The Five Daughters of the Moon (The Waning Moon, #1)
Inspired by the 1917 Russian revolution and the last months of the Romanov sisters, The Five Daughters of the Moon by Leena Likitalo is a beautifully crafted historical fantasy with elements of technology fueled by evil magic.The Crescent Empire teeters on the edge of a revolution, and the Five Daughters of the Moon are the ones to determine its future.Alina, six, fears Gagargi Prataslav and his Great Thinking Machine. The gagargi claims that the machine can predict the future, but at a cost that no one seems to want to know.Merile, eleven, cares only for her dogs, but she smells that something is afoul with the gagargi. By chance, she learns that the machine devours human souls for fuel, and yet no one believes her claim.Sibilia, fifteen, has fallen in love for the first time in her life. She couldn't care less about the unrests spreading through the countryside. Or the rumors about the gagargi and his machine.Elise, sixteen, follows the captain of her heart to orphanages and workhouses. But soon she realizes that the unhappiness amongst her people runs much deeper that anyone could have ever predicted.And Celestia, twenty-two, who will be the empress one day. Lately, she's been drawn to the gagargi. But which one of them was the first to mention the idea of a coup?Inspired by the 1917 Russian revolution and the last months of the Romanov sisters, The Five Daughters of the Moon is a beautifully crafted historical fantasy with elements of technology fuelled by evil magic.

The Five Daughters of the Moon (The Waning Moon, #1) Details

TitleThe Five Daughters of the Moon (The Waning Moon, #1)
Author
FormatPaperback
ReleaseJul 25th, 2017
PublisherSt. Martins Press-3pl
ISBN0765395436
ISBN-139780765395436
Number of pages222 pages
Rating
GenreFantasy, Historical, Fiction, Science Fiction Fantasy, Adult

The Five Daughters of the Moon (The Waning Moon, #1) Review

  • Alice
    June 17, 2017
    This is such an interesting world! Both immersive and incredibly surreal due to the parallels with real historical events. As described, it takes inspiration from the Russian revolution, the five daughters being the heirs to the Crescent Empire. The villain is really well written. I disliked him a LOT and found myself rooting hard for Celestia to kick his butt. I look forward to 'soul beads' being explained more in the sequel (out in November '17 I think) as the concept really grabbed me. I'd re This is such an interesting world! Both immersive and incredibly surreal due to the parallels with real historical events. As described, it takes inspiration from the Russian revolution, the five daughters being the heirs to the Crescent Empire. The villain is really well written. I disliked him a LOT and found myself rooting hard for Celestia to kick his butt. I look forward to 'soul beads' being explained more in the sequel (out in November '17 I think) as the concept really grabbed me. I'd recommend this to people who enjoy unique, character-driven fantasy. It was pretty dark, but not explicitly violent. I wouldn't call it YA, but I think YA readers would enjoy it.
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  • Ticklish Owl
    March 3, 2017
    I hope this story is as fantastic as the cover!
  • Nthato Morakabi
    May 30, 2017
    A really beautiful and poignant tale.Told through the perspective of each of the sisters, The Five Daughters of the Moon is a story of family, betrayal, loyalty and loss. About a kingdom on the brink of destruction and one man orchestrating its downfall through manipulation, deceit and fear.Each sister's perspective draws in their unique personalities and gifting. Little Alina who is far more perceptive than her sisters think and sometimes, want to admit. Merile thinks too much of herself, too c A really beautiful and poignant tale.Told through the perspective of each of the sisters, The Five Daughters of the Moon is a story of family, betrayal, loyalty and loss. About a kingdom on the brink of destruction and one man orchestrating its downfall through manipulation, deceit and fear.Each sister's perspective draws in their unique personalities and gifting. Little Alina who is far more perceptive than her sisters think and sometimes, want to admit. Merile thinks too much of herself, too conscious of her future role and keeping appearances. Sibilia tends to her diary, writing her thoughts and hopes and fears. The more intellectual of the sisters yet still a child in many aspects. Elise balances between maturity and immaturity. Hopeful for something greater and willing to risk for it. Celestia carries the regal elegance of an empress-to-be, and as the older sister she must. However this also places her in the most precarious of situations. The Gagargi Prataslav, creator of the Thinking Machine, will do whatever it takes to succeed in his nefarious plan. Anything at all.The writing style is nostalgic and honest. Capturing the essence of each character well. The ending is fitting and leaves one pining for more, while accepting the truth of the situation the sisters have fallen in. Praise to Leena Likitalo for this beautiful novella.
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  • Alicia
    July 27, 2017
    http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2017/07...This is a pretty interesting fantasy novel--the first in a duology--inspired by the Russian Revolution and the Romanov children--only here, all five are girls (and the youngest is afflicted with something more magical), in a more matriarchal society, each of whom takes turns narrating the story of their crumbling empire. The Rasputin analogue here is even more disturbing than the real deal (trigger warnings for mind control and mentions of rape) but I love http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2017/07...This is a pretty interesting fantasy novel--the first in a duology--inspired by the Russian Revolution and the Romanov children--only here, all five are girls (and the youngest is afflicted with something more magical), in a more matriarchal society, each of whom takes turns narrating the story of their crumbling empire. The Rasputin analogue here is even more disturbing than the real deal (trigger warnings for mind control and mentions of rape) but I loved all five sisters and their relationships, and am eager to read the sequel (out in November). B+.
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  • Caro
    July 30, 2017
    I'm a simple reader. I see this book compared to Valente's Deathless, I click buy.I pre-ordered the sequel too, to be on the safe side. The cover though. I can't get over this beautiful perfect cover and when will Valente write Matryoshka? This will tide me over, I hope.
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  • Gaby
    July 4, 2017
    Page Turner. Worth reading. Full review to follow on Geek Planet online
  • Leah Rachel
    June 10, 2017
    Review to come!
  • LOURDES (ChaptersWeLove)
    June 3, 2017
    I really wanted to love this book, the characters were great. I think it's a great story and will continue to the second book I just wished it was a 5 *s read for me.Review to follow
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