesses.Helen Rappaport points out so man Not being a Russophile, I was unaware of the blame game going on as to whose fault it was that the Romanov family was killed. With all of the royal families in Europe being related, one of them should have whisked the family to safety.England’s King George gets the biggest rap, but Germany’s Emperor Wilhelm seems to have been in a better position, since Germany was dictating terms in the war with Russia. Plus, most of the Romanov women had been German princesses.Helen Rappaport points out so many factors making escape difficult, if not impossible: the war, the political alliances, personal antipathies, logistics, geography, and the weather. The Soviets wanted the tsar to pay for centuries of despotism; they weren’t going to let him go.When one throne toppled, the others felt shockwaves. The kings had to protect their own thrones rather than assist the disposed. In any case, there was really only one window of opportunity for the Romanovs to leave, and that was before Nicholas abdicated.The Romanovs didn’t want to leave Russia, in any case. They would have preferred death to being rescued by Germany. Brutal as it was, that’s what they got.
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  • Jill Meyer
    January 1, 1970
    "The Race to Save the Romanovs" is British historian Helen Rappaport's fourth book about the Romanovs and the Russian Revolution. As she states in her forward, she'd covered every part of the Romanov's fate beside the long-asked question, "why didn't anyone try to rescue the royal family and bring them to safety outside Soviet Russia"? The book's subtitle, "The Truth Behind the Secret Plans to Rescue the Russian Imperial Family", basically tells the sad, frustrating story of other countries' fai "The Race to Save the Romanovs" is British historian Helen Rappaport's fourth book about the Romanovs and the Russian Revolution. As she states in her forward, she'd covered every part of the Romanov's fate beside the long-asked question, "why didn't anyone try to rescue the royal family and bring them to safety outside Soviet Russia"? The book's subtitle, "The Truth Behind the Secret Plans to Rescue the Russian Imperial Family", basically tells the sad, frustrating story of other countries' failure in providing asylum to the family.I think most people reading this book are long-familiar with the Russian royal family. Nicholas was a weak ruler, though his heart seemed to be in the right place regarding "his people". His wife, Alexandra, loved by her husband but was hated and distrusted by other court members and government officials.She was haunted by her son, Alexey's ill health (he was a hemophiliac) and depended on Gregori Rasputin, who seemed to be able to control the bleeding episodes but was considered by the court to be a terrible influence upon the rulers. The five children - four girls and then the blessed-but-sickly son - were as much a part of the Romanov legend as their parents. All were murdered at the "house of special purpose" in Ekaterinburg, in July 1918. Before their internal exile and murders, attempts had been made to rescue the Royal Family. Nicholas and Alexandra were related to most of the rulers in Europe Their cousins in Britain had first extended an invitation to move there and other monarchial countries did as well. But objections soon came to the idea of the Russian Royal family exiling in Great Britain. Would having the Romanovs in England perhaps foment the anti-monarchy feelings there? What about in Spain. Germany, of course, couldn't take them in because even though an armistice had been conducted between newly established Soviet Russia and Germany in December, 1917. Helen Rappaport is a solid writer of history and this book is a well-written look at an unfortunate period where the lives of so many people were tossed about.
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  • Kristi Thielen
    January 1, 1970
    Solid work of scholarship and very readable, too. Rappaport details why virtually every royal family (or government) in Europe considered rescuing the imperiled Czar, Czarina and family – and why they ultimately didn’t. A loathing for the breathtakingly snobbish Alexandra certainly played a part, but political factors did as well. The Russian Revolution had unsettled not just Russia, but had created unrest among the laboring classes in countries as far away as Great Britain. Sovereigns such as K Solid work of scholarship and very readable, too. Rappaport details why virtually every royal family (or government) in Europe considered rescuing the imperiled Czar, Czarina and family – and why they ultimately didn’t. A loathing for the breathtakingly snobbish Alexandra certainly played a part, but political factors did as well. The Russian Revolution had unsettled not just Russia, but had created unrest among the laboring classes in countries as far away as Great Britain. Sovereigns such as King George V hesitated to offer refuge to the Romanovs, for fear hostility to the autocrats might lead to their own overthrow. The sheer logistics of travel, during a war, were daunting, too, and in retrospect, the window of opportunity was smaller than anyone could have imagined. The details of the actual murders are not a part of this book, but Rappaport’s story continues with how the news of the murders got out, when, to whom – and how people responded. As the author notes, several countries – including Great Britain – still refuse access to some of the papers that might fully explain why their governments turned their backs on the doomed family. One hundred years later, the shame of inaction continues to sting – as well it should.
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  • Michelle Ule
    January 1, 1970
    Extremely detailed examination of 1917-1918 events in regards to who did or did not (most) try to save the Romanov family from their murder in Ekaterinberg.Rappaport is a well known researcher and author of other Romanov books, but in this story she examined archives from around the world, seeking answers to what really happened among the other heads of state.Much was a surprise, including the information both Kaiser Wilhelm and King George V were trying to help, though much too late.Who knew Al Extremely detailed examination of 1917-1918 events in regards to who did or did not (most) try to save the Romanov family from their murder in Ekaterinberg.Rappaport is a well known researcher and author of other Romanov books, but in this story she examined archives from around the world, seeking answers to what really happened among the other heads of state.Much was a surprise, including the information both Kaiser Wilhelm and King George V were trying to help, though much too late.Who knew Alexandra's relatives all thought so little of her?One fact which often gets forgotten in the finger pointing is that Germany and England were at war, and war-related considerations had to take precedence over a cousin whose nation deposed him.Ultimately, the responsibility for what happened falls, as always, on the tsar and tsaritsa themselves.
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  • Geoffrey
    January 1, 1970
    (Note: I received an advanced reader copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Helen Rappaport returns again to the ends days of the Russian Empire with a deep look at all the attempts made behind the scenes to try and protect the lives Tsar Nicholas II and his family. The author leaves absolutely no stoned unturned in her extensive coverage, and gives attention from everything ranging from behind the scenes diplomatic wrangling and arguing in Europe's halls of power to a surprisingly wide array (Note: I received an advanced reader copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley) Helen Rappaport returns again to the ends days of the Russian Empire with a deep look at all the attempts made behind the scenes to try and protect the lives Tsar Nicholas II and his family. The author leaves absolutely no stoned unturned in her extensive coverage, and gives attention from everything ranging from behind the scenes diplomatic wrangling and arguing in Europe's halls of power to a surprisingly wide array of rescue schemes cooked up with a mix of earnest intentions and utter naivety. As usual Rappaport's research is incredibly deep and incomparably extensive, and through an abundance of historical documentation she has created what is probably the clearest and most comprehensive overview to date on a little-remembered but no less tragic aspect of the final days of the Romanov Dynasty.
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    What a great read! Easy enough to say now that “someone” should have saved the Romanovs, but Helen Rappaport, with her meticulous and exhaustive research, explores how indeed many people, including the crowned head of Europe, came up with plans and stratagems and machinations to do just that but how all these ideas were pretty much doomed from the start. And would the Tsar have agreed to leave Russia anyway? A fascinating and compelling examination of those terrible last days of the Romanovs.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    A hundred years have come and gone but the story of the Romanovs still captures our heart and grabs our attention. Helen Rappaport has written a third intriguing book on Russia’s last Tsar and his family. As the title suggests this book is about the endless plans to rescue the family from their plight. Rappaport writes: "One of the most dispiriting aspects of the Romanov asylum issue of 1917 is a total lack of coordination between the various interested parties who might, had they acted in uniso A hundred years have come and gone but the story of the Romanovs still captures our heart and grabs our attention. Helen Rappaport has written a third intriguing book on Russia’s last Tsar and his family. As the title suggests this book is about the endless plans to rescue the family from their plight. Rappaport writes: "One of the most dispiriting aspects of the Romanov asylum issue of 1917 is a total lack of coordination between the various interested parties who might, had they acted in unison, have collectively been able to effect the family’s sake evacuation from Russia." (pg. 109) It was equally dispiriting to read. The plans to rescue the Romanovs continued right up to their last day. Once the Imperial Family had been murdered the finger-pointing began. King George V, Kaiser Wilhelm II, and other relatives, plus the Russians themselves were blamed for not helping them. However, in her final thoughts, Rappaport rests the ultimate responsibility on with the Romanovs. "If they had actually been presented with a real and viable evacuation or escape plan, what would the Romanovs have done?" (pg. 296) Unbelievable as it may seem, there is no doubt in my mind, they would have turned it down. To understand why, you will have to read The Race to Save the Romanovs. In this book Rappaport doesn’t harp so much on Alexandra, and she gives more insight into Alexandra’s family situation than in her previous book The Romanov Sisters. It was thought that the Tsaritsa was the cause of the grievances toward her family. "Alicky is the cause of it all…" (pg. 47) I saw her as a misunderstood, sickly woman.Also interesting is how the untrue claims of Anna Anderson as the escaped Anastasia got started.
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  • Carolyn Harris
    January 1, 1970
    A thoroughly researched analysis of the obstacles to rescuing Czar Nicholas II, Empress Alexandra and their children in 1917-1918. Rappaport argues that there was a very narrow window of opportunity for the Imperial family to escape because of the internal political situation within Russia. Rappaport includes her own notes on her research process and how she built on the work of previous authors who have examined efforts to rescue the Romanovs by Europe's monarchs. I found Rappaport's analysis o A thoroughly researched analysis of the obstacles to rescuing Czar Nicholas II, Empress Alexandra and their children in 1917-1918. Rappaport argues that there was a very narrow window of opportunity for the Imperial family to escape because of the internal political situation within Russia. Rappaport includes her own notes on her research process and how she built on the work of previous authors who have examined efforts to rescue the Romanovs by Europe's monarchs. I found Rappaport's analysis of the influence of Empress Alexandra's reputation on attitudes toward rescuing the Romanovs both within Russia and across Europe especially interesting. By 1917, Alexandra had alienated many of her own relatives as well as popular opinion in both the United Kingdom and Russia and negative attitudes toward her undermined interest her welfare and that of her family.The book concludes with the former Imperial family's own views of rescue plans. Their reluctance to be separated from one another and to leave Russia means that they sadly would not have supported many of the plans discussed in the book. An engaging and absorbing read, even though the ending is sadly well known.
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  • Vigee
    January 1, 1970
    As we hurtle towards the 100th anniversary of the murder of the Romanovs I shoved aside my sky-high TBR pile and concentrated on reading this book in tandem with C.W. Gortner's "The Romanov Empress".I highly recommend "The Race to Save the Romanovs". The reader is led through the tangle of diplomacy, plans and half-baked schemes to rescue the imperial family that all ended in nothing, and comes to the tragic conclusion the only real chance those children had of rescue was in the March of 1917 wh As we hurtle towards the 100th anniversary of the murder of the Romanovs I shoved aside my sky-high TBR pile and concentrated on reading this book in tandem with C.W. Gortner's "The Romanov Empress".I highly recommend "The Race to Save the Romanovs". The reader is led through the tangle of diplomacy, plans and half-baked schemes to rescue the imperial family that all ended in nothing, and comes to the tragic conclusion the only real chance those children had of rescue was in the March of 1917 when their father was still on the throne. I found Victoria Milford-Haven's request to Balfour, that she could take the girls into her home privately on the Isle of Wight enormously touching. All the what if's and might have been's. I enjoyed the italicized insertions about the author's discoveries and the questions she still has. I also appreciate Rappaport's restrained empathy for the people she writes about. Wonderful scholarship, to sit alongside - and in many aspects clear up - Summers & Mangold's File On The Tsar. A fascinating and rewarding read.
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  • John Walker
    January 1, 1970
    Very nearly one hundred years to the actual day the Romanov family was butchered in Ekaterinberg, mystery still surrounds the several plans to save Nicolas, Alexandra and their children. Thanks to Helen Rappaport, who continues to dig through all the lies, deceits and cover-ups of European Royal families and their governments to hide the fact that could have been a rescue attempt.Had countries put aside their hatred of one another and found away our for the family even though World War I was rag Very nearly one hundred years to the actual day the Romanov family was butchered in Ekaterinberg, mystery still surrounds the several plans to save Nicolas, Alexandra and their children. Thanks to Helen Rappaport, who continues to dig through all the lies, deceits and cover-ups of European Royal families and their governments to hide the fact that could have been a rescue attempt.Had countries put aside their hatred of one another and found away our for the family even though World War I was raging.Well documented, when they can be released, letters, memoirs of those many diplomats which were allowed by their government to publish near fiction. In order to protect Kings, Queens, etc. Then there is the Russian provisional government, Bolsheviks and the Soviet deceit in the illusions of helping the Romanov's.Highly recommended, but keep a score card to follow all the various factions of this compelling story.
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  • Douglas Osler
    January 1, 1970
    This is an interesting and scholarly clear up of many if the rumours and misleading beliefs about the attempts,or not,to rescue the Romanivs. Exceedingly well researched,it is also well written and I found the last section about the refusal to reveal the truth about their deaths and the attempts,or not,of other royal families to rescue them particularly interesting.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    With the 100th anniversary of the murder of the Romanov family coming up this month, This peaked my interest. This was a interesting book and shocking that nobody helped the Romanov family, despite the plans to offer asylum and left the family to their own demise.
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  • Marguerite
    January 1, 1970
    Concentrate, concentrate. I prefer to use this book as a reference.
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